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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#3501 Waka

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 05:05

Good to know !! I've still got the set of Super Cars stashed away somewhere..... will have to dig ....


I have scanned all the large cutaways. I will tweak them with Photoshop to remove the centre fold (sigh, oops, there's a space in there) and staples and post them over the next few weeks.

Warwick

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#3502 B Squared

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 15:52

Another from C.O. LaTourette. This being, according to the verbiage, a 270 Offenhauser. Brian

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#3503 terrance trump

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 19:17

Another in the history of technical illustrating. The date this time is 1930. The car is a Lea-Francis and the illustrator is Max Millar.
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#3504 terrance trump

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 19:20

[quote name='terrance trump' date='Jan 19 2010, 19:17' post='4086403']
Another in the history of technical illustrating. The date this time is 1932. The car is a Standard Big 12 and the illustrator is Max Millar.
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#3505 ABG

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 20:28

Scrolling through Ibsen"s great Index, I see Brian Hatton's Lotus 72 hasn't been aired yet.
Anyone have a better scan please ?
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Marc

A better Hatton Lotus 72
http://img697.images...tonlotus72.jpg/

and a Hatton BRM P160
http://img30.imagesh...tonbrmp160.jpg/

Al

#3506 ibsenop

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 23:03

From the web

CT Automotive DOHC Flathead engine cutaway by Clarence LaTourette

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Agajanian Studebaker V8 DOHC engine cutaway by Clarence LaTourette

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Ibsen

#3507 ibsenop

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 23:11

More from the web

Fred Carrillo's Modified Roadster cutaway by Ron Bennett(?). Is this his name? I can't read the signature. Rex Burnett. Thanks Tom.
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Spalding Chevrolet Six cutaway by Ron Bennett(?) Rex Burnett
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Competition Hot Rod cutaway by Ron Bennett(?) Rex Burnett
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Hot Rod Roadster. Who is the artist? Rex Burnett
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Hot Rod Roadster cutaway by Jim Richards
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Ibsen

Edited by ibsenop, 21 January 2010 - 20:13.


#3508 macoran

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 23:52

MG R2 by Clarence LaTourette
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#3509 TWest

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 00:00

More from the web

Fred Carrillo's Modified Roadster cutaway by Ron Bennett(?). Is this his name? I can't read the signature.
Posted Image

Spalding Chevrolet Six cutaway by Ron Bennett(?)
Posted Image

Competition Hot Rod cutaway by Ron Bennett(?)
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Hot Rod Roadster. Who is the artist?
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Hot Rod Roadster cutaway by Jim Richards
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Ibsen


Ibsen,
Except for that last illustration from Jim Richards, they are all Rex Burnett drawings out of the early days of Hot Rod Magazine. This is pretty much the standard that was set for those old hot rod and custom cutaways over here. He did the Hot Rod series into about 1953, and later did some sports car work for Petersen in Motor Trend and a couple of their other magazines.
The Jim Richards illustration is from a little half-page format publication called Hop Up. They ran about six or seven of his drawings in the early 50s.
Tom West

#3510 Andrew Kitson

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 08:22

The brilliant late Barry Foley - greatly missed.
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#3511 Duc-Man

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 09:10

:up: :up: :up: :up: :up:

#3512 ibsenop

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 20:28

Alpine A110 cutaway by Bruno Betti

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Ibsen

#3513 macoran

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 23:41

Very "friendly" note from fellow TNFer Rob Ryder !!!!!!!

I say "It's only January ! but Beware the Ides of March.......watch your backs !!!"

Quote:

Stuart, are your mild repremands regarding copyright selective?
I don't see any similar posting from you (as moderator) on the 'Cutaways' thread ...
Rob

This post has been edited by Rob Ryder: Yesterday, 23:40

Unquote.

Edited by macoran, 22 January 2010 - 00:24.


#3514 Rob Ryder

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 08:44

macoran I'm glad you liked my friendly note to Stuart also thanks for correcting my spelling. :kiss:

I quoted the 'Cutaways' thread (scan based) as an example to TW and not as a specific target...;)
Rob

Edited by Rob Ryder, 22 January 2010 - 08:45.


