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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#2901 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 15:44

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I've just discovered that I can scan 10"x8" trannies! What I want to know from all you digital illustrators is - what sort of graphics tablet should I get? A5 strikes me as far too small, , is A4 big enough? I've spent over two evenings cutting out this Williams FW18 using 'Paint' and a mouse and it's not much fun. Certainly not fun enough to clean up the cut-lines and sections or highlights, which is what I would like to do.

Edited to say that I managed to trim a bit off the bottom of the LR tyre - that took some skill, I can tell you!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 25 November 2009 - 15:46.


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#2902 alansart

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 16:00

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I've just discovered that I can scan 10"x8" trannies! What I want to know from all you digital illustrators is - what sort of graphics tablet should I get? A5 strikes me as far too small, , is A4 big enough? I've spent over two evenings cutting out this Williams FW18 using 'Paint' and a mouse and it's not much fun. Certainly not fun enough to clean up the cut-lines and sections or highlights, which is what I would like to do.

Edited to say that I managed to trim a bit off the bottom of the LR tyre - that took some skill, I can tell you!


Flat spotted a tyre eh! I always thought that were only flat at the bottom :)

I used to have a Wacom A3 Tablet, but it took some getting used to.

In the end I tended to use it for virtually everything as I much preferred it to a mouse. Systems have moved on so it's been consigned to the bin and my current work doesn't really justify buying another one. I still have an A5 Tablet but it's just too small. A4 is probably OK if an A3 costs too much.

I work on a 22" Apple Mac, but due to some software issues, I've had to link it to a small screen PC laptop to sort a couple of jobs out. Even though it's a small screen it wasn't anywhere near as bad as I thought it was :)

Edited by alansart, 25 November 2009 - 16:01.


#2903 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 16:22

Flat spotted a tyre eh! I always thought that were only flat at the bottom :)


This is the sort of flat that goes round with the tyre, Alan, normally associated with barn-finds! The last time I checked Wacom prices the A3 was not horrendous, but as usual there are several purchases in mind and not everything can be afforded in one go! I went to a phographic trade show earlier in the year, and the Waco stand had an A2 beauty, but that was expensive, actually, as I think about it, it may have been bigger than A2 - enormous thing, in a sinister dark olivey-brown, militaristic, purposeful, slightly threatening, highly desireable...I bet David Hockney was given one. Hello, Wacom, I'm over here...


#2904 alansart

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 17:54

This is the sort of flat that goes round with the tyre, Alan, normally associated with barn-finds! The last time I checked Wacom prices the A3 was not horrendous, but as usual there are several purchases in mind and not everything can be afforded in one go! I went to a phographic trade show earlier in the year, and the Waco stand had an A2 beauty, but that was expensive, actually, as I think about it, it may have been bigger than A2 - enormous thing, in a sinister dark olivey-brown, militaristic, purposeful, slightly threatening, highly desireable...I bet David Hockney was given one. Hello, Wacom, I'm over here...


I don't think I'd like to go to the Waco stand!

I can never understand why because the tablet is bigger it goes up in price by 500% :well:

They are good, especially as a digital airbrush - and you get no coloured dust up your nose :cool:

Edited by alansart, 25 November 2009 - 17:55.


#2905 Cam2InfoNeeded

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 17:59

Tony,

I will be eagerly awaiting ANY McLaren Can-Am drawings you can produce!

One of my all-time favorites cars (and I think somewhat under appreciated in design and beauty) is Bruce's original M6A. It has a flow, grace, and demonstrated successful function that few cars display. From the first time I saw it in my Autoweek back in 1967 (I was only 13, and I paid for my subsciption by mowing lawns) I loved the wonderful way the car looked, before all of the tacked on wings and spoilers came along (not so much on Bruce's cars, but most other Can-Am cars). Have you ever thought of doing THAT car?

doug

Edited by Cam2InfoNeeded, 25 November 2009 - 18:01.


#2906 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 19:06

They are good, especially as a digital airbrush - and you get no coloured dust up your nose :cool:

That was the only bit I enjoyed!

Doug, I thought of doing all sorts of cutaways...

