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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#3801 alansart

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 13:47

Not sure if anyone's seen this yet (and I'm afraid it's planes not cars). There's a book called 'The Vintage Years of Airfix Box Art'. On amazon you can view a few of the pages - it looks like there are some quite nice cutaways and a biography of the the author Roy Cross...

http://www.amazon.co.../ref=pd_sim_b_1


I had a look at that in Waterstones a few weeks ago. It's very good and on my shopping list when someone gets around to paying me :)

Edited by alansart, 17 February 2010 - 14:36.


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#3802 Tony Matthews

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 14:33

I had a look at that in Waterstones a few weeks ago. It's very good and on my shopping list whens someone gets around to paying me :)

Just ordered it from amazon, a moment of weakness. I'll feel less guilty when someone gets round to paying me!

#3803 TWest

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 20:25

I, too, gave into my weaker instincts after checking out that link to the Airfix book. Having been involved from the US side after the purchase of the business by the General Mills group back in the 80s, it was of interest beyond the couple of cutaways that were in there. I checked the US Amazon site and found a book by Haynes featuring 100 of their old cover cutaways. Since I did a couple of those for them here at the end of the whole concept for them, I was surprised that I had never heard of this, or seen it. Can't put 3 cutaways in a book where I won't smell the publication on a book shelf.
I have my order in, and picked it up for about $37 or so, including free shipping ... so I will see if sometime mid-summer ...
Has anyone else seen this book, titled: Haynes; The Classic Cutaways.
Seems like an interesting addition. I was trying to find a publication date, and there was nothing shown, so I don't know if it is a new or old publication.
I am giving the link to the Motorbooks site, but you can get it for much less at Amazon ...
See what you think.
Tom West

http://www.motorbook...ProductID=41950

#3804 Duc-Man

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 09:25

Amazon Germany offers the book for €30,99. Through amazon marketplace it's offered from €22.- (+3.-for shipping) up.
So I guess I gonna go for it.
Their site sais that the book was published at September 18th 2008.
The weird thing: the book doesn't show up on the Haynes website...?

BTW here is the ISBN-13: 978-1844255702. In case somebody wants to order it through a normal bookstore.

#3805 werks prototype

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 10:47



From left, 'The Seventh Sun' TR7 by Laurie Watts from Motor. Alongside a particularly richly coloured TR7 drawn by F. Gordon Reaves Limited Coventry UK TR7 brochure.

Edited by werks prototype, 28 April 2010 - 17:50.


#3806 Tony Matthews

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 12:51

Just ordered it from amazon, a moment of weakness. I'll feel less guilty when someone gets round to paying me!

Book just arrived! God Bless amazon and the Post Office, or whatever it is called now. A good book, but my copy was badly guillotined, with most pages un-cut at the corners, not so badly that it couldn't be overcome, and the back of the dust jacket is wrinkled. I hope that is a one-off for anyone stll waiting for their copy. Still, not bad enough to return it - one of the disadvantages of mail-order.

#3807 B Squared

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 14:06

Tony - I wouldn't be happy about that at all! Maybe I'm a little bit "touched", but I even make sure the magazines I buy are in pristine condition. I'd say that every Motor Sport, Autosport, Indy Car, Vintage Motorsport, etc. are in as perfect condition as the day they came off the press. And yes, I do read them. I play darts every Tuesday with a group of friends (all "car/racing guys") and the latest Motor Sport was setting on the table. Kip set his beer on the cover, I promptly got a napkin and wiped it clean. A new book in the condition you described? Intolerable :rotfl:

#3808 alansart

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 14:16

It being a book on Airfix, I'm surprised it didn't come in bits, with a tube of glue and a set of instructions on how to put it together :lol:

#3809 Tony Matthews

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 14:29

Tony - I wouldn't be happy about that at all! Maybe I'm a little bit "touched", but I even make sure the magazines I buy are in pristine condition. I'd say that every Motor Sport, Autosport, Indy Car, Vintage Motorsport, etc. are in as perfect condition as the day they came off the press. And yes, I do read them. I play darts every Tuesday with a group of friends (all "car/racing guys") and the latest Motor Sport was setting on the table. Kip set his beer on the cover, I promptly got a napkin and wiped it clean. A new book in the condition you described? Intolerable :rotfl:

