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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#3951 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 12:04

How many based on your work did they end up producing Tony? Have you had the pleasure of re-constructing/de-constructing your own work? Over one very long sitting.

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The Jaguar D Type was added later, but in a large tub rather than a printed box, as the production costs were so high that the profit margin was minute. The only one that was worth doing, if my memory serves me, was the 250 GTO - but then any Ferrari subject is guaranteed to sell, and out-sell any other subject.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 01 March 2010 - 12:13.


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#3952 werks prototype

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 13:25

Good grief. That really is a top quality selection. Technical illustration and the cutaway are actually the perfect material for a Jigsaw. I wonder why we haven't seen more. Or is it just me who hasn't come across these before.

#3953 werks prototype

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 13:26

What great-looking cars they were!


Beasts!

#3954 werks prototype

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 13:37

2 others robert roux:matra ms5 and db750 sport

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Robert Roux must have illustrated almost the entire family of the Matra? I wonder if he was in-house there for a while or whether the series was tied to the market and a specific magazine in France? Wonderfully interesting cars. :up: He varies the placement of his signature a lot as well, it becomes a 'tyre track' with the DB 750!

Edited by werks prototype, 01 March 2010 - 14:03.


#3955 alansart

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 14:54

excuse
i m a newcomer
this is my first drawing in 2d

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Very nice. Is this produced using a modelling package or have you used Illustrator/Photoshop?



#3956 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 15:03

Technical illustration and the cutaway are actually the perfect material for a Jigsaw.

I had the idea, and hand-cut a prototype (not very big!) when I was at Motoring News, but there wasn't much interest, so I didn't persue it. Years later, I was contacted by someone who also thought cutaway illustrations would make good jigsaw puzzles, and as it wasn't going to cost me anything, in fact I would get a small royalty, I agreed! The DFX was the first, then it was decided that colour would help, also a 'graph paper' background on the white bits. As far as I can remember the total was the five shown on the brochure, plus the D Type. The two jet engines were - I think - both Frank Munger.

It was an expensive business making and packaging them, plus a lot of work wrapping and posting them, and eventually KK gave up. It was a bit like technical illustrating in general, people either really liked them or were completely uninterested - no half measures! However, I was in a local modelshop some years ago, having a mooch around, when a guy picked up a 250 GTO puzzle, took it to the counter, and asked for plastic cement and a tin of Ferrari Red paint!

There was, I've just remembered, an Ilmor jigsaw too, how many were made I don't know, I think it was done as a promotional/gift item - Paul Morgan was always up for anything interesting, and was a fan of cutaways. I did a 'background' for the 265A cutaway, added a title and a box for the specification. I used to have one, un-opened puzzle, but I haven't seen it for years so it may have gone. The engine actually looked quite good on it's background. I may have a trannie...

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The box with the tech. spec. and/or I believe, a power/torque graph, was inserted below the title. The fact that I had drawn the original with a 'shadow' underneath made the 'spotlight' treatment fairly obvious.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 01 March 2010 - 15:33.


#3957 Manfred Cubenoggin

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 23:26

Gentlemen...

I see that we are about to go to a full 100 pages in this astonishing thread. To all whom have contributed to make this possible, my heart-felt thanks. :wave:

Edit: seconds after posting...

Mon Dieu! C'est moi!!! :)


Edited by Manfred Cubenoggin, 01 March 2010 - 23:27.


#3958 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:10

Mon Dieu! C'est moi!!! :)

If I had a coconut, MC, I would send it to you!

#3959 ibsenop

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:13

Matra 670C by Giorgio Piola

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Ibsen

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#3960 ibsenop

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:16

And as promised....

TNF Cutaway drawing and its artists Index page 01 to page 108 - up to post #4289

Automobiles / SUV / 4WD / Off-road

A

Abarth
Abarth 500 Record 1958 by Giovanni Cavara - page 47
Abarth 2000 Sport Spyder by Franco Rosso - page 50-104

AJS
AJS 1932 by John Ferguson - page 102

Alec Issigonis
Alec Issigonis Lightweight Special by unknown artist - page 85

Alfa Romeo
Alfa Romeo 159 Alfetta by Laurence Watts - page 31-38
Alfa Romeo P3 by Bruno Betti - page 42
Alfa Romeo Bimotore 1935 by Giulio Betti - page 42
Alfa Romeo Bimotore 1935 by Brian Hatton - page 42
Alfa Romeo 179 by Paolo D'Allesio - page 42
Alfa Romeo P3 by Tony Matthews - page 42-63
Alfa Romeo 512 1940 by Giulio Betti - page 43
Alfa Romeo V8 2650 Turbo engine by Bruno Betti - page 43
Alfa Romeo Montreal by Bruno Betti - page 45
Alfa Romeo P3 by unknown artist - page 45
Alfa Romeo 2900B by unknown artist - page 45
Alfa Romeo Montreal engine by Bruno Betti(?) - page 45
Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Corsa 1939-1940 by Giovanni Cavara - page 46
Alfa Romeo 8C by Rens Biesma - page 46
Alfa Romeo 159 Alfetta side view by unknown artist - page 31-38
Alfa Romeo 2000 Sportiva 1954 by Giovanni Cavara - page 46
Alfa Romeo 6C 2900 by Giovanni Cavara - page 46
Alfa Romeo 158 by Giovanni Cavara - page 52
Alfa Romeo Flat 12 3000cc by Bruno Betti - page 54
Alfa Romeo P2 1924 by Giulio Betti - page 54-105
Alfa Romeo 179T by Bruno Betti - page 63
Alfa Romeo AR51 by Giulio Betti - page 66
Alfa Romeo 159 Alfetta by Serge Bellu - page 66
Alfa Romeo 2300 by unknown artist - page 67 (?) Walter Brito (?)
Alfa Romeo Alfetta GT by Franco Rosso - page 67
Alfa Romeo Canguro by Makoto Ouchi - page 68
Alfa Romeo OSI Scarabeo 1966 by Sergio Baratto - page 77
Alfa Romeo 33 1967 cutaway by unknown artist - page 78
Alfa Romeo 33 1967 cutaway by Giovanni Cavara - page 78
Alfa Romeo 33 1967 drawings (not a cutaway) by Betti (Giulio or Bruno?) - page 78
Alfa Romeo 33-3 1970 by Betti (Giulio or Bruno?) - page 78
Alfa Romeo 33TT3 1972 by Bruno Betti - page 78
Alfa Romeo 33TT12 1973 by Bruno Betti - page 78
Alfa Romeo 33SC12 1977 by unknown artist - page 78
Alfa Romeo Disco Vollante by Clarence LaTourette - page 83-86
Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ1 by Clarence LaTourette - page 86
Alfa Romeo Sprint Veloce roadster by Clarence LaTourette - page 86
Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint 1954 Bertone by Giovanni Cavara - page 104

Alpine
Alpine A110 by Bruno Betti - page 88
Alpine A110 by Editechnic - page 105

Amphicar
Amphicar by Rosso(?) - page 86

AMC
AMC AMX by unknown artist - page 97

Armstrong
Armstrong Siddeley 1932 interior by John Ferguson - page 102 (Not a cutaway)

Arrows
Arrows FA1 by Giorgio Piola - page 95

Aston Martin
Aston Martin DBR1 by Tony Matthews - page 04-21
Aston Martin DBR1 by TD Collins - page 22
Aston Martin DB3S by Theo Page - page 68
Aston Martin DB3S by Tony Matthews - page 69-75
Aston Martin DB6 by Inkwell - page 87
Aston Martin DBR1-300 by Clarence LaTourette - page 88
Aston Martin DB2/2-4 by James A. Allington - page 92
Aston Martin DB3S by Bruno Betti - page 94
Aston Martin V8 engine by Brian Hatton - page 96
Aston Martin DBR1 by James A. Allington - page 100
Aston Martin DB4 Zagato by Ian Cleaver - page 100

Atilla
Atilla Ford 1963 by Gordon Bruce - page 38-81

ATS
ATS F1 1963 by Giovanni Cavara - page 47
ATS F1 1963 by unknown artist - page 48-102 (?) Vic Berris - Bruno Betti (?)
ATS F1 1963 by Clarence LaTourette - page 88

Auburn
Auburn Speedster by Tony Matthews - page 93

Audi
Audi F1 Concept by Michael Stirm - page 31
Audi Quattro Rallye by Jim Bamber - page 44
Audi Quattro Rallye by Bruno Betti - page 61
Audi Sport Quattro Rallye 1984 by Bruno Betti(?) - page 95
Audi Sport Quattro S1 Rallye 1985 by Technical Art(?) - page 95
Audi R10 TDI by Pan-Nullo - page 98

Austin
Austin Sedan 1951 A/Gas Supercharged "Herrera & Sons" 1967 by Tom West - page 73
Austin Cambridge 1954 by S.E. Porter - page 102-104
Austin Light Six 1931 by Max Millar - page 102-104

Auto Avio Construzione
Auto Avio Construzione AAC 815 by Giovanni Cavara - page 80

Auto Union
Auto Union Type C 1936-1937 by Terry Collins - page 38
Auto Union P Wagen by unknown artist - page 44
Auto Union 1934 by Klaus Unbekannt - page 52-67
Auto Union Type C 1936 by Yoshihiro Inomoto - page 67
Auto Union 1938 by S.E. Porter - page 102
Auto Union Type C 1936-1937 by Bruno Betti - page 103
Auto Union Type C 1937 by J. Walkden Fisher - page 103-104
Auto Union Type C 1937 by G. Gedo - page 107

Avallone
Avallone Ford 1973 by Walter Brito - page 44

B

Babs
Babs V12 1927 by Vic Berris - page 59

Beatrice
Beatrice THL2 Ford by Tony Matthews - page 35

Benetton
Benetton B194 by Terry Collins - page 23
Benetton B187 by Terry Collins - page 55
Benetton B188 by Terry Collins - page 55
Benetton B192 by Terry Collins - page 56
Benetton B193B by Bruno Betti - page 56
Benetton B193B by Terry Collins - page 56
Benetton B194 by Terry Collins - page 56
Benetton B190 by Terry Collins - page 56

Bentley
Bentley 4.5L Blower 1930 by Tony Matthews - page 41
Bentley 4.5L Blower 1930 by Bruno Betti - page 103

BMS Dallara
BMS Dallara 1989 by Sergio Baratto - page 85

BMW
BMW 320i by Technical Art - page 35
BMW 320i Imsa by Bruno Betti - page 36
BMW 3000 CSL by Bruno Betti - page 36
BMW M1 Procar by Technical Art - page 36
BMW M12 4 cylinder 1500 Turbo engine by Niedermeier - page 36
BMW 600 by unknown artist - page 36
BMW 3500 CSL by Bruno Betti - page 36
BMW 507 by Serge Bellu - page 51
BMW M3 by Bruno Betti - page 66
BMW 3200 Engine section by Unknown artist - page 96
BMW 3200 by Unknown artist - page 96
BMW 600 1956 by Schlenzig - page 105

Borgeault
Borgeault Formula Jr by Gordon Bruce - page 74-81

Borgward
Borgward RS by Clarence LaTourette - page 87
Borgward P100 by unknown artist - page 97

Brabham
Brabham BT34 by unknown artist - page 25
Brabham BT34 by Giorgio Piola - page 25
Brabham BT34 by Dick Ellis - page 25
Brabham BT34 by Tony Matthews - page 27
Brabham BT11 1965 by James A. Allington - page 28
Brabham BT49C by Giorgio Piola - page 36
Brabham BT52 BMW Turbo by Sergio Baratto - page 38
Brabham BT45 Alfa Romeo by Technical Art - page 38
Brabham BT34 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
Brabham BT33 by Bill Bennett "Anglia Art" - page 52
Brabham BT54 by Giorgio Piola - page 67
Brabham 1963 by James A. Allington - page 75
Brabham Climax F1 1963 by Gordon Bruce - page 81
Brabham BT19 by Theo Page - page 83(only link)
Brabham BT3 1965 by James A. Allington - page 101
Brabham BT19 by Serge Bellu - page 104

BRM
BRM V16 by Tony Matthews - page 09
BRM P261 by Bill Bennett - page 21
BRM P160 by Tony Matthews - page 27
BRM P261 by James A. Allington - page 28-101
BRM 1962 (rear view) by Gordon Bruce - page 28
BRM P133 by unknown artist - page 47 - (?) Vittorio Dal Basso (?)
BRM H16 engine by Vic Berris - page 48
BRM V16 engine by Vic Berris - page 49
BRM V16 engine by Cresswell - page 49
BRM V16 by Theo Page - page 49
BRM P180 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
BRM V16 by Max Millar - page 53
BRM P57 1962 by Serge Bellu - page 56
BRM 4WD by Brian Hatton - page 64
BRM P261 by Theo Page - page 65
BRM P261 by Bruno Betti - page 65
BRM 1962 "Stackpipe" (front view) by Gordon Bruce - page 68-78-81
BRM V8 1963 by James A. Allington - page 75
BRM 2.5 Litre 4 cylinder engine with transaxle by James A. Allington - page 77
BRM H16 by Dick Ellis - page 78
BRM H16 by Vittorio Dal Basso (?) - page 78
BRM P160 by Brian Hatton - page 88(only link)
BRM P51 by James A. Allington - page 100
BRM H16 by Theo Page - page 101-104

