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#4301 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 12:36

Welcome back Tony. I'm a bit biased, but I couldn't agree more with the preceding statement. Your artwork was greatly anticipated each season too!

Thanks Brian, and isn't it a shame that such a good series was shafted? Ho hum.

I often felt that if I achieved anything it was the trust that Penske, Lola, March and eventually Reynard showed, by allowing me intimate access to their new cars, knowing that I had seen, or was about to see, their rivals cars in the same detail. It was a very exciting period in my illustrating career, working flat out from November to late March, then seeing the very cars I had illustrated racing each other on the track! With the value of the £ against the $ I wish I was still doing it! That sounds a bit mercenary, but it was a job, after all, and these things make a difference. I remember talking to a Lola employee about a sudden drop in value of the dollar, and his response was - how could it possibly affect me, compared with the affect it was having on Lola Cars? I didn't persue the point, but a 20% drop in my income was hard to bear too!

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#4302 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 14:36

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Here you are, Marc - glad I can still surprise you! Valvoline Reynard 96I, complete with Robbie Gordon on board.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 30 March 2010 - 14:38.


#4303 werks prototype

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 17:05

That certainly looks like it means business, a phenomenon further heightened by the inclusion of the driver. Is that a fairly unique viewpoint for you to have used there Tony?

On a side note, did you ever hear or use in anger the term 'trammelling' Tony?

Edit: I know it is only a small detail, but I am pretty keen on the look of that shark fin. Wonderful stuff.

Edited by werks prototype, 30 March 2010 - 17:23.


#4304 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 18:22

That certainly looks like it means business, a phenomenon further heightened by the inclusion of the driver. Is that a fairly unique viewpoint for you to have used there Tony?

On a side note, did you ever hear or use in anger the term 'trammelling' Tony?

Edit: I know it is only a small detail, but I am pretty keen on the look of that shark fin. Wonderful stuff.

I used it quite quite a lot for Valvoline, several Lolas and two Reynards, the last Vavoline commission was the next, third, Reynard, which was a high rear three-quarter view. Although this lower frontal view works quite well I don't think it is appropriate for rear views, as the engine gets in the way of the front suspension and pedals etc., and it isn't the best view if you want to show the maximum amount of detail from front to rear, as the foreshortening hampers the far end, be it the sharp or blunt end.

Trammelling is, I think - I ought to look it up - the method of constructing ellipses with a piece of paper or card, or possibly two pins and some string! At college we were occasionally encouraged to do technical illustrations using the former method. Ellipse guides are the answer! Two things I wish I'd invented, the ellipse guide and the cable tie! And Google, I suppose. Cor, the things I'd do if I had money!

#4305 alansart

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 18:25

Trammelling is, I think - I ought to look it up - the method of constructing ellipses with a piece of paper or card


Marking the short axis and the long axis then moving the paper around to create the ellipse - not tried that for years :cool:


#4306 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 18:28

Marking the short axis and the long axis then moving the paper around to create the ellipse - not tried that for years :cool:

:up: And how many times have you started making the dots before realising you've got the wrong marks on the wrong axis, Alan? Oh, what fun...

#4307 alansart

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 18:34

Two things I wish I'd invented, the ellipse guide and the cable tie! And Google, I suppose. Cor, the things I'd do if I had money!


Cue a very old and poor joke. When Percy Shaw invented Cats Eyes the idea came from cats facing headlights. Lucky they weren't looking the other way as he would have invented the Pencil Sharpener....Sorry :)


#4308 alansart

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 18:36

:up: And how many times have you started making the dots before realising you've got the wrong marks on the wrong axis, Alan? Oh, what fun...


I had to do it quite often on large ellipses. The ones bigger than the templates. Those were the days :)


#4309 werks prototype

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 18:43

I had to do it quite often on large ellipses. The ones bigger than the templates. Those were the days :)


That is the exact context that it came up in. I was in conversation with my Dad and he suddenly came out with this bizarre word. He was talking about constructing a very large radius, he also mentioned an extended compass like device that he said they used to just call 'trams'?

