Jump to content


Photo

The cutaway drawing and its artists


  • Please log in to reply
13352 replies to this topic

#12301 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 15 December 2012 - 05:50

Here are a couple for those interested in aviation cutaways by old friends who we usually see in the automotive arena.

First, the Twin Pioneer, a STOL transport mfg by Scottish Aviation that first flew in 1955, by RE Poulton.
Posted Image

Next, the VC-10, a jet airliner/transport mfg by Vickers-Armstrong that first flew in 1962, by Frank Munger.
Posted Image

Last, a site that I don't think has been mentioned yet - between 800-900 aviation images, mostly cutaways but some related type drawings
http://charlyecho.com/cutaways/?page=1

Peter

Advertisement

#12302 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 15 December 2012 - 22:01

I wanted to jump back into the mix with some new scans, but find that I am just jumping onto the aviation-themed artwork wave being seen in Cutawayland. I hope that this works. I did pick three that are not just the first off the top, thought I would check in with a few pieces out of the pre-WW2 period, and think that I may just try to do this in the future so it is not just themed to aircraft manufacturers with names starting with D or something. Might as well have some pertinence to the pieces.
So, this is the first, a French aircraft out of 1938, the Bloch 152C-1. This is an Aviagraphica-Mike Badrocke piece out of teh April, 1978 issue of Air International. Marcel Bloch was one of the early aviation manufacturers out of France who eventually all merged to become the later corporate identities. Honestly, one of the things that always appealed to me about this era was that you had companies that were run by guys who could actually do what the company was doing ... Henry Ford ... Tony Fokker ... Ettoire Bugatti ... Marcel Bloch. Now, it is all coming out of British Aerospace, Airbus, General Motors ... with apologies to Albert Airbus, of course ...
Tom West


Bloch152C1-1938-AirIntl04-1978-Aviagraphica
Posted Image

#12303 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 15 December 2012 - 22:10

The second is a bit earlier, out of 1932. The print from Mike Badrocke is out of Aeroplane from August, 2006, but i know that I have this from earlier publications, namely Air International or Air Enthusiast and it was probably a better rendition, but this will work for now. I find it hard to imagine that they actually thought that a couple of hundred of these dudes , most of them stationed in Michigan, were going to be a deterrent to foreign aggression, especially being right across from our constantly bellicose Canadian neighbors. The Boeing P-26A certainly never seemed to be all that ominous a craft, although I am sure that it might have been fairly competitive in 1932. The name Peashooter could have at least been made more aggressive ... like naming a fighter the Curtiss Spitwad, or the Hawker Hairpull ... I can't imagine that something named after a gradeschool "weapon" would be the greatest deterrent in the world, even in 1932. Just picture Hitler sitting around in his prison cell writing Mein Kampf, considering that he wants to take over the world, but just can't figure out how to overcome 150 Peashooters to do it ... the absurdity is amazing.
Tom West


BoeingP26APeashooter-1932-Aeroplane08-2006-Badrocke
Posted Image

#12304 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 15 December 2012 - 22:15

The last of the early aircraft is the Brewster F2A-3 Buffalo out of 1941. John Weal did this piece that was published out of Pilot Press in many publications, including this one in a series of themed books, this being on US Naval fighters of WW2. The Buffalo is one of those aircraft, a bit like the Grumman Wildcat, that was amazingly unaerodynamic compared to the competing aircraft of the day. It seems like building around later larger radials and stretching out the designs made this much better looking by the end of the war.
Hope you enjoy this little trip back into aircraft history.
Tom West


BrewsterF2A3Buffalo-1941-Weal
Posted Image

#12305 Wuzak

Wuzak
  • Member

  • 3,478 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 16 December 2012 - 00:52

The second is a bit earlier, out of 1932. The print from Mike Badrocke is out of Aeroplane from August, 2006, but i know that I have this from earlier publications, namely Air International or Air Enthusiast and it was probably a better rendition, but this will work for now. I find it hard to imagine that they actually thought that a couple of hundred of these dudes , most of them stationed in Michigan, were going to be a deterrent to foreign aggression, especially being right across from our constantly bellicose Canadian neighbors. The Boeing P-26A certainly never seemed to be all that ominous a craft, although I am sure that it might have been fairly competitive in 1932. The name Peashooter could have at least been made more aggressive ... like naming a fighter the Curtiss Spitwad, or the Hawker Hairpull ... I can't imagine that something named after a gradeschool "weapon" would be the greatest deterrent in the world, even in 1932. Just picture Hitler sitting around in his prison cell writing Mein Kampf, considering that he wants to take over the world, but just can't figure out how to overcome 150 Peashooters to do it ... the absurdity is amazing.
Tom West


BoeingP26APeashooter-1932-Aeroplane08-2006-Badrocke
Posted Image


I believe that the only official designation that this aircraft was given was P-26.