I know what you mean Brian, but the book is probably better than I made it sound - the pages seperated cleanly, and the dust-jacket may un-wrinkle with time - much as I expect to. Certainly I would not have accepted it from a book shop, and if it was more serious it would definitely go back, but what a hassle! Re-packing it, going to a Post Office that is not jammed with loads of people sending multiple parcels to many destinations, worrying about parking wardens... You get the picture. I still grieve over a Christmas 1956 issue of Aeromodeller magazine that I dropped in a muddy puddle on the way home from school - Oh, the hot, salty tears!

I hope Kip learned his lesson.

#3810 Tony Matthews

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 14:33

It being a book on Airfix, I'm surprised it didn't come in bits, with a tube of glue and a set of instructions on how to put it together :lol:

Remember the early ones with the glue in a small, yellowish, translucent, ovoid blister? Like a suppository... Must have been sourced from France, where I believe most ailments are treated with something up the chuff.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 18 February 2010 - 14:33.


#3811 smarjoram

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 14:37

Remember the early ones with the glue in a small, yellowish, translucent, ovoid blister? Like a suppository... Must have been sourced from France, where I believe most ailments are treated with something up the chuff.

A French doctor gave my son some of those for his ear ache. I couldn't quite see the logic in it. What do they do for chuffatory complaints - stick something in your ear?

#3812 Tony Matthews

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 14:42

A French doctor gave my son some of those for his ear ache. I couldn't quite see the logic in it. What do they do for chuffatory complaints - stick something in your ear?

I think it is a French medical fetish. Of all the orifices in all the World, you had to choose one of mine...

#3813 alansart

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 14:53

Remember the early ones with the glue in a small, yellowish, translucent, ovoid blister? Like a suppository... Must have been sourced from France, where I believe most ailments are treated with something up the chuff.


Yes I do remember them. Pierced with one of my mothers dressmaking pins.

No comment regarding the French and sticky rear ends :)


#3814 Tony Matthews

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 15:12

No comment regarding the French and sticky rear ends :)

I've heard of glue ear, but this is ridiculous!

#3815 TWest

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 19:11

Amazon Germany offers the book for €30,99. Through amazon marketplace it's offered from €22.- (+3.-for shipping) up.
So I guess I gonna go for it.
Their site sais that the book was published at September 18th 2008.
The weird thing: the book doesn't show up on the Haynes website...?

BTW here is the ISBN-13: 978-1844255702. In case somebody wants to order it through a normal bookstore.


Thanks for the information, but it is interesting that there doesn't seem to be any knowledge of these drawings, or maybe appreciation of them. I am always looking for new Cutaways, as would everyone on this Board. I did three illustrations for them over here ... the office is in Newbury Park, almost walking distance from my home at the time. Seemed like a good fit, except that they had David Kimble signed, and had made a fairly big deal about him doing the covers.
Don't believe that he was necessarily touting them, but he had them done by one of his guys and they worked for what they were trying to do.
The last couple of times I was over there, one of the guys showed me their archives, and I worked out a deal to borrow the things so I could copy the covers. I literally filled my '70 GTO, to the point of bottoming the rear suspension a couple of times on the way home, and returned the first load for a second, which I had when the deal blew up because I had now spoken with David. His agent gave the head of the group crap for using someone else.
I became Personna non grata and ended up with a load of maybe 250 of the old manuals ... high alpha titles mainly.
I really didn't have much to do with them, so I finally ended up trading them to a book store for one of the CMC Mercedes Grand Prix diecast, I think. At least that traveled more compactly than boxes of those Haynes Manuals.
I still have more reference on Terry Davey Haynes covers than any other cutaway artists, maybe with the exception of Mike Badrocke and the aviation stuff that he has done.
I gather they decided that the detailed cutaways made people think it might be difficult to work on their cars, at least according to the research that they had done. I saw the same type of research ruin the modelkit business in the 80s when snap-togeter kits dominated the market and made modelbuilding an activity rather than a hobby. When the kids left to do video games, they had nothing satisfying to justify returning to the hobby.
I presume it is the same in England, and elsewhere, especially as well represented by the underutilization of some amazing talent here on this Board. We have so reduced the skill levels that talent isn't necessary and nobody needs to be able to do anything except open it on a computer.
Some amazing stuff going on there, and I like it, but it still isn't the same as seeing some of these amazing pieces that Tony has shown here. I can remember checking every issue of Racecar Engineering to see what new piece showed up every month, and will still check, in the hopes of seeing something interesting; but buy maybe an issue per year now, as opposed to hanging onto those early Matthews-infused copies.
Crap changes, I suppose.
Should have the Haynes book in a few days, and will duly report when it arrives, and in how many pieces ...
Tom West