I have convinced him to get his ellipse templates out in a few days for a quick demo!

Edited by werks prototype, 30 March 2010 - 20:11.


#4310 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 22:35

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If I've done this right this side view should be actual size on a screen. This is about as small as I liked to work with any comfort, it is not very neat, some letters are miss-shapen, but it was not practical to do it any larger, it fitted the board, not too close to the edge, bottom or the cutaway next to it. A lot depended on the available brushes, some worked, others didn't, and the HP2 water-colour board was a bit 'hairy'.

A bit of the rear wing endplate is missing because this is all I could get on my scanner! I had to scan it on the diagonal, then skew it round to horizontal, then remove the triangular background.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 30 March 2010 - 22:48.


#4311 werks prototype

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 22:53

Posted Image

If I've done this right this side view should be actual size on a screen. This is about as small as I liked to work with any comfort, it is not very neat, some letters are miss-shapen, but it was not practical to do it any larger, it fitted the board, not too close to the edge, bottom or the cutaway next to it. A lot depended on the available brushes, some worked, others didn't, and the HP2 water-colour board was a bit 'hairy'.


:) It's still difficult even at this scale to pick out any discernible brush strokes, that is quite a feat. I particularly appreciate that subtle central sheen that runs along the body fading out some of the text. The 'Detroit Diesel' text works because it looks like a shimmering optical illusion. And again on the sidepod where the aero appendage meets the bottom of the Marlboro R and O's.

Would this have been a profile that would have been destined to be embedded into a larger work?

Blinking marvelous!

Edited by werks prototype, 30 March 2010 - 23:01.


#4312 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 23:24

Would this have been a profile that would have been destined to be embedded into a larger work?

Open wheelers tend to leave a lot of white space on a board, unless you use a viewpoint similar to the Valvoline Reynard that I posted, and when I had a bit of spare time after the panic of finishing the cutaway I would do a sideview in a lower corner and team logo/badge in the opposite top corner, so the illustration looked a bit more 'finished'. I had to make myself do it fairly soon afterwards, as if I left it too long I'd be involved in another illustration and lose the incentive. Got a few like that, bald, unfinished, lonely... So, yes, this sideview is part of the complete board with the Penske PC20 cutaway, the problem was getting the board to stay under the lid of the scanner at an angle of about 45° and most of it hanging in mid-air and stopping the Perspex rule from spitting out like an orange pip. The risks I take!

#4313 werks prototype

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 23:39

the problem was getting the board to stay under the lid of the scanner at an angle of about 45° and most of it hanging in mid-air and stopping the Perspex rule from spitting out like an orange pip. The risks I take!


Exactly. You should be careful. I think we would rather you not damage any work in the name of this thread. :eek:


#4314 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 23:45

Exactly. You should be careful. I think we would rather you not damage any work in the name of this thread. :eek:

wp, are you saying that the work is more important than me? Me and my health and safety? Well, actually I would be a bit miffed if a painting was damaged... I'm off to bed, cheers!

#4315 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 08:25

wp, are you saying that the work is more important than me? Me and my health and safety? Well, actually I would be a bit miffed if a painting was damaged... I'm off to bed, cheers!


As long as you are taking all the right precautions you should be ok. I'm thinking an array of cones around the scanner, perhaps a non-slip mat, anti-flash goggles for yourself and perhaps an anti-flash suit and of course the ubiquitous fire extinguisher to hand whilst you scan, really, I can't forsee any problems.

#4316 PAUL S

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:58

Not sure if planes are allowed, but saw this cutaway of the late great Vulcan and thought a few peeps would like it.

Posted Image

the red arrow is to mark the area where the engine blades let go causing one of them to crash in the 60s

Edited by PAUL S, 31 March 2010 - 11:59.