BRP
BRP BRM F1 1963 by Gordon Bruce - page 81

Brooke-Weston
Brooke-Weston V8 by Theo Page - page 49

Bugatti
Bugatti Royale by James A. Allington - page 18
Bugatti Type 59 by Tony Matthews - page 42
Bugatti Type 35 by James A. Allington - page 94
Bugatti Royale 1930 by Antonio Eiras - page 97
Bugatti Type 35 by Antonio Eiras - page 98

Buick
Buick V8 aluminium engine 1960 by Clarence LaTourette - page 101

C

Cadillac
Cadillac LMP side view by Stephen Miller - page 14

CD
CD Panhard Le Mans 1964 by G. Gedo - page 50
CD Panhard by Unknown artist - page 107

Chaparral
Chaparral 2F by James A. Allington - page 27-59-76
Chaparral 2E by David Kimble - page 66
Chaparral 2D by Vic Berris - page 70
Chaparral 2F by Antonio Eiras - page 95
Chaparral 1 by Unknown artist - page 96-102
Chaparral 2H by Brian Hatton - page 102
Chaparral 2J by Brian Hatton - page 102
Chaparral 2C by Brian Hatton(?) - page 102

Chevrolet
Chevrolet V8 c/w Weber sidedraft carbs by Bill Bennett - page 21
Chevrolet Corvette C6 ZR1 by David Kimble - page 66
Chevrolet Corvette C6R by David Kimble - page 69
Chevrolet Corvette C6 Coupe by David Kimble - page 69
Chevrolet Corvette C6 Convertible by David Kimble - page 69
Chevrolet Corvette C6 Z06 by David Kimble - page 69
Chevrolet Camaro 1968 Funny Car "Vicious Too" by Tom West - page 74
Chevrolet Nova 1968 Funny Car "Super Nova II" by Tom West - page 75
Chevrolet Corvette 1967 Funny Car "Fiberglass Trends" by Tom West - page 77
Chevrolet 3500 V8 IRL 2002 engine by David Kimble - page 81
Chevrolet Opala SS 1972 by unknown artist - page 83
Chevrolet Corvette 1958 by unknown artist - page 84
Chevrolet Chevy II 1969 Funny Car "Jungle Jim" by Tom West - page 86
Chevrolet Corvette 1963 by Clarence LaTourette - page 92
Chevrolet Corvette 1969 Funny Car "Too Bad" by Tom West - page 101

Chevron
Chevron B19 by Betti - Giulio(?) or Bruno(?) - page 71-93

Chrysler
Chrysler AA/Fuel Dragster 1965 "Yeakel Plymouth Special" by Tom West - page 73

Cisitalia
Cisitalia 360 by Harold Bubb - page 101

Citroën
Citroën C23 by James A. Allington - page 18
Citroën SM by Giulio Betti - page 81
Citroën XM by E.T.A.I. - page 81
Citroën Mehari chassis (not a cutaway) by Unknown artist - page 96
Citroën DS by Unknon artist - page 107

Cooper
Cooper Monaco by James A. Allington - page 18
Cooper T77 1965 by James A. Allington - page 28
Cooper T51 Climax by Tony Matthews - page 38
Cooper Maserati 1966 by Theo Page - page 50
Cooper Coventry Climax 1964 (rear view) by Theo Page - page 50
Cooper Coventry Climax 1964 (front view) by Theo Page - page 50
Cooper Climax 1959 by unknown artist - page 52
Cooper 500cc racer by Theo Page - page 58
Cooper T51 1959 by Serge Bellu - page 62
Cooper T51 1959 by unknown artist - page 62 (?) Vic Berris (?)
Cooper Maserati 1966 by Dick Ellis - page 66
Cooper Twini Mini Prototype 1963 by unknown artist - page 68
Cooper Mini by Giorgio Alisi - page 71
Cooper Monaco by J. Walkden Fisher - page 74
Cooper Climax F1 1963 by Vic Berris - page 81
Cooper Monaco by James A. Allington - page 87
Cooper Climax roadster by Clarence LaTourette - page 88
Cooper Maserati by Robert Roux - page 99
Cooper T68 1965 by James A. Allington - page 101
Cooper 500 1947 by Max Millar - page 102
Cooper Mk2 T56 1961 by Brian Hatton - page 105
Cooper Mk3 T59 1962 by Willin - page 106
Cooper Mk1 T52 FJ 1960 by Brian Hatton - page 106
Cooper Mk3A T67 FJ 1963 by Theo Page - page 106
Cooper Mk5 by Vic Berris- page 106
Cooper Mk9 by Max Millar - page 106
Cooper Mk8 by Theo Page - page 106
Cooper Mk2 FJ by Unknown artist - page 106


Cosworth
Cosworth Vega engine by Tony Matthews - page 07-52
Cosworth GAA 3.4 litre V6 by Tony Matthews - page 38
Cosworth GAA 3.4 litre V6 by Terry Collins - page 39
Cosworth DFY engine by Diana Stevens - page 42
Cosworth DFX engine by Tony Mattews - page 49
Cosworth 4WD by Brian Hatton - page 64
Cosworth 4WD by John Hostler - page 64
Cosworth 4WD by Klaus Unbekannt - page 64
Cosworth DFY engine by Keith Harmer - page 70
Cosworth DFV engine by Theo Page - page 70
Cosworth DFV engine by Bruno Betti - page 70
Cosworth DFV engine by Vic Berris - page 70

Courage
Courage C36 Porsche by Jean-Jacques François - page 85


Coventry Climax
Coventry Climax Flat 16 engine by Vic Berris - page 48
Coventry Climax Flat 16 engine by James A. Allington - page 49
Coventry Climax FWMV engine by James A. Allington - page 49
Coventry Climax Flat 16 engine by S. Porter - page 49
Coventry Climax FWMV engine by Vic Berris - page 49
Coventry Climax FPF four-cylinder Twin-cam engine by James A.Allington - page 49

D

Datsun
Datsun Violet by Tony Matthews - page 58

DB
DB 750 Sport by Robert Roux - page 99

De Tomaso
De Tomaso Pantera by Anders Bonde - page 08-09
De Tomaso F1 1962 by Giovanni Cavara - page 47
De Tomaso Pantera by Alloisi Milanesi - page 101-104
De Tomaso Pantera by Alloisi - page 101 (colour)
De Tomaso Deauville by Franco Rosso - page 102

Delta
Delta T83 FF2000 by anders Bonde - page 45

Dodge
Dodge Viper SRT10 by David Kimble - page 69
Dodge Charger Funny Car 1969 "Chi-Town Hustler" by Tom West - page 73
Dodge Charger Funny Car 1968 "Rambunctious" by Tom West - page 77
Dodge Dart Funny Car 1968 "Saddleback Dodge" by Tom West - page 77
Dodge Charger Funny Car 1968 "Super Chief" by Tom West - page 81
Dodge Charger Funny Car 1968 "Color Me Gone" by Tom West - page 81
Dodge Charger Funny Car 1969 "Hawaiian" by Tom West - page 86
Dodge Charger Funny Car 1970 "Rambunctious" by Tom West - page 92
Dodge Challenger Funny Car 1969 "Challenger 1" by Tom West - page 92

Dolphin
Dolphin Formula Jr by Clarence LaTourette - page 78/92
Dolphin Porsche by unknown artist - page 78
Dolphin Porsche by Gordon Bruce - page 106

Dragada
Dragada FJr by Emily - Page 27-33-83-90

Dragster
Twin-Buick AA/G Dragster 1962 "TV Tommy Ivo" by Tom West - page 73
Kent Fuller-built AA/FD "Magicar" by Tom West - page 73
AA/Fuel Dragster 1999 "Tom Hanna" by Tom West - page
Ford T 1923 AA/Fuel Altered 1969 "Groundshaker Jr." - page 92
AA/Fuel Dragster 1970 "Smothers Brothers Beach Boys SApecial" by Tom West - page 101

E

Eagle
Eagle AAR 103 oil tank by unknown artist - page 34
Eagle AAR 103 chassis by Brian Hatton - page 34
Eagle Coventry Climax by Theo Page - page 34-47
Eagle AAR 103 by Bill Bennett - page 34-35
Eagle AAR 103 by Roy Huxley - page 51
Eagle 1972 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 53
Eagle TG2 by Clarence LaTourette - page 62
Eagle Formula A 1969 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 62

Elva
Elva MkVIII chassis by ra Epton - page 54
Elva Formula Junior by James A. Allington - page 84
Elva Mk4 by Cresswell - page 101

Estonia
Estonia 18 by unknown artist - page 97

G

Galmer
Galmer KN1 by Tony Matthews - page 16

GAZ
GAZ 69 AM by Giulio Betti - page 66

Gilbern
Gilbern Genie or Invader or GT by John Ferguson - page 83

GM
GM Firebird III Concept Car by Clarence LaTourette - page 83

Gurgel
Gurgel Xavante XTC 1974 by Walter Brito - page 107

F

Ferguson
Ferguson P99 by James A. Allington - page 60-64
Ferguson P99 by John Ferguson - page 84

Ferrari
Ferrari 512S by Bruno Betti - page 01-64
Ferrari 312 T by Kurt O. - page 02
Ferrari 330 P3 by Jean-Jacques François - page 02
Ferrari 330 P4 side view by Mark Fenijn - page 02
Ferrari 330 P4 by René Bellu - page 02 (colour version at page 104)
Ferrari 250 TR59 by Tony Matthews - page 04
Ferrari 250 Testarossa 1957 by Tony Matthews - page 04-09-30
Ferrari F2007 by Tony Matthews - page 04-32
Ferrari Dino 246 by Tony Matthews - page 05-14
Ferrari 049 engine by Tony Matthews - page 06-12
Ferrari 312 PB by Tony Matthews - page 10
Ferrari 365 BB by Jeremy Banks - page 13
Ferrari F2000 by Tony Matthews - page 20
Ferrari F2000 gearbox by Tony Matthews - page 20-43
Ferrari 156 Shark Nose by Giulio Betti - page 26
Ferrari F2 1960 by James A. Allington - page 26
Ferrari Dino 246 F1 1958 by John Marsden - page 26
Ferrari 330 P4 by James A. Allington - page 27-59
Ferrari 156 Shark Nose by James A. Allington - page 27
Ferrari 158 by James A. Allington - page 28
Ferrari V12 engine by Brian Kinkaid - page 28
Ferrari 156 Shark Nose by Serge Bellu - page 31
Ferrari 126C by Giorgio Piola - page 36
Ferrari 156 Shark Nose by Giovanni Cavara - page 37
Ferrari 156 Shark Nose by Gordon Bruce - page 37-81
Ferrari 156 Shark Nose by Paolo D'Alessio - page 37-52
Ferrari 156 Shark Nose by unknown artist - page 39
Ferrari 312 Boxer F1 engine by Giulio Betti - page 40
Ferrari 125 1948 by Giulio Betti - page 51
Ferrari 500 F2 1952 by Bruno Betti - page 51
Ferrari 641/2 1990 by Bruno Betti - page 51
Ferrari 312 F1 1969-1973 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
Ferrari 312 B2 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
Ferrari Dino 246 1958 by Franco Rosso - page 52
Ferrari Dino 246 F1 1958 by Giovanni Cavara - page 52
Ferrari Dino 246 F1 1958 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 52
Ferrari 500 1953 by Giovanni Cavara - page 52
Ferrari 125S 1950 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 52
Ferrari 312 1966 by Paolo D'Allessio - page 52-61
Ferrari 312 B 1970 by Bruno Betti - page 52
Ferrari 312 1968 by Bruno Betti - page 52
Ferrari 641-2 1990 by unknown artist - page 52 (plus plan and side views)
Ferrari 158 F1 1964 by Bruno Betti - page 53
Ferrari 500 Superfast by Bruno Betti - page 53
Ferrari 512 S Longitudinal Section by Bruno Betti - page 55 (not a cutaway)
Ferrari 312 T2 by Sergio Baratto - page 56
Ferrari 500 F2 by Betti (Bruno or Giulio?) - page 56
Ferrari 312 T2 by Marco Siotto - page 56
Ferrari 555 Super Squalo by Bob Thatcher - page 57
Ferrari F189 by unknown artist - page 57 (?) Hideo Mizokawa (?)
Ferrari 158 F1 1964 by Vic Berris - page 57
Ferrari 312 T4 by Serge Bellu - page 60
Ferrari 250 GTO (right side) by Tony Matthews - page 60
Ferrari 312 1966 by Vic Berris - page 61
Ferrari 312 1966 by Bruno Betti - page 61
Ferrari 046 engine by Bruno Betti - page 62
Ferrari 049 engine by Bruno Betti - page 62
Ferrari 312 T by Tony Matthews - page 63-82
Ferrari 512 S by Vic Berris - page 64
Ferrari 512 S engine by Vic Berris - page 64
Ferrari 512 S by unknown artist - page 64 (B&W)
Ferrari 512 S by unknown artist - page 64 (colour)
Ferrari 312 B by Brian Hatton - page 64
Ferrari 512 F1 1965 by Bruno betti - page 64
Ferrari 312 T2 by Vic Berris - page 64
Ferrari Dino 246 by James A. Allington - page 64
Ferrari 312 B3 1974 by Giorgio Piola - page 67
Ferrari GTO 1984 by Bruno betti - page 68
Ferrari Enzo by unknown artist - page 68
Ferrari 312 P 1969 by Vittorio Dal Basso - page 68
Ferrari 250 GTO (left side) by Tony Matthews - page 68
Ferrari 250 GTO by Shin Yoshikawa - page 68
Ferrari Berlinetta Boxer by Dick Ellis - page 72
Ferrari BB engine by Vic Berris - page 72
Ferrari BB gearbox by Vic Berris - page 72
Ferrari 512 Testarossa by Matt Jennings - page 74
Ferrari 375 1951 by unknown artist - page 74
Ferrari F40 by unknown artist - page 74
Ferrari 612 Can Am by unknown artist - page 74
Ferrari 312 T4 by unknown artist (Tamiya Box Art) - page 74
Ferrari V6 F1 1963 by James A. Allington - page 75
Ferrari Gilera Formula Concept 1962 by Sergio Baratto - page 78
Ferrari 312 B3 1974 by Terry Davey - page 82
Ferrari 312 B3 1973 by Giorgio Piola - page 82
Ferrari 312 B3 1974 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 82
Ferrari 312 B3 1973 by Bruno Betti - page 82
Ferrari 312 T2 1976 by Bruno Betti - page 82
Ferrari 312 T3 1978 by Bruno Betti - page 82
Ferrari 312 T2 1977 by Bruno Betti - page 83
Ferrari 312 T4 1979 by Bruno Betti - page 83
Ferrari 312 B3 1974 by Bruno Betti - page 83
Ferrari 750 Monza by Clarence LaTourette - page 83
Ferrari 500 Mondial by Giovanni Cavara - page 86
Ferrari 250 Testarossa 1957 by Clarence LaTourette - page 92
Ferrari 365 GTB4 by James A. allington - page 92
Ferrari 275 GTB by James A. allington - page 94
Ferrari 275 GTB by Bruno Betti - page 94
Ferrari 125 S 1947 by Giovanni Cavara - page 96
Ferrari 330 P4 by Antonio Eiras - page 97
Ferrari F1/90 (641) by Sergio Baratto - page 97
Ferrari F40 by Antonio Eiras - page 100
Ferrari 330 P4 by René Bellu - page 104
Ferrari 126CK by Paolo D'Alessio - page 104
Ferrari 126C2 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 104
Ferrari 625 TF Vignale Berlinetta s/n 0302 TF by Alfredo Zanellato - page 104
Ferrari Dino 206 S by Giovanni Cavara - page 104
Ferrari 312 PB by Demand - page 107