#3816 Tony Matthews

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 20:05

I still have more reference on Terry Davey Haynes covers than any other cutaway artists, maybe with the exception of Mike Badrocke and the aviation stuff that he has done.
I gather they decided that the detailed cutaways made people think it might be difficult to work on their cars, at least according to the research that they had done. I saw the same type of research ruin the modelkit business in the 80s when snap-togeter kits dominated the market and made modelbuilding an activity rather than a hobby. When the kids left to do video games, they had nothing satisfying to justify returning to the hobby.


Should have the Haynes book in a few days, and will duly report when it arrives, and in how many pieces ...
Tom West


Plastic construction kits are great, as even unskilled little fingers can glue together something that looks real. I started when it was 'solid' models, and a kit was a box of balsa blanks, a bubble canopy and some decals. The skill side, and the pleasure to be gained from the effort and concentration of making something oneself seems to be dying, though. When I was doing the fencing job in December my colleague and I were driving home along a narrow lane past some fields when I saw a familiar small silhouette - a guy holding a small box with an ariel sticking out of it, his head craned back, staring into the clear, but darkening sky. Naturally we stopped,and he was flying a superb ready-to-fly Chinese model of a Mustang. To shorten the tale, when it got round to talking about actually building a model, he was very dismissive, and almost rude when I said that I got as much, if not more pleasure from designing and/or building than flying.

So there you go...

I did wonder about the change in style of the Haynes cutaways, putting it down to either cost-cutting or lack of skilled illustrators - your comment about the complexity of the art putting people off is very interesting. Sad, but understandable. Looking forward to seeing some, Tom, thanks for all your effort.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 18 February 2010 - 20:07.


#3817 TWest

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 00:07

Plastic construction kits are great, as even unskilled little fingers can glue together something that looks real. I started when it was 'solid' models, and a kit was a box of balsa blanks, a bubble canopy and some decals. The skill side, and the pleasure to be gained from the effort and concentration of making something oneself seems to be dying, though. When I was doing the fencing job in December my colleague and I were driving home along a narrow lane past some fields when I saw a familiar small silhouette - a guy holding a small box with an ariel sticking out of it, his head craned back, staring into the clear, but darkening sky. Naturally we stopped,and he was flying a superb ready-to-fly Chinese model of a Mustang. To shorten the tale, when it got round to talking about actually building a model, he was very dismissive, and almost rude when I said that I got as much, if not more pleasure from designing and/or building than flying.

So there you go...

I did wonder about the change in style of the Haynes cutaways, putting it down to either cost-cutting or lack of skilled illustrators - your comment about the complexity of the art putting people off is very interesting. Sad, but understandable. Looking forward to seeing some, Tom, thanks for all your effort.