#4317 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 12:02

As long as you are taking all the right precautions you should be ok. I'm thinking an array of cones around the scanner, perhaps a non-slip mat, anti-flash goggles for yourself and perhaps an anti-flash suit and of course the ubiquitous fire extinguisher to hand whilst you scan, really, I can't forsee any problems.

Just tripped over a cone, bent my fingers back on the non-slip mat, which also dragged my anti-flash goggles down my face, grazing my nose, then the fire extinguisher toppled over and gave me a heavy blow to my left temple. Now I'm stuck in my anti-flash suit because I can't unzip due to my damaged fingers. Got any more helpful suggestions, wp?

#4318 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 13:02

Cue a very old and poor joke. When Percy Shaw invented Cats Eyes the idea came from cats facing headlights. Lucky they weren't looking the other way as he would have invented the Pencil Sharpener....Sorry :)

I tried sharpening a pencil this morning. Now the cat won't come back into the house...

#4319 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 14:51

Not sure if planes are allowed, but saw this cutaway of the late great Vulcan and thought a few peeps would like it.


Well, the Thread Title is 'The cutaway drawing...', and I don't think there is a car enthusiast who doesn't like 'planes too!

Posted Image

the red arrow is to mark the area where the engine blades let go causing one of them to crash in the 60s

It is always hard to select an absolute favourite aeroplane, but for me the Vulcan is right up there! The odd thing I have noticed over the years is that for some reason the Vulcan invariably excites women too, even if they normally have no interest in aeroplanes what so ever. So, men! Worried by your waning sexual attractivness? Feeling your ability to excite slipping away? Forget the toupee and chest wig, abandon the white socks and cravat - try the new TM Vulcan wallpaper and frieze, with matching 'Farnborough' ceiling motifs. Guaranteed to cause a stir, not just in the bedroom! Order now and get the complimentary 'Vulcan over Port Stanley' duvet cover, and see if you can drop your stick on the target!

Edited to say I hope that is the only time a Vulcan is hit by a Red Arrow!

Edited again for spellin.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 31 March 2010 - 17:40.


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#4320 CVA

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 15:15

ROBERT ROUX DAY
I have some Robert ROUX drawings never seen in the forum but in low definition or in small size,may be somebody have the same (or others) in good quality?
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#4321 TWest

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 16:54

That is the exact context that it came up in. I was in conversation with my Dad and he suddenly came out with this bizarre word. He was talking about constructing a very large radius, he also mentioned an extended compass like device that he said they used to just call 'trams'?

I have convinced him to get his ellipse templates out in a few days for a quick demo!


Werks,
I find it interesting that this kind of thing is so unusual. But, alas, time moves on, doesn't it?
I just checked, because it has been sitting inside the front of the drawer of my board L-return desk for so long, and still have my beam compass here that will handle up to a 48-inch radius. I have that extension for a standard bow compass that will go up to probably 12-inches ... for all the small stuff. I have had that beam compass for probably 40 years, and have only used it maybe six times.
More likely to use the "hole guides," which will handle everything up to probably 6-inches, and the section version that will go up to 12-inches.
The Ellipse guides are something that I am not sure could ever be replaced, so I am fortunate to have 2 sets ... although I really haven't come close to using up one of them. Except for the really small stuff, the larger ones get spread out in their use so much that they are touch to use up. Never found the higher angle guides for the large set, so only have those from 10-60°, going from 4 to 12-inch. All of the smaller ellipsed can be done from 5 to 80°, in 5° increments from about 1/32 to 4-inch diameter. And, there are some that you still have to approximate at times.
I also have probably the largest collection of Ships curves and French curves in Southern California. Not a real claim to fame when someone trots out the latest CAD or Illustration program lately.
Want to check out my buggy whip collection???
Almost feels like that at times when someone looks at the drawing and asks why I don't do it on the computer so it can be rotated around to look at from all angles. The only response without venomous overtones can be, "Gee, I never thought of that ... how stupid of me."
At least there will be someone else who will know what this stuff is, so thank your dad for me.
Tom

#4322 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 16:55

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

Here we have something that slipped my memory! A card model, a skin added in 2D form, and - serendipity strikes! - a photograph of the full size car from the same angle. If I had 'skinned' the card model, and lit it from the same angle as the full-size, finished car I would have had a very good idea of the shadows and highlights needed to make the artwork look reasonably like the car.