Fiat
Fiat 131 Abarth Alitalia by Bruno Betti - page 61
Fiat Grand Prix 1907 by Giulio Betti - page 63
Fiat Grand Prix 1927 by Giulio Betti - page 63-105
Fiat Mefistofele 1924 by Bruno Betti - page 63
Fiat Ballila 1934 by Giulio Betti - page 63
Fiat 500 Topolino 1936 by Bruno Betti - page 63-97
Fiat 600 1955 by Giulio Betti - page 63-97
Fiat 131 Abarth by unknown artist - page 63
Fiat 131 Abarth Olio Fiat by Bruno Betti - page 63
Fiat 131 Abarth Maratona by Franco Rosso - page 63
Fiat 3.5 HP 1899 by Giulio Betti - page 64-105
Fiat Zero 1915 by Bruno Betti - page 64-103
Superfiat 1921 by Bruno Betti - page 64
Fiat 501 2 Serie 1925 by Bruno Betti - page 64-103
Fiat Campagnola by Franco Rosso - page 66
Fiat Dino V6 engine by Giulio Betti - page 70
Fiat 8V by Makoto Ouchi - page 86
Fiat 600 by Lofthouse - page 89
Fiat 1100 1957 Longitudinal Section by Unknown artist - page 97 (not a cutaway)
Fiat 500 C Longitudinal Section by Unknown artist - page 97 (not a cutaway)
Fiat 500 Saloon Longitudinal Section by Unknown artist - page 97 (not a cutaway)
Fiat Grand Prix 1927 by Giulio Betti - page 106 (Side, front and rear views - not a cutaway)

Fittipaldi
Fittipaldi FD04 by Technical Art - page 24
Fittipaldi FD01 by Walter Brito - page 25

Ford
Ford Capri RS by Tony Matthews - page 07
Formula Ford by Anders Bonde - page 10
Ford Escort Mk. III Group 5 Comprex-supercharged by Anders Bonde - page 12
Ford Fiesta Group 2 by Terry Collins - page 19
Ford Mk IV by James A. Allington - page 27-76
Ford Capri Turbo Zakespeed by Bruno Betti - page 36
Ford Capri RS2600 Cosworth by Bruno Betti - page 37
Ford F3L P68 by Theo Page - page 39-59-60
Ford Mk IV by Mati Palk - page 40
Ford GT40 Mk II (colour) by James A. Allington - page 40
Ford GT40 Mk I by Dick Ellis - page 47-69
Ford GT40 Mk I by Theo Page - page 47
Ford GT40 Mk I with annotations by Theo Page - page 47
Ford GT40 Mk I by James A. Allington - page 47
Ford GT40 Mk I by Brian Hatton - page 47
Ford GT40 Mk I by Bruno Betti - page 47
Ford GT40 Mk I by unknown artist - page 47 - (?) Vic Berris (?)
Ford F3L P68 by unknown artist - page 59
Ford Mutt M151 by Giulio Betti - page 66
Ford GT40 Mk I chassis by Tony Matthews - page 69-102
Ford C100 by Terry Collins (rear view) - page 71
Ford C100 by Terry Collins (front view) - page 71
Ford Mustang 2008 Funny Car "John Force Racing" by Tom West - page 73
Ford Track Roadster 1929 "Gary Meadors" by Tom West - page 73
Ford 1929 A/Modified Roadster 1962 "22JR Tony Nancy" by Tom West - page74
Ford 1932 AA/Fuel Altered 1967 "Thurmond Brothers" 1967 by Tom West - page 74
Ford Cortina-Lotus by James A. Allington - page 76
Ford Mustang 1968 Funny Car "Frantic Ford" by Tom West - page 73
Ford Escort 1986 by Studio Collins - page 81
Ford Escort 1975 by Terry Collins - page 81
Ford Maverick Super 1974 by Walter Brito - page 85
Ford Maverick 1978 Four Door chassis by unknown artist (Walter Brito?)- page 85
Ford Maverick 1978 by unknown artist (Walter Brito?) - page 85
Ford Sierra RS 500 by Terry Collins - page 90
Ford V8 DOHC Indy engine by Clarence LaTourette - page 92
Ford GT40 1964 by Unknown artist - page 96
Ford GT40 Gulf by Unknown artist - page 96
Ford RS200 by Terry Lawless - page 98-104
Ford RS200 by Allerston - page 98-104
Ford RS200 by Harmer and Allerston - page 98-104
Ford Thunderbird Nascar 1994 by Russell Von Sauers - page 98
Ford Mustang 1970 Funny Car Allison powered "Hollywood Badman" by Tom West - page 101
Ford GT40 Mk I body by James A. Allington (?Tony Matthews?) - page 102 (exploded view)
Ford G7A by Unknown artist - page 102
Ford Escort Mark III 1980 by Chris Plant - page 103-104
Ford GT40 Mk II by Unknown artist - page 103 (colour and B&W)
Ford MkIV by René Bellu - page 104
Ford Escort 1986 by Studio Collins - page 105
Ford Escort XR3i 1986 by Unknown artist (Terry Collins?) - page 105
Ford Orion 1986 by Studio Collins - page 105
Ford Sierra Turnier 1982 by Studio Collins - page 105
Ford Maverick Super 1974 by Walter Brito - page 106 (black & white version)
Ford Corcel Coupe 1975 by Walter Brito - page 106
Ford Del Rey 1983 cutaway by Unknown artist (Walter Brito?) - page 106
Ford 1932 w/ Ferrari engine "Deucari" by Rex Burnett - page 107
Ford Escort WRC by Terry Collins - page 107

Frazer
Frazer GT 1967 by unknown artist - page 78
Frazer Nash Shelsley by James A. Allington - page 94

G

Ginetta
Ginetta G18 FFord by Bill Bennett - page 77

GM
GM EV-1 1996 by David Kimble - page 68

Goggomobil
Goggomobil T300 cutaway by Unknown artist - page 106
Goggomobil engine cutaway by ??? Defhsmoan??? - page 106

H

Harvey Aluminum Special
Harvey Aluminum Special by Steve Swaja - page 43

Hesketh
Hesketh 308 by Tony Matthews - page 32-37(colour)

Hewland
Hewland LD200 by Andrew Kitson - page 01
Hewland LD200 by Andrew Kitson - page 06

Hillman
Hillman Hunter by John Ferguson - page 90
Hillman Saloon 1933 by John Palmer - page 103

Honda
Honda Accord BTCC by Tony Matthews - page 04
Honda Vtec engine by Jeremy Banks - page 15
Honda RA302 by Akira Fujimoto - page 25
Honda RA271 1964 by James A. Allington - page 28
Honda S800 by Vic Berris - page 57
Honda S800 chassis by unknown artist - page 57
Honda R1300 by Makoto Ouchi - page 84
Honda R1300 Second Version by unknown artist - page 84
Honda RA302 engine by Makoto Ouchi - page 84
Honda RA302 by Ken - page 84
Honda RA301 by Akira Fujimoto - page 84
Honda RA301 by Vittorio Dal Basso - page 84
Honda NSX by Kevin Hulsey - page 87
Honda NSX by Takashi Jufuku - page 98

Hot Rods
CT Automotive DOHC Flathead engine by Clarence LaTourette - page 88
Agajanian Studebaker V8 DOHC engine by Clarence LaTourette - page 88
Fred Carrillo's Modified Roadster by Rex Burnett - page 88
Spalding Chevrolet Six by Rex Burnett - page 88
Competition Hot Rod by Rex Burnett - page 88
Hot Rod Roadster by Rex Burnett - page 88
Hot Rod Roadster by Jim Richards - page 88

Howmet
Howmet TX Turbine by William A. Moore - page 47

Humber
Humber Hawk by Poulton - page 89
Humber Hawk by R.E. Poulton - page 89-90

I

Ikantiki V15/F1 1957 by Anders Bonde - page 12

Ibec
Ibec P2 by Tony Matthews - page 27


Ilmor
Ilmor Mercedes 500E by Tony Matthews - page 04
Ilmor V10 F1 Engine by Tony Matthews - page 05-33-43-49
Ilmor Chevrolet 265C by Tony Matthews - page 09
Ilmor Chevrolet 265A by Tony Matthews - page 10-49-67-99
Ilmor Mercedes 265E/500I by Tony Matthews - page 56

ISO

Iso Rivolta by G. Alloisi - page 71

Isotta Fraschini
Isotta Fraschini IM 1913 by Giulio Betti - page 105

J

Jabro
Jabro Mk III by Clarence LaTourette - page 45

Jaguar
Jaguar E Type Low Drag by Jean-Jacques François - page 30
Jaguar D Type by Tony Matthews - page 30-44-94
Jaguar XJR9LM by Stuart Spencer - page 36 and 74
Jaguar XJR9LM by unknown artist - page 36
Jaguar D Type by Theo Page - page 44
Jaguar XJ13 by Lawrence Watts - page 46
Jaguar XJ13 by John Hostler - page 46-47
Jaguar V12 engine by Vic Berris - page 47
Jaguar SS100 by Tony Matthews - page 59
Jaguar XJ6 by Theo Page - page 59
Jaguar E Type by Porter - page 72
Jaguar E2A by Vic Berris - page 72
Jaguar XJ120C by Robert Roux - page 81
Jaguar E Type Coupe by Clarence LaTourette - page 92
Jaguar Mark X by Clarence LaTourette - page 92
Jaguar XJ220 V12 Prototype by Spencer - page 96
Jaguar XJ220 by Spencer - page 96 (colour and B&W)
Jaguar E Type by Vic Berris - page 96
Jag SS 3.5L Saloon by Unknow artist - page 96
Jaguar Linx D Type by Eastwood - page 96
Jaguar Mark X 1961 by Unknown artist - page 96
Jaguar XJ6 / Sovereign / XJ12 by Unknown artist - page 96
Jaguar Type XK engine by S.E. Porter - page 96
SS Jaguar 1.5 Litre chassis (not a cutaway) by Frederick Gordon Crosby - page 96
Jaguar Mark VII and XK120 1952 (not a cutaway) by Unknown artist - page 96
Jaguar XK 120 Engine (not a cutaway) by Unknown artist - page 96
Jaguar XK 120 carbureters by Unknown artist - page 96
Jaguar XK 120 Engine and Gearbox section (not a cutaway) by Unknown artist - page 96
Jag V6 S-Type engine by Unknown artist - page 96
Jag V8 S-Type engine by Unknown artist - page 96
Jaguar Mark V 3.5 litre engine by Unknown artist - page 96
Jaguar XJ5-3C by Dich Ellis - page 99
Jaguar C Type by Ian Cleaver - page 100
Jaguar E Type engine by S.E. Porter(?) - page 103
Jaguar 2 Litre Saloon 1934 by Forgeron - page 105

Jeep
Jeep 1958 by G. Alloisi - page 66
Jeep by Max Millar - page 66
Jeep by Gen Sateh(?) - page 71

Jordan
Jordan Special 1957 by Unknown artist - page 106

Jowett
Jowett R4 by Theo Page - page 97
Jowett Javelin 1951 by John Ferguson - page 102