#3515 Waka

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 21:32

A 'little' off subject, although they purport to be Mercedes Benz & Simca, hence the links, not thumbs : http://img713.images...i/mbrobot5.jpg/, http://img718.images...i/mbrobot6.jpg/,
http://img638.images...i/mbrobot1.jpg/, http://img51.imagesh...i/mbrobot2.jpg/,
http://img686.images...i/mbrobot3.jpg/ & http://img638.images...i/mbrobot4.jpg/.

If Tony thought he'd "killed and eaten the last one, after copulating with it of course" (ie, the offerings on page 85), perhaps these are more to his taste...

Warwick

Edited by Waka, 23 January 2010 - 21:52.


#3516 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 21:43

How very, very odd! However, if Castrol 'R' is involved, I'm up for it!

#3517 74spider

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 23:14

Hi All,

First post to Autosport forum. :wave:

Anyone have a cutaway of the Alfa 33 Stradale please ? (I know some of the 33 tipo racers are really similar but it's the STradale version I'm really interested in)

Thanks in advance.

Paul.

#3518 Waka

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 00:59

I have taken the liberty of creating an index of cutaway drawings by Artist.

The index is for pages 1 to 88. Where an artist has multiple entries on a page they are only listed once. Only 'known' artists are included (ie, 'unknown' has been excluded) & only cutaways are included - photos & normal paintings have been excluded.

I was in two minds as to whether or not to include Tony Matthews (pause for effect) since he appears on almost every page...

Any errors & omissions are obviously mine. Please let me know if you spot any obvious mistakes - your knowledge is greater than mine - I have just acted as a collator. This is obviously a work in progress.

I hope it will perform a useful purpose.
Warwick


A

A N Other (Klaus Unbekannt?) - page 64
Alisi, Giorgio - page 57
Allington, James A - page 18, 26 - 28, 40 - 42, 45, 47 - 49, 60, 64, 65, 75 - 77, 79, 82, 84, 86, 87
Alloisi, G - page 66, 71

B

Badrocke, Michael - page 25, 26, 31
Bamber, Jim - page 44, 86
Banks, Jeremy - page 13, 15
Baratto, Sergio - page 30, 38, 56, 61, 77
Barber - page 25
Beak, F W - page 22
Bellu, Serge - page 31, 45, 51, 55 - 57, 60, 61, 62, 66, 72
Bennett, Bill "Anglia Art" - page 20, 21, 23, 29, 34, 35, 36, 77, 81, 87
Berris, Vic - page 22, 45, 47 - 49, 53, 57, 60 - 64, 70 - 72, 78
Betti, Bruno - page 1, 14, 24, 26, 31, 36, 37, 40 - 45, 47, 51, 53 - 58, 60 - 66, 68, 70, 71, 77, 79, 82, 83, 88
Betti, Giulio - page 26, 31, 40, 42, 43, 51, 53, 54, 63, 64, 66, 67, 69, 70, 81
Betti, Giulio(?) or Bruno(?) - page 56, 60, 71
Biesma, Rens - page 46
Bonde, Anders - page 7, 9, 12, 16, 45
Brito, Walter - page 25, 44, 45, 67, 85
Brown, Andrew "London Art Tech" - page 64
Bruce, Gordon - page 28, 37, 38, 40, 68, 74, 77, 80, 81, 83
Bubb, Harold - page 36
Buhrer, Werner - page 26, 37, 51, 62, 65, 75
Burnett, Rex - page 88

C

Cavara, Giovanni - page 37, 46, 47, 52, 77, 80, 83, 86, 87
Collins, Terry - page 19, 22, 38, 39, 55, 56, 71, 79, 81
Cooke, Graham (?) - page 17
Cresswell - page 49
Crosby, Gordon - page 22

D

D'Alessio, Paolo - page 23, 37, 42, 61, 72, 75, 82
Dal Basso, Vittorio - page 47, 68, 78, 84
Davey, Terry - page 82
Demand (?) - page 39
Design Maru (?) - page 38
Dibben, Andrew - page 56
Divey, Tony - page 61

E

E T A I France - page 30, 72, 81, 83
Ellis, Dick - page 22, 25, 35, 47, 50, 66, 69, 72, 77
Emily - page 27
Epton, Ira - page 54