Obviously there were several changes made between my model/sketch and the finished bodywork, but in essence it is the same basic shape.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 31 March 2010 - 17:07.


#4323 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 16:56

Just tripped over a cone, bent my fingers back on the non-slip mat, which also dragged my anti-flash goggles down my face, grazing my nose, then the fire extinguisher toppled over and gave me a heavy blow to my left temple. Now I'm stuck in my anti-flash suit because I can't unzip due to my damaged fingers. Got any more helpful suggestions, wp?


Yes Tony. The Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL)






#4324 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 17:09

Yes Tony. The Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL)

I'll bear that in mind... Thanks!

#4325 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 17:24

Not sure if planes are allowed, but saw this cutaway of the late great Vulcan and thought a few peeps would like it.


That is really great Paul :up:

This is beside the point but we recently had some family movie footage of old weddings from the 60's and 70's converted to digital and lo and behold at the end of the Cine film was an amount of footage of the Vulcan, most likely from an old air show (probably in the Midlands) since it was clearly doing flybys. It was difficult to get my head round the fact that this is actually a 'Nuclear bomber'.


#4326 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 17:31

CVA, you must have completed the entire 'Roux' back catalogue there. 'There are no more known examples' :)

#4327 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 17:36

Werks,
I find it interesting that this kind of thing is so unusual. But, alas, time moves on, doesn't it?
I just checked, because it has been sitting inside the front of the drawer of my board L-return desk for so long, and still have my beam compass here that will handle up to a 48-inch radius. I have that extension for a standard bow compass that will go up to probably 12-inches ... for all the small stuff. I have had that beam compass for probably 40 years, and have only used it maybe six times.
More likely to use the "hole guides," which will handle everything up to probably 6-inches, and the section version that will go up to 12-inches.
The Ellipse guides are something that I am not sure could ever be replaced, so I am fortunate to have 2 sets ... although I really haven't come close to using up one of them. Except for the really small stuff, the larger ones get spread out in their use so much that they are touch to use up. Never found the higher angle guides for the large set, so only have those from 10-60°, going from 4 to 12-inch. All of the smaller ellipsed can be done from 5 to 80°, in 5° increments from about 1/32 to 4-inch diameter. And, there are some that you still have to approximate at times.
I also have probably the largest collection of Ships curves and French curves in Southern California. Not a real claim to fame when someone trots out the latest CAD or Illustration program lately.
Want to check out my buggy whip collection???
Almost feels like that at times when someone looks at the drawing and asks why I don't do it on the computer so it can be rotated around to look at from all angles. The only response without venomous overtones can be, "Gee, I never thought of that ... how stupid of me."
At least there will be someone else who will know what this stuff is, so thank your dad for me.
Tom

Tom, I never had a beam compass, although I used to hanker after one, they just look so cool. I do have a large standard compass that will take an extension giving, as you say, about 12" radius, but I'm still puzzled by wp's mention of the 'trammel', perhaps I've misunderstood, I thought he meant a device that constructs extra-large ellipse.

As to ellipse guides, I have 'em all, 5° to 80°, tiny to 2", 2 1/8 to 4" and 4 ¼ to 12" - some of those fractions may be out, my sets are in the attic with the hob-goblin - but I also have one of the single most useful items, a single guide with all the ellipses from 10° to 60°, 1/8" to 3/8", which became so important to me that when the first one got to almost-gone fruitgum stage I bought three, just to be on the safe side! I have a small collection of French curves, which I rarely used, apart from one long one, that Jim Allington modified, filing down the longest edge to make the curve much less aggressive, much more usefull for body profiles. I confess that it went with me when I left his studio. Are ships curves like railway curves, or are they progressive? I have seen sets of railway curves in civil engineering offices, and they are constan radius - are ships curves the same! If they are progressive they would be covetable!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 31 March 2010 - 21:29.