K

KKK
KKK Turbocharger by Andrew Kitson - page 01

Kharkov
Kharkov 6 Formula 1 by by Unknown artist - page 87

Kieft
Kieft GP by Theo Page - page 50
Kieft CK51 F3 500 by Vic Berris - page 71-105

Kojima
Kojima KE-007 by Unknown artist - page 91
Kojima KE-007 by Unknown artist - page 93(link only)
Kojima KE-009 by Unknown artist - page 93(link only)

L
Lagonda V12 engine by Vic Berris - page 22

Lancia
Lancia D50 by Tony Matthews - page 04-09-75
Lancia Montecarlo Gr5 by Bruno Betti - page 14-45
Lancia B20 by Brian Kinkaid - page 28
Lancia Delta S4 by unknown artist - page 43
Lancia Stratos by Shin Yoshikawa - page 43
Lancia 037 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 43-85
Lancia 037 by unknown artist - page 43
Lancia ECV by unknown artist - page 43
Lancia 037 by Bruno Betti - page 43
Lancia Stratos (Marlboro) by Bruno Betti - page 43
Lancia Stratos (B&W) by Bruno Betti - page 43
Lancia Stratos (Alitalia) by Bruno Betti - page 43
Lancia Stratos Gr4 1974 (Alitalia) by Jiro Yamada - page 43
Lancia Stratos Gr4 1974 (Pirelli) by Jiro Yamada - page 43
Lancia Fulvia HF by Bruno Betti - page 44
Lancia Stratos (Alitalia) by Bruno Betti - page 44
Lancia Ferrari D50 Longitudinal Section by Bruno Betti - page 56 (not a cutaway)
Lancia D24 by Bruno Betti - page 60
Lancia Delta HF 4WD Gruppe A by Bruno Betti - page 68
Lancia Ferrari D50 1956 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 104
Lancia Delta HF Integral 1988-1989 by Bruno Betti - page 106

Land Rover
Land Rover by Giulio Betti - page 66
Range Rover 1993 by Chris Baker - page 105

Lamborghini
Lamborghini Miura P400 by Giulio Betti - page 53
Lamborghini Miura chassis by Vic Berris - page 53
Lamborghini Espada by Vic Berris - page 57
Lamborghini Espada chassis by unknown artist - page 57
Lamborghini Espada 1968 by Bruno Betti - page 58

Lea-Francis
Lea-Francis 1930 by Max Millar - page 88

Lexus
Lexus LS 400 by Yoshihiro Inomoto - page 103

Ligier
Ligier JS11 by Jean-Jacques François - page 58
Ligier JS7 by Serge Bellu - page 61
Ligier JS11/15 by Jean-Jacques François - page 75
Ligier JS5 1976 by 'Unknown' Bellu - page 104

Lister
Lister Jaguar 1958 by James A. Allington - page 18

Lola
Lola T93-00 by Tony Matthews - page 05
Lola T8830 front suspension by Andrew Kitson - page 06
Lola T280 by Tony Matthews - page 07
Lola T332 F5000 by Tony Matthews - page 10
Lola T93-00 by Tony Matthews - page 16 (Road course and Super Speedway)
Lola T70 MkIII coupe by James A. Allington - page 18
Lola Mk IV 1962 by Gordon Bruce - page 28
Lola T286 Cosworth by Bruno Betti - page 36
Lola T94-00 by Tony Matthews - page 42 (Road course and Super Speedway)
Lola T90-00 Alfa Romeo by Bruno Betti - page 43
Lola T70 MkI by Brian Hatton - page 45
Lola T70 MkI by Clarence LaTourette - page 45
Lola T70 MkI by unknown artist - page 45
Lola T70 MkI by Theo Page - page 45
Lola T70 MkI by James A. Allington - page 45
Lola Mk6 by Vic Berris - page 47
Lola Mk6 by Theo Page - page 47
Lola T70 MkIII Coupe by James A. Allington - page 48
Lola T70 MkIII Coupe by Brian Hatton - page 51
Lola T93-00 by Tony Matthews - page 61 (blue paper)
Lola MkI by Brian Hatton - page 67
Lola MkII by Brian Hatton - page 67
Lola Mk4 1962 by James A. Allington - page 76
Lola Mk3 F Jr 1961 by James A. Allington - page 76
Lola Mk3 F Jr 1961 by Clarence LaTourette (?) Gordon Bruce (?) - page 76
Lola T91-00 by Tony Matthews - page 94
Lola T616 Mazda by Unknown artist - page 95-99-104
Lola T90 by Brian Hatton - page 98
Lola T??-00 by Tony Matthews - page 61 (blue paper - not a cutaway)

Lormar
Lormar by Hodge - page 90

Lotus
Lotus 95T by Tony Matthews - page 04-11s
Lotus 102 by Tony Matthews - page 07
Lotus Seven Mk4 by Tony Matthews - page 18-65-87
Lotus 79 By Tony Matthews - page 22
Lotus 56 Turbine by Jim Barber - page 25
Lotus 77 by Tony Matthews - page 35
Lotus 80 by unknown artist - page 39
Lotus 72 by Demand (?) - page 39
Lotus 72 by Giulio Betti - page 40
Lotus 72 by Tony Matthews - page 40
Lotus 78 by Tony Matthews - page 40
Lotus 24 by Gordon Bruce - page 40
Lotus 78 by Bruno Betti - page 40
Lotus Omega by Bruno Betti - page 40
Lotus 97T by Mick Hill - page 41
Lotus 49 by James A. allington - page 41-48
Lotus 79 by Tony Matthews (rear) - page 41
Lotus 79 by Bruno Betti - page 41
Lotus 63 by Bruno Betti - page 41-98
Lotus 72 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
Lotus 49B by Bruno Betti - page 53
Lotus 72 by Giorgio Piola - page 54-87
Lotus Eprit SE by Andrew Dibben - page 56
Lotus 25 by Serge Bellu - page 57
Lotus 56 Turbine by Theo Page - page 59
Lotus Elite Plus II by Brian Hatton - page 59
Lotus Esprit by Tony Divey - page 61
Lotus Elite by Tony Divey - page 61
Lotus 79 by Vic Berris - page 63
Lotus 23 by Jean-Jacques François - page 64-102
Lotus 63 by Brian Hatton - page 64
Lotus 63 by Andrew Brown "London Art Tech" - page 64
Lotus 63 by Bruno Betti - page 64
Lotus 49 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 65
Lotus 9 by unknown artist - page 65
Lotus 17 by James A. allington - page 65
Lotus 19 by James A. allington - page 65
Lotus 23 by James A. allington - page 65-76
Lotus 16 by Theo Page - page 65
Lotus 49 by Brian Hatton - page 65
Lotus 49 by Theo Page - page 65-83(only link)
Lotus 49 by unknown artist - page 65
Lotus 81 Essex by Tony Matthews - page 67
Lotus Elise 111S by Jiro Yamada - page 68
Lotus Elan S3 '1965 by Jiro Yamada - page 68
Lotus Europa S1 '1967 by Jiro Yamada - page 68
Lotus 79 by Tony Matthews (unfinnished) - page 70
Lotus 79 by Brian Hatton - page 71
Lotus Elite 1974 by Brian Hatton - page 74
Lotus Cortina DOHC 4 1963 engine by James A. Allington - page 77
Lotus 22 F Jr 1962 by James A. Allington - page 77
Lotus 18 1960 by Dick Ellis - page 77
Lotus 18 1960 by G. Gedo - page 77
Lotus 87 JPS by Tony Matthews - page 77
Lotus 41 F3 by Bill Bennett - page 78
Lotus 25 Climax by James A. allington - page 78-79
Lotus 30 by James A. allington - page 78
Lotus 33 by James A. allington - page 79-101
Lotus 29 Ford by James A. allington - page 79
Lotus 25 Climax by Collins - page 79
Lotus 33 by Bruno Betti - page 79
Lotus 29 Ford by Brian Hatton - page 80
Lotus 29 Ford by unknown artist - page 80
Lotus 29 Ford by Gordon Bruce - page 80
Lotus 70 F5000 by Bill Bennett - page 81
Lotus 20 Formula Junior by James A. allington - page 84
Lotus Elite by R. H. Rodge - page 86
Lotus Elite by James A. allington - page 87
Lotus 72 by Bill Bennett - page 87
Lotus 72 by Brian Hatton - page 88-88(only link)
Lotus Elan S3 by James A. allington - page 92
Lotus F1 1959 by Clarence LaTourette - page 101
Lotus 56 Turbine by John Hostler - page 102
Lotus 49 by unknown artist - page 102
Lotus 43 BRM by Bennett - page 105
Lotus Esprit Turbo by Andrew Dibben - page 106 (colour version)
Lotus Esprit Turbo by Andrew Dibben - page 106 (B&W version)
Lotus Super Seven by Brian Sapsford - page 108

M

Maki
Maki F-101 by Takashi Jufuku - page 25

March
March Porsche 90P by Tony Matthews - page 18
March 711 by Bennett "Anglia Art" - page 20
March 711 by by Tony Matthews - page 20
March 735 BMW by by Tony Matthews - page 27
March Porsche 89P by Tony Matthews - page 29
March 85C by Tony Matthews - page 29
March 707 by Bennett "Anglia Art" - page 29
March 84C by Tony Matthews - page 51
March 721 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
March 85G Buick by Tony Matthews - page 56
March 88C by Tony Matthews - page 60
March 792 by Tony Matthews - page 62
March 89CE by Bruno Betti - page 63
March 901 by Brian Hatton - page 67
March 701 by Herbert Müdsam - page 72
March 711 by Herbert Müdsam - page 94

Marcos
Marcos Mantis by Brian Hatton - page 83

Maserati
Maserati 250F by Tony Matthews - page 05-38
Maserati 8CTF by Tom Johnson - page 05
Maserati Tipo 61 Birdcage by James A. Allington - page 18-76-87
Maserati Tipo 61 Birdcage by Makoto Ouchi - page 51
Maserati A6GCM 1953 by unknown artist - page 52 (?) Cavara (?)
Maserati 4CL 1939 by Giovanni Cavara - page 52
Maserati 250F by Giovanni Cavara - page 52
Maserati Mistral by Bruno Betti - page 53
Maserati Ghibli by Bruno Betti - page 58
Maserati Bora by Bruno Betti - page 64
Maserati 8CM 3000 1933 by unknown artist - page 66 (?) (?)
Maserati Tipo 64 Birdcage by Giovanni Cavara - page 87
Maserati Tipo 61 Birdcage (colour) by James A. Allington - page 89
Maserati Tipo 61 Birdcage by Antonio Eiras - page 97
Maserati 300S by Clarence LaTourette - page 105
Maserati A6G-1500 by Clarence LaTourette - page 105
Maserati Tipo 61 Birdcage by Clarence LaTourette - page 105
Maserati 250F V12 by Clarence LaTourette - page 105

Martini
Martini MK16 BMW F2 by Tony Matthews - page 27

Matra
Matra 660 by robert Roux - page 22
Matra MS12 V12 engine by Robert Roux - page 22
Matra MS9 V12 engine by Robert Roux - page 22
Matra MS11 by Robert Roux - page 22
Matra MS84 by Robert Roux - page 30-64
Matra MS80 by Serge Bellu - page 45
Matra MS120C drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
Matra MS80 by Robert Roux - page 60
Matra MS84 by Brian Hatton - page 64
Matra MS84 by Andrew Brown "London Art Tech" - page 64
Matra MS84 running gear highlight by Robert Roux - page 64
Matra MS10 by Robert Roux - page 75
Matra 650 by Robert Roux - page 75
Matra 630 by Robert Roux - page 81
Matra MS5 by Robert Roux - page 99
Matra 670C by Giorgio Piola - page 100

Maybach
Maybach Zeppelin DS8 1931 by Giulio Betti - page 107

Mazda
Mazda RX7 by Yoshihiro Inomoto - page 69
Mazda 787B by Unknown artist (Tamiya Box Art) - page 75
Mazda RX7 by Vic Berris - page 90

Mclaren
Mclaren M19 by Tony Matthews - page 17-87
Mclaren M26 by Tony Matthews - page 17
Mclaren M26 by Technical Art - page 17
Mclaren M23 by Tony Matthews - page 18
Mclaren M19 by Giorgio Piola - page 25-87
Mclaren M19 by Michael Badrocke - page 25
Mclaren M8A by Brian Hatton - page 27
Mclaren M8A by unknown artist - page 27
Mclaren MP4-7 by unknown artist - page 28
Mclaren M9A by Brian Hatton - page 30
Mclaren MP4-5 by Yoshihiro Inomoto - page 34
Mclaren MP4-5B by Hideo Mizokawa - page 34
Mclaren M16 by Fornander (?) - page 35-38
Mclaren M23 by John Hostler - page 37
Mclaren M23 by Bruno Betti - page 37
Mclaren M23 drawings by Werner Buhrer - page 37
Mclaren M23 by Bruno Betti - page 41 (B&W)
McLaren MP4-2 by Technical Art - page 44
McLaren MP4-2 by Jean-Jacques François - page 44
Mclaren MP4-5B by Bruno Betti - page 51-58
Mclaren MP4-5B by Hideo Mizokawa - page 57
Mclaren MP4-2B by unknown artist - page 58 (?) Jean-Jacques François (?)
Mclaren MP4-2 by Technical Art - page 58
Mclaren MP4 by Jean-Jacques François - page 58
McLaren M9A by Brian Hatton - page 64
Mclaren M26 by Tony Matthews - page 81
Mclaren MP4-5B by Sergio Baratto - page 97
Mclaren M8B by Unknown artist - page 102
Mclaren M8A by Andrew Brown (London Art LTD) - page 104
Mclaren MP4-2 by Walter Brito - page 107