F

Fenijn, Mark - page 2, 25
Ferguson, John - page 32, 42, 83, 84, 85
Fisher, J Walkden - page 74
Fornander, Ted - page 85
Foyer, Jones - page 15
François, Jean-Jacques - page 2, 30, 32, 44, 58, 64, 75
Fretwell, Keith - page 88
Fujimoto, Akira - page 25, 34, 84

G

Gahr - page 52
Gedo,G - page 50, 77
Gould - page 33
Grace, Patrick - page 60

H

Harmer, Keith - page 70
Hatch, Jim - page 55
Hatton, Brian - page 24, 27, 34, 35, 42, 45, 47, 51, 52, 64 - 68, 70, 71, 74, 80, 83, 88
Hill, Mick - page 41
Hostler, John - page 37, 46, 47, 64
Hulsey, Keith - page 87
Huxley, Roy - page 51

I

Inkwell - page 87
Inomoto, Yoshihiro - page 22, 34, 48, 67, 69, 84

J

Jennings, Matt - page 74
Johnson, Tom - page 5, 6
Jufuku, Takashi - page 25, 34

K

Ken - page 84
Kimble, David - page 57 (?), 66 - 69, 75, 80, 81
Kinkaid, Brian - page 28
Kitson, Andrew - page 1, 5, 6, 8
Kral, Vaclav - page 57

L

LaTourette, Clarence - page 3, 45, 62, 76, 77, 83, 85, 87, 88
Lodge, R H - page 85

M

Marjoram, Stefan - page 2
Marsden, John - page 26
Matthews, Tony - page 3 - 24, 27 - 30, 32 - 38, 40 - 44, 47, 49 - 53, 56 - 70, 73, 75, 77, 81 - 83, 85, 87
Millar, Max - page 22, 53, 60, 66, 88
Miller, Stephen - page 14
Mizokawa, Hideo - page 34, 35, 57
Moore, William A - page 47
Müdsam, Herbert - page 72

N

Nation, Brian - page 44, 45
Niedermeier - page 36

O

O, Kurt - page 2
Ouchi, Makoto - page 48, 51, 68, 84, 85

P

Page, Theo - page 2, 10, 34, 39, 44 - 47, 49, 50, 58, 59, 65, 66, 68, 70, 87
Palk, Mati - page 40
Piola, Giorgio - page 24, 25, 36, 53, 66, 67, 82, 87
Plant, Chris - page 22
Porter - page 49, 72
Portugies Visual Communications - page 72

R

Raine, Alan - page 2, 15, 18, 19, 77
Richards, Jim - page 88
Rogers, Kane - page 7
Rosso, Franco - page 44, 50, 52, 53, 63, 66, 67
Roux, Robert - page 22, 30, 60, 64, 72, 75, 81

S

Sateh, Glen (?) - page 71
Siotto, Marco - page 56
Spencer, Stuart - page 36, 74
Stevens, Diana - page 42
Stirm, Michael - page 31, 54, 74
Storey, Barron - page 75
Studio Collins - page 81
Swaja, Steve - page 42

T

Technical Art (L Ebert) - page 58
Technical Art (Norbet Schafer) - page 17, 24, 35, 36, 53, 66, 67, 82, 87
Thatcher, Bob - page 57

W

Watts, Lawrence - page 3, 37, 38, 46
Wesner, S - page 50, 60
West, Tom - page 73 - 75, 77, 81, 85, 88

Y

Yamada, Jiro - page 43, 68
Yoshikawa, Shin - page 43, 68

Edited by Waka, 24 January 2010 - 07:45.


#3519 Waka

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 01:21

How very, very odd! However, if Castrol 'R' is involved, I'm up for it!


Speaking of 'odd' - I'm intrigued with your new avatar (I live in that part of Godzone, also known as 'Middle Earth', where all the digital effects for 'Avatar' the movie were created). Is it a type of face cream? Or are we seeing the new paper-based (papier-mache) Tony?

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#3520 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 09:54

Speaking of 'odd' - I'm intrigued with your new avatar (I live in that part of Godzone, also known as 'Middle Earth', where all the digital effects for 'Avatar' the movie were created). Is it a type of face cream? Or are we seeing the new paper-based (papier-mache) Tony?

