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#4251 CVA

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 08:25

ford escort wrc by terry Collins today
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#4252 werks prototype

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 15:07

Ferrari 312 PB 1972 cutaway by Demand.
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Ibsen


:eek: Blinking Beautiful!


#4253 werks prototype

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 15:09

I understand that he has a project out of town for a couple weeks. My guess is he's focused on it, maybe sans computer and likely sapped at the end of the day.... just speculation, except for the "project out of town" part/


With any luck he has been contacted by McLaren with a view to a little job on their current road car.


#4254 werks prototype

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 17:30

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The full scan of the Gedo W154. (For the benefit of CVA, see if you can fix that 'creased' right front and suspension :) It might be an idea to try and transplant the right front from your image?)


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A new Factory Illustrated Beetle. (Selection inspired by Macorans 'artsy' Maybach)


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A cleaned up version of the 52 Beetle. Courtesy of CVA.


#4255 macoran

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 19:34

Posted Image
Citroen ID / DS the worst car for a youthful apprentice macoran to do an engine oil change on !
I believe the artwork to be in house Citroen.

I really would have fancied seeing it with one of the flat-six engines

Edited by macoran, 25 March 2010 - 19:35.


#4256 werks prototype

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 21:35

Posted Image
Citroen ID / DS the worst car for a youthful apprentice macoran to do an engine oil change on !
I believe the artwork to be in house Citroen.

I really would have fancied seeing it with one of the flat-six engines


Tell us more?

#4257 macoran

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 21:44

Tell us more?

Well, on most of the cars I had worked on up to the Citroen, the sump drain plug was the foremost one !!


#4258 werks prototype

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 22:08

Well, on most of the cars I had worked on up to the Citroen, the sump drain plug was the foremost one !!


You were tricked!

#4259 ibsenop

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 23:20

Renault Dauphine cutaway by Hivelet (?) - Is this his name? Nivelet

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ibsen

Edited by ibsenop, 26 March 2010 - 00:23.


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#4260 macoran

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 23:26

Renault Dauphine cutaway by Hivelet (?) - Is this his name?

ibsen

My longhand N is like that, so I think the name is Nivelet

#4261 werks prototype

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 23:31

Renault Dauphine cutaway by Hivelet (?) - Is this his name?

Posted Image

ibsen


That's pretty unique. Lots of carpet/fabric texture there.

#4262 macoran

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 23:34

You were tricked!

It ended with the owner driving away with a drained gearbox and a double filling of engine oil.
He came back an hour later complainig of a badly smoking exhaust.
The gearbox had held up just fine !

#4263 macoran

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 23:38

Posted Image

I remember them fondly. They were very popular as taxis in the Golden triangle countries in the 60's
The spare wheel was accessed from under the front luggage compartment by opening a hatch under the bumper.

Edited by macoran, 25 March 2010 - 23:39.


#4264 ibsenop

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 00:10

Here in Brazil, Renault Dauphines and Renault Gordinis, built by Willys Overland do Brasil, got a funny nickname.
The people call them "Leite Glória" because an ad of the powder milk "Leite Gloria" (Gloria Milk Company) who says: it unmakes without beat.

Edited by ibsenop, 26 March 2010 - 01:51.


#4265 werks prototype

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 00:29

It ended with the owner driving away with a drained gearbox and a double filling of engine oil.
He came back an hour later complainig of a badly smoking exhaust.
The gearbox had held up just fine !


He was tricked!

#4266 CVA

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 10:20

Thank's Mark for the mercedes w154,i put the "spare wheel" on the front and i have improved the right front suspension
Posted Image
i attach 2 others Gedo but unhappy in low definition
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Posted Image
For information,to improve the drawings,i use photoshop cs3

#4267 madmad64

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 13:58

Posted Image

Mr. Matthew
i wanted to ask you
if i can receive a copy of it in full-size pencil drawing of nissan r89c
iI appreciate his wonderful work and I would study the techniques
thanks
my address is
info@antoniopannullo.it


#4268 werks prototype

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 23:49

Thank's Mark for the mercedes w154,i put the "spare wheel" on the front and i have improved the right front suspension
Posted Image
i attach 2 others Gedo but unhappy in low definition
Posted Image
Posted Image
For information,to improve the drawings,i use photoshop cs3


Very good :up: Many thanks Christian. It is unfortunate that I own a flawed print.

#4269 ibsenop

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 23:49

Brazilian "Gurgel Xavante XTC 1974" by Walter Brito

Posted Image

Ibsen

Edited by ibsenop, 27 March 2010 - 15:36.