Tony,
I started in the modelkit business with a design project that I did while living in Southern California. It was to become one of those mystic things that guys seem to remember very fondly, although it is like a lot of things ... there seem to be more around now than we ever produced back in the day.
I can remember the incident that told me the whole concept was doomed ... we had done some advertising in Boys Life (Boy Scouts national publication), and had gotten back a bound copy of the year's issues to save. I never looked at the magazine, but skimmed through and saw their "Hobby" column, featuring all types of new hobby possibilities from the readers. The first one that I looked at was from a Scout who went to card stores and bought stickers off of all the gift wrap accessory rolls. He brought them home and had a 3-ring binder of notepaper and he stuck them in there ...
Hobby ...
I knew that the modelkit was going to go to hell in that single moment.
Don't get me started, although that ship has probably already sailed.
When I get a chance, I will send out both versions of the first Haynes piece that I did. I always had a much simpler style than the Terry Davey stuff, but the Kimble stuff seemed to be much too simple, but that was the direction that he was given. I actually have one of those things around yet, and it is almost a shame to see his name on it, as it certainly doesn't fit into the style or level of his major work.
Will let you know about the book, as well.
By the way, I have about 15 prints of Shin Yoshikawa drawings, including the W196, which I believe was discussed here. He has offered them for sale individually at one of the bookstores out here, so I picked up a bunch of them. What does everyone think about posting them, as they are obviously copyrighted. For our high academic purpose, maybe this would work since this is only to display some fairly cool drawings to an admiring audience.
Tom West

#3818 eldougo

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 04:26

Posted Image
Nice car lovely sound. :up:

#3819 werks prototype

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 08:50

Posted Image
Nice car lovely sound. :up:


Wow, very nice :) It looks like a slightly less complicated Brabham. I wonder if that curved sheet in the nose is an early front splitter or something structural?

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#3820 Tony Matthews

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 08:56

Wow, very nice :) It looks like a slightly less complicated Brabham. I wonder if that curved sheet in the nose is an early front splitter or something structural?

I think it's just to duct the air round to the twin radiators and keep the driver's feet cool!

#3821 alansart

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 08:57

Wow, very nice :) It looks like a slightly less complicated Brabham. I wonder if that curved sheet in the nose is an early front splitter or something structural?


It's to direct the air to the radiators which are either side of the pedal box.

The Tecno engine made a lovely noise...apart from at 5am on the sunday morning before the 73 Silverstone GP when a mechanic was testing Amon's car up and down the Club Straight. I was trying to sleep in a tent on the the edge of the track at the time :eek:

Edited by alansart, 19 February 2010 - 09:00.


#3822 alansart

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 09:00

.... and keep the driver's feet cool!


I thought it may have the opposite effect as it's taking cool air away from the drivers feet and there are some water pipes going through the area in front of the pedal box.


#3823 werks prototype

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 09:16

Ah! Ron Tauranac was involved with this car, I thought there was something a little 'Brabhamish' going on.

#3824 Tony Matthews

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 10:31

I thought it may have the opposite effect as it's taking cool air away from the drivers feet and there are some water pipes going through the area in front of the pedal box.

Oi! I thought you said you were wasting too much effing time! You are right of course Alan, I saw the water pipes, but I was trying to be short, succinct and quick!

#3825 werks prototype

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 17:18

I have to confess that the XJ220 was 'the' car of my childhood. It had an enormous aesthetic effect on me even though the car itself turned into a bit of an engine downgraded dud.


From left

Row 1: XJ220 V12 PROTOTYPE 1988 Spencer, XJ-220, XJ-220 Colour

Row 2: XK-E COUPE Vic Berris Autocar, D-Type, Jag SS 3.5L Saloon Motor illustration 21-9-1937

Row 3: The Lynx D-Type 1 Eastwood,The Lynx D-Type 2 Eastwood, 1961 Jaguar Mark X

Row 4: Jaguar XJ6 - Sovereign - XJ12 1, Jaguar XJ6 - Sovereign - XJ12 2, sportscargraphic-0862

Row 5: Jaguar Type XK Engine S.E. Porter, Frederick Gordon Crosby (designer of the Jag leaping cat) SS Jaguar 1.5 Litre chassis Autocar Magazine 1937, Mark VII and XK120 1952

Row 6: Published 1948 Jaguar colour XK 120 Engine, Carburation, Crank case + Gearbox

Row 7: Jag V6 S-Type, Jag V8 S-Type, Jaguar Mark V 3.5 ltr published 1948 Official Jaguar Brochure.


1Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

2Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

3Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

4Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

5Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

6Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

7Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

Edited by werks prototype, 20 February 2010 - 17:21.


#3826 eldougo

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 08:30

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Ok here is a test. how do you like this rear engine car made in 1934.....supply name ??