I am the sole survivor of a Bacofoil explosion. I believe that this high-quality product has been re-formulated to eliminate any traces of trinitrotoluene from the aluminium. My one wish is that they had done this before my accident. Fortunately the oven was insured, and the corn-fed chicken was found two streets away.

I try not to be bitter...

#3521 terrance trump

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 10:06


Another in the history of technical illustrating. The date this time is 1932. The car is a Standard Big 12 and the illustrator is Max Millar.
Posted Image
[/quote]
I would like to add some more historical illustrations to the pot. These guys were the pioneers of our subject matter. They worked for "The Autocar" and "The Motor" magazines (now merged) and definitely have a place in this forum.
The first is a Triumph Northern Star from 1934 and is by John Ferguson.
The second is a Morris 8 by Max Millar.
The third is a Humber Hawk by Poulton.
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Posted Image
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#3522 Waka

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 10:23

I am the sole survivor of a Bacofoil explosion. I believe that this high-quality product has been re-formulated to eliminate any traces of trinitrotoluene from the aluminium. My one wish is that they had done this before my accident. Fortunately the oven was insured, and the corn-fed chicken was found two streets away.

I try not to be bitter...


Tony,
that sounds fowl. I hope you weren't doing anything rash. Remember to keep your shiny side up.
Warwick

#3523 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 10:26

Another in the history of technical illustrating. The date this time is 1932. The car is a Standard Big 12 and the illustrator is Max Millar.
Posted Image

I would like to add some more historical illustrations to the pot. These guys were the pioneers of our subject matter. They worked for "The Autocar" and "The Motor" magazines (now merged) and definitely have a place in this forum.
The first is a Triumph Northern Star from 1934 and is by John Ferguson.
The second is a Morris 8 by Max Millar.
The third is a Humber Hawk by Poulton.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

These are really nice, tt, thanks. I toyed with working on sepia paper, using black/brown and white pencil, but apart from some scrap experiments I didn't pursue it. Some years ago I tried to buy a Gordon Crosby 'cutaway' done with that technique, I still have the auction catalogue illustration somewhere - lovely piece of work.

The history of technical illustration is very interesting - it is hardly surprising that this thread concentrates on automotive subjects, but it is not an area that I have ever delved into. Every now and then you see early steel-engravings of steam engines and civil engineering projects, some very good work indeed.

#3524 Waka

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 10:39

The history of technical illustration is very interesting - it is hardly surprising that this thread concentrates on automotive subjects, but it is not an area that I have ever delved into. Every now and then you see early steel-engravings of steam engines and civil engineering projects, some very good work indeed.


Not sure if this http://img69.imagesh...nation1937.jpg/ is what you're alluding to, Tony - not really a cutaway, more like an engineering drawing, but very impressive all the same.
Warwick

#3525 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 12:11

It is beautiful, but doesn't qualify! We have to draw the line somewhere, so to speak, and the job of the technical illustrator is to convey this sort of imformation to people who can't read engineering drawings. I'd happily have it on my wall, though!

#3526 Waka

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 18:05

It is beautiful, but doesn't qualify! We have to draw the line somewhere, so to speak, and the job of the technical illustrator is to convey this sort of imformation to people who can't read engineering drawings. I'd happily have it on my wall, though!


My thoughts exactly - W.

#3527 TWest

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 20:46

These are really nice, tt, thanks. I toyed with working on sepia paper, using black/brown and white pencil, but apart from some scrap experiments I didn't pursue it. Some years ago I tried to buy a Gordon Crosby 'cutaway' done with that technique, I still have the auction catalogue illustration somewhere - lovely piece of work.

The history of technical illustration is very interesting - it is hardly surprising that this thread concentrates on automotive subjects, but it is not an area that I have ever delved into. Every now and then you see early steel-engravings of steam engines and civil engineering projects, some very good work indeed.


Guys,
Flight International seems to be carrying on the history of cutaway drawings as much as any publications of which I am aware. They have a large range of scanned historic cutaways that are available in print form, as has been mentioned here previously. In 1998, they put out a special little magazine supplement called Beneath the Skin: A History of Aviation Cutaway Drawings from Flight International.

