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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#12001 tbolt

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 11:13

Not the G4 - that was a two-seater sports/racer. The fibreglass monocoque F3 car was the G8,


Correct, the G4 is mentioned in the article a couple of times, the cutaway is refered to as "the prototype"
having now checked the index for a G8 I see it was posted on page 251

Edited by tbolt, 01 September 2012 - 14:51.


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#12002 Duc-Man

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 13:26

Ladies and Gentlemen I want to send congratulations to our dear friend Tony Matthews for post #12000 on this thread.

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: Hip Hip Hoorah! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:


#12003 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 14:26

Ha ha! I didn't notice! Well, I'm glad it was such a thoughtful, pertinent post...

#12004 TWest

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 19:28

Hi Tom,

The key to this Su-22 cutaway drawing is not complete.

Is there any way you could share the rest with us?

Thanks

J.


It must have gone over to a next spread in the magazine, and I have put all of that stuff away. So, I can't do it at the moment. Maybe someone else has something on this and can add that extra information. Sorry.
Tom West

#12005 TWest

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 19:33

Ha ha! I didn't notice! Well, I'm glad it was such a thoughtful, pertinent post...



Nothing like a Monty Python reference for this momentous occasion. Somehow seems very appropriate at this point in time.
Anyone want to go help clear the dead Vicar from the stairway?
Let's keep this train a'rollin', folks.
Tom West

#12006 werks prototype

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 21:00

Posted Image
Notorious 'bumper car'. Ferrari F310-B. Artist, Giulio Betti.

#12007 ibsenop

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 16:41

1979 Fiat 127 'Sport' (Not great quality)


I always knew I still had the 127 Sport brochure with the G Betti cutaway in it somewheres.
Posted Image


A larger version of the 1979 Fiat 127 Sport (Still not great quality)

Posted Image

#12008 Embers

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 18:50

It must have gone over to a next spread in the magazine, and I have put all of that stuff away. So, I can't do it at the moment. Maybe someone else has something on this and can add that extra information. Sorry.
Tom West

Here: Posted Image


#12009 Jian10

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 20:10

Thanks very much!

Here: Posted Image



#12010 TWest

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 03:38

Here: Posted Image


Thanks for the assist on this one. I don't always check to make sure there is not carryover on the legend for the drawings. Catch quite a few, but I am sure that some will be missed, so good to have the research base of this kind of group ... as always.
Tom West

#12011 Duc-Man

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 15:34

A larger version of the 1979 Fiat 127 Sport (Still not great quality)

Posted Image

Are you talking about the quality of the car or the picture? Sorry, I couldn't help it.

Edited by Duc-Man, 04 September 2012 - 15:37.


#12012 werks prototype

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 18:36

Posted Image
Ferrari F2003-GA (Gianni Agnelli). Artist, Giulio Betti.

#12013 TWest

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 02:39

Felt like I wanted to post a few pieces, and the first ones in the file were the three that you are getting this evening.
A bit unusual a subject for Terry Davey, this is the Aerospatiale Westland SA-341 Gazelle Helicopter. It appeared in the December, 1977 issue of Air Enthusiast magazine.
Tom West


AerospatialeWestlandSA341Gazelle-1967-AirEnth12-1977-Davey,Terry
Posted Image

#12014 TWest

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 02:41

The second piece is the little Aerotec A122 Uirapuru (means "Take a Parachute" in Aztec ...). This is a Mike Badrocke piece under the Aviagraphica name out of Air Enthusiast, July, 1977.
Tom West


AerotecA122Uirapuru-1975-AirEnth07-1977-Aviagraphica
Posted Image

#12015 TWest

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 02:45

The last of my submissions for tonight is the Agusta A-109A from 1971. It was under Mike Badrocke's Aviagraphica name in the October, 1978 issue of Air International.
Tom West