#2907 macoran

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 21:46

Thanks for the comments. Since I was in complete awe of your work from the first time I saw it, this is especially satisfying.
I was immersed in the drag racing stuff in the mid-60s after I moved here from Denver. The biggest fuel race I had been to there, and the largest they had ever held, hosted 7 fuel cars in 1964. My first race out here was the second Mickey Thompson 200mph Club race, and featured 64 Top Fuel cars. It was like having one of those old drag magazines come to life, and I knew I was where I wanted to be.
I "trained" myself by copying a Steve Swaja drawing of a streamlined dragster (designed completely reverse of the true aero teardrop shape), and progressed up to copying a James Allington Ferrari out of Road and Track (maybe Car & Driver). Had a mechanical drawing instructor here who had taught that single year course, but knew nothing beyond that. I actually ended up helping him teach the course (cams, etc.) and he told me he had nothing else he could teach me, so I had to come up with something to fill the rest of the semester. I jumped in and copied 8 illustrations, just to get the feel for them. When I got out of high school, and was in the Co-op part of my General Motors time, I ended up borrowing a camera and getting involved in drag photography (racing ... not the other ...). That introduced me to the sport and I stuck with it after having my first extremely primitive illustration published.
I can remember seeing those early line drawings with that Matthews signature and seeing a real step forward, and had followed your work ever since.
Wish I had the chance to work with some of the more complicated things. May have to step in and do that McLaren M8D that I shot for a modelkit project that I did a few years ago. Supposed to have been one of the better restorations, and I have a full set of reference photos, and the base drawings to be able to build the illustration.
Anyway, I don't feel nearly as stupid as I did earlier this morning. Thanks for waiting ...
I will start posting more of these as I go through, although all of the ones that I have cleaned up are on that ImageShack site now.
Tom West


Really loved dragsters,Funny cars and the NHRA/Gatornational dragraces as a teenager. Good memories of Connie Kalita, Don Prudhomme and Shirley Muldowney. Hot Rod magazine was a
must for me then if only to drool on all the chrome, coloured plating, braided hosing and tubing and such.
Great drawings Tom !! :up:
Fancy you bringing up the name Steve Swaja, I have only one of his cutaways posted on page 43 of this thread (thanks for your indexing work Ibsen).
Do you recall in which magazines Swaja's work was usually published ?

#2908 macoran

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 21:53

I've spent over two evenings cutting out this Williams FW18 using 'Paint' and a mouse and it's not much fun. Certainly not fun enough to clean up the cut-lines and sections or highlights, which is what I would like to do.

Edited to say that I managed to trim a bit off the bottom of the LR tyre - that took some skill, I can tell you!

Good one Tony !! Do I recall correctly that you once mentioned FW18 was the last cutaway you did ?

BTW "Paint" has Kwik-Fit facilities to repair your flat-spotted tyre ! :p

#2909 macoran

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 21:59

Jan de Rooy's 1988 Paris-Dakar DAF Turbo Twin by Portugies bureau for visual communications
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#2910 TWest

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 22:18

Really loved dragsters,Funny cars and the NHRA/Gatornational dragraces as a teenager. Good memories of Connie Kalita, Don Prudhomme and Shirley Muldowney. Hot Rod magazine was a
must for me then if only to drool on all the chrome, coloured plating, braided hosing and tubing and such.
Great drawings Tom !! :up:
Fancy you bringing up the name Steve Swaja, I have only one of his cutaways posted on page 43 of this thread (thanks for your indexing work Ibsen).
Do you recall in which magazines Swaja's work was usually published ?


The Swaja work was probably best known for being the Cutaway of the month in Car Craft. He started, doing about 8 of them, and it then passed over to William Moore who did them for maybe three years. It sat for about 18 months and they brought me in to pick up on it. Since I was alternating back and forth between Southern California and Michigan doing my Engineering degree, I could only be involved about half time, so we did a few and they decided they needed to do something different. I know that it wasn't the cost of the drawings.
Steve did a few drawings for Hot Rod, Car Life and a couple of others out of the SoCal automotive publishing groups. He was going to Art Center and had started doing them because he felt like he could do much better than some of the US guys who had been the traditional cutaway artists here ... and he certainly could.
I had never seen that illustration previously; where was it published. I have 13 other illustrations of his, not including the four "joke" (what's wrong) drawings that he did for Pete Millar's Drag Cartoons magazine.
The drag racing has been my mainstay since I started, especially considering that there were probably a dozen monthly publications in the 60s that focused primarily on drag racing. There are two now ... and they are struggling. I got into the photography, so I used to either pull them apart to set up for drawings in the pits, or dodge them and their pieces out on the trackside. It has gotten me the credibility to even shoot Formula 1 trackside, might have to start scanning some of that stuff for all you Empire types in here.
Tom West