This supposedly accompanied another book by the same name, presenting some out of their 90 years of aviation cutaways. Their claim was that the modern cutaway drawing actually started in the cycling industry when Edward Iliffe and Edmund Dangerfield set up the cutaway to present the technical advancements that were coming so quickly in bicycling in the pages of The Cyclist and Cycling. This effort expanded into Iliffe and Temple Press with a range of technical subject magazine titles, including Autocar and The Aeroplane.

To get specific, they claim that the first true cutaways were drawn by (get this) Maximillian Attila Millar, better known under his signature of Max Millar. Note that he did not use the term "technical illustrator," preferring "engineer artist" as the appropriate designation. His first drawings were done for Flight at the 1912 Paris Salon as detail sketches, done on a freelance basis not on specific assignment. Millar started the Art Department of Illiffe & Sons in 1920, including Jimmy Clark as one of his artists. Millar's first work primarily went into Autocar and Motor Cycle.

This 9-page history of the Flight International cutaway also includes a couple of pages with brief biographies on various of their artists, including Millar, Clark, Arthur Bowbeer, Frank Munger, John Marsden, Ira Epton, Michael Badrocke, Tim Hall, David Hatchard and Giuseppe Picarella. It also includes some samples of the different styles of illustration that has been used over the years in Flight International, so it is a prized little 52 page book for me.

I am thinking of running a copy of this stuff to send to you guys, as this is an educational and historic endeavor and should fall under the fair use guidelines for copyrights ... in case anyone wants to get into this deal ...

Let me know if this works for everyone.

Haymarket isn't a part of Illiffe or Temple, are they???

Tom West


#3528 terrance trump

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 00:28

Guys,
Flight International seems to be carrying on the history of cutaway drawings as much as any publications of which I am aware. They have a large range of scanned historic cutaways that are available in print form, as has been mentioned here previously. In 1998, they put out a special little magazine supplement called Beneath the Skin: A History of Aviation Cutaway Drawings from Flight International.

This supposedly accompanied another book by the same name, presenting some out of their 90 years of aviation cutaways. Their claim was that the modern cutaway drawing actually started in the cycling industry when Edward Iliffe and Edmund Dangerfield set up the cutaway to present the technical advancements that were coming so quickly in bicycling in the pages of The Cyclist and Cycling. This effort expanded into Iliffe and Temple Press with a range of technical subject magazine titles, including Autocar and The Aeroplane.

To get specific, they claim that the first true cutaways were drawn by (get this) Maximillian Attila Millar, better known under his signature of Max Millar. Note that he did not use the term "technical illustrator," preferring "engineer artist" as the appropriate designation. His first drawings were done for Flight at the 1912 Paris Salon as detail sketches, done on a freelance basis not on specific assignment. Millar started the Art Department of Illiffe & Sons in 1920, including Jimmy Clark as one of his artists. Millar's first work primarily went into Autocar and Motor Cycle.

This 9-page history of the Flight International cutaway also includes a couple of pages with brief biographies on various of their artists, including Millar, Clark, Arthur Bowbeer, Frank Munger, John Marsden, Ira Epton, Michael Badrocke, Tim Hall, David Hatchard and Giuseppe Picarella. It also includes some samples of the different styles of illustration that has been used over the years in Flight International, so it is a prized little 52 page book for me.

I am thinking of running a copy of this stuff to send to you guys, as this is an educational and historic endeavor and should fall under the fair use guidelines for copyrights ... in case anyone wants to get into this deal ...

Let me know if this works for everyone.

Haymarket isn't a part of Illiffe or Temple, are they???

Tom West



Hi Tom,

Yes I'd be interested. I use to work with David Hatchard and Tim Hall at a company called Polygraphic in Titchfield, Hampshire, England. We used to work on BAC contracts then drawing Hawks and Harriers.

Terrance Trump

#3529 Waka

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 04:35

Guys,
Flight International seems to be carrying on the history of cutaway drawings as much as any publications of which I am aware. They have a large range of scanned historic cutaways that are available in print form, as has been mentioned here previously. In 1998, they put out a special little magazine supplement called Beneath the Skin: A History of Aviation Cutaway Drawings from Flight International.
...