McRae
McRae GM1 by Tony Matthews - page 08

Mercedes Benz
Mercedes Benz W196 1954 by Sigfried Werner - page 37-52
Mercedes Benz W196 1954 by Tony Matthews - page 38-59
Mercedes Benz W165 by Brian Hatton - page 42
Mercedes Benz W194 300 SL 1952 by Sigfried Werner - page 50
Mercedes Benz W165 by Serge Bellu - page 55
Mercedes Benz W196 1954 (rear view) by Sigfried Werner - page 52-60-93
Mercedes Benz FO110E V10 engine by Michael Stirms - page 54
Mercedes Benz 300 SLR chassis by Max Millar - page 60
Mercedes Benz 300 SL engine by Vic Berris - page 60
Mercedes Benz G-Model by unknown artist - page 66
Mercedes Benz 300 SL by unknown artist (Betti?) - page 79
Mercedes Benz 300 SL by Keith Fretwell - page 88
Mercedes Benz 300 SL 1952 (W194) by Antonio Eiras - page 95
Mercedes Benz G-Modell by unknown artist - page 96
Mercedes Benz CW311 by unknown artist - page 97
Mercedes Benz W100 600 by Unknown artist - page 99
Mercedes Benz 600 engine by Unknown artist - page 99
Mercedes Benz 300 SL by Unknown artist (Stan Barrett?) - page 99
Mercedes GP 1914 ACF by Leslie Cresswell - page 104
Mercedes Benz W154 1939 by R.E.Poulton - page 104
Mercedes Benz W154 by G. Gedo - page 105-107
Mercedes Benz W165 by Unknown artist - page 105
Mercedes Benz W25 by Unknown artist - page 105
Mercedes Benz W125 by Unknown artist - page 105

Merlyn
Merlyn 1100 Sport by Gordon Bruce - page 81

MG
MGB GT by James A. Allington - page 18
MGB Roadster by James A. Allington - page 18
MGTF by James A. Allington - page 18
MGB V8 by Dick Ellis - page 50
MG TC by James A. Allington - page 82
MGA Twin Cam by Clarence LaTourette - page 88
MG R2 by Clarence LaTourette - page 88
MG TD by Max Millar - page 90(only link)-98
MG Q-Type 1934 by D.Attwood (Aubois) - page 104

Miller
Miller powered Lakester by Unknown artist - page 84

Minardi
Minardi M189 by Sergio Baratto - page 85

Mini
Mini by Theo Page - page 101
Mini Cooper by Theo Page - page 101

Mirage
Mirage M6 1973 by Tony Matthews - page 28

Morris
Morris Minor Chassis by Frederick Gordon-Crosby - page 88
Morris 8 by Max Millar - page 89
Morris Isis by Lofthouse - page 89
Morris Isis by Max Millar - page 89

N

Nissan
Nissan R89C by Tony Matthews - page 04
Nissan GTI by Tony Matthews - page 07
Nissan R98C by Hideo Mizokawa - page 35
Nissan R382 by Inomoto - page 48
Nissan R382 by Makoto Ouchi - page 48
Nissan ZX Turbo by Jim Hatch - page 55
Nissan GTI by by Tony Matthews - page 61
Nissan 300Z by David Kimble(?) or Kevin Hulsey(?) - page 91
Nissan 300Z drivetrain by Unknown artist - page 91
Nissan VG30DETT engine by Unknown artist - page 96

Novi Ferguson
Novi Ferguson Novi by James A. Allington - page 45
Novi Ferguson Novi by Vic Berris - page 45

NSU
NSU Prinz 4 1967 by Schlenzig - page 95
NSU 1200C 1971 by Schlenzig - page 95

O

Offenhauser
Offenhauser 270 by Clarence LaTourette - page 88

Oldsmobile
Oldsmobile V8 Turbo engine by Ted Fornander - page 86
Oldsmobile Aurora V8 IRL engine by Tom Quilan - page 98

Opel
Opel Kadett GTE by Bruno Betti - page 44
Opel Kadett GTE by Technical Art - page 44
Opel Ascona 400 Gr4 by Technical Art - page 44-58
Opel Ascona 400 Gr4 by Franco Rosso - page 44
Opel Kadett A by Bruno Betti - page 56
Opel GT by Giulio Betti - page 69
Opel Kadett 4x4 by Giulio(?) or Bruno(?) Betti - page 71
Opel Manta 400 1982 by Jim Bamber - page 80-86

Osca
Osca 1500 Sport 1958 by Giovanni Cavara - page 47

P

Packard
Packard by James A. Allington - page 18

Pagani
Pagani Zonda by Giulio Betti - page 93

Panhard
Panhard Dyna Z 1954 -by Unknown artist - page 102

Panther
Panther 6 by Lawrie Watts - page 90

Parnelli
Parnelli VPJ2 by Design Maru(?) - page 38

Penske
Penske PC26 road course kit parts by Tony Matthews - page 04
Penske PC25 by Tony Matthews - page 04
Penske PC26 by Tony Matthews - page 05
Penske PC11 by Tony Matthews - page 13
Penske PC17 by Tony Matthews - page 15-16
Penske PC18 by Tony Matthews - page 16-29
Penske PC23 Ilmor by Tony Matthews - page 28
Penske PC23 Mercedes by Tony Matthews - page 28
Penske PC16 by Tony Matthews - page 30
Penske PC9B by Tony Matthews - page 33
Penske PC6B by Tony Matthews - page 33-77
Penske PC9 by Tony Matthews - page 33-77
Penske PC22 by Tony Matthews - page 43
Penske shock absorber by Tony Matthews - page 53

Peugeot
Peugeot 205 Turbo by E.T.A.I. France - page 83
Peugeot 203 1950 by Unknown artist - page 107

Pinifarina
Pinifarina Sigma Grand Prix 1969 by Theo Page - page 87

Pontiac
Pontiac Firebird Funny Car 1968 "Tyree Headers" by Tom West - page 75

Porsche
Porsche 917K by Stefan Marjoram - page 02
Porsche 917-10 by Tony Matthews - page 10
Porsche 911 by James A. Allington - page 18
Porsche 907 by James A. Allington - page 18-76
Porsche 917K by Michael Badrocke - page 26
Porsche 804 by James A. Allington - page 28-52
Porsche 917K Martini 1971 by unknown artist - page 31
Porsche 917-20 Pink Pig by Bruno Betti - page 31
Porsche 911 1963 by unknown artist - page 37
Porsche 935 by Bruno Betti - page 46
Porsche 914 1971 by Vic Berris - page 47
Porsche 906 by Inomoto - page 48
Porsche 917 engine by Vic Berris - page 48-61 (B&W)
Porsche 935 Turbo Martini by Bruno Betti - page 54
Porsche 924 Turbo 1981-1982 Le Mans by Bruno Betti - page 54
Porsche 956 by Bruno Betti - page 54
Porsche 908-3 1970 Targa Florio by Giorgio Alisi - page 57
Porsche 959 by David Kimble (?) - page 57
Porsche 917 engine by Vic Berris - page 61 (colour)
Porsche 917-30 Sunoco (left side) by Bruno Betti - page 62
Porsche 917-30 Sunoco (right side) by Bruno Betti - page 62
Porsche 917-10 (four views - blueprints) - page 65
Porsche Boxter by Unknown artist - page 69
Porsche 911 engine by Unknown artist - page 81
Porsche Turbo engine 2007 by Unknown artist - page 81
Porsche 911 Turbo by Unknown artist - page 85
Porsche 904 by Theo Page - page 97-104
Porsche 906 by Madmad64 - page 102
Porsche 924S 1985 by Unknown artist - page 103
Porsche 911 1986 by Unknown artist - page 103
Porsche 365 1963 cross section by Unknown artist - page 103-104 (not a cutaway)
Porsche 911 1965 cross section and details by Unknown artist - page 104 (not a cutaway)
Porsche 924 1978 by Unknown artist - page 104
Porsche 908-2 by Vittorio Dal Basso - page 104
Porsche 914 by Siegfried Werner - page 105
Porsche 911S 1970 by Jiro Yamada - page 106
Porsche 962 by Russell Von Sauers - page 106

Puma
Puma GTS 1975 by Walter Brito - page 108

R

Ralt
Ralt gearbox detail by Tony Matthews - page 47

Renault
Renault V6 1500 Turbo F1 engine by E.T.A.I - page 30
Renault RE30 by Jean-Jacques François - page 32
Renault R4 by unknown artist - page 47
Renault RS26 by unknown artist - page 52
Renault RS01 by Patrick Grace - page 60
Renault RS01 by unknown artist - page 60
Renault RS01 by unknown artist - page 61
Renault RE25 by Serge Bellu - page 72
Renault RE30B by E.T.A.I France - page 72 (colour)
Renault RE30B by E.T.A.I France - page 72 (B&W)
Renault Alpine A441 by unknown artist (E.T.A.I France ?) - page 72
Renault Alpine A442 E.T.A.I France - page 72 (colour)
Renault Alpine A442 by E.T.A.I France - page 72 (B&W)
Renault Alpine A442 by unknown artist (E.T.A.I France ?) - page 72
Renault RE30 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 72
Renault RE20 by unknown artist (Tamiya Box Art) - page 74
Renault R5 Turbo by Unknown artist - page 85
Renault Turbine "Shooting Star" by Unknown artist - page 87
Renault 6 by Mike Badrocke - page 90
Renault 4CV by Unknown artist - page 105
Renault Dauphine by Nivelet - page 107

Reo
Reo Ddoodlebug 1932 by Steve Amos - page 95 (only link)

Reynard
Reynard R97 by Tony Matthews - page 05-51

Rolls Royce
Rolls Royce Phantom 16 V16 Quad Turbo engine by Tony Matthews - page 15
Rolls Royce Silver Ghost engine by max millar - page 103 (link only)

Rondeau
Rondeau M371C 1981 by Serge Bellu - page 56

Rover
Rover Turbine 1963 by John Ferguson - page 42
Rover Turbine 1963 by James A. Allington - page 42
Rover 3.5Litre v8 engine by Unknown artist - page 58
Rover PBS6 by Brian Hatton - page 71

S

Saab
Saab 99 by Gahr - page 53
Saab by Wood - page 89

Sauber
Sauber C9 Mercedes by Hideo Mizokawa - page 35
Sauber C9 Mercedes AEG by unknown artist - page 84

Scarab
Scarab rear engine by Robert Roux - page 72
Scarab F1 engine by by Clarence LaTourette - page 87

Shadow
Shadow DN1 by Tony Matthews - page 23-35-50
Shadow DN1 by Dick Ellis - page 35
Shadow DN1 by Brian Hatton - page 35
Shadow DN1 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 51

Shelby
Shelby GT 500 Cobra by Unknown artist - page 97

Shelvoke and Drewry
Shelvoke and Drewry fire engine cab by Tony Matthews - page 102

Sheraton Thompson Hallibrand
Sheraton Thompson Hallibrand 1964 by Dave Kimble - page 75

Skoda
Skoda 733 Spyder II by Vaclav Kral - page 57

Spyker
Spyker 50 HP 1902 by Brian Hatton - page 42

Standard
Standard Flying 12 by John Ferguson - page 32
Standard Big 12 1932 by Max Millar - page 88
Standard 8 by Lofthouse - page 89
Standard Vanguard Phase 11 by John Ferguson - page 90

Stanguellini
Stanguellini Formula Junior by J. Walkden Fisher - page 74
Stanguellini Formula Junior by Giovanni Cavara - page 83

STP-Paxton
STP-Paxton side view by Mark Fenijn - page 25

Sunbeam
Sunbeam Talbot by Max Millar - page 89
Sunbeam by John Ferguson - page 102

Surtees
Surtees TS9B by Tony Matthews - page 07-08
Surtees TS7 by Bill Bennett "Anglia Art" - page 36
Surtees TS8 F5000 by Bill Bennett "Anglia Art" - page 36
Surtees TS9a drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52

Steyer
Steyr 1937 by John Ferguson - page 90

Stutz
Stutz Black Hawk LSR by Clarence LaTourette - page 83

T

Talbot
Talbot Samba by Lawrie Watts - page 90
Talbot T26 by Brian Hatton(?) - page 103
Talbot T26 by G. Gedo - page 103

Tecno
Tecno PA123-1 by Bruno Betti - page 47-96
Tecno PA123-1 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52

Temperino
Temperino 8/10 HP 1920 by Brian Hatton - page 103

Toyota
Toyota Supra by Tony Matthews - page 10
Toyota 2000GT by N.E Lipscombe - page 93
Toyota Celica Turbo 4WD (Castrol) by Antonio Eiras - page 98-100
Toyota Celica Turbo 4WD (Repsol) by Antonio Eiras - page 100
Toyota Celica Turbo 4WD ST205 1994 (Castrol) by Antonio Eiras - page 100
Toyota 2000 GT by Yoshihiro Inomoto - page 103
Toyota Corola Rally by Unknown artist - page 106