AgustaA109A-1971-AirIntl10-1978-Aviagraphica
Posted Image

#12016 Embers

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 00:09

Today, I would like to show some recognition to a couple of the lesser-known aircraft cutaway illustrators that worked back in the 1960’s. The first is Peter Endsleigh Castle, whose work has been posted here previously. Much of his work was featured in the old RAF Flying Review. Apparently they tasked him with providing cutaways of the many V/STOL (Vertical/Short Takeoff and Landing) aircraft proposals that were appearing at that time to respond to a NATO requirement. As these were proposals, and some were barely more that notional, Endsleigh Castle didn’t have much to work with. My Post #11,197 shows a couple of these: The Hawker P1154 and the Dassault Mirage IIIV (which I mistakenly called out as a Dassault Balzac). Here are two more from the September 1962 issue of RAF Flying Review:

Posted Image The Fiat G.95/6. This airplane is fairly easy to understand. It uses the separate lift and cruise engine propulsion scheme, employing eight engines in total. The “/6” apparently refers to the number of lift engines.

Posted Image The Fokker-Republic D.24 Alliance, alternatively, uses only one engine, but swivels its exhaust nozzles to vector its thrust down or aft. This engine was the Bristol-Siddeley BS.100/3, an advanced version of the BS.53 that powered the P1127-Kestrel-Harrier, now injecting fuel into the plenum chambers that precede each nozzle to increase thrust. The drawing is of the earliest version of the D.24, as is apparent if you start to examine any of the details: Those variable-sweep wings somehow slide over the delta wing and hook in place when swept aft. Where, exactly, do those main wheels go at “X”? Considering that the aircraft CG is located somewhere between the fore and aft nozzles, would really mount your deployable weapons way back at “R” and “S”?

After thinking about it a little more, the D.24 evolved into this version, shown in a cutaway from FlightGlobal:
Posted Image I don’t have the letter key, but it’s fairly obvious. What’s also apparent is that this airplane wouldn’t carry a lot of stores, maybe just a nuclear bomb semi-submerged beneath the engine. That main landing gear now retracts into area “K” and, from pictures of a display model, lies partially exposed.

I had thought that when Endsleigh Castle did these minimalist illustrations he just signed his initials, PEC. However, here is his illustration of the Lockheed P-3A Orion, from RAF Flying Review, Vol. 19, No. 6, signed the same way:
Posted Image



#12017 Embers

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 00:29

The second illustrator’s work also appeared in RAF Flying Review, Vol. 15, No. 12. His name appears to be Jacques Tiziou and he has drawn the Dassault Etendard IVM:
Posted Image I was always struck by the curious appearance of a ventral fin on the nose. This would ordinarily be a destabilizing aerodynamic appendage, but, in this case, it is actually an antenna fairing for guidance of that Nord S.103 missile aft of the wing. I had also wondered about the name of the airplane, Etendard, which is invariably translated into English as “standard”. When its naval attack aircraft contemporaries had names such as “Scimitar”, “Attacker”, “Buccaneer”, “Corsair”, and “Skyhawk”, “Standard” seems a bit pedestrian. It’s like calling your airplane one step above “ordinary”. However, it is the alternate definition of “standard” which applies here: A flag or pennant raised on a pole as a rallying point.

To show how the that airplane and the cutaway technique evolved over the years, here is the Dassault-Breguet Super Etendard from the February 1986 issue of Air International. Credited to Aviagraphia, this is probably a Mike Badrocke illustration and was the basis of “Motocar”’s speculative modernization in Post #10,842:
Posted Image While the Super appears similar to the IVM, the accompanying story reports 90 percent of its parts to be different.