#3827 GIGLEUX

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 09:31

Ok here is a test. how do you like this rear engine car made in 1934.....supply name ??


Crossley


#3828 werks prototype

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 12:13

Crossley



Yep :up: , I had to search but I found it to, Crossley 2litre 'Burney'. I was going to plump for a Merc at first.

#3829 macoran

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 13:04

Here are two that haven't been posted here for sure. Both were done for Motor Klassik in 1989/90 by Antonio Eiras.

Chaparral 2F


Mercedes 300SL



And guys don't wonder about the quality/look, I did them with a digital camera (since I don't have an A3 scanner).

I messed around with your pics a bit Duc Man
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Posted Image


#3830 werks prototype

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 13:11

This is largely my batch of unknown artist (The tank is an exception). It is getting tricky consulting the list regarding what has been already posted here.

From left:

Row 1: Triumph's engine for the earlier Saab 99s, 1964 Ford GT, Ferrari 'Giovanni Cavara', Chaparral, Volkswagen Beetle

Row 2: BMW 3200 Engine, BMW 3200, Streamlined Car 1931, Aston-Martin V8, 4X4 chassis for 2CV Mehari

Row 3: Mercedes G.Wagen, VG30DETT NISSAN, GB HarryHopkins Vickers CutAway, Northrop X-35B Flying wing cutaway, FORD GT-40




Edited by werks prototype, 28 April 2010 - 17:51.


#3831 werks prototype

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 15:25

Who's the Saboteur in your avatar Tony? Replacing that picture of the guy with all the water coming out of his mouth? :)

#3832 Tony Matthews

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 17:53

Who's the Saboteur in your avatar Tony? Replacing that picture of the guy with all the water coming out of his mouth? :)

Water? Don't remember that one - although it could be arranged! Was there one with some wine spillage? I may have used that as an avatar - the 'saboteur' was me in some kitchen foil, but it upset a few people, so I've gone incognito.

#3833 alansart

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 18:31

.. so I've gone incognito.


I always thought you had nicely arranged ratios :)


#3834 werks prototype

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 21:21

Water? Don't remember that one - although it could be arranged! Was there one with some wine spillage? I may have used that as an avatar - the 'saboteur' was me in some kitchen foil, but it upset a few people, so I've gone incognito.



No, no. The Saboteur was the most recent one you had, tampering with the rear of a race car. The water was what the foil looked like from a distance (if you didn't know it was foil) which I didn't. :)

#3835 eldougo

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 21:29

Yep :up: , I had to search but I found it to, Crossley 2litre 'Burney'. I was going to plump for a Merc at first.

Yep you both right :wave: ,its a 1934 Crossley-Burney ,15.7 hp 6 cyl 2 liter and a pre selector gearbox ,very unconventional and only a few where ever made.

#3836 werks prototype

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 21:50

Ah, sorry wp, I misunderstood you. You may think I was tampering, but I was changing gear ratios on a Crossle FF at Imola in 1970, very hot indeed, and my only claim to fame is that the driver, who had two regular mechanics before he asked for help on the Johnson's Wax Eurotrophy series, said I was the only one he could trust to do the job without supervision. Couldn't do it now though, without a refresher course... The foil photo only surfaced recently, my daughter took it years ago when I was, as usual, messing about, and she put it on facebook, so I thought I'd use it for a laugh - not many laughs, though, so it's gone!

Posted Image

I thought you might have meant this - if anyone finds it intollerable, I will remove it - it was certainly a waste of wine...



:rotfl:

Well, it would be damn funny to see that pop up in a thread. Especially if no-one drew attention to it, or who they may be potentially conversing with :)

Regarding the changing of ratio's "the driver, who had two regular mechanics before he asked for help on the Johnson's Wax Eurotrophy series, said I was the only one he could trust to do the job without supervision". I take it he was familiar with your technical illustration? That would have been the reason. 'The doing of things properly'.

Edited by werks prototype, 21 February 2010 - 21:53.


#3837 Tony Matthews

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 21:58

I take it he was familiar with your technical illustration? That would have been the reason.