TOJ
TOJ F201 1976 by Bruno Betti - page 57

Triumph
Triumph TR3 by James A. Allington - page 18
Triumph TR4 IRS by Bill Bennett - page 21
Triumph Stag by Vic Berris - page 57
Triumph TR4 by James A. allington - page 78
Triumph Northern Star 1934 by John Ferguson - page 89
Triumph Acclaim by Dick Ellis - page 90
Triumph Toledo by Dick Ellis - page 90
Triumph Roadster by John Ferguson - page 90
Triumph TR7 by Laurie Watts - page 96-104
Triumph TR7 by F. Gordon Reaves Limited - page 96-97
Triumph 1709cc engine for the earlier Saab 99s by Unknown artist - page 96

Trojan
Trojan T102 by Tony Matthews - page 30

TVR
TVR 3000 by Unknown artist - page 92

Tyrrell
Tyrrell 005 by Tony Matthews - page 07-33
Tyrrell 003 by Bill Bennett "Anglia Art" - page 23
Tyrrell 002 by Tony Matthews - page 23
Tyrrell 001 by Bill Bennett "Anglia Art" - page 23
Tyrrell 002 by Paolo D'Alessio - page 24
Tyrrell 003 by Brian Hatton - page 24
Tyrrell 003 by Bruno Betti - page 24
Tyrrell P34 by Bruno Betti - page 24-25
Tyrrell P34 by Giorgio Piola - page 24
Tyrrell P34 by Werner Buhrer - page 26
Tyrrell 007 by Tony Matthews - page 34
Tyrrell 019 Yamaha by Tony Matthews - page 43
Tyrrell 002 drawings (not a cutaway) by Werner Buhrer - page 52
Tyrrell 016 by Jean-Jacques François - page 85
Tyrrell 019 by Sergio Baratto - page 85

U
UAZ 469 B by Giulio Betti - page 66

V

Vanwall
Vanwall F1 by James A. Allington - page 18
Vanwall F1 1958 by Max Millar - page 81 (only link)
Vanwall F1 1958 by Cresswell - page 92 (only link)

Vauxhall
Vauxhall Viva 1967 by Mike Way - page 89


Volkswagen
Volkswagen engines by Alansart - page 02
Fittivolks bimotor by unknown artist - page 44
Volkswagen K70 by unknown artist - page 50
Volkswagen Corrado by David Kimble - page 67
Volkswagen Golf details by Alan Raine - page 78
Volkswagen Beetle by Unknown artist - page 96
Volkswagen 4 cylinders inline engine by Alansart - page 101
Volkswagen Beetle 1950-1973 by Unknown artist - page 106 (Twenty six cross sections - not a cutaway)
Volkswagen Beetle (five) by Unknown artist - page 106
Volkswagen Beetle by Sigfried Werner - page 106
Volkswagen Beetle 1954 by Reuters - page 106
Volkswagen Beetle by Unknown artist - page 106 (cross section and chassis plan view - not a cutaway)
Volkswagen Brasilia 1600 1974 by Walter Brito - page 106
Volkswagen Beetle by Unknown artist - page 107
Volkswagen Beetle 1952 by Unknown artist - page 107

Volvo
Volvo 144 by John Hostler - page 90

W

Weaver
Weaver 1500 Formula 1 by Gordon Bruce - page 83

Webster
Webster Special Two-liter by William A. Moore - page 80

Williams
Williams FW14 by Tony Matthews - page 05
Williams FW14B by Tony Matthews - page 20
Williams FW15C by Tony Matthews - page 07
Williams FW09 by Tony Matthews - page 11
Williams FW07C by Tony Matthews - page 11
Williams FW07 by Jeremy Banks - page 13
Williams FW16B side view by Tony Matthews - page 14
Williams FW11B by Tony Matthews - page 24
Williams FW09 by Takashi Jufuku - page 34
Williams FW18 by Tony Matthews - page 73
Williams FW19 by Tony Matthews - page 85
Williams FW14B (working drawing) by Tony Matthews - page 92
Williams FW09 by Unknown artist - page 92
Williams FW13B by Sergio Baratto - page 97

Wolf
Wolf WR1 by Sergio Baratto - page 30

Y

Yamaha
Yamaha OX99-11 by unknown artist - page 81

Z

Zakspeed
Zakspeed 871 by Giulio Betti - page 67

Zundapp
Zundapp Janus 1956 by Thusius - page 106





Trucks

Bedford M1120 by Tony Matthews - page 69
DAF Turbo Twin Paris-Dakar racetruck 1986 by Portugies Visual Communications - page 72
DAF Turbo Twin Paris-Dakar racetruck 1988 by Portugies Visual Communications - page 72
Scania 13-litre 6-cylinder Euro 5 engine by Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania 16-litre V8 by Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania 270hp 9-litre ethanol EEV by Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania GR875 Gearbox by Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania GRSO905R 12+2-speed Gearbox by Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania Non-synchronous trasmission from the Meritor drivetrain Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania Vacuum servo brake by Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania hub reduction bogie by Semcon Informatic Graphic Solutions - page 95
Scania 141 by Vic Berris - page 106
Fiat 693NI 6x4 by Giulio Betti(?) - page 106


Motorcycle

Motorcycle engine by Lawrence Watts - page 03
HRD motorcycle by Tony Matthews - page 05
BMW R100RS motorcycle by Bruno Betti - page 36
Moto Guzzi 500 cc V8 exploded view by unknown artist - page 49
MV Agusta 1970 by Giulio Betti - page 54
Suzuki 500 1977 by Tony Matthews - page 83
NSU Baumm 009 Stressed skin Hammock By Schlenzig - page 103-104
Norton Manx Double Knocker 1957 engine by J. Bennett - page 106

Airplane

Mustang P51C by Reynold Brown - page 02
Concorde by Theo Page - page 10
Rolls Royce Merlin supercharger by unknown artist - page 66
Rolls Royce Merlin XX supercharger by unknown artist - page 66
Napier Sabre by Max Millar - page 66
Pitts Model 12 by Tom Johnson - page 06
Space Shuttle by Barron Storey - page 75
Junkers Jumo 211 engine by unknown artist - page 81
Boing AEWC by Giuseppe Picarella - page 91
Fokker DR1 Triplane by David R. Jones - page 91
RV-7A by Tom Johnson - page 92
Northrop X-35B Flying Wing by Unknown artist - page 96


Books and Magazine Articles

Beneath The Skin (13 pages) - page 89
Cutaway Kings by Autocar Vol 248 No 4240 - 11 February 1978 (2 pages) - page 89
Cutaway Kings by Aeroplane Magazine December 1998 - James H. Clark (8 pages) - page 89
Cutaway Kings by Aeroplane Magazine November 1999 - Peter Endsleigh Castle (9 pages) - page 89
Cutaway Kings by Aeroplane Magazine April 1999 - Frank Munger (10 pages) - page 91
The Fine Art of Tony Matthews - 4 pages - 1995 Indianapolis 500 Yearbook - page 91


??

Tank by Alansart - page 02
JPS boat by Tony Matthews - page 10
Eight Wheels Truck by Anders Bonde - page 10
Benetton wind tunnel by Tony Matthews - page 19
?? by Max Millar - page 22
Delage 1,5 Litre (?) by Gordon Crosby - page 22
?? by Dick Ellis - page 22
?? by FW Beak - page 22
MG ?? by Chris Plant - page 22
Bluebird by Harold Bubb - page 36-37
Ferrari wind tunnel by ?? - page 40
"Loobeetle" by unknown artist - page 52
Essex Motorhome by Tony Matthews - page 57
Pan-Galactic Starfriend Luxury Liner by Theo Page - page 66
Fictional F1 car 1976 by Michael Stirm - page 74
Nikki Carburetter NK802 exploded view by Alan Raine - page 78
MKIVb helmet by Tony Matthews - page 78
Lner 2001 1936 steam engine by Harry Clark - page 84(only link)
Lner 10000 1936 steam engine by Harry Clark - page 84(only link)
Godzilla Thing by unknown artist - page 85
Vulcan Locomotives Liberation 2-8-0 by Unknown artist - page 90(only link)
Locomotive 1847 by G. Smith(?) - page 90(only link)
Streamlined Car 1931 by Unknown artist - page 96
Tank by (?) GB-Harry Hopkins Vickers (?) - page 96
Chassis of 4 cylinder car by unknown artist - page 97
Skulls by Leonardo da Vinci - page 102

Edited to update to page 108.
Any complement or correction are welcome.

To be continued...

Ibsen


Posted Image
100 Pages. Fantastic. Thanks guys.

Edited by ibsenop, 28 March 2010 - 16:15.


#3961 werks prototype

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:26

I had the idea, and hand-cut a prototype (not very big!) when I was at Motoring News, but there wasn't much interest, so I didn't persue it. Years later, I was contacted by someone who also thought cutaway illustrations would make good jigsaw puzzles, and as it wasn't going to cost me anything, in fact I would get a small royalty, I agreed! The DFX was the first, then it was decided that colour would help, also a 'graph paper' background on the white bits. As far as I can remember the total was the five shown on the brochure, plus the D Type. The two jet engines were - I think - both Frank Munger.

It was an expensive business making and packaging them, plus a lot of work wrapping and posting them, and eventually KK gave up. It was a bit like technical illustrating in general, people either really liked them or were completely uninterested - no half measures! However, I was in a local modelshop some years ago, having a mooch around, when a guy picked up a 250 GTO puzzle, took it to the counter, and asked for plastic cement and a tin of Ferrari Red paint!

There was, I've just remembered, an Ilmor jigsaw too, how many were made I don't know, I think it was done as a promotional/gift item - Paul Morgan was always up for anything interesting, and was a fan of cutaways. I did a 'background' for the 265A cutaway, added a title and a box for the specification. I used to have one, un-opened puzzle, but I haven't seen it for years so it may have gone. The engine actually looked quite good on it's background. I may have a trannie...

Posted Image

The box with the tech. spec. and/or I believe, a power/torque graph, was inserted below the title. The fact that I had drawn the original with a 'shadow' underneath made the 'spotlight' treatment fairly obvious.



What on earth were you using to hand cut a Jigsaw? Were they regular-shaped cuts? Is there a specific 'Jigsaw' tool? Don't tell me you literally used a Jigsaw. I can't believe that didn't take off though (no doubt collectors items now). The fundamental relationship between the 'information contained' in the Cutaway and the process of 'putting together' a thing, a Jigsaw is definitely a natural one. Maybe you can find that 265A or some other gem in time for the 4000 post!

#3962 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:28

TNF Cutaway drawing and its artists Index page 01 to page 100 - Up to this post



To be continued...

Amazing Ibsen - many thanks.

#3963 werks prototype

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:32

Ibsenop, the updating of that list provides an amazing service and source of reference for the users of this thread. I have no idea how you manage to sift through all that information. I don't envy you what must be a mammoth task! Simply incredible :up:

#3964 CVA

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 09:38

3 Antonio Eiras today:2 toyota celica 4wd and 1 ferrari f40

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

#3965 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 14:34

What on earth were you using to hand cut a Jigsaw? Were they regular-shaped cuts? Is there a specific 'Jigsaw' tool? Don't tell me you literally used a Jigsaw. I can't believe that didn't take off though (no doubt collectors items now). The fundamental relationship between the 'information contained' in the Cutaway and the process of 'putting together' a thing, a Jigsaw is definitely a natural one. Maybe you can find that 265A or some other gem in time for the 4000 post!

Well, the 'prototype' was probably only 250 x 300mm, and I think it was a print of the Chevy-Cosworth 2 litre engine, stuck to some thin card and cut into about 30 jigsaw-shaped bits with a scalpel. Compared to a cutaway illustration it wasn't much of a task! Full-size jigsaws are cut in a press, the printed card placed under a heavy platter with the shapes made from thin, razor-edged blades set in the platter. I think these are in short sections, so if any blade is damaged it can be replaced fairly easily. They can also determine whether the blades cut right through or not, if they don't you get what is called a half-cut, which is usefull for marketing - I still have a few.

It is odd trying to do one of these cutaways, or at least I thought so. Some bits were instantly recogniseable, but others were a complete mystery, so although I was intimately familiar with the illustration I don't suppose I was any quicker at finishing a jigsaw - except possibly when it came to the un-marked white out-field pieces, as I am quite good at spotting shapes and patterns.

#3966 werks prototype

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 16:14

I know it is probably hassle, but it would be fascinating if at some point in the future you could post an image of just part of that half-cut Jigsaw cutaway. :up: It would certainly add to the general oeuvre of the cutaway. The basic concept of the cutaway is definitely open to many changes of medium. 'The survival of knowledge'.

Edited by werks prototype, 02 March 2010 - 16:25.


#3967 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 18:06

I know it is probably hassle, but it would be fascinating if at some point in the future you could post an image of just part of that half-cut Jigsaw cutaway. :up: It would certainly add to the general oeuvre of the cutaway. The basic concept of the cutaway is definitely open to many changes of medium. 'The survival of knowledge'.

Posted Image

There's one behind the pile of bits! Or did you want a close-up? It looks just like a finished puzzle, but is still one piece of board - a bit floppy, though!

Edited to remove the word 'wan't', which doesn't exist, at least in Hertfordshire.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 02 March 2010 - 19:16.