Just to round out things, here is a color three-view of the Etendard IVM, signed by Endsleigh Castle.
Posted Image


#12018 Jian10

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 15:41

Here's the Fokker-Republic D.24 Alliance cutaway with key:

Posted Image

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Today, I would like to show some recognition to a couple of the lesser-known aircraft cutaway illustrators that worked back in the 1960’s. The first is Peter Endsleigh Castle, whose work has been posted here previously. Much of his work was featured in the old RAF Flying Review. Apparently they tasked him with providing cutaways of the many V/STOL (Vertical/Short Takeoff and Landing) aircraft proposals that were appearing at that time to respond to a NATO requirement. As these were proposals, and some were barely more that notional, Endsleigh Castle didn’t have much to work with. My Post #11,197 shows a couple of these: The Hawker P1154 and the Dassault Mirage IIIV (which I mistakenly called out as a Dassault Balzac). Here are two more from the September 1962 issue of RAF Flying Review:

Posted Image The Fiat G.95/6. This airplane is fairly easy to understand. It uses the separate lift and cruise engine propulsion scheme, employing eight engines in total. The “/6” apparently refers to the number of lift engines.

Posted Image The Fokker-Republic D.24 Alliance, alternatively, uses only one engine, but swivels its exhaust nozzles to vector its thrust down or aft. This engine was the Bristol-Siddeley BS.100/3, an advanced version of the BS.53 that powered the P1127-Kestrel-Harrier, now injecting fuel into the plenum chambers that precede each nozzle to increase thrust. The drawing is of the earliest version of the D.24, as is apparent if you start to examine any of the details: Those variable-sweep wings somehow slide over the delta wing and hook in place when swept aft. Where, exactly, do those main wheels go at “X”? Considering that the aircraft CG is located somewhere between the fore and aft nozzles, would really mount your deployable weapons way back at “R” and “S”?

After thinking about it a little more, the D.24 evolved into this version, shown in a cutaway from FlightGlobal:
Posted Image I don’t have the letter key, but it’s fairly obvious. What’s also apparent is that this airplane wouldn’t carry a lot of stores, maybe just a nuclear bomb semi-submerged beneath the engine. That main landing gear now retracts into area “K” and, from pictures of a display model, lies partially exposed.

I had thought that when Endsleigh Castle did these minimalist illustrations he just signed his initials, PEC. However, here is his illustration of the Lockheed P-3A Orion, from RAF Flying Review, Vol. 19, No. 6, signed the same way:
Posted Image



#12019 Magoo

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 16:31

Here's the latest from your very own Tony Matthews at Motor City Garage: cutaway painting of the Auburn 851 Supercharged Boattail Speedster.

Pretty far afield from his usual fare, hmm. Love the Columbia two-speed axle. Check it out.

Tony Matthews Cutaway: Auburn 851 | Mac's Motor City Garage


Posted Image

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#12020 ibsenop

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 18:18

Westinghouse J46 Turbojet Engine by artist unknown

Posted Image

Westinghouse J34-WE-48 Turbine Engine by artist unknown

Posted Image

Westinghouse J34 Turbojet Engine by artist unknown

Posted Image

Edited by ibsenop, 07 September 2012 - 18:20.


#12021 werks prototype

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 18:42

Posted Image
Ferrari F300. Artist, Giulio Betti.

Posted Image
Mini. Austin-Morris 1100. AP, four-speed box. 1967. Artist, Lawrence Watts.

#12022 ibsenop

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 23:25

Republic P-47D-10 Thunderbolt - no signature (Mike Badrocke or John Weal?)

Posted Image

Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat - no signature (Mike Badrocke or John Weal?)

Posted Image

Chance Vought F4U Corsair - no signature (Mike Badrocke or John Weal?)

Posted Image

#12023 TWest

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 19:55

Republic P-47D-10 Thunderbolt - no signature (Mike Badrocke or John Weal?)

Posted Image

Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat - no signature (Mike Badrocke or John Weal?)

Posted Image

Chance Vought F4U Corsair - no signature (Mike Badrocke or John Weal?)