#2911 TWest

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 22:30

For those of you who claim you can't do these cutaways, I will show you what happens when you just jump in and start doing them. This was my first piece, published the end of 1968 in Popular Hot Rodding magazine. It was about as big as any I have done, and was originally done with just single weight lines. Looked a bit static, so I eventually took the time to dig back and shape a few lines, but it still needs mucho help to really be much of worth to this group. Just know that it is not impossible to get started with cutaways, whether you have any real artistic talent or training. Of course, you also have to like hitting yourself on the head with hammers frequently.
The car is the latest (in 1968) A/Gas Supercharged car, an Austin Sedan run by the Herrera and Sons team. They lived maybe five miles from me so I was brought along on a photo shoot for the magazine and shot all the pics on the campus of a local college. This was about the first car of its type to actually have the fully hinged body that would lift off the chassis (love those drag cars ...). Because of the rules, it still had to have the opening doors in the lift-off body, which seemed rather counterproductive as they had to make the body very heavy compared to the equivalent one-piece funny cars. These were about 150-160 mph cars in the day, and quite a popular class of racing for not running nitro.
Anyway ... here goes.
Tom West

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#2912 macoran

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 22:34

The Swaja work was probably best known for being the Cutaway of the month in Car Craft.

I had never seen that illustration previously; where was it published.
Tom West

Road&Track June 1963 accompanying an article title Two for a Showdown

#2913 macoran

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 22:40

The car is the latest (in 1968) A/Gas Supercharged car, an Austin Sedan run by the Herrera and Sons team.

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That looks hairier than the A40 Devon my dad had in the SS..............oops !! I mean Straights Settlements

#2914 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 22:53

Good one Tony !! Do I recall correctly that you once mentioned FW18 was the last cutaway you did ?


I struggled on for another six years Marc, Ferrari F2000 was the last.

BTW "Paint" has Kwik-Fit facilities to repair your flat-spotted tyre ! :p

:lol: Blowed if I can find it...

Great to have Tom West posting away like demon!

#2915 TWest

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 22:53

Road&Track June 1963 accompanying an article title Two for a Showdown


Thanks for the reference. I have been trying to collect everything on the history of Hot Rodding (and Mickey Thompson certainly falls into that category), but just missed that one, I guess. Will have to keep an eye out for it as I go back through all of those magazines.
I have decided to try to scan some of the other European subjects that I haven't actually scanned in for this US project, so will try to size them to fit here and post a few as we go along.
But, thanks for that particular one. Any chance of getting a higher res scan of it???
Tom West

#2916 TWest

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 22:57

I struggled on for another six years Marc, Ferrari F2000 was the last.


:lol: Blowed if I can find it...

Great to have Tom West posting away like demon!


Yeah, just great ...
I actually have some design work that I am trying to complete here for money, and this crap is so much more enjoyable ...
Very diverting, to say the least.
I will try to send a couple every day, although since tomorrow is Thanksgiving, I will send out a couple of more then. Figure that the Turkey population is going through the inter-species version of Ethnic Cleansing, I will honor them with a couple of cutaways. Can't think of anything more appropriate ... or maybe I can.
Tom West

#2917 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 23:50

Figure that the Turkey population is going through the inter-species version of Ethnic Cleansing, I will honor them with a couple of cutaways.

Turkeys are always welcome in Cutawayland, but they enter at their own risk...

#2918 macoran

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 23:59

Turkeys are always welcome in Cutawayland,

Especially if they bring the gravy,stuffing,trimmings and mashed potatoes with 'em
Happy Thanksgiving !

Edited by macoran, 26 November 2009 - 00:01.


#2919 TWest

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 00:56

Especially if they bring the gravy,stuffing,trimmings and mashed potatoes with 'em
Happy Thanksgiving !


Yes, that does seem to be especially risky behavior ... for a turkey.
I know that the thoughts of those Pilgrims probably are a bit of a sore subject for most of the folks on this Board, but Happy Thanksgiving.

Actually, you guys probably got the best of that deal just getting rid of them ... they seemed to be extraordinarily unpleasant types from what can be found reading between the lines of the story. Too bad we can't give some of them back ...
Tom West

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#2920 scorerr770

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 07:59

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I've just discovered that I can scan 10"x8" trannies! What I want to know from all you digital illustrators is - what sort of graphics tablet should I get? A5 strikes me as far too small, , is A4 big enough? I've spent over two evenings cutting out this Williams FW18 using 'Paint' and a mouse and it's not much fun. Certainly not fun enough to clean up the cut-lines and sections or highlights, which is what I would like to do.