Tom West


The 'Beneath the Skin: a history of flight technical illustration' was an exhibition of cutaway drawings from 'Flight' and 'Aeroplane' magazines at the Science Museum (London) from December 1998 to April 1999. Subjects included a wide variety of military and civil aircraft (from the Lancaster to the F-22, from the Ensign to Concorde), & included aircraft, engines, helicopters, hovercraft (I have scans of two early hovercraft) & space vehicles. There was also a three-dimensional Rolls Royce Pegasus engine along with a Napier Rapier engine. Both were exhibited alongside a matching cutaway (probably by Clark or Millar).

I have copies of Aeroplane's "Cutaway Kings"; articles dealing with J H Clark (Dec 98), Frank Munger (Apr 99) & Peter Endsleigh Castle (Nov 99) which I could offer as pdfs if anybody is interested (some guidance regarding copyright would be useful).

Most of my own collection of cutaways deal with aeroplanes, an interest that started when I was an early teen - the 'Lion' comic featured 2nd World War aircraft of all nations, which I collected assiduously. They may still be boxed in my mother's garage - I will need to hunt them out.

Warwick

#3530 TWest

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 04:53

The 'Beneath the Skin: a history of flight technical illustration' was an exhibition of cutaway drawings from 'Flight' and 'Aeroplane' magazines at the Science Museum (London) from December 1998 to April 1999. Subjects included a wide variety of military and civil aircraft (from the Lancaster to the F-22, from the Ensign to Concorde), & included aircraft, engines, helicopters, hovercraft (I have scans of two early hovercraft) & space vehicles. There was also a three-dimensional Rolls Royce Pegasus engine along with a Napier Rapier engine. Both were exhibited alongside a matching cutaway (probably by Clark or Millar).

I have copies of Aeroplane's "Cutaway Kings"; articles dealing with J H Clark (Dec 98), Frank Munger (Apr 99) & Peter Endsleigh Castle (Nov 99) which I could offer as pdfs if anybody is interested (some guidance regarding copyright would be useful).

Most of my own collection of cutaways deal with aeroplanes, an interest that started when I was an early teen - the 'Lion' comic featured 2nd World War aircraft of all nations, which I collected assiduously. They may still be boxed in my mother's garage - I will need to hunt them out.

Warwick


I have boxes of Air International and Air Enthusiast, which features artwork by John Weal and Mike Badrocke. Just let a subscription drop when they stopped running the monthly cutaways, but have every issue until mid-2009. Never had much from Flight International, which seemed to be the other source for aircraft artwork. I know that the Beneath the Skin thing was something, but it really wasn't clear to me that it was a museum display. Thanks for the clarification.
I have a couple of those cutaway king articles, I think Frank Marsden, but it may be the Munger issue. I don't think I got the Clark or Castle feature, so I would raally like to see them.
As to copyright, I think that if you went out and sold copies, you might have a problem. To do something like we are doing here would not be worth anyone's efforts to chase, unless they are just flush with money and want a way to throw it away on litigation expense. I know that they aren't going to get anything out of me ...
If you are doing straight research (althought this probably isn't considered academic-based), it probably isn't that big a deal. I know that all of those Flight International drawings are available through the magazine as prints. Wish some of the car books would do the same. Also wish it was possible to get prints of those Mike Badrocke illustrations. I have something like 600 of his pieces between the Aviagraphica and Mike Badrocke signed pieces.
Tom West

#3531 Waka

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 05:34

...
I am thinking of running a copy of this stuff to send to you guys, as this is an educational and historic endeavour and should fall under the fair use guidelines for copyrights ... in case anyone wants to get into this deal ...

Let me know if this works for everyone.

Tom West


Tom,
I'd also be interested.
Warwick

#3532 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 07:34

Tom,
I'd also be interested.
Warwick

Me too!

#3533 macoran

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 16:52

It'd work for little ole me too !!