Posted Image


I have other full scans of these pieces that were going to be sent out when I got around to assembling them. The Corsair and the Thunderbolt are definitely John Weal illustrations. The Bearcat does not quite look like his, but the large version that I have is unsigned ... so don't think it is Weal.
Tom West

#12024 Motocar

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 00:36

FMA IA-58 "Pucara" Cutaway, jet fighter and interdiction Argentina, designed to fight counterinsurgency or COIN, which provides services under the Air Forces of Argentina and Paraguay, Colombia use a small number but were soon down for lack of spare parts, too to be very few available units are expensive to maintain and were removed from service, also participated in the war in the Falkland / Malvinas with varying success but many were lost in ground attack from the Sea Harrier, author Aviagraphica for Pilotpress and taken the forum Zonamilitar.com.ar:

Posted Image

Success


#12025 Jian10

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 00:45

The Bearcat is by Mike Badrocke.


I have other full scans of these pieces that were going to be sent out when I got around to assembling them. The Corsair and the Thunderbolt are definitely John Weal illustrations. The Bearcat does not quite look like his, but the large version that I have is unsigned ... so don't think it is Weal.
Tom West



#12026 Embers

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 01:37

Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat - no signature (Mike Badrocke or John Weal?)
Posted Image

This Bearcat illustration seems to be stretched horizontally, producing a image with an erroneously high fineness ratio. The F8F was a stubby little fighter, being the smallest airframe that could be wrapped around the Pratt & Whitney R2800 engine. The cutaway should look like this:
Posted Image
Notice, in this illustration credited to "Aviagraphica", (presumably this is Mike Badrocke), from the May 1980 issue of Air International, that additional underwing ordnance has been added. This occurs in the examples I have of the other two cutaways in Ibsen's posting.

In going through my files to try and answer the original Badrocke or Weal question, I came across a Peter Endsleigh Castle illustration of the Republic P-47D-25-RE Thunderbolt from RAF Flying Review Vol XVIII, No. 11:
Posted Image
I also found a cutaway of the Douglas SBD Dauntless by R. G. Smith:
Posted Image
For those who can't get enough fighter cutaways, the aircraft that Ibsen posted, along with 97 others can be found in The World's Greatest Fighter Aircraft, edited by Green and Swanborough, ISBN 0-517-358255. The individual drawings are unattributed, but the credits page says "cutaway drawings by John Weal and M. A. Badrocke". For more WWII aircraft cutaways, the P-47 and F4U-1 are again shown, but this time signed by Weal in Aircraft Anatomy of World War II, edited by Paul Eden and Soph Moeng, ISBN 0-7858-1722-0. The credit page attributes the artwork to Mike Badrocke, even though some cutaways and paintings are signed by others.


#12027 CVA

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 09:53

standard eight 5 hp 1953 by Robert Roux
Posted Image

#12028 CVA

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 10:39

honda s800 by the same artist which drew the lamborghini miura
Posted Image

#12029 Embers

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 16:14

Here are two examples of a cutaway which were done for a different reason than those we normally post. Most cutaways appeal to the mechanical cognoscenti who want more insight into the workings of an automobile or aircraft. These were produced for the customer, in this case Pan American Airways, to show the interior appointments of their new airplane to their prospective customers. The airplane in this case is the Boeing 314. Both illustrations were done by the same artist, L. Kronquist, although only the black and white image bears his signature.

Posted Image
Posted Image

The images show subtle differences: The highter resolution b&w image bears the aircraft registration number NC-18601, while the color image shows NC-18607. Curiously, the specifications refer to another airplane, NC-18603. The specifications list 70 passengers, which, unless there is a steerage compartment which is not shown, the layout shown in the cutaways could not accommodate. I would assume that the callouts shown were added when the drawings were produced, during the late 1930's. The images were obtained from two historical magazines, American History Illustrated and Aviation Heritage of 1989 and 1990, respectively. The articles were probably written to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the introduction of this flying boat.

#12030 bradbury west

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 16:40

I am not sure if we have had these before.
Dino 246, 1960 from Piero Casucci Ferrari book
Posted Image
Author and copyright unknown. Ferrari 156
Posted Image
Source as above, author is shown on image
Will delete if not appropriate.
Click on image for larger view.
Roger Lund

Edited by bradbury west, 11 September 2012 - 17:04.