Edited to say that I managed to trim a bit off the bottom of the LR tyre - that took some skill, I can tell you!


A4 Wacom seems to fit the bill for me, A3 would be nicer but due to cost and desk space A4 is fine. When you say using paint? is that the standard paint or corel Photo paint? Photoshop here and using pen tool to draw and mask makes life so easy for cutting out.



#2921 mattjenn123

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 15:10

Love to see some of that a bit bigger !!! Great Stuff !! :up:


Here you go.
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#2922 alansart

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 15:21

I like that :up:

#2923 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 16:56

When you say using paint? is that the standard paint or corel Photo paint? Photoshop here and using pen tool to draw and mask makes life so easy for cutting out.

No, just the regular 'paint' that came with the Vista rubbish. I used to have photoshop - #6 I think - in another life, I enjoyed using it, and could do most things I needed to as it was mostly intuitive, especially as I was used to darkroom practice. Ideally I would have photoshop and a tablet. I know what you mean about desk space...

#2924 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 17:01

I know that the thoughts of those Pilgrims probably are a bit of a sore subject for most of the folks on this Board, but Happy Thanksgiving.


I'd be surprised if any one has given a nano-second of thought to the Pilgrims, Tom.

Actually, you guys probably got the best of that deal just getting rid of them ... they seemed to be extraordinarily unpleasant types from what can be found reading between the lines of the story. Too bad we can't give some of them back ...


We've got enough coming in, thanks!

#2925 macoran

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 17:31

Here you go.
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Really lovely Matt :up:
Don't you sign or initial your work ?

Edited by macoran, 26 November 2009 - 17:33.


#2926 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 17:45

Really lovely Matt :up:
Don't you sign or initial your work ?


Yes, Matt, very nice. Perhaps you didn't want to risk writing on your perfect paviours!

#2927 macoran

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 22:55

Sport Auto published this article about a fictional F1 car in 1976. Michael Stirm let loose his imagination and drew up what it might have looked like.
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#2928 TWest

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 05:47

Sport Auto published this article about a fictional F1 car in 1976. Michael Stirm let loose his imagination and drew up what it might have looked like.
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That is quite a presentation. Some very cool proposals, that would have fit with a lot of the other 4x4 designs that were floated at the time. Like seeing stuff like that, especially when someone thinks through the possible mechanics like this.
Too much fun. Thanks for posting it for us.
Tom West


#2929 TWest

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 06:07

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OK, here is a rather unusual car as it was built just a few years ago by one of the master metalworkers in drag racing from the 60s, Tom Hanna. Tom built the car just to have a front-engined car for the Cacklefest commemorations over here. Check some of the details on this car, as it is essentially a 60s dragster, but built with the technologies that might be applied today. A real piece of rolling artwork.
Tom West

#2930 TWest

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 06:19

Going to put up another for you guys this evening. This is a little Modified Roadster that Tony Nancy ran back in the early 60s. It featured a simple Kent Fuller chassis, and an injected Buick engine that would have been typical for the Tommy Ivo cars and a few others of the time. It was one of Tony's cars that made the cover of Hot Rod Magazine, one of a record number of covers by a single racer.
Tom West

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#2931 smarjoram

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 09:50

Just found a couple by J Walkden Fisher - and they're for sale too...

Cooper Monaco
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Formula Junior Stanguellini
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They're at the Illustration Art Gallery

#2932 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 17:49

Just found a couple by J Walkden Fisher - and they're for sale too...

Thanks for the link and pix, smarj, how well I remember the 'fish' logo that Mr Fisher used. J Walkden! Wow! Why do some people get relly memorable monikers and others, most, don't? I blame the parents...