The name Peashooter was a nickname given by pilots, ground crew or others and refers to the gun sight mounted above the cowl in front of the cockpit.

The P-26 entered service in 1934.

#12306 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 16 December 2012 - 01:00

The second is a bit earlier, out of 1932. The print from Mike Badrocke is out of Aeroplane from August, 2006, but i know that I have this from earlier publications, namely Air International or Air Enthusiast and it was probably a better rendition, but this will work for now.
Tom West


Here is a different version of Badrocke's P26a Peashooter - illustration appears identical, but the annotation is arranged differently - the files are the same size, but this version has a little better resolution - hopefully you won't have to search for your other copy now. {Though Wuzak dropped in a comment which has good resolution while I was preparing this (maybe it will teach me not to put multiple images in a single post), I will not remove it since the annotation is arranged differently - Wuzak is correct that Peashooter is not part of the official name - the date Tom was referencing was the first flight, 3/20/1932, not when the plane entered service.}
Posted Image

Like you, I am a bit reticent to add more aviation items, especially since I recently did so, but here is a John Weal from the same era - the Russian Il-2 Flying Tank from 1941.
Posted Image

This last item is also a John Weal, but is a bit newer - it is a Cessna, but it is rather unlike most of the planes of that manufacturer that are found in airports all around the country (whichever one you live in) - this is the A37 Dragonfly or Super Tweet light attack aircraft, from 1963.
Posted Image

Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 16 December 2012 - 01:11.


#12307 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 16 December 2012 - 02:13

Here is a different version of Badrocke's P26a Peashooter - illustration appears identical, but the annotation is arranged differently - the files are the same size, but this version has a little better resolution - hopefully you won't have to search for your other copy now. {Though Wuzak dropped in a comment which has good resolution while I was preparing this (maybe it will teach me not to put multiple images in a single post), I will not remove it since the annotation is arranged differently - Wuzak is correct that Peashooter is not part of the official name - the date Tom was referencing was the first flight, 3/20/1932, not when the plane entered service.}
Posted Image

Like you, I am a bit reticent to add more aviation items, especially since I recently did so, but here is a John Weal from the same era - the Russian Il-2 Flying Tank from 1941.
Posted Image

This last item is also a John Weal, but is a bit newer - it is a Cessna, but it is rather unlike most of the planes of that manufacturer that are found in airports all around the country (whichever one you live in) - this is the A37 Dragonfly or Super Tweet light attack aircraft, from 1963.
Posted Image

Peter



Peter,
I was just having a little fun with the captions on these things. I tend to be pretty dry, and am not going to do a complete history on anything, car or aircraft, as I am more about the imagery here. If you want history, there are dozens of places, so i don't feel the need to recreate it. i know that the Peashooter name came from that little soda-straw gunsite, which would have to be interesting to use if you are flying over about 17 mph, much less dogfighting. i do try to use the date of the first flight when I can easily pick it up, although that certainly predates more modern aircraft by a decade or more compared to their better recognized service entry dates.
Thanks for adding more of this stuff, no matter what. Can't get enough of the cutaways, especially since there are not exactly a lot of them being printed anywhere anymore. This is like the only source in town for our fix, so please keep it flowing ... if you don't mind the metaphor being applied.
Tom West

#12308 RDV

RDV
  • Member

  • 6,731 posts
  • Joined: March 02

Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:56

:clap: :up: ....by all means , more planes...

#12309 IrishMariner

IrishMariner
  • Member

  • 212 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:27

Just want to let you guys know that over at Jalopnik they've announced a Cutaway-centric Tumblr (no, I don't know either).

The bottom of the piece has links to two more cutaway sites. No mention of this thread yet.