#4270 werks prototype

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 23:51

Here in Brazil, Renault Dauphines and Renault Gordinis, built by Willys Overland do Brasil, got a funny nickname.
The people call them "Leite Glória" because an ad of the powder milk "Leite Gloria" (Gloria Milk Company) who says: it unmakes without beat.


Are you basically saying that they 'fall to pieces' Ibsen?

#4271 ibsenop

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 00:14

Are you basically saying that they 'fall to pieces' Ibsen?


Yes, the joke is about the fragility of the car and the low quality of roads in Brazil at the time.
American cars, like Chevrolet and Ford were very popular at the time. Small cars like the Dauphine frightened people.

#4272 werks prototype

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 00:22

Brazilian "Gurgel Xavante XRC 1974" by Walter Brito

Posted Image

Ibsen


I have really developed an appreciation of Brito over the past couple of weeks. And in particular his subtle use of colour. Do you have any interesting biography on his career Ibsen? Is he a fairly well known illustrator in Brazil?

Edited by werks prototype, 27 March 2010 - 00:23.


#4273 ibsenop

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 02:20

Walter Brito is a technical artist well know in Brazil. He made illustrations and cutaways to some car magazines and books. I have not recent information about him.
Searching Walter Brito - ilustração at Google returns nothing new, only those TNF posts.
Here is his ad at Talento 3 book (1987).

Posted Image

and here Mclaren MP4-2 by Walter Brito

Posted Image

Ibsen



#4274 werks prototype

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 20:08

Walter Brito is a technical artist well know in Brazil. He made illustrations and cutaways to some car magazines and books. I have not recent information about him.
Searching Walter Brito - ilustração at Google returns nothing new, only those TNF posts.
Here is his ad at Talento 3 book (1987).

Posted Image

and here Mclaren MP4-2 by Walter Brito

Posted Image

Ibsen


Ibsen, I have had a quick check this afternoon. Here is a link to a Walter Brito Puma GTS 1975 that he completed for Editora Abril. You have probably already seen it?

http://1.bp.blogspot...Raio-x_1975.JPG

There is something very clean and consistent about his work.


#4275 ibsenop

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 20:27

Ibsen, I have had a quick check this afternoon. Here is a link to a Walter Brito Puma GTS 1975 that he completed for Editora Abril. You have probably already seen it?

http://1.bp.blogspot...Raio-x_1975.JPG

There is something very clean and consistent about his work.


I have this cutaway to scan and splice. And some more.

Editora Abril publishes the "Quatro Rodas" magazine and published the "Enciclpédia do Automóvel" in 1974-1975 with many cutaways of Bruno Betti, Giulio Betti, Franco Rosso (many have seen at this forum) and the great Walter Brito - for the brazilian cars (also posted here)

Ibsen

Edited by ibsenop, 27 March 2010 - 20:38.


#4276 werks prototype

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 20:46

I have this cutaway to scan and splice. And some more.

Editora Abril publishes the "Quatro Rodas" magazine and published the "Enciclpédia do Automóvel" in 1974-1975 with many cutaways of Bruno Betti, Giulio Betti, Franco Rosso (many have seen at this forum) and the great Walter Brito - for the brazilian cars (also posted here)

Ibsen


Very good. I did not really think the Puma would be unknown to you. Similarly there are some Walter Brito non-cutaway illustration/renders to be found here.

http://www.carroanti...ceito_nac_6.htm

Note alongside illustrators such as Ernst Rilke there is also mention of one 'Demerval Brito'?

#4277 ibsenop

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 22:00

Illustrations of Ernst Rilke were present in Quatro Rodas magazine of '70s and early '80s, but I don't remember have seen cutaways signed by him. I also don't remember of Demerval Brito.

#4278 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 23:43

Hello Cutawayland, I is back!

#4279 beighes

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 23:51

Tony.....................You were missed!

Cheers!
Steve

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#4280 werks prototype

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 01:26

Hello Cutawayland, I is back!



Good grief! Welcome back Tony! I hope you are well. :up: We thought you had been lost to all and sundry. You have a lot of catching up to do + plenty of Cut-aways to review!



#4281 werks prototype

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 01:41

I thought you may have been captured and were perhaps being held prisoner Tony in a mysterious seaside village somewhere similar to Portmeirion.



The 'Prisoners' (I am not a number) Lotus Super Seven (Cosworth) By 'Brian Sapsford'.