#2933 TWest

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 22:24

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This is the second illustration that I did. It was driven by the "kid" of the day, Dale Pulde, who was to go on to a long and successful racing career, and is still involved in the Nostalgia Funny Cars today. The owner of this Camaro Funny Car was Charlie Wilson, a real home-spun racer from the South who pretty much built the cars himself. They could get away with that back in the 60s, and have a good chance to be successful.
Anyway, another of those very simple racers from back at my beginning.
Tom West

#2934 TWest

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 22:31

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OK, I lied on that last drawing .. this was my second.
These cars were the first of the Fuel Altered class of drag racing. Short wheelbase, nitro burning cars that could be reasonably quick and fast, but were just as likely to dart over the guard rail. This car of the Thurmond Brothers was pretty obsolete by the time I got involved with it for the drawing, but they had just upgraded to the Chrysler from an Oldsmobile engine. That '32 Ford frame was certainly a throwback to the earlier Fuel Coupes which were all but gone by this time. There was enough Altered racing in Southern California that they could go out and compete, even if they were at a disadvantage to the newer cars.
This was a time, in the mid-60s, where there were few real long-lasting patterns for any of the classes of cars; everyone pretty much built their own stuff and tried it out. If it worked, everyone jumped in and tried to duplicate it, and if not, you never saw it again.
I should probably park this drawing, as well. Pretty primitive in my expression of the car, too ... probably fitting.
Tom West

#2935 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 22:41

I should probably park this drawing, as well. Pretty primitive in my expression of the car, too ... probably fitting.
Tom West

We all probably have mixed feelings about our early work, Tom. I used to cringe when I saw my earlieast attempts, but now I just accept them as part of a different era, almost as if done by someone else - a much younger me! Your Thurmond Brothers Ford looks anything but primitive, you obviously found a 'style' very quickly, but also it is a good record of the car, which is what technical illustration is all about.

#2936 TWest

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 00:21

We all probably have mixed feelings about our early work, Tom. I used to cringe when I saw my earlieast attempts, but now I just accept them as part of a different era, almost as if done by someone else - a much younger me! Your Thurmond Brothers Ford looks anything but primitive, you obviously found a 'style' very quickly, but also it is a good record of the car, which is what technical illustration is all about.



Tony,
I had an interesting impression of you, somehow having heard someone reference you as a bit of a curmudgeon ... can't say who, where or when. Maybe it was one of those created events that come up recreationally over our time. Have to say that you certainly do not come near to that impression. I have been very impressed with your openness about this stuff and the process, and, to say that your comments have been completely encouraging is certainly the case. Thanks for taking this on and for participating in this group. I would think that folks who do this rather pedantic and detailed work would not be overly social, but all of the ones that I have had the honor to speak with or communicate with have been very pleasant to deal with.
Now, to figure out who put that impression in my mind ... no damned idea ...
You will appreciate a little information on how I built these early drawings, since I was doing photography, including the actual prints of my research photos. I would print them out at 11x14 or 8x10, and grid the drawing with 1/8", while using a 1/4 or 3/8 grid for an underlay on the vellum. I found out about the Lucie projectors (sp?) later when talking with Steve Swaja. Then figured out that I could print the pics larger ...or could actually use copy machines ...
Talk about groping about in the woods with these things.
I do want to express thanks to you and to the rest of the group for the acceptance of this material. I am actually digging back into a collection of old magazines to get reasonable scans on a lot of those old US magazine cutaways. They are also pretty weak compared to the Allington & Matthews work, but they are what they are, and carry interest for being 50-60 years old ... amazing in itself.
Tom West

#2937 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 10:15

Tony,
I had an interesting impression of you, somehow having heard someone reference you as a bit of a curmudgeon ...

Curmudgeon, eh? I like it, it's a good old word, not used enough these days - I may add it as a middle name by Deed Poll. No doubt the impression was given by someone who's never met me, that would be par for the course... As for being anti-social because the work is detailed and requires a deal of concentration - my philosophy has always been work hard, play hard. My impression is that there is a specific type of humour that exists, or existed, in drawing offices, and by extension, studios. I don't know whether the work creates the humour, or attracts characters who have a similar outlook on life. No doubt there are genuine curmudgeons who illustrate, but I've never met one, and on this thread I've met illustrators who are the exact oposite.

Briefly, my approach to a cutaway was:- a)Arrange to see the car, b)if it was an unfamiliar site, scan the area for nearby flat roofs, stairs, high windows or nearby transporters, c)photograph every damn detail of the car, d)get it moved to where I could get an overall shot or two from the aformentioned vantage point, e) go home. Obviously c) and d) could be reversed in order depending. If a Williams was just back from a GP it would be stripped down to it's component parts very quickly, so I would photograph the complete car ASAP so not to hold the mechanics up too much, then watch and click as they tore it down. Work fast and keep out of the way! Oh, and I always had back-up cameras, loads of film and batteries - and a Surveyors ladder!