#3534 TWest

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 19:41

OK, going to do the presentation of that Beneath the Skin history from Flight International. This is copyrighted by Reed Business Information, 1998, for those of you who are concerned with this, as are we all. This is being sent to you as an intellectual academic piece of information only, and is not for frivolous enjoyment or further distribution, or for sale or any sort of commercial use.
Just wanted you to know ...
We will start with the cover, the index page (so you can see what drawings are included in this publication), and the history part of the book.
Enjoy ... but not in a copyright infringing kind of way.
Tom West

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#3535 macoran

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 21:29

Tom,........................................that is SCINTILLATING !!!!!

Have you got the ISBN for that book ?

Edited by macoran, 25 January 2010 - 23:40.


#3536 macoran

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 21:37

Marc, here is a better scan.

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Ibsen

Thanks Ibsen, and as long as we do our best and dig deep enough we will find more......and maybe more
The James Allington Birdcage Maserati in colour
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Edited by macoran, 25 January 2010 - 21:43.


#3537 macoran

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 22:57

http://img69.imagesh...nation1937.jpg/
Warwick

That is brilliant, I suppose all the + and x are rivet positions ?

#3538 ibsenop

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 23:15

An article by Autocar Vol 248 No 4240 - 11 February 1978

Cutaway Kings

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Ibsen

PS.

Marc, fantastic find.

Tom, thanks. Indispensable material for my academic research.


#3539 TWest

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 00:53

Tom,........................................that is SCINTILLATING !!!!!

Have you got the ISBN for that book ?


Marc,
No, don't have that. It was some kind of supplement, not a book, so I am not sure if there was one shown. I am forgetting where I was picking this stuff up, but I have a couple of other supplements from Flight International, a cutaway calendar from 2002 or so, a British aircraft insert and a classic cutaways insert. They are all very cool, but this is the only one that presents the history like this.
Glad you like it.
Tom West

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#3540 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 01:29

Enjoy ... but not in a copyright infringing kind of way.

Half past one in the morning! I should have started 'enjoying' this a bit earlier! Many thanks Tom.

#3541 TWest

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 05:21

Half past one in the morning! I should have started 'enjoying' this a bit earlier! Many thanks Tom.


Tony,
I figure that you probably know a few of those folks in that article, so I hope you enjoy it.
And, that photo really creeps me out, just for your information ...
Tom West

#3542 Waka

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 07:45

OK, going to do the presentation of that Beneath the Skin history from Flight International. This is copyrighted by Reed Business Information, 1998, for those of you who are concerned with this, as are we all. This is being sent to you as an intellectual academic piece of information only, and is not for frivolous enjoyment or further distribution, or for sale or any sort of commercial use.
Just wanted you to know ...
We will start with the cover, the index page (so you can see what drawings are included in this publication), and the history part of the book.
Enjoy ... but not in a copyright infringing kind of way.
Tom West


Tom,
brilliant. Is it possible to supply the dimensions of the original supplement? I'm assuming it's not A4.
Warwick


#3543 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 09:48

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Just for you, Tom W.

All the names, bar James Clark, are familiar, but I have never met any of them. Wierd, really, that we illustrators, in the UK at least, seem to have so little contact with others outside our small sphere - Jim Allington didn't seem to know any other illustrators, and I only met one other, briefly, and at this instant I can't remember his name! Perhaps it's down to competition - we, that is Jim and I, certainly lost at least two contracts to other local studios who blatantly poached our customers. Technical Illustration - A Dog-Eat-Dog World!

#3544 alansart

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 11:57

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I wouldn't wear that shirt with those glasses :)


All the names, bar James Clark, are familiar, but I have never met any of them. Wierd, really, that we illustrators, in the UK at least, seem to have so little contact with others outside our small sphere - Jim Allington didn't seem to know any other illustrators, and I only met one other, briefly, and at this instant I can't remember his name! Perhaps it's down to competition - we, that is Jim and I, certainly lost at least two contracts to other local studios who blatantly poached our customers. Technical Illustration - A Dog-Eat-Dog World!


On the odd occasion I was overloaded with work, I was asked if there was anyone else who could do the job. I've never known anyone locally who could do it.



#3545 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 12:23

I wouldn't wear that shirt with those glasses :)


Damn! Foiled again!


On the odd occasion I was overloaded with work, I was asked if there was anyone else who could do the job. I've never known anyone locally who could do it.