#12310 IrishMariner

IrishMariner
  • Member

  • 212 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:31

Last week at Boeing, the engineering design guys working on the 747-8 programme were given large prints (3ft x 1-1/2ft) of FLIGHT magazines recent cutaway. I'm hoping to get one myself as they look superb. Never seen them give out cutaways like that in my 15yrs at work there. It was nice to see several guys taking great care with handling theirs and I reckon quite a few will end up on walls around the Pacific NW.

#12311 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 17 December 2012 - 17:26

Last week at Boeing, the engineering design guys working on the 747-8 programme were given large prints (3ft x 1-1/2ft) of FLIGHT magazines recent cutaway. I'm hoping to get one myself as they look superb. Never seen them give out cutaways like that in my 15yrs at work there. It was nice to see several guys taking great care with handling theirs and I reckon quite a few will end up on walls around the Pacific NW.


If I am not mistaken, those new posters are done with corporate sponsorship for the exact reason that they will be used for PR. I doubt that we will see a lot of cutaways done just for the art from this point forward.
I can remember doing this with a couple of the NASCAR engine shops back around 1999 or so. I had done a breakdown of the new GM engine that was being run, based on three of the major teams in the sport. I have this particular way that I do these in sheets of parts, not individual pages for each part, so the whole engine with accessories, etc., broke down into three pages. I combined them all for a large negative so we could run stat prints, just because I thought it was fairly cool looking. We took maybe 30 copies down there and gave them out at a couple of the shops, and that print ended up on quite a few walls. Cool, since it was intended as the basis only for a "toy" reproduction of the engine (which was, in fact, produced).
Just thought it was pretty cool that they thought enough to do that, and I can imagine that the same would apply to that 747 illustration. It is always fun to get that, "Wow, you even got THAT in the drawing/design." When the guys who work on the subject can say that, I consider it to be a great complement.
Not sure that this has anything to do with our on-going conversation here, but here it is.
Tom West

#12312 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 17 December 2012 - 23:00

Just one for you folks today. I pulled a bunch of my scan pieces based on 50s fighters, so there will be a common theme going among the next 20 or so images that you will see from me here ... unless I get completely bored and go dig into something else just for a break. This is one from the early days of Air Enthusiast magazine, under the Pilot Press copyright. There is no artist signature, so I cannot tell you who actually did this illustration. It was from April 1972 issue of Air Enthusiast, and that would have been Volume 1, I believe. This is the Canadair CL-13 Sabre Mark 4 which was from a design that first flew in 1947, obviously the North American F-86 Sabre. This piece was much better as a reproduction, although the front of it was really chopped up in the stat process, so I spent quite a bit of time filling to give actually black sections instead of something that looked to have been printed from a rock. Hope it helps.
By the way, if anyone knows the illustrator, I would really like to credit it here.
Thanks, all.
Tom West

CanadairCL13SabreMk4-1947-AirEnth04-1972-Unsigned
Posted Image

#12313 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:37

Going to switch back to automobiles for a bit...

First, the Buick LeSabre concept car from 1951 - both Embers and I have posted this car before, but the following image has no annotation and thus is easier to view. Artist/illustrator is not known.
Posted Image

Next is another vehicle we have seen before, but an illustration that I don't believe we have yet seen - the Bugatti EB-110 (1991-95) - artist is in-house Bugatti, but unnamed.
Posted Image

Next is a 2014 Chevrolet 5.7L engine by David Kimble.
Posted Image

Last are a pair of Renault engines - the first is a stock i4, ohv engine from an older sedan (unidentified Renault advertisement artist), the second is their Formula 1 v6, dohc, 24v twin turbo engine by ETAI Studios
Posted Image Posted Image

Peter


#12314 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:50

and, just for fun, a sampling of aircraft...

first, from the civilian arena, the Boeing 767-200 first flown in 1981, drawn by Mike Badrocke.
Posted Image

next, an American jet fighter from the military side, the McDonnell-Douglas F-18a Hornet from 1958, again by Mike Badrocke.
Posted Image

last, a military/civilian helicopter, the Italian/British AW-101 (designated EH101 until 2007), used as a civilian medium-lift transport and military anti-submarine aircraft from AgustaWestland, first flown in 1987 and manufactured in both Italy and GB. The illustration, also by Mike Badrocke, is of the military application.
Posted Image

Peter

#12315 Duc-Man

Duc-Man
  • Member

  • 1,068 posts
  • Joined: November 08

Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:13

Next is another vehicle we have seen before, but an illustration that I don't believe we have yet seen - the Bugatti EB-110 (1991-95) - artist is in-house Bugatti, but unnamed.
Posted Image

Can we have this one back in real life instead of this Volkswagen monstrosity? IMHO was the EB110 much closer to the ideas and ideals of Ettore Bugati than anything that came under the current ownership.