Once home, process the film, choose an O/A shot, make a 20"x30" print for the outline and panels etc, and then print up the detail shots. Then tape the big print to a s/s piece of 3mm hardboard, tape drafting film over that and draw in all the detail I could. Then tape the film onto a hardboard-backed sheet of white board to show the lines, and start fettling the shape, re-drawing the wheel ellipses and find features that would enable me to establish a vanishing point. Having ascertained where the little devil was hiding, draw in a load of perspective lines, some based on features of the car, some intermediate, and decide where to cut the bodywork away...

Before I had my own darkroom I used a friend's Grant Projector to get the outline, etc., but I didn't like using his facilities, especially when his studio - graphic design and advertising - moved on to more advanced methods and the redundant projector was banished to his office basement, and new, young staff didn't know who I was - well, it just got a bit embarrassing. I have also used the squaring-up method, it is surprisingly accurate, and all these techniques have their uses, but if you are illustrating commercially, time is of the essence. I didn't want to spend three days drawing and re-drawing an outline when I could be cutting and detailing! However, having had to progress through these earlier techniques does no harm, they all add to your knowledge and experience.

Before all that, working for Jim Allington and then at Motor Sport and Motoring News, everything was sketched out from scratch - I look at drawings like the Porsche 917/10 and can't really imagine how I did it. I think one of the several reasons for giving up illustrating was that I felt I had gone as far as I could regarding technique, it had been a steep learning curve for decades, and suddenly I had reached a plateau - all that was before me was more of the same, and although I still think of cars I would really like to have illustrated, and I am still enthusiastic about the subject - and love this thread - somehow the fire has gone out. Also, all the manual work I do now has changed my hands, no doubt they would eventually revert to their former shape, but after wielding a wrecking bar for a week, holding a pencil is a bit alien.

So, in other words, we all tend to gravitate to more or less the same starting point and process. The next big jump is digital, which I admire enormously, but don't personally want to make. However, having discussed this with Tom Johnson on this thread and privately, and with alansart, I feel sure that a background of some of the traditional techniques probably helps. I may be wrong.


Bit of a ramble...

Edited by Tony Matthews, 29 November 2009 - 15:04.


#2938 Tim Murray

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 10:31

Bit of a ramble...

... but fascinating stuff. I've learned a great deal from it. Thanks, Tony.

#2939 sundance76

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 10:59

Hi guys. I would ask if there is a cutaway drawing of the Ferrari 375 F1 (1951, Gonzalez and Ascari).... I'm looking for a long time, without finding..

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#2940 ibsenop

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 15:40

Hi Sundance76

Here is a Ferrari 375 1951 cutaway by unknown artist.

Posted Image

Ibsen

#2941 macoran

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 16:20

Googling around for a 375 I found this F40.
Haven't got a clue by who
Posted Image

#2942 Duc-Man

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 17:02

I googled around as well and found some Ferrari cutaways in a brazilian blog.
Here is one of them:

Posted Image

I can't see a name anywhere. Is it by Jim Allington? Has anybody a bigger/better version of it?

Here is the link to that blog:Mondo Ferrari Brasils Blog

The cutaways are about 2/3rds down the site.

#2943 macoran

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 17:10

I don't think it could be by Jim Allington, it's a complete different style

Edited by macoran, 28 November 2009 - 17:11.


#2944 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 19:10

Correctomundo Marc, not Jim's work. What I want to know is - why are two of mine on that site? Oh well...

#2945 sundance76

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 19:12

Hi Sundance76

Here is a Ferrari 375 1951 cutaway by unknown artist.

Posted Image

Ibsen


Thank you very much, you were very fast!!

#2946 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 19:13

Hi Sundance76

Here is a Ferrari 375 1951 cutaway by unknown artist.

Posted Image

Ibsen

What a great-looking car!

By the way, are we going to reserve post #3000 for Anders? He's been a bit quiet recently...

#2947 macoran

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 19:51

Correctomundo Marc, not Jim's work. What I want to know is - why are two of mine on that site? Oh well...

They were snitched from your khulsey site.
I have seen a lot of the work which I have spliced from two pages on a czech site, I know because I mark each makeover job somewhere,
so in a way it is a compliment, just no one bothers to say where they got the stuff they are putting-up from.