#3968 ABG

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 18:24

One of the pieces I ended up with was a pilots handbook for an early P51 Mustang which included this wonderful cutaway.
Posted Image

Cheers,
Kurt O.
[/quote]

Perusing Ibsen's index and revisited this P-51C flagged as artist unknown.
The artist is Reynold Brown who definitely deserves recognition. He along with R.G. Smith did a series of lovely full color aircraft cutaways that appeared in Flying Magazine during the early 40's. Brown could also be considered as a cautionary tale of a great technical artist lead astray ending up in the 'fine' arts, portraiture and landscapes, via book covers and movie posters. (Just joking.) Think Saturday matinee "Attack of the 50 foot woman" along with high budget films like "Spartacus". The book "Reynold Brown A Life in Pictures" is available from Amazon.

Al

#3969 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 19:14

One of the pieces I ended up with was a pilots handbook for an early P51 Mustang which included this wonderful cutaway.
Posted Image

Cheers,
Kurt O.


Perusing Ibsen's index and revisited this P-51C flagged as artist unknown.
The artist is Reynold Brown who definitely deserves recognition. He along with R.G. Smith did a series of lovely full color aircraft cutaways that appeared in Flying Magazine during the early 40's. Brown could also be considered as a cautionary tale of a great technical artist lead astray ending up in the 'fine' arts, portraiture and landscapes, via book covers and movie posters. (Just joking.) Think Saturday matinee "Attack of the 50 foot woman" along with high budget films like "Spartacus". The book "Reynold Brown A Life in Pictures" is available from Amazon.

Al

It is a fine cutaway, as far as I can see at maximum enlargement, and thanks for the name. One thing that worries me though - and I speak as someone who has only done one propeller-driven aircraft - is that it is obviously airborne, yet the prop is stationary. I understand the problem, and I'm not sure what the answer is. I showed a blurred prop, as the Pitts Special was shown flying, and I think the procedure at 'Flight' - I say this without checking - was to show the aircraft with the undercarriage down.

Reynold Brown probably did the smart thing and followed the money! There used to be a studio doing film poster art in my home town, and they were doing very well! That also is now all done on computer, I assume.

#3970 terrance trump

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 19:32

Posted Image

There's one behind the pile of bits! Or did you want a close-up? It looks just like a finished puzzle, but is still one piece of board - a bit floppy, though!

Edited to remove the word 'wan't', which doesn't exist, at least in Hertfordshire.


Tony did you pour whiskey on the puzzle to make it half-cut. I planted a lawn that way. I poured whiskey on the grass seed and when it came up it was half-cut. Saves a lot of mowing.

#3971 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 21:04

I poured whiskey on the grass seed and when it came up it was half-cut. Saves a lot of mowing.

Concrete. Saves a lot of mowing, and doesn't waste any whiskey!

#3972 TWest

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 21:38

Just to throw another related item in here, the first time I went to the Japanese Toy and Hobby Show, one of the things that hit me personally was a line of cutaway puzzles that were being produced from the Yoshihiro Inomoto drawings. Seeing classic and historic cars done in a line of puzzles was rather striking to me considering that this was around the point where they were doing a lot of photo-realistic artwork on surfing and related US lifestyle subjects. I have the catalog sheet around somewhere and will copy it out for you guys when I find it ... don't hold your collective breath.
I believe that there have been puzzles based on David Kimble artwork, although I don't believe I have anything that shows it.
Tom West

#3973 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 22:39

Just to throw another related item in here, the first time I went to the Japanese Toy and Hobby Show, one of the things that hit me personally was a line of cutaway puzzles that were being produced from the Yoshihiro Inomoto drawings. I have the catalog sheet around somewhere and will copy it out for you guys when I find it ...
I believe that there have been puzzles based on David Kimble artwork,
Tom West

It doesn't surprise me that puzzles have been made from other technical illustrations, it surprises me a little that I haven't heard of them, or seen them revued or advertised. I think I was right in my first conclusion with the test jigsaw that I showed to several MN journo's, there is limited appeal. Now, a rose-covered cottage, a stream, a field of cows and a comely milkmaid...

By the way, I have a little picture of a pair of instruments that I used all the time when I was making my working drawings, and yet they are not often mentioned nowadays. I will post it ASAP...

#3974 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 22:42

Posted Image

Proportional dividers - there is a third somewhere, my first one, a smaller, brass instrument, but fairly worn, and allowed to retire to a nice dark draw, from whence it has disappeared. It's probably on a pensioners coach trip to the Rotring factory, along with some drawing pins and a cracked eraser shield.

I found the proportional divider to be a really useful instrument, and made life so much easier and quicker. Quicker in that there was less worrying and double-checking to see if a tyre diameter was indeed correct relative to a wheel, for instance. I ended up with two good ones - and they weren't cheap - simply because on a large complex illustration it helped to have each divider set to a different ratio for use in different planes, rather than having to constantly re-set one of them. Very sharp points. Get one of them in a bit of hand loaded with nerve-endings and it took your mind off illustrating for a few minutes!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 02 March 2010 - 22:56.


#3975 ibsenop

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 22:47

Perusing Ibsen's index and revisited this P-51C flagged as artist unknown.
The artist is Reynold Brown who definitely deserves recognition. He along with R.G. Smith did a series of lovely full color aircraft cutaways that appeared in Flying Magazine during the early 40's. Brown could also be considered as a cautionary tale of a great technical artist lead astray ending up in the 'fine' arts, portraiture and landscapes, via book covers and movie posters. (Just joking.) Think Saturday matinee "Attack of the 50 foot woman" along with high budget films like "Spartacus". The book "Reynold Brown A Life in Pictures" is available from Amazon.

Al


Hi ABG,

Credits to Reynold Brown given on the index. Thanks.

and a third Celica by Antonio Eiras

Toyota Celica Turbo 4WD ST205 1994

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Ibsen

Edited by ibsenop, 03 March 2010 - 00:51.


#3976 CVA

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 09:48

Today I suggest 2 James Allington :aston martin DBR1 and BRM P51(coloured)

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#3977 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:00

Today I suggest 2 James Allington :aston martin DBR1 and BRM P51(coloured)

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I am realy surprised by the number of JA cutaways that I have not seen before - the DBR1 is an early one, pre-elipse guides and early tyre stippling, but as all his work was kept in the converted workshop which was the studio, in a large pile, I can't think why it is new to me! Perhaps I saw it but don't remember - perhaps it was actually kept somewhere else! Thank goodness I chose a different angle for my version!

Who coloured the BRM I do not know, I'm pretty certain it wasn't Jim, I know the B&W version, but have never seen the added colour. It is very crude, and may have been done by a magazine with or without Jim's prior knowledge - these things happen. Anyway, thanks CVA.

#3978 alansart

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:11

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Proportional dividers - there is a third somewhere, my first one, a smaller, brass instrument, but fairly worn, and allowed to retire to a nice dark draw, from whence it has disappeared. It's probably on a pensioners coach trip to the Rotring factory, along with some drawing pins and a cracked eraser shield.

I found the proportional divider to be a really useful instrument, and made life so much easier and quicker. Quicker in that there was less worrying and double-checking to see if a tyre diameter was indeed correct relative to a wheel, for instance. I ended up with two good ones - and they weren't cheap - simply because on a large complex illustration it helped to have each divider set to a different ratio for use in different planes, rather than having to constantly re-set one of them. Very sharp points. Get one of them in a bit of hand loaded with nerve-endings and it took your mind off illustrating for a few minutes!


I've still got mine somewhere. As you say a very useful tool although a little sharp. It's surprising we still have fingers left, what with Swann Morton scalpel blades and the like :eek:


#3979 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 14:18

I've still got mine somewhere. As you say a very useful tool although a little sharp. It's surprising we still have fingers left, what with Swann Morton scalpel blades and the like :eek:

We used to use the old double-edged blue Gillette blades for major alterations to ink on CS10 board, one slip and there was a dark pink smear on the board! They were good because, being flexible you could generate a bit of 'scoop' on the edge, really get into the old china clay! People nowadays have no idea what a dangerous job illustrating used to be! Stabbed by dividers, slashed by razors, inadvertantly tattoo'd by Rotring pens and even burnt on the bridge of the nose by Anglepois lamp shades.

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#3980 alansart

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 14:29

We used to use the old double-edged blue Gillette blades for major alterations to ink on CS10 board, one slip and there was a dark pink smear on the board! They were good because, being flexible you could generate a bit of 'scoop' on the edge, really get into the old china clay! People nowadays have no idea what a dangerous job illustrating used to be! Stabbed by dividers, slashed by razors, inadvertantly tattoo'd by Rotring pens and even burnt on the bridge of the nose by Anglepois lamp shades.


There are time when I felt spraying large areas with an Airbrush could be a bit hallucinogenic :smoking:

I think my worst injury was falling off my stall and smacking my head against the drawing board (which had a similar effect).


#3981 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 14:59

There are time when I felt spraying large areas with an Airbrush could be a bit hallucinogenic :smoking:

I think my worst injury was falling off my stall and smacking my head against the drawing board (which had a similar effect).

:up:

#3982 werks prototype

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 16:08

There are time when I felt spraying large areas with an Airbrush could be a bit hallucinogenic :smoking:

I think my worst injury was falling off my stall and smacking my head against the drawing board (which had a similar effect).


Didn't anyone manufacture a desktop extraction fan type 'fume-removal' :) device?

Edited by werks prototype, 03 March 2010 - 16:12.


#3983 alansart

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 16:18

Didn't anyone manufacture a desktop extraction fan type 'fume-removal' :) device?


I had a studio built at my last house and had a large 18" x 18" extractor fan fitted into the wall above my drawing board. It made a lot of noise but didn't always work as well as it could.


#3984 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 17:25

I bought - on the spur of the moment, like a lot of things I have bought - a purpose-built airbrush extractor, many years ago now. It was about 1.5m long, 200mm high and 100mm deep, with four axial fans spaced out along it, and a big filter in front. It was reasonably quiet, and the idea was that it would extract spray bounce apart from general mist. However, the desk space turned out to be more important than clean air, so after a trial run it was put back in it's box and ten or twelve years later disposed of. I know, I know... If I'd had a bigger studio I could have accommodated it. Back to the facemask.

One point I've just remembered, and that is the amount of air used in just cleaning the brush. At a guess it is probably ten times as much as used to blow paint onto your latest masterpiece. Blowing cleaning air/water/medium at the extractor was inconvenient and hazardous, as you were operating over vulnerable artwork, so all that stuff went over the right-hand pedestal of the desk, the carpet below and my right leg. I'm sure there were/are neater, cleaner airbrush users than me!

#3985 alansart

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 17:32

I bought - on the spur of the moment, like a lot of things I have bought - a purpose-built airbrush extractor, many years ago now. It was about 1.5m long, 200mm high and 100mm deep, with four axial fans spaced out along it, and a big filter in front. It was reasonably quiet, and the idea was that it would extract spray bounce apart from general mist. However, the desk space turned out to be more important than clean air, so after a trial run it was put back in it's box and ten or twelve years later disposed of. I know, I know... If I'd had a bigger studio I could have accommodated it. Back to the facemask.

One point I've just remembered, and that is the amount of air used in just cleaning the brush. At a guess it is probably ten times as much as used to blow paint onto your latest masterpiece. Blowing cleaning air/water/medium at the extractor was inconvenient and hazardous, as you were operating over vulnerable artwork, so all that stuff went over the right-hand pedestal of the desk, the carpet below and my right leg. I'm sure there were/are neater, cleaner airbrush users than me!


My said, purpose built office.. well a 10ft x 10ft extension.. was designed with a Stable Door so that for airbrush cleaning purposes I could open it up and point the DeVilbiss to the garden. Unfortunately if there was a slight breeze, any paperwork would flutter around the room ....and occasionally get caught in the extractor fan :)

Edited by alansart, 03 March 2010 - 17:33.


#3986 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 17:53

My said, purpose built office.. well a 10ft x 10ft extension.. was designed with a Stable Door so that for airbrush cleaning purposes I could open it up and point the DeVilbiss to the garden. Unfortunately if there was a slight breeze, any paperwork would flutter around the room ....and occasionally get caught in the extractor fan :)

Alan, how often did you clean your airbrush? I did it very frequently, unless there were large areas of the same colour. I'm trying to visualize it, unless the door was at your elbow you must have been pretty fit, even with casters on your chair! I envy you the space, my 'studio' was 7' x 9', a compact, bijou studio, a bit like my Minis, in which I could open the left rear window without getting out of the driving seat.

I've just been reminded by your comment about the fan... Some time ago I used to frequent a pub that had one, large and extremely noisy extractor. Before the smoking ban it would remain off untill even the heaviest smokers were complaining about itchy eyes, then the switch would be thrown. One quiz night, during a period of intense, silent brain-racking by a dozen teams, the fan was switched on. I happened to be sitting right under it, and mischievously tossed a beer mat in its general direction. In an instant it was sucked in and lodged on one of the stays, the fan blades rattling and banging on it like a lolly stick on your bike spokes. Fantastic racket!

Well, just had two mugs of tea, time to point my DeVilbiss at the garden.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 03 March 2010 - 23:33.


#3987 alansart

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 18:22

Alan, how often did you clean your airbrush? I did it very frequently, unless there were large areas of the same colour. I'm trying to visualize it, unless the door was at your elbow you must have been pretty fit, even with casters on your chair! I envy you the space, my 'studio' was 7' x 9', a compact, bijou studio, a bit like my Minis, in which I could open the left rear window without getting out of the driving seat.