#12316 terrance trump

terrance trump
  • Member

  • 30 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:55

All the Tony Matthews cutaway stories featured at Motor City Garage.com so far, as a collection:


Tony Matthews at Motor City Garage.com


And here are links to all the features individually:


Maserati 250F

Williams FW07

Honda Accord BTCC

Ilmor Chevrolet 265A Indy engine

Williams FW14

Auburn 851 Speedster

Buick Ilmor Indy V8 Never-Was

1994 Penske PC23


Chevy Ilmor 265B Indy engine

Penske 8760 Series damper



If anybody is interested. There is an original Tony Matthews illustration for sale on Ebay. Here is the link.


http://www.ebay.co.u...984.m1555.l2649

#12317 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 19 December 2012 - 12:07

A bargain! I'm tempted...

#12318 CVA

CVA
  • Member

  • 248 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 19 December 2012 - 17:31

cooper t49 by Theo Page
Posted Image

#12319 CVA

CVA
  • Member

  • 248 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 19 December 2012 - 17:55

porsche 917 by M Badrocke, in a better definition
Posted Image

Advertisement

#12320 werks prototype

werks prototype
  • Member

  • 5,543 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 22 December 2012 - 13:04

Some vintage web-based articles.

Posted ImagePosted Image

Posted ImagePosted Image

Edited by werks prototype, 22 December 2012 - 13:15.


#12321 stankoprowski

stankoprowski
  • New Member

  • 24 posts
  • Joined: October 09

Posted 22 December 2012 - 14:37

Some vintage web-based articles.

Posted ImagePosted Image

Posted ImagePosted Image


Back in the day I remember lusting after Vittone's Fiat. I would have thought it was before '72.

Stan

#12322 Karabas

Karabas
  • Member

  • 110 posts
  • Joined: June 10

Posted 22 December 2012 - 17:03

A little goodies for bikers. Unfortunately, the author is unknown (someone from Japanese artists)

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Edited by Karabas, 22 December 2012 - 17:03.


#12323 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 22 December 2012 - 17:58

Back in the day I remember lusting after Vittone's Fiat. I would have thought it was before '72.

Stan



Both from a very good friend, Kenny Youngblood.
Tom West

#12324 Embers

Embers
  • Member

  • 141 posts
  • Joined: May 11

Posted 22 December 2012 - 22:33

I came across this interesting webfind: James A. Allington's illustration of the Ferrari 250TR V12 engine/transmission. This was the motive power of the famous Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa of 1958, hence the "TR" designation.
Posted ImageThe engine was single-overhead cam per cylinder bank, 2,953 cc's displacement, producing 290 horsepower at 7,500 rpm. In searching around for another image to assure myself of the correct identification of this drawing, it became apparent that the artist used a little license, compressing the clutch bellhousing length to be able to show the gearbox within a reasonable illustration length. Here is a low resolution picture of a model of the engine. As you might imagine pictures of the entire engine-transmission unit outside the car are rare:
Posted Image
I know of only two other engine cutaways by Allington, which have been posted here: A BRM engine/transmission and the Lotus Twincam. Does anyone know of others? I also found it curious that his signature is followed by what appears to be the number 83. Was he contunuing to produce illustrations in the early '80's? I have a low resolution Allington drawing of Mercedes Benz 300SL with a 80-something number. If he had chosen to separate out its engine and transmission, it would have made an equally impressive stand-alone engine drawing.

#12325 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 23 December 2012 - 00:17

Jim was still illustrating in the eighties - the Ferrari engine and gearbox were the units from his Testa Rossa, and the 300SL was his too, although the Mercedes was sold before the TR was aquired. He would have continued for longer if he had not had a stroke. Even after the stroke he continued drawing, but nothing as complex as the cutaways.

Edited to add that other engine cutaways include the Coventry Climax Flat Sixteen and the BRM H Sixteen.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 23 December 2012 - 00:19.