#2948 TWest

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 21:18

Curmudgeon, eh? I like it, it's a good old word, not used enough these days - I may add it as a middle name by Deed Poll. No doubt the impression was given by someone who's never met me, that would be par for the course... As for being anti-social because the work is detailed and requires a deal of concentration - my philosophy has always been work hard, play hard. My impression is that there is a specific type of humour that exists, or existed, in drawing offices, and by extension, studios. I don't know whether the work creates the humour, or attracts characters who have a similar outlook on life. No doubt there are genuine curmudgeons who illustrate, but I've never met one, and on this thread I've met illustrators who are the exact oposite.

Briefly, my approach to a cutaway was:- a)Arrange to see the car, b)if it was an unfamiliar site, scan the area for nearby flat roofs, stairs, high windows or nearby transporters, c)photograph every damn detail of the car, d)get it moved to where I could get an overall shot or two from the aformentioned vantage point, e) go home. Obviously c) and d) could be reversed in order depending. If a Williams was just back from a GP it would be stripped down to it's component parts very quickly, so I would photograph the complete car ASAP so not to hold the mechanics up too much, then watch and click as they tore it down. Work fast and keep out of the way! Oh, and I always had back-up cameras, loads of film and batteries - and a Surveyors ladder!

Once home, process the film, choose an O/A shot, make a 20"x30" print for the outline and panels etc, and then print up the detail shots. Then tape the big print to a s/s piece of 3mm hardboard, tape drafting film over that and draw in all the detail I could. Then tape the film onto a hardboard-backed sheet of white board to show the lines, and start fettling the shape, re-drawing the wheel ellipses and find features that would enable me to establish a vanishing point. Having ascertained where the little devil was hiding, draw in a load of perspective lines, some based on features of the car, some intermediate, and decide where to cut the bodywork away...

Before I had my own darkroom I used a friend's Grant Projector to get the outline, etc., but I didn't like using his fascilities, especially when his studio - graphic design and advertising - moved on to more advanced methods and the redundant projector was banished to his office basement, and new, young staff didn't know who I was - well, it just got a bit embarrassing. I have also used the squaring-up method, it is surprisingly accurate, and all these techniques have their uses, but if you are illustrating commercially, time is of the essence. I didn't want to spend three days drawing and re-drawing an outline when I could be cutting and detailing! However, having had to progress through these earlier techniques does no harm, they all add to your knowledge and experience.

Before all that, working for Jim Allington and then at Motor Sport and Motoring News, everything was sketched out from scratch - I look at drawings like the Porsche 917/10 and can't really imagine how I did it. I think one of the several reasons for giving up illustrating was that I felt I had gone as far as I could regarding technique, it had been a steep learning curve for decades, and suddenly I had reached a plateau - all that was before me was more of the same, and although I still think of cars I would really like to have illustrated, and I am still enthusiastic about the subject - and love this thread - somehow the fire has gone out. Also, all the manual work I do now has changed my hands, no doubt they would eventually revert to their former shape, but after wielding a wrecking bar for a week, holding a pencil is a bit alien.

So, in other words, we all tend to gravitate to more or less the same starting point and process. The next big jump is digital, which I admire enormously, but don't personally want to make. However, having discussed this with Tom Johnson on this thread and privately, and with alansart, I feel sure that a background of some of the traditional techniques probably helps. I may be wrong.


Bit of a ramble...


Tony,
Having gone back into the archives on this board, I have to say that the cutaway artist has certainly gotten a good representation here. Very helpful and very social ... and I do wish I could figure out where I heard that comment ... maybe looking at some of your work while reviewing some of the liquid refreshment over the years.
The idea of hearing some of the technique that everyone came up with to start this process shows how individual this work can be. Sounds like it is as individual as any other art form out there ... you have to fit it to your own point in time and the things that come available to you. As they say, if I only knew then ... and had my MacBook Pro back in 1967 ...
Thanks for the comments. Look forward to many more.
Owe you a beer, or your choice ...
Tom West

#2949 macoran

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 21:39

By the way, are we going to reserve post #3000 for Anders? He's been a bit quiet recently...

No problem here, and I'll give him a little wake up shake........
I know he has a soft spot for Gordon Bruce
Bourgeault F Jr
Posted Image

#2950 ABG

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 22:27

Just thought I'd throw in some Tamiya box art.
Great kits and great packaging.


Ferrari 312t4
http://img407.images...rrari312t4.jpg/

Renault Re20
http://img513.images...enaultre20.jpg/

Al