#4328 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 17:37

At least there will be someone else who will know what this stuff is, so thank your dad for me.
Tom


I will Tom. I am always grilling him :) , but I have never heard him use that term before. He started out as an apprentice toolmaker, followed by the Royal Navy (Gas Turbines) then Design engineer, Aerospace and various etc, one of the last things he worked on (a minor role he told me) was a robot that would scale the sides of an Aircraft Carrier inorder to clean it!

#4329 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 17:44

Tom, I never had a beam compass, although I used to hanker after one, they just look so cool. I do have a large standard compass that will take an extension giving, as you say, about 12" radius, but I'm still puzzled by wp's mention of the 'trammel', perhaps I've misunderstood, I thought he meant a device that constructs extra-large ellipse.


It is my mistake Tony. I have combined two things. He was talking about two distinct things, the technique 'trammelling' which is what you described and also a device that they used to refer to in the drawing office as 'trams' probably a nickname for the beam compass.


#4330 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 18:00

It is my mistake Tony. I have combined two things. He was talking about two distinct things, the technique 'trammelling' which is what you described and also a device that they used to refer to in the drawing office as 'trams' probably a nickname for the beam compass.

Easily done, wp, and I thought it was a possibility. Jim Allington had a large case of - I think - Lee Guiness drawing instruments, including tiny dedicated pencil- and ink spring-bow compasses and dividers. Very desirable! I have a boxed set of Pelikan (once again, I will have to check the name) nibs, a large collection of weird and wonderful steel devices that, if you didn't know, could be instruments of torture or surgery. I used to use a couple, mainly for hand-lettering team-member names on comemeratve documents for one of Britain's top F1 teams, at a time when they were winning regularly...

#4331 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 18:01

Here we have something that slipped my memory! A card model, a skin added in 2D form, and - serendipity strikes! - a photograph of the full size car from the same angle. If I had 'skinned' the card model, and lit it from the same angle as the full-size, finished car I would have had a very good idea of the shadows and highlights needed to make the artwork look reasonably like the car.

Obviously there were several changes made between my model/sketch and the finished bodywork, but in essence it is the same basic shape.


It is really amazing to see such precision over the three different mediums there Tony. :up:

Do you think adding such layer or 'skin' would have been much help to you in hindsight, in light of the previous techniques that you have described? You seem to be fundamentally a master of what is going on regardless even when confined to the picture plane. Is the model in this context relegated to the status of 'extra' 'useful tool'?

The thing that got me started on this line, before you made mention of the 'hospitality suite' model that you had previously mentioned was actually your mention before that of buying the bottle of bear inorder to obtain the sponsors logo? because I thought to myself that it would be convenient if also the shape upon which you were working was curved like that bottle etc etc.

Thinking again in terms of 'models' would you say that my attempted description of you almost creating a sort of topographical map beforehand of the 'position' of the shadows, highlights and midtones is an accurate one?



#4332 werks prototype

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 18:20

Posted Image

With all this talk of drawing instruments and drawing offices flying around. Take a look at this (in the context of the cutaway) you could say a rather self-aware/self-referential 'pen'.

Cutaway Technical Pen By (Staedtler UK)

Edited by werks prototype, 01 April 2010 - 01:07.


#4333 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 18:24

It is really amazing to see such precision over the three different mediums there Tony. :up:

Do you think adding such layer or 'skin' would have been much help to you in hindsight, in light of the previous techniques that you have described? You seem to be fundamentally a master of what is going on regardless even when confined to the picture plane. Is the model in this context relegated to the status of 'extra' 'useful tool'?