Perhaps not really a Cut-away in the traditional sense, but still.

Posted Image

Edited by werks prototype, 28 April 2010 - 18:13.


#4282 ibsenop

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 02:04

Welcome back to Cutawayland Tony!!

Puma GTS 1975 cutaway by Walter Brito

Posted Image

Looking for in "Telelistas" (one of the brazilian web phonebooks) I found this:

Walter Pacheco da Cunha Brito
Rua Br Jaceguai, 908 Sao Paulo - SP
Tel: 55 (11) XXXX-XXXX

This is the same adress on the ad of Walter Brito in the Talento book from 1987.

Ibsen

#4283 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 13:08

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1993 Range Rover By 'Chris Baker'

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Mr Christian Baker used to live a few miles from me, but I haven't seen hide nor hair of him for some years - he was talking of moving to Devon. He did several cutaways for Landrover, and had a very nice, slick style. I remember a Virgin Atlantic 747 and a cruise ship too...

Edited by Tony Matthews, 28 March 2010 - 13:19.


#4284 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 13:17

Apologies to this thread...when I took the M8A Can-Am pic at the Bruce McLaren Trust in AUK....I neglected to check whodunnit!! So...who is AB??

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AB was/is Andrew Brown. He was my immediate predecessor at LAT, and the person I spoke to when I called Motor Sport to ask if they ever used freelance illustrators. He said no, but "if you want my job you had better apply for it, I'm leaving!" He was a graphic designer, and had to take on the cutaway side of LAT after Bill Bennet left, and although he made a good job of it - in fact exceptional considering it was not his speciality - he didn't enjoy it much, and wanted out. That was a fatefull phone call, if I hadn't made it I might never have done any cutaways!

#4285 werks prototype

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 16:09

Welcome back Tony. I take it you weren't captured by a mysterious organisation, which really, is a relief.

If at any point you get time Tony (hoping you have gotten your breath back and bearings) could I ask you how you would approach the more intricate logos that appeared with some of the liveries? How much of a problem/headache did such logos cause you. I'm thinking particularly about the artistry involved in replicating that 'Brut' logo on your 1977 Sheene Suzuki 500, the 'BULL' logo on the front wing end-plates of your FW 15C, the 'TRD' logo behind the left front of your Fujitsu Ten Team Toms Supra (trying saying that with a biscuit in your mouth), the ubiquitous 'PPG' logo on the roll bar of your 1988 Penske PC17. The Goodyear 'Winged Boot' on the Tyrrell 007, the 'Black Tower'text on the nose of your FW18, the 'Auto Motor Sport' and 'Falke' text on the nose of your FW19.

The logos are not really three-dimensional objects are they? I suppose they are something more akin to a 'layer' or a 'surface' transposed onto a three-dimensional object. Are the logos treated as a thing distinct from the main drawing? Especially where the geometry of the Logo is a little abstract in comparison to the 'hard edged' three-dimensional mechanical objects/components.



#4286 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 19:56

Welcome back Tony. I take it you weren't captured by a mysterious organisation, which really, is a relief.


Every now and then, wp, I get a call from the lizards, via David Icke, for some complex maintainance work, about which I cannot speak. It's always a relief to get back in one piece!

If at any point you get time Tony (hoping you have gotten your breath back and bearings) could I ask you how you would approach the more intricate logos that appeared with some of the liveries? How much of a problem/headache did such logos cause you. I'm thinking particularly about the artistry involved in replicating that 'Brut' logo on your 1977 Sheene Suzuki 500, the 'BULL' logo on the front wing end-plates of your FW 15C, the 'TRD' logo behind the left front of your Fujitsu Ten Team Toms Supra (trying saying that with a biscuit in your mouth), the ubiquitous 'PPG' logo on the roll bar of your 1988 Penske PC17. The Goodyear 'Winged Boot' on the Tyrrell 007, the 'Black Tower'text on the nose of your FW18, the 'Auto Motor Sport' and 'Falke' text on the nose of your FW19.

The logos are not really three-dimensional objects are they? I suppose they are something more akin to a 'layer' or a 'surface' transposed onto a three-dimensional object. Are the logos treated as a thing distinct from the main drawing? Especially where the geometry of the Logo is a little abstract in comparison to the 'hard edged' three-dimensional mechanical objects/components.