#12326 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 23 December 2012 - 13:56

http://www.ebay.co.u...984.m1555.l2649

I've been racking my brains trying to remember how this illustration escaped, to the point of wondering if it was indeed the original, and not a print. Very few went to the commisioners af artwork after the 'early years', I have sold two and given away three or four. Then I remembered that I gave the Trojan to Patrick Head a long time ago, when Williams were still at the first factory in Didcot, near Didcot Station.

#12327 timf5000

timf5000
  • Member

  • 83 posts
  • Joined: November 06

Posted 23 December 2012 - 15:21

I've been racking my brains trying to remember how this illustration escaped, to the point of wondering if it was indeed the original, and not a print. Very few went to the commisioners af artwork after the 'early years', I have sold two and given away three or four. Then I remembered that I gave the Trojan to Patrick Head a long time ago, when Williams were still at the first factory in Didcot, near Didcot Station.



My brother and I still own the Trojan T102 and I have the Motoring News cutaway on the wall here! Was very useful when we were first trying to put the car together from several boxes of bits in the very early 80's! Would be great to have the original drawing, though.......

#12328 quintin cloud

quintin cloud
  • Member

  • 4,599 posts
  • Joined: June 00

Posted 24 December 2012 - 05:23

I came across this interesting webfind: James A. Allington's illustration of the Ferrari 250TR V12 engine/transmission. This was the motive power of the famous Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa of 1958, hence the "TR" designation.
Posted ImageThe engine was single-overhead cam per cylinder bank, 2,953 cc's displacement, producing 290 horsepower at 7,500 rpm. In searching around for another image to assure myself of the correct identification of this drawing, it became apparent that the artist used a little license, compressing the clutch bellhousing length to be able to show the gearbox within a reasonable illustration length. Here is a low resolution picture of a model of the engine. As you might imagine pictures of the entire engine-transmission unit outside the car are rare:
Posted Image
I know of only two other engine cutaways by Allington, which have been posted here: A BRM engine/transmission and the Lotus Twincam. Does anyone know of others? I also found it curious that his signature is followed by what appears to be the number 83. Was he contunuing to produce illustrations in the early '80's? I have a low resolution Allington drawing of Mercedes Benz 300SL with a 80-something number. If he had chosen to separate out its engine and transmission, it would have made an equally impressive stand-alone engine drawing.



cool, nice find :-)

#12329 Motocar

Motocar
  • Member

  • 264 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 24 December 2012 - 15:08

Factories Government Type 452-2 Cutaway Ikarus (Pre-release), a
small twin-engine jet aircraft developed research in 1953 in the former Yugoslavia, had swept wings and middle position in the very short fuselage and twin rudder at the end of two beams and the horizontal stabilizer also arrow attached to the top of the who joined the drifts deeper rear fuselage, the engine was provided by two Turbomeca Palas engines 056A of just 150 Kgs of thrust each and unorthodox placed one above the other, with a side air intakes in the wing roots that fed the lower engine was slightly delayed and the top engine had two air intakes on the sides above the fuselage, landing gear had fully retractable tricycle and the booth had an excellent front visibility and riding a large data collection probe (neglected in this drawing for space reasons) his weight was only 1,100 Kgs her dimensions really small with only 5.25 and 5.97 mts major length, with an overall height of 1.77 m had a speed of 780 km / h and a range of 1:15 minutes, this aircraft allowed to continue with the progress in achieving self-built aircraft and was followed by several twin-engine prototype that used the same powerplant but now straight wings, with a curious vertical surface under the nose and armed with two guns of unknown type, all these works allowed to give life to post Galeb jet trainer which we have already exposed their schematic section in this topic Author Motocar and uploaded with ImageShack.us

Posted Image

Merry Christmas and a 2013 full of success for all lovers friends "Cutaways", Maracay Venezuela Motocar

#12330 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 24 December 2012 - 20:48

No illustrations for you today, just my best wishes for the Christmas and New Year Holiday Season. Hope that you are all having a good time and that you are with your families. Sharing the season is what makes it special, so thank-you all for having been there all year. This has become a staple piece of my daily involvement, and I thank you all for your work in finding so much new material for everyone.
Happy Holidays, Cutawayland.
Tom West

#12331 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 24 December 2012 - 22:08

Best wishes to you, Tom, and everyone else!