#12031 TWest

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 19:28

I am not sure if we have had these before.
Dino 246, 1960 from Piero Casucci Ferrari book
Posted Image
Author and copyright unknown. Ferrari 156
Posted Image
Source as above, author is shown on image
Will delete if not appropriate.
Click on image for larger view.
Roger Lund



Not sure of the 246 origin, but the 156 is from Sergio Baratto.
Tom West

#12032 TWest

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 06:00

Just for interest, I wanted to tell the folks of Cutawayland that I just got the first two Aeroplane Collector's Archive editions, which were ordered direct from the publisher, Kelsey Publishing Group out of Cudham, Kent. They are pretty cool collections of photos and period cutaways on specific subjects. These two that I just received are British Bombers of World War 2, and British Fighters of World War 2. The one that I had was on Flying Boats. They have future editions of this series on later aircraft, later Flying Boats, all British thus far shown, but I would imagine that it will end up including other material as well. It features primarily work out of Aeroplane by James Clark, but also includes Flight drawings by Max Millar, along with other material. Very cool 98-page editions with only a couple of pages of advertising. The bomber collection is built around 15 aircraft cutaways, two color pieces, plus two engines and a handful of other detail armament and gun turret detail cutaways. Some great photos from the magazine archives, as well. Well worth picking up if you are a fan of the cutaway. These are pretty decent. Of course, you really have to dig British aircraft to go for these first three issues, of course.
Just thought you might like to take a look at them.
Tom West

#12033 312f1

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 18:07

Moto Morini mid-70s to mid 80s air-cooled V twin with Heron heads.

Posted Image

#12034 312f1

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 18:12

Moto Guzzi V35/V50 engine and drivetrain.

Posted Image

#12035 ibsenop

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 17:20

Well, the 127 Sport is definitely Giulio Betti, I can confirm that. But I wanted to throw the racing 131 out there regardless, I have my suspicions, but it is an experts eye that is required. For now they have achieved 'provisional Betti' status. ;)


Confirmed! Fiat 131 Racing by Bruno Betti.

Posted Image



#12036 werks prototype

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 20:40

Posted Image
Ferrari 360 Modena. Artist, Giulio Betti.


#12037 werks prototype

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 20:41

Confirmed! Fiat 131 Racing by Bruno Betti.


At last! :lol:

#12038 ibsenop

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 23:54

A replacement for the Honda NSX (Takata Dome NSX) JGTC Super GT GT500 1999 by Takashi Jufuku posted at page 98 and 145 (can no longer be seen).

Posted Image

Edited by ibsenop, 15 September 2012 - 23:57.


#12039 Embers

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 01:13

Here's another one of those curious aircraft cutaways from the 1930's which don't really show the aircraft structure, but attempt to show what it can carry. In this case it is the North American Aviation XB-21 Dragon, drawn by G. Tharratt in 1937:
Posted Image
Now the XB-21 was designed to a somewhat vague U.S. Army Air Force requirement that sought an increase in payload and range over the existing Martin B-10. This cutaway addressed that payload capacity, but, instead of showing its bomb capacity, the drawing shows it loaded with supply boxes and twelve airmen. Its normal crew complement was eight, and you have to wonder why even eight were needed on a medium bomber. Only one of these rotund bombers was built as it was slower than the airplane it was designed to replace. However, NAA learned from it and the following private venture NA-40 how to build the much more successful B-25.



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#12040 TWest

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 21:11

Here's another one of those curious aircraft cutaways from the 1930's which don't really show the aircraft structure, but attempt to show what it can carry. In this case it is the North American Aviation XB-21 Dragon, drawn by G. Tharratt in 1937:
Posted Image
Now the XB-21 was designed to a somewhat vague U.S. Army Air Force requirement that sought an increase in payload and range over the existing Martin B-10. This cutaway addressed that payload capacity, but, instead of showing its bomb capacity, the drawing shows it loaded with supply boxes and twelve airmen. Its normal crew complement was eight, and you have to wonder why even eight were needed on a medium bomber. Only one of these rotund bombers was built as it was slower than the airplane it was designed to replace. However, NAA learned from it and the following private venture NA-40 how to build the much more successful B-25.