If I had the opportunity to see a car in its livery then it was not a huge problem, just a matter of cleaning up the image when drawing it, and transfering it neatly at the painting stage. As all bar one of the Champ Cars that I did were in carbon when I saw them the lettering was quite a challenge. Large, straightforward logos like Pennzoil or Valvoline were fun to transfer from flat artwork to a cutaway, wrapping it around a curved sidepod or wing, but small, fiddly logos, even on a flat surface like a rear wing endplate, used to make my teeth itch. First they had to be drawn in perspective, then pressed through onto the painted endplate, 'drawn' in paint with a ruling pen and brush, then often outlined in another colour! The Black Tower logo I had to source by buying a bottle of the stuff - not like me to spend money on alcohol, but hey!, it's work, I have to! Some were more of a challenge than others, the GE symbol, with its curly lettering inside a circle with added curlicues was hard to get right first time, every time, others were relatively simple but time-consuming.

The point about lettering is that it only has to be slightly wrong to look horrendous, and I was always slightly concerned about that stage in an illustration. It doesn't help to know that the people who, in the main, funded the work were the very sponsors whose logos I was painting - I knew that they were only looking at one thing! When the late, great Gavin McLeod introduced himself to me at the Autosport International Racing Car Show many years ago he said how much he appreciated my 'sign writing'. I was very surprised, and flattered, as I had always admired his lettering, and know it was better than mine, but he spoke from experience!

I'll see if I can illustrate my points about transfering flat lettering to a compound curve drawn in perspective.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 29 March 2010 - 16:33.


#4287 IrishMariner

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 03:37

I'll see if I can illustrate my points about transfering flat lettering to a compound curve drawn in perspective.


...so can we can expect to see some more working drawings?

Them's my favourite.

#4288 Tony Matthews

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 11:13

Posted Image

Posted Image

I posted the big section of working drawing, rather than just the bit with 'Valvoline' on it, at IM's request, although it's not the most interesting drawing, in my opinion! This is one of the most extreme cases of wrapping a logo onto bodywork, as not only is there a gentle curve along the sidepod, there is big negative, or female, compound curve to deal with. I wonder if that is the first time the words 'female' and 'negative' have appeared in the same sentence. Anyway, you can just make out pencil lines projecting the already foreshortened logo onto the curve, not including the compound indent. Theoretically the construction should be made by selecting the point where the logo base-line makes a tangent with the sidepod curve, drawing a vertical line at that point and using it as the minor axis for some large, concentric ellipses, each one transferring a point on the logo to a point on the sidepod, but in this instance the difference between bits of ellipse and straight lines didn't make a vas deferens, so straight lines it was - in perspective, of course. I'm a pragmatist, me.

The added curves necessitated by the compound indent were eye-balled - yes, there is still room for good old-fashioned skill! Then a little juggling of lines and radii to make the logo look right, and Bob's your mother's brother. As for the colour, the blue was fairly strongly staining - it would bleed through a white over-paint - the red less so, but still a problem just because of the area involved, so the white was painted first, then the logo outline pressed through, and the colour added. Only it didn't work, as trying to blend the blue tones to give the impression of the 'over-hang' was impossible in short brush strokes, so I let the whole thing dry out, masked the area and air-brushed the blue. It also meant that I could add a little shadow to the 'Valv' part of the logo, although it hardly shows on the transparency. I blame the photographer. Oh, and then the joy of adding the black outline, where one slip and the whole area could be jeopardized - brain surgery must be a doddle. There is a certain pedantic pleasure to be had from adding the panel line detail, where the logo crosses it, then it's a case of covering the area quickly, before anything can happen to it!

If anyone wants clarification on any point in the above, I'll do my best.

Edited to say that on looking at the posted colour version the shadow on the white lettering is quite obvious, I was multi-tasking by typing with one finger whilst looking at a 10x8 trannie in the other hand, and the shadow did look very faint. I blame my eye-sight.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 29 March 2010 - 16:26.


#4289 Pat Clarke

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 11:23

Hi Tony,

Welcome home ;-) we missed you!

Pat

#4290 Tony Matthews

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 12:19

Hi Tony,

Welcome home ;-) we missed you!

Pat

Thank you Pat, and everyone else who inquired after me! I managed an occasional squint at the thread on a vintage computer, but could not respond as I couldn't remember my password! I thought it must be a bit like being in the spirit-world, observing but not able to communicate - knowing the winner of the Grand National, but no one using their ouija board...