#12332 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 24 December 2012 - 22:38

Trying to find a Christmas related cutaway is a discouraging task - the closest I could find is below, not at all what the season is about, but sadly what it has largely become.
Posted Image

Eagle comics had several Christmas images over the years, but most were about the marvels of modern package handling and mail delivery (as the illustration below) or weren't actually cutaways - some illustrated gift delivery to troops in the jungles, but none really captured the season itself.
Posted Image

May each of you relax with family and friends this Christmas season,
May you enjoy the joy and peace that are what real Christmas is all about.

Peter



#12333 Wuzak

Wuzak
  • Member

  • 3,478 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 25 December 2012 - 00:38

So no Santa sleigh cutaway?

#12334 Motocar

Motocar
  • Member

  • 264 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 26 December 2012 - 11:17

Cutaway Repost of the North American F-100 BI, given improved F-100 Super Sabre, bottom outlet supersonic just below the cockpit, which then would lead to the F-107 "Ultra Sabre"
Cutaway North American F-100BI and Mockup. That must have been in the first moments of life that later became the YF-107, this is a free interpretation of the machine which was shown as full-scale mockup "Mockup", noting photography are many details that arise from the modification of a cell of F-100 Super Sabre, with very different air intake, which was designed for high supersonic speeds, divided by the center channel for handling both the amount of air, as the shock waves present at these regimes ends, your nose is not as pointy needle but rather flattened in front, the car is slightly more advanced with respect to the wing base model, with more slanted windshield frame and cover or "canopy" lowest and aerodynamics, its drift was smaller surface and even smaller than the first series of the F-100A, then this game evolved to a higher plane with a Pratt & Whitney J-75 for more than ten tons of thrust, with the feature that characterized it as was dorsal air intake and integral rudder adrift, then used in another signature product the A5 Vigilante North American, which entered service initially supersonic bomber of the U.S. Navy and then amended as reconnaissance aircraft very high performance of this proposal have not seen your drawings or cutaway profiles will be full of speculation, but we can recreate what it would look if this initial proposal if it had advanced beyond the Mockup, not lucky enough to have their Cutaway today that modestly prepared for friends who follow this thread daily, which is starting to attract fans from around the world are welcome and enjoy this new amendment, which, like it did in the past I was worth of a drawing of the existing F -100 to modify to carry this free interpretation of F-100 Ultra Sabre BI.
Author Aviagraphica, via The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aviation, modified and uploaded with Imageshack.us by Motocar
http://q-zon-fighter...ters-usa/usa-v/


Posted Image

Edited by Motocar, 09 March 2013 - 17:53.


#12335 Motocar

Motocar
  • Member

  • 264 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 26 December 2012 - 14:28

photo Cutaway Engine Chrysler CCV, The Chrysler CCV prototype/concept used a ~25HP Vanguard. take forum:
http://forums.subdri...p?4466494/page5


Posted Image

Success

Edited by Motocar, 26 December 2012 - 14:29.


#12336 Embers

Embers
  • Member

  • 141 posts
  • Joined: May 11

Posted 26 December 2012 - 20:20

Edited to add that other engine cutaways include the Coventry Climax Flat Sixteen and the BRM H Sixteen.

I should have checked the Forum index and my own files rather that relying on memory. Allington's rendition of the Coventry Climax Flat-16 is quite well documented. I don't remember seeing the BRM H-16, though. Would someone post it if they have a copy? In reviewing Flat-16 images I noticed that a sort of colorized version of S.E. Porter's work has been posted. Here is a slightly higher resolution black-and-white version:
Posted Image Coventry Climax FWMW 1.5L Flat 16 engine from the May 1965 issue of Road & Track.
The index lists a BRM V8, but that is Allington's drawing of the F1 car. Here is a Vic Berris cutaway of the engine that powered Graham Hill's 1962 World Driving Champioship car:Posted Image BRM P56 1.5L V8 engine - 1962 from the March 1963 issue of Car and Driver magazine which also carried his comparable drawing of the Coventry Climax V8 F1 engine which has been posted here.
To continue this engine theme, here is John Marsden's drawing of the Cosworth SCA F2 engine, originally from Autocar, but here from the April 1966 issue of Road & Track:
Posted Image
Another Vic Berris drawing, the DOHC, four-valve-per-cylinder Lotus 907 engine. This is the production version of the Vauxhall-based racing prototype which I have previously posted.
Posted Image
Finally, readers of this forum are familiar with the work of David Kimble, especially his engine cutaways done for General Motors and Chevrolet. His technique has developed since this first published drawing of a Chevrolet-based engine, done for a 1965 Indianapolis preview he wrote for the June 1965 issue of Sports Car Graphic:
Posted Image Mickey Thompson's Quad-cam Chevrolet V8 - 1965.