It was between leaving Jim Allington and starting with Motoring News - I had no idea what I was going to do with my life (MN was in the future) and was unemployed, which is why I was available for Europe and neither of the others were - or perhaps that was their excuse, and they didn't fancy the trip. At the time the driver didn't know about my illustrating, he just knew I could hold a spanner because I was mechanicking for another guy in Super Saloons, and we all knew each other. Funny old World...

#3838 werks prototype

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 22:24

It was between leaving Jim Allington and starting with Motoring News - I had no idea what I was going to do with my life (MN was in the future) and was unemployed, which is why I was available for Europe and neither of the others were - or perhaps that was their excuse, and they didn't fancy the trip. At the time the driver didn't know about my illustrating, he just knew I could hold a spanner because I was mechanicking for another guy in Super Saloons, and we all knew each other. Funny old World...


Ah, you must have just carried that 'attention to detail' vibe about yourself. During this period though do you think that if a long term opportunity had presented itself to you, you would have become a mechanic for a couple of years? Or were you just enjoying a self-imposed break from technical illustration?

#3839 ibsenop

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 22:52

Bugatti Royale 1930 by Antonio Eiras.

Scanned by Duc-Man. Thank you for sharing this with us.

Only for Academic application. Another use not allowed.

Posted Image

Ibsen

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#3840 werks prototype

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 00:48

Spot the difference? for the grand title of 'Sharp as a pin'. Actually don't bother, the differences are legion.

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#3841 IrishMariner2

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:10

Somewhat OT, to say the least, but I thought I'd post a link to something I thought was first-class. It's the response letter from one of the artists of Ren & Stimpy to a young fan's letter:-

http://www.lettersof...pal-john-k.html

I hope some of you like it.

#3842 yasmin

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 02:12

Spot the difference? for the grand title of 'Sharp as a pin'. Actually don't bother, the differences are legion.

Posted ImagePosted Image


If my memory serves me well; the fixed head TR7 was illustrated by Gordon Reeves. But the TR8 (LHD and RHD) and dropheads were illustrated by John Beecham from Warwickshire Illustrations. I think there were about 9 or 10 slightly different illustrations in all.

#3843 werks prototype

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 16:25

Yes, I believe those are both by F. Gordon Reaves Limited Coventry, one is 'signed' one isn't. I posted a third as well by a different artist in post 3809. But the images above intrigue me very much mainly due to the rich colouring. I think it is a real case of the artist flattering the good old TR7 here.

Edited by werks prototype, 22 February 2010 - 18:55.


#3844 Alexey Rogachev

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 17:58

One more from the East, this time not the invented F1 car but the real F3: the Estonia 18.

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#3845 werks prototype

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 18:06



'Theo Page' 1964 Porsche Carrera GTS



Posted Image

'Theo Page' Jowett R4

Edited by werks prototype, 28 April 2010 - 18:09.


#3846 Tony Matthews

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 18:08

I hope some of you like it.

Thanks IM2, a nice letter - there is absolutely no point in being anything other than friendly, polite and helpful. Difficult, I suppose, if you are by nature a Nasty Bastard, but most people are not. You do sometimes get letters that ask too much, like actually helping on projects, or supplying a mound of prints for a presentation, but you pick the wheat from the chaff. I have always maintained that giving advice is not giving skill - the inquirer still has to learn to do whatever you have described, there are still skills to be learned by hours of practice, and a personal style to be developed where necessary.

#3847 Tony Matthews

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 18:10

One more from the East, this time not the invented F1 car but the real F3: the Estonia 18.

Posted Image

That's nice Alexey - what year was it drawn/published?

#3848 Alexey Rogachev

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 18:19

The car itself appeared in 1972, and this cutaway drawing was published in 1975.

#3849 werks prototype

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 18:26

Is this from a technical paper or programme Alexey? Or a Motorsport publication.

Edit: Already answered :)

Edited by werks prototype, 22 February 2010 - 18:28.


#3850 werks prototype

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 23:13

Somewhat OT, to say the least, but I thought I'd post a link to something I thought was first-class. It's the response letter from one of the artists of Ren & Stimpy to a young fan's letter:-

http://www.lettersof...pal-john-k.html

I hope some of you like it.


:up: The world is full of good guys.