#4291 Philip Whiteman

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 13:41

Tony: did you ever have to amend what was 'theoretically correct perspective' because it didn't look right to the eye? The reason I ask is because I was once working on a drawing of a Hawker Tempest, flying in a banked turn. When I carefully constructed the wings from either three-view refrences or even a model, the type's characteristic anhedral centre-section (the wings are actually angled downwards at the root) made the thing look 'wrong'. Fudging the perspective gave a much more pleasing look – the drawing ended up looking right, but was technically incorrect!

Edited by Philip Whiteman, 29 March 2010 - 13:42.


#4292 Tony Matthews

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 14:59

Tony: did you ever have to amend what was 'theoretically correct perspective' because it didn't look right to the eye? The reason I ask is because I was once working on a drawing of a Hawker Tempest, flying in a banked turn. When I carefully constructed the wings from either three-view refrences or even a model, the type's characteristic anhedral centre-section (the wings are actually angled downwards at the root) made the thing look 'wrong'. Fudging the perspective gave a much more pleasing look – the drawing ended up looking right, but was technically incorrect!

Hi Philip, an interesting point. As I have said before, I always tried to avoid 'artistic license', but it does happen that a properly constructed part of a machine will just not look right. I think the problem is that if a photograph was available of the same subject, with the same anomaly, it would be accepted as accurate because 'the camera never lies'. If it is obviously a drawing or painting the reaction is - it must be a mistake by the artist. I cannot remember ever having to change anything major, but one thing that rankles is the LR brake disc on the cutaway of the Williams FW15C. It doesn't look right, somehow the ellipse looks wrong, it may be the patches of heat-indicating paint cause an optical illusion but whatever, every time I see it I worry. I have placed a relevant ellipse guide over it and it is correct, and I did fiddle with it years ago, but it still looks odd!

I read an article about an aeronautical artist, many years ago - his name escapes me - and he made simple card models of his subjects, the fuselages made of a side-elevation spine with half formers glued either side, plus wings and tail plane. They can be a great help, but you have to avoid the temptation to lavish hours on the model and ignore the illustration! I had to draw a hospitality unit once, based on a 40' trailer and tractor unit. It had a kitchen, toilet, changing room and 'lounge', fitted with TV and about 18 steel-tube stacking chairs. I had a problem deciding what angle to use, so started a simple card box model to help. Some days later I had a model complete with kitchen, toilet, changing room, 'lounge' with 18 chairs, two coffee tables, two sets of glass doors - one single, one double with a glazed lobby, and two sets of exterior metal steps with handrails and platforms. When it came to throwing the model away I couldn't chuck the chairs etc., so I still have all the equipment I need if I'm ever asked to set up a 1/12 scale conference room.

What great, purposeful aircraft the Tempest and Typhoon were! A bit of anhedral always helps, I think.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 29 March 2010 - 15:18.


#4293 macoran

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 22:02

I cannot remember ever having to change anything major, but one thing that rankles is the LR brake disc on the cutaway of the Williams FW15C. It doesn't look right, somehow the ellipse looks wrong, it may be the patches of heat-indicating paint cause an optical illusion

Good to see you back in town Tony !

I see what you mean about the patches of heat-indicating paint causing the optical illusion !

But, but, .............. how come I don't recall having seen the whole Reynard cutaway before ?

#4294 werks prototype

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 22:53

Posted Image

Posted Image

I posted the big section of working drawing, rather than just the bit with 'Valvoline' on it, at IM's request, although it's not the most interesting drawing, in my opinion! This is one of the most extreme cases of wrapping a logo onto bodywork, as not only is there a gentle curve along the sidepod, there is big negative, or female, compound curve to deal with. I wonder if that is the first time the words 'female' and 'negative' have appeared in the same sentence. Anyway, you can just make out pencil lines projecting the already foreshortened logo onto the curve, not including the compound indent. Theoretically the construction should be made by selecting the point where the logo base-line makes a tangent with the sidepod curve, drawing a vertical line at that point and using it as the minor axis for some large, concentric ellipses, each one transferring a point on the logo to a point on the sidepod, but in this instance the difference between bits of ellipse and straight lines didn't make a vas deferens, so straight lines it was - in perspective, of course. I'm a pragmatist, me.