#12337 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,570 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:57

Sorry for the break, but wanted to get another illustration out for everyone, another of the early jet pieces that I pulled for your dining and dancing pleasure. This is one out of the late 1940s, 1948 to be more precise. it was to fly off of US carriers into the Korean Conflict, but I don't believe that it made it much past that. One of the very interesting variations on the them from that time, this is the Chance Vought F7U-3M Cutlass as illustrated by Mike Badrocke in the November, 1992 edition of Air International. Always found this to be an interesting design.
Tom West


ChanceVoughtF7U3MCutlass-1948-AirIntl11-1992-Badrocke
Posted Image

#12338 ibsenop

ibsenop
  • Member

  • 813 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 27 December 2012 - 18:41

Suzuki Vitara 1989 by Franco Rosso.

Posted Image

#12339 ibsenop

ibsenop
  • Member

  • 813 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 29 December 2012 - 14:47

Daihatsu Feroza 1989 by artist unknown.

Posted Image

Advertisement

#12340 Embers

Embers
  • Member

  • 141 posts
  • Joined: May 11

Posted 29 December 2012 - 17:48

When I first found this thread of TNF (the Nostalgia Forum) I enjoyed adding to my collection of automotive cutaways. Then I thought that I should and could contribute some of the cutaway images that I had collected. Over time I noticed that this thread encompassed other cutaway subjects. What particularly interested me were the aircraft cutaways. As I had a number of articles saved from old magazines, I thought I could help preserve these works and bring attention to some lesser-known artists. Today, I would like to address a slightly different aspect of cutaways, that of historical accuracy. The Autosport website may not be the best place to bring up an aeronautical error, but, as I have noticed that some aircraft cutaways that I have posted have reappeared on other websites, this is as good a place to attempt a correction as any. What I am bothered about may seem like “nit picking” to some, but this error seems to have been around for at least 50 years and is perpetuated by the Internet. Specifically, I would like to correct the idea that the Republic F-84F Thunderstreak jet fighter-bomber had wing-leading-edge slats. I say “idea”, rather than statement, because this feature is shown on a cutaway available on the Internet. While I try to avoid posting cutaways with the Aviagraphica signature, as I believe that they are widely available, I would like to post the following “corrected” cutaway in which I have removed the incorrect mechanisms and the key references thereto:
Posted Image
I cannot vouch for the remaining leading-edge structure, but I suspect that the original artist cannot, either. This error apparently started with a shaded three-view of the airplane that appeared in the book The Jet Aircraft of the World, by William Green and Roy Cross, that was first published in 1955. It was given the authority of a cutaway in The World’s Great Fighter Aircraft by William Green and Gordon Swanborough, published in 1981. It is puzzling that this configuration mistake arose and persisted, for the F-84F was not an obscure aircraft, serving in the air forces of the United States, West Germany, Belgium, Italy, Norway, Denmark, France, Greece, and Turkey. If we have any Belgian readers of this forum, perhaps they can confirm the impression that examples of this airplane litter their landscape.

Peter Endsleigh Castle, several of whose cutaways for RAF Flying Review magazine have been posted, got the configuration right in this colored three-view he did for an article in that magazine:
Posted Image


#12341 Motocar

Motocar
  • Member

  • 264 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 29 December 2012 - 18:01