It is good to see some of this unusual stuff dug out of older magazines. Most of my old reference starts in the early 70s with the first Flight Internationals, so the older stuff is quite interesting. The various types of aircraft, cars, trains, nuclear reactors and the rest have really gone beyond the original concept of this Board, haven't they? Good to see the different styles that have been out there over the years, and the amount of material. This is one of the few sites that I recheck multiple times per day, so keep it going, with my thanks and appreciation.
Tom West

#12041 Embers

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 16:41

And "Thank you", Tom, for the review of the Aeroplane Collector's Archive editions.

#12042 TWest

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 16:58

And "Thank you", Tom, for the review of the Aeroplane Collector's Archive editions.



They are worth having ... and now easier to get. A couple of days after I wrote the note on the Collector's Archive, I went into Barnes and Noble to find a wrapped two pack of those first two editions in the magazine section. $24.95 ... plus tax, of course. At least you don't have to order them now, assuming you have a Barnes and Noble in your area .. and you are in the US ...
Tom West

#12043 Motocar

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 10:12

HESA Shafaq cutaway, the proposed Iranian fighter and trainer, based on a Russian design that makes use of an extended wing LERX round or large surface mobile version of hunting has swept wings, while the training has straight wings and LERX fixed ground attack capability and self defense, Iran latter presented a mockup model that continues to show its strong resemblance to the Russian Yakovlev Yak-130, there is little information available about this modern game, is known to be powered by an RD-33 this what equipe with serrated petals, has the characteristics of "Stealth light" and a modern radar with a range of only 80 km plus a small infrared sensor in front of the windshield, cabin with very instrumental complete with three screens multi-function and ejection seat K-36, its total viewing deck is frameless, can be varied weapons from air to air missiles and rockets and laser-guided bombs, along with multiple rocket launchers unguided, I also allowed to speculate on the installation of a 30mm cannon in LERX port with a small fairing and cover mouth with sawn, air-air missiles in containers both discrete radar guidance as infra-red, on its internal structure can only speculate , this little project called its current state of development, it is thought that this was very delayed or canceled, this is my first cut schematic complete development, author Motocar RLM uploaded with ImageShack.us

Posted Image

Success

Edited by Motocar, 27 September 2012 - 18:05.


#12044 ibsenop

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 23:13

Honda XL 250 1974 engine by artist unknown

Posted Image

#12045 helioseism

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 00:32

Two web finds of modern Subaru engines.

Subaru Boxer Turbo Diesel:
Posted Image

Subaru Tribeca 3.6 Liter (Physical cutaway):
Posted Image

#12046 TWest

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 05:10

I got a request for this from one of our members. Having it already scanned, I stepped it up to the front of the line and put it together for the group.
This is John Weal's illustration of the experimental Rockwell XFV-12A Thrust Augmented VSTOL that first flew in 1978. This piece is from the February, 1974 issue of Air Enthusiast. Amazing to think that this is close to 40 years ago now ... time flies when you are having fun.
Tom West


RockwellXFV12AThrustAugmentedVSTOL-1978-AirEnth02-1974-Weal
Posted Image

#12047 Motocar

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 13:33

I got a request for this from one of our members. Having it already scanned, I stepped it up to the front of the line and put it together for the group.
This is John Weal's illustration of the experimental Rockwell XFV-12A Thrust Augmented VSTOL that first flew in 1978. This piece is from the February, 1974 issue of Air Enthusiast. Amazing to think that this is close to 40 years ago now ... time flies when you are having fun.
Tom West