The added curves necessitated by the compound indent were eye-balled - yes, there is still room for good old-fashioned skill! Then a little juggling of lines and radii to make the logo look right, and Bob's your mother's brother. As for the colour, the blue was fairly strongly staining - it would bleed through a white over-paint - the red less so, but still a problem just because of the area involved, so the white was painted first, then the logo outline pressed through, and the colour added. Only it didn't work, as trying to blend the blue tones to give the impression of the 'over-hang' was impossible in short brush strokes, so I let the whole thing dry out, masked the area and air-brushed the blue. It also meant that I could add a little shadow to the 'Valv' part of the logo, although it hardly shows on the transparency. I blame the photographer. Oh, and then the joy of adding the black outline, where one slip and the whole area could be jeopardized - brain surgery must be a doddle. There is a certain pedantic pleasure to be had from adding the panel line detail, where the logo crosses it, then it's a case of covering the area quickly, before anything can happen to it!

If anyone wants clarification on any point in the above, I'll do my best.

Edited to say that on looking at the posted colour version the shadow on the white lettering is quite obvious, I was multi-tasking by typing with one finger whilst looking at a 10x8 trannie in the other hand, and the shadow did look very faint. I blame my eye-sight.



Thank you very much for taking the time to post such a technical explanation Tony.

From your description of the problem and the solution, it appears that you really have had to utilize the full repertoire of skills including as you say 'eye balling' inorder to solve the complex problems posed by the side pod. And there is a real sense of a problem solved, especially through your explanation. It is almost like a Physics problem, where the solution lies in you demonstrating that you understand fundamentally 'what is going on'.

The point about lettering is that it only has to be slightly wrong to look horrendous, and I was always slightly concerned about that stage in an illustration. It doesn't help to know that the people who, in the main, funded the work were the very sponsors whose logos I was painting - I knew that they were only looking at one thing!


That is an interesting point because from my own point of view as the 'viewer' there is a definite area of tension associated with those logos, and to make a poor football analogy, it is almost like the illustrator has been asked to step up and take a penalty.

It also meant that I could add a little shadow to the 'Valv' part of the logo


With the working drawing we can see where you have marked out the initial 'shape' of the shadow through the V and A. It is almost as if you create a sort of topographical map of shadow, midtone, and highlight?

Where you mention the potential usefullness of the construction of a simple three dimensional model, a sort of facsimile of the geometry being looked at, could such models ever help with tonal values, if lit correctly?


#4295 ibsenop

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 00:25

Skoda Super Sport cutaway by Unknown artist

Posted Image

Ibsen

#4296 IrishMariner

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 04:12

Tony,

The post above with the Reynard neatly encapsulates every reason why this thread would not have become the behemoth it has without you. Brilliant artwork, great explanation.

Thanks again and welcome back.

IM

P.S I really miss mid-to-late 90's Indycar Racing.


#4297 IrishMariner

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 04:14

Perhaps it's just a coincidence, but I reckon that every car that has been 'blessed' with Valvoline colors looks special. Ditto for Gulf-Oil and, more recently, Vodafone.

#4298 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 11:39

Tony,
Thanks again and welcome back. IM

P.S I really miss mid-to-late 90's Indycar Racing.

Thanks IM, while I was away I thought it would give my daily post average a chance to sink back well below the embarrassing 14-odd, but of course it made very little difference!

Re your PS, I completely agree - I used to really look forward to the races, whether road, street, short oval or super speedway. The cars looked terrific, a wonderfull balance of shapes, the big and small wings always looked right, and the racing was something else. The colour schemes probably look old-fashioned to young F1 fans now, but they were restrained, on the whole, yet bold and instantly recogniseable. A great, much missed series.

#4299 B Squared

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 12:14

Re your PS, I completely agree - I used to really look forward to the races, whether road, street, short oval or super speedway. The cars looked terrific, a wonderfull balance of shapes, the big and small wings always looked right, and the racing was something else. The colour schemes probably look old-fashioned to young F1 fans now, but they were restrained, on the whole, yet bold and instantly recogniseable. A great, much missed series.



Welcome back Tony. I'm a bit biased, but I couldn't agree more with the preceding statement. Your artwork was greatly anticipated each season too!

Edited by B Squared, 30 March 2010 - 12:15.


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#4300 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 12:18

Where you mention the potential usefullness of the construction of a simple three dimensional model, a sort of facsimile of the geometry being looked at, could such models ever help with tonal values, if lit correctly?

Tonal values, reflections and highlights depend on the various light sources playfully striking the surface of the subject, the only effect the sections have is how they form the final surface shapes. Remove the surface and you lose the chance of checking the lighting. The only way a model can help is if it has a skin, but experience, plus a scrapbook of cuttings from magazines - of all types - helps. Otherwise it is just a matter of balancing light against dark to differentiate - todays long word - one feature or component from its neighbour.