FIAT G.50 Cutaway, the Italian game early in the Second World War designed by the Engineer Gabrieli and had to be a substitute CR.42 biplane monoplane that was still in service in large numbers with Italian aircraft and was preferred above a mountain of recent and more advanced monoplane fighters, which in a rather controversial decision the high command of the Italian aircraft instead of purchasing a large number of the best among the three models: Macchi MC.200, Reggiane RE.2000 and FIAT G 50 was decided to build three models and put into service, all these fighters had enclosed cabs from the beginning but was not liked by the pilots who prefer flying in open cockpits he came to the case where the same were withdrawn by mechanics at the request of the riders, something similar happened in Japan with the latest fighter monoplanes FISAT this reason to make changes to it being now an open cockpit with a small access door to port, the FIAT G.50 enjoyed excellent maneuverability but because of its engine a FIAT A.74 RC.38 than just delivering 740 HP then raise to 840 in successive versions could not even reach 500 km / h maximum speed being 472 km / h but even worse was his relatively light armament of two 12.7 mm machine guns, when compared with the 8 machine guns mounted the Hawker Hurricane with which later would be in combat and would be far outweighed by this, it became clear the need for a more powerful motor plant, the new engine chosen was the Mercedes Benz DB 601 and then the more powerful DB 605 and was produced under license in Italy, improving the performance of the new FIAT G.55 fighter now armed with a cannon 20 mm Mauser and two 12.5 mm machine guns, but that's another story, the G.50 not achieve what was expected of him and if the other fighters with 200 and Reggiane Mcchi RE.2000 be a huge waste resource and a disaster logistics by having three different types of fighters and having to produce all parts and spares, these have never been available and in many cases these planes were stranded at their bases sometimes serving as decoys, definitely a no hunting very graceful with her lanky and his cabin on top that did provide excellent visibility despite how close it was the same, author Zigato and retouched by the MC72 forista Italian forum:

http://www.aereimili...paccati/page-15

Posted Image

Success and Happy New Year 2013





#12342 Motocar

Motocar
  • Member

  • 264 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 30 December 2012 - 17:33

Monteverdi Hai cutaway, author Borher 69 and take of blog:
http://www.autoneuro...everdi-hai.html

Posted Image

Success and happy New Year 2013


#12343 Amaroo Park

Amaroo Park
  • Member

  • 296 posts
  • Joined: April 06

Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:25

Every time I look at this tread I am in awe. And more than a little envious that I can't do any thing like it lol

#12344 ibsenop

ibsenop
  • Member

  • 813 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 31 December 2012 - 12:15

Lamborghini Diablo 1989 by Franco Rosso

Posted Image

Happy New Year to All.

#12345 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,498 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 31 December 2012 - 12:26

Thanks Ibsen - Happy New Year to everyone in Cutawayland!

#12346 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 31 December 2012 - 16:57

Joyous New Year to all...

this cutaway originally rang in the new year in 1953, actually a day late (1/2) because of standard issue release on Fridays (until 8/2/58)
from Eagle Comics, by L Ashwell Wood

Posted Image

Peter

#12347 Motocar

Motocar
  • Member

  • 264 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 31 December 2012 - 19:11

Happy New Year 2013 to all forum members and friends who visit us again this year to achieve all your goals and succeed in everything you undertake, together with his family and friends, get a big hug and best wishes to all.

A thousand congratulations from Maracay, Venezuela wishes Motocar

Posted Image

Success

Edited by Motocar, 31 December 2012 - 19:27.


#12348 Duc-Man

Duc-Man
  • Member

  • 1,068 posts
  • Joined: November 08

Posted 01 January 2013 - 13:46

Posted Image

Happy 2013 everybody in cutawayland.

@marcoran: sorry for not responding but my e-mail client quit on me.

#12349 Languedoc

Languedoc
  • Member

  • 52 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 01 January 2013 - 16:15

Monteverdi Hai cutaway, author Borher 69 and take of blog:
http://www.autoneuro...everdi-hai.html

Posted Image

Success and happy New Year 2013


Happy new year for everybody!!!!

The car looks VERY low, like a GT40. Anybody knows how tall was it?
The chassis looks rather "primitive", little trosional rigidity. Looks like it will twist badly just accelerating that huge HEMI. Interesting rear De Dion suspension with Watt linkage.

#12350 Duc-Man

Duc-Man
  • Member

  • 1,068 posts
  • Joined: November 08

Posted 01 January 2013 - 16:45

Happy new year for everybody!!!!

The car looks VERY low, like a GT40. Anybody knows how tall was it?
The chassis looks rather "primitive", little trosional rigidity. Looks like it will twist badly just accelerating that huge HEMI. Interesting rear De Dion suspension with Watt linkage.


Look here!