I only asked for help three times when I was illustrating, once when I was very ill, twice because of work-load. On all three occasions I was comprehensively let down. It's a bummer when you pay someone £1,000 then have to do the job yourself!

#3546 TWest

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 18:24

Tom,
brilliant. Is it possible to supply the dimensions of the original supplement? I'm assuming it's not A4.
Warwick


Warwick,
I copied that out at 100%, and had thought it was standard US legal size, but it isn't. I gather is it the English standard, but will give you the dimensions and you can decide. 30cm x 21cm. What size would that be considered?
Hope that helps.
By the way, the ISBN, which I hadn't noticed previously, is 0-617-01268-7.
Tom West

#3547 TWest

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 18:34

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Just for you, Tom W.

All the names, bar James Clark, are familiar, but I have never met any of them. Wierd, really, that we illustrators, in the UK at least, seem to have so little contact with others outside our small sphere - Jim Allington didn't seem to know any other illustrators, and I only met one other, briefly, and at this instant I can't remember his name! Perhaps it's down to competition - we, that is Jim and I, certainly lost at least two contracts to other local studios who blatantly poached our customers. Technical Illustration - A Dog-Eat-Dog World!


Yeah, that's great. Thanks. Glad I caught this first thing in the morning instead of last thing in the evening. May be able to deal with this in a sane and rational way now.
I think that you describe the group here, as most people who do this stuff aren't the biggest attention seekers around. I was around Steve Swaja, who was my initial inspiration to start doing these things when I was in high school, but took a couple of years to actually step up and talk with him. There was a guy who did some stuff for one of the eastern magazines, and I was never able to find anyone who ever met him. I missed meeting Rex Burnett, the godfather of the hot rod cutaway here, as he passed away before I got that chance. I have been trying to find some of the others, like Clarence LaTourette, but can find absolutely nothing. Have even contacted a few people named LaTourette on Facebook, who have never heard of him.
I spoke with David Kimball a couple of times, but haven't been able to find a way to contact him lately.
I have talked with a few other artists who have done cutaways, but none of them would consider doing another ... just not into the long detailed process compared to "normal" painting art process.
I did meet Yoshihiro Inomoto, as I think I mentioned earlier, and he was really welcoming and considerate. Amazing stuff there at that display, and he was happy to speak with someone who recognized it for what it was.
Now, Paper-mache-head Matthews, who seems to be my most frequent contact in the "sport" at this time.
Thanks again for the pleasant and larger image ...
Tom West

#3548 Waka

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 05:15

I have a few 'Cutaway Kings' articles that I will post here.

I will also caveat them with a re-hash of Tom's comments: I offer them to you as an intellectual academic piece of information only, for use in a purely research context. They are not for further distribution, sale or any sort of commercial use.

The first article is about J H Clark & is from 'Aeroplane', Dec 1998. For archival purposes, it is roughly A4 size.

please enjoy responsibly.
Warwick

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Edited by Waka, 27 January 2010 - 09:26.


#3549 Waka

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 06:00

Just for you, Tom W.

All the names, bar James Clark, are familiar, but I have never met any of them. Wierd, really, that we illustrators, in the UK at least, seem to have so little contact with others outside our small sphere - Jim Allington didn't seem to know any other illustrators, and I only met one other, briefly, and at this instant I can't remember his name! Perhaps it's down to competition - we, that is Jim and I, certainly lost at least two contracts to other local studios who blatantly poached our customers. Technical Illustration - A Dog-Eat-Dog World!


Tony,
this looks remarkably like a work in progress. I look forward to further images showing how the Master approaches this art form & how you reach the final result.
Warwick

#3550 Waka

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 06:11

Warwick,
I copied that out at 100%, and had thought it was standard US legal size, but it isn't. I gather is it the English standard, but will give you the dimensions and you can decide. 30cm x 21cm. What size would that be considered? ...
Tom West


Tom,
A4 is 210 x 297cm, A5 is 148 x 210cm & foolscap is 210 x 310, so I'm confused. The pages have a single page number so they're not folded in half. I will go with A4 (29.7 x 21.0). Many thanks for the article, though.
Warwick