I cleaned it all the time to stop it drying up when masking or for when the phone rang, making coffee, picking kids up etc. The Stable door was brilliant, at arms length and easy to open.

Me fit, you must be joking :well:

#3988 S&M Minis

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 19:13

Interesting comment by Tony regarding the P-51C cutaway with the gear up. It's great to hear some of the criteria and techniques the artists applied when doing these works. Most aircraft cutaways I have seen also don't have crew figures included, further supporting the gear down drawing protocol. I tried the rationale that the plane in question is in an engine-off glide, but that doesn't work either since the propellor blades are in flat pitch. Any pilot with a survival instinct would have the propellor feathered. When building a model of an airplane in flight and mounted on a stand I would simply leave the propellor blades off in preference to the clear plastic disc option.

#3989 madmad64

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 20:05

Very nice. Is this produced using a modelling package or have you used Illustrator/Photoshop?


i used Photoshop paths only
the difficulty of drawing are the few well-detailed images of the car
i modeled the same car with Lightwave 3D but without the engine
if you prefer for other jobs
http://www.antoniopa...on/910expl2.jpg

http://www.antoniopa.....10TDI_lm .jpg


#3990 madmad64

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 20:05

Very nice. Is this produced using a modelling package or have you used Illustrator/Photoshop?


i used Photoshop paths only
the difficulty of drawing are the few well-detailed images of the car
i modeled the same car with Lightwave 3D but without the engine
if you prefer for other jobs
http://www.antoniopa...on/910expl2.jpg

http://www.antoniopa.....10TDI_lm .jpg


#3991 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 22:28

Interesting comment by Tony regarding the P-51C cutaway with the gear up. It's great to hear some of the criteria and techniques the artists applied when doing these works. Most aircraft cutaways I have seen also don't have crew figures included, further supporting the gear down drawing protocol. I tried the rationale that the plane in question is in an engine-off glide, but that doesn't work either since the propellor blades are in flat pitch. Any pilot with a survival instinct would have the propellor feathered. When building a model of an airplane in flight and mounted on a stand I would simply leave the propellor blades off in preference to the clear plastic disc option.

As I wrote that post about the stationary prop I remembered my modelling dilemmas too! I normally built the planes with lowered gear, but every now and then I was tempted to mount one, and then what do you do? I don't remember a British kit with a clear disc supplied, but I did cut a couple out of acetate - if I'd had an airbrush at that age I would have tried flashing a curved blurr for each blade with a yellow flash at the tip. I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn't even know about airbrushes! Leaving the blades off is an interesting option.

As I have said on several occasions, technical illustration and modelling have a lot in common, at least for me. I always thought of my cutaways as 2D models. To get back to the Mustang, for me wheels up, stationary prop doesn't really work.

#3992 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 22:39

the difficulty of drawing are the few well-detailed images of the car

It is always the case that if you don't have the information you can't do a cutaway! Once again we come back to the fundamental reason for technical illustration - it is to show how something is put together, or how it works. It doesn't matter how cool it looks, if it's wrong, it's wrong.

Early in my relationship with Jim Allington, aged about 16 or 17 and before my official apprenticeship started, I can remember getting all fired up and saying "I'm going to do a cutaway of a Hawker Hurricane!" His response was "Where are you going to get the information?" I immediately realised the enormity of the task. It would not have been impossible to gather details, but it brought me up short and I never forgot it - you have to have the information.

#3993 TWest

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 01:28

It is always the case that if you don't have the information you can't do a cutaway! Once again we come back to the fundamental reason for technical illustration - it is to show how something is put together, or how it works. It doesn't matter how cool it looks, if it's wrong, it's wrong.

Early in my relationship with Jim Allington, aged about 16 or 17 and before my official apprenticeship started, I can remember getting all fired up and saying "I'm going to do a cutaway of a Hawker Hurricane!" His response was "Where are you going to get the information?" I immediately realised the enormity of the task. It would not have been impossible to gather details, but it brought me up short and I never forgot it - you have to have the information.


I have run into this on occasion with the drawings, and it will absolutely stop me if I don't feel confident in what I am putting down on the drawing. I have dug back and come up with things on occasion, but I also have some partially complete things rolled up here that will probably never get finished because of that lack of information.
And, I thought it was just me ... didn't realize it could be a global principal of the art form ...
Thanks for clearing that up.
And ... we find ourselves another step closer to seeing that big ball drop, to use a US metaphor here. A couple of more and we get to 4000 posts. Want to have Marc or Ibsen or Tony get that honor, as they are the backbone of this deal for me.
Congratulations, all, and thanks for all of the great material.
Tom West

#3994 CVA

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 06:57

never published artist in this forum:Ian Cleaver with 2 drawings:aston martin db4 zagato and jaguar c
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#3995 Tony Matthews

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 08:29

I have run into this on occasion with the drawings, and it will absolutely stop me if I don't feel confident in what I am putting down on the drawing.
And, I thought it was just me ... didn't realize it could be a global principal of the art form ...


Tom West

We're all in this together, Tom! I had two problems on my last illustrating work. There was an area inside the cylinder head of the Ferrari 049 engine, around the exhaust tract, an area obviously impossible to photograph, and the engineering drawings that I had didn't make much sense. Essentially, I had an area on the drawing about 2" square that was almost blank. I scanned the part of my working drawing that concerned me, e-mailed it to the Ferrari drawing office and waited for a reply. "That is OK, that is exactly how it looks!" or words to that effect. Now, it could be that everyone was too busy to give any time to my problems, or the person asked to deal with it couldn't 'read' my drawing, or it was a sensitive area, or, as sometimes happens, people who are intimate with something fail to see that there is a problem for anyone else - they visualise what they know to be there, and think it is! Eventually I managed to fill the blank with what I thought should be there, I'm still not sure it is totally accurate.

The other was a stepper motor (I think!) driving the gear-change barrel. The drawings just indicated a small, featurless cylinder. I tried e-mail but was getting nowhere, so I phoned the factory and to my delight and mild surprise was almost immediately talking to Rory Byrne. He seemed mystified by my question, which was basically - what does it look like? "It's just a small steel cylinder. It is steel-coloured!" Shortly afterwards an e-mail arrived with a photograph of the said unit. It was basically a small cylindrical object, but had several bands of colour, 'tints' of steel, two sections of a slightly smaller diameter and, deep joy, a length of pale blue cable with lettering on it, secured to the motor with crude blobs of some sort of glossy dark-blue adhesive! I am not criticizing Mr B, all he was interested in was did it do the job, was it dependable and was it as light as it could be?

Compared to these minor niggles, lacking fundamental design information means we are all stymied.

Edited to say - Where is Marc? Been a bit quiet lately... I just managed to avoid the biggie - If you get my drift!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 04 March 2010 - 08:41.


#3996 alansart

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 10:58

i used Photoshop paths only
the difficulty of drawing are the few well-detailed images of the car
i modeled the same car with Lightwave 3D but without the engine
if you prefer for other jobs
http://www.antoniopa...on/910expl2.jpg

http://www.antoniopa.....10TDI_lm .jpg


I have found it easier to draw the paths in Illustrator and then import them into Photoshop for final rendering. Mind you I'm self taught on the Apple Mac so tend to have an odd way of doing things. I've not really got around to using 3D packages yet. It's on my To Do List. You seem to have achieved some very good results with Lightwave so I might give it a go.


#3997 werks prototype

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 11:08

It is always the case that if you don't have the information you can't do a cutaway! Once again we come back to the fundamental reason for technical illustration - it is to show how something is put together, or how it works. It doesn't matter how cool it looks, if it's wrong, it's wrong.

Early in my relationship with Jim Allington, aged about 16 or 17 and before my official apprenticeship started, I can remember getting all fired up and saying "I'm going to do a cutaway of a Hawker Hurricane!" His response was "Where are you going to get the information?" I immediately realised the enormity of the task. It would not have been impossible to gather details, but it brought me up short and I never forgot it - you have to have the information.


Great, I can post now we have passed that 4000 barrier! :up: Out of respect for the core contributors who have provided us with a real education and insight into the history of this wonderful practice. I kept my counsel until the 'big one' had passed :)

You know, I found it really fascinating when you first mentioned the possible use/reading of the draughtsman's drawing as a 'tool' as a part of the process of producing a technical illustration, it just never occurred to me, it should have, but obviously if you are seeking that most 'fundamental' level of information, can there really be a better source/starting point than the engineering drawing, assuming you can accurately interpret the drawing. Which clearly begs the question, do your illustrations adhere to any particular level of tolerance and fit Tony? :)

Seriously though, I realise that being given access to engineering drawings or very detailed technical information beforehand is probably neither common nor necessarily a prerequisite. It could be argued that an initial lack of information is one of the primary challenges you face as a technical illustrator and you have given us numerous examples of how, in being denied certain information rather than 'make it up' you have instead applied engineering principles and attempted to work out a particular process or mechanism yourself in order to 'get it right'. However, on which work do you feel that you were provided with or were able to amass the most satisfactory levels of preparatory information beforehand? And beyond possibly reducing the lead time did this in your opinion necessarily make for an easier process as well as a better final work?

Edited by werks prototype, 04 March 2010 - 12:00.


#3998 werks prototype

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 11:12



BRM H-16 'Theo Page'


Edited by werks prototype, 28 April 2010 - 18:05.


#3999 alansart

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 12:00

Great, I can post now we have past that 4000 barrier! :up: Out of respect for the core contributors who have provided us with a real education. I kept my counsel until the 'big one' had passed :)


Sorry I missed that. I should have left it for Bonde :wave:

I think it would be impossible to do any serious Technical Illustration without the ability to read Engineering Drawings.

For instance, this was produced using a photo for external detail but all the internal parts were drawn completely from plans.

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Edited by alansart, 04 March 2010 - 12:02.


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#4000 Tony Matthews

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 12:02

Great, I can post now we have past that 4000 barrier! :up:


I was worried that it might be like waiting for Anders when we were on#2999! What a relief - a bit like the dreaded 40th birthday, the next day you realise that in fact you feel just the same! I was aware that #4000 was approaching at about #3750, but then forgot about it. I suppose it's a bit like being on Death Row for twenty years - nineteen years drift past, then one morning you are woken by the warden with "Wakey wakey, sunshine - today's the day! What do you want for breakfast!"

You know, I found it really fascinating when you first mentioned the possible use/reading of the draughtsman's drawing as a 'tool' as a part of the process of producing a technical illustration, it just never occurred to me, it should have, but obviously if you are seeking that most 'fundamental' level of information, can there really be a better source/starting point than the engineering drawing, assuming you can accurately interpret the drawing. Which clearly begs the question, do your illustrations adhere to any particular level of tolerance and fit Tony? :)


One of the things we were taught at college was reading engineering drawings. You have to be able to do it, and at a fudamental level that is what the job is all about - taking engineering drawings and interpreting them in a way that any non-engineer can understand. Sometimes all you have is ED's, the machine/sub-assembly/part may not have been made, but an illustration is still needed. I drew the Ilmor 265A without ever seeing a complete engine, I saw a lot of parts before I finished the drawing, but to start, all I had was a bunch of ED's. This is common, nearly every illustrator can and has worked this way. My aeromodelling was a big help, as I had been poring over model plans for years, probably from eight years old, puzzling over geodetic glider wing construction and so on.

As to tolerence and fit - unless you mean "Can I tolerate doing this job?" and "Will it fit my drawing board?" - as I have said before, engines have lots of bits all in contact with their neighbouring bits, 'fit' is all-important, 'tolerence' not so, and sometimes you need to use artistic license, although I hate it, I'd rather use a bit of lateral thinking to get round a problem.

Seriously though, I realise that being given access to engineering drawings or very detailed technical information beforehand is probably neither common nor necessarily a prerequisite. It could be argued that an initial lack of information is one of the primary challenges you face as a the technical illustrator and you have given us numerous examples of how, in being denied certain information rather than 'make it up' you have instead applied engineering principles and attempted to work out a particular process or mechanism yourself in order to 'get it right'.


It is fairly common, or was, to be given reasonable information. It depends how the job is commissioned. If a sponsor insists on a car cutaway but the constructor is unhappy about it, and particularly if you are not known to them, it can be a bit tricky. If the constructor commissions it, there is generally more willingness to help. You also come across individuals within organisations that are more or less sympathetic! It's great when you are seen to be struggling with a sub-assembly by a friendly storeman who says "I've got one of those in bits in the store - come with me!" Sorry about the change of tense here and there, I sometimes forget I'm not illustrating anymore!

However, on which work do you feel that you were provided with or were able to amass the most satisfactory levels of preparatory information beforehand? And beyond possibly reducing the lead time did this in your opinion necessarily make for an easier process as well as a better final work?


It is possible to have too much information - you only need enough, more than enough is a burden, or takes up space and wastes time. I probably had more information from Ilmor than anyone else, it was a pleasure in more ways than one, and I always hoped that, having been involved in a very small way from the outset, that I might go on to do all their engines, but it wasn't to be. Got a ton of drawings from Benneton, too, for the windtunnel, plus my photographs, but that was a challenge - I have never used a 15mm Nikkor on so many shots! What influences produce a 'better' final work I'm not sure. This is where the art side creeps in, although I will always call it Technical Illustration. Perhaps it's the phases of the moon...