RockwellXFV12AThrustAugmentedVSTOL-1978-AirEnth02-1974-Weal
Posted Image


Only to supplement some history on this project naval game

Cutaway Rockwell International XFV-12A VSTOL fighter project for the U.S. Navy, in this case shows the schematic section of the development version that used the curious nose section of a McDonnell Douglas Skyhawk A4F which joined a new fuselage that housed a huge turbofan engine Pratt & Whitney F401-PW-400, which had a nozzle equipped with a series of cones permitting close part of the exhaust gases and through ducts refer to slots in planes forced the surrounding air flow speed and increase the volume about 10 times generating a huge lift, better known in English as' Thrust Augmented VSTOL "this system is extremely complex and even revealed was successfully tested in a prototype captive flights conducted in 1978, the constant delays and escalating development costs led to the cancellation of this game, but when there were plans to build the new AV-8B Harrier, a derivative of British VTOL fighter but with a new composite wing, a more powerful engine and greater overall capabilities in the transport of arms, with a latest generation avionics but something that if XFV-12 would exceed the Harrier serious full speed as it was designed to be a supersonic fighter, something that we see in the ramps of their air intakes (similar to those of F-4 Phantom) for better management of shock waves in supersonic flight, in their weapons in this picture is shown with AIM-7 Sparrow radar when lacking in this cutting and AIM-9 Sidewinder infra-red guide launchers in the tip of the main planes, had canard planes containing the previously described air purge system and which, in turn allowed not install any point under the same drive for auxiliary tanks or weapons, an interesting fact is seen as taking many other fighters and remnants of designing only what is strictly necessary to build this prototype achievement took many years to be available for flight testing, yet the year 1980 relaunch kept hope in this game and updated to its final form, which did not happen and I am more of a curiosity like so many cases in the long history aviation

Edited by Motocar, 20 September 2012 - 13:46.


#12048 Embers

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 17:17

. . . Rockwell XFV-12A Thrust Augmented VSTOL that first flew in 1978.

As a former North American Rockwell and later Rockwell employee, I hate to have to tell you this, but there is serious question if the XVF-12A ever actually "flew". Unlike the earlier Lockheed tail-sitting XFV-1, it was never tested in conventional horizontal flight, and, when vertical takeoff was attempted, it was tethered from above to cranes. This brought snide remarks from an English fellow involved in the Hawker P.1127 development who pointed out that it was, initially, tethered to the ground. The thrust augmentation for vertical takeoff did not scale from model tests and the project was a major embarrassment to Rockwell. The original idea to use an A-4 forward fuselage and F-4 inlets to speed its construction worked about as well as the Fisher XP-75 of WW II (an ugly cluge but, at least, it flew).

#12049 TWest

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 17:43

As a former North American Rockwell and later Rockwell employee, I hate to have to tell you this, but there is serious question if the XVF-12A ever actually "flew". Unlike the earlier Lockheed tail-sitting XFV-1, it was never tested in conventional horizontal flight, and, when vertical takeoff was attempted, it was tethered from above to cranes. This brought snide remarks from an English fellow involved in the Hawker P.1127 development who pointed out that it was, initially, tethered to the ground. The thrust augmentation for vertical takeoff did not scale from model tests and the project was a major embarrassment to Rockwell. The original idea to use an A-4 forward fuselage and F-4 inlets to speed its construction worked about as well as the Fisher XP-75 of WW II (an ugly cluge but, at least, it flew).


I just picked up the date from the article, in February, 1974, so the initial flight date was projected to be 1978. I am not going back and researching thing stuff beyond what I pull from the article at the time. It takes enough time to put the pieces of the scan together and clean them up, so you are on your own for the research. I like that there are so many people in here who have such a wide knowledge of this stuff that someone will know the true story on almost anything you can put up. I will lob it over the net, so you guys can respond how you will, with my thanks.
Tom West

#12050 Tony Matthews

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 17:48

:up: Tom - well said! People seem to think that I know everything about the vehicles I've illustrated - well, shock horror, I don't. Knowing everything about what other illustrators have drawn...