The only reason - no, the main reason for making the model - in 1/8 scale - was that I thought it was the best way of showing Paul Morgan , who had asked me to re-style the body for his Talbot, how I felt it should look, and how far I had got. It took about three hours to make the model, then I took the wheels off, put all the bits in a plastic bag and drove to his house. "Wait a minute, and don't look!" I said, fished all the bits out of the bag, pushed the wheels back on to the axles, placed the model on his hall table and said "Right, you can look now!" Renderings work, but models are better.

The thing that got me started on this line, before you made mention of the 'hospitality suite' model that you had previously mentioned was actually your mention before that of buying the bottle of bear inorder to obtain the sponsors logo? because I thought to myself that it would be convenient if also the shape upon which you were working was curved like that bottle etc etc.


Not really, all I needed was the label - and the wine - and I soaked the label off and stuck it on some card. The fact that the bottle was curved was no help, it was easier to have flat artwork and make my own curves.

Thinking again in terms of 'models' would you say that my attempted description of you almost creating a sort of topographical map beforehand of the 'position' of the shadows, highlights and midtones is an accurate one?


Oh absolutely, they might not always be very obvious on the working drawings, and sometimes in a very abreviated, shorthand fashion, but they are there as an aide memoire for when the colour was added. Sometimes all it was was a single line showing a section, so I knew where I wanted to emphasise a curve and stick a highlight. I didn't need much because I lived these damn drawings, thinking about nothing else but the construction and painting for the time that they took, day and night! I can concentrate when I have to...


#4334 TWest

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 18:46

Tom, I never had a beam compass, although I used to hanker after one, they just look so cool. I do have a large standard compass that will take an extension giving, as you say, about 12" radius, but I'm still puzzled by wp's mention of the 'trammel', perhaps I've misunderstood, I thought he meant a device that constructs extra-large ellipse.

As to ellipse guides, I have 'em all, 5° to 80°, tiny to 2", 2 1/8 to 4" and 4 ¼ to 12" - some of those fractions may be out, my sets are in the attic with the hob-goblin - but I also have one of the single most useful items, a single guide with all the ellipses from 10° to 60°, 1/8" to 3/8", which became so important to me that when the first one got to almost-gone fruitgum stage I bought three, just to be on the safe side! I have a small collection of French curves, which I rarely used, apart from one long one, that Jim Allington modified, filing down the longest edge to make the curve much less aggressive, much more usefull for body profiles. I confess that it went with me when I left his studio. Are ships curves like railway curves, or are they progressive? I have seen sets of railway urves in civil engineering offices, and they are constan radius - are ships curves the same! If they are progressive they would be covetable!



Tony,
I agree that the most important one of these Ellipse guides is that tiny one. I almost went into mourning when I rolled over my smallest guide with my office chair. They weren't intended to handle that kind of pressure, I found. But, I have two more in waiting, and have a drawer full of backups. I think my most used piece is the 1/8 - 1/2 guide, and I have a few of those that are unused yet. Since that one I am using has probably made it 20+ years, I think I may be OK.
The ships curves are progressive, and run from an almost straight but swept gentle curve to a more radical progressive curve. They have them in mild to wild S-bends and a couple of other series, so yeah, they are very handy to have around. They are the only ones that I didn't back up. Amazing how little I actually paid for them when a large drafting supply store went out of business probably around 1970. I am not even sure how I heard about it, but went to the warehouse sale and probably got these things for $2 each. Don't think I have the complete set, but there is always something that seems to fit what I am trying to do.
Consider that I am in complete awe of your work, I am not sure that you suffered all that much from not having all the remedial aids that I have had to use.
Tom

#4335 ibsenop

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 01:02

Huber-Warco HWB-Dresser model 205 grader

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Ibsen

#4336 CVA

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:29

We see no more drawings from "inside 100 great cars".May be Macoran is on holidays?To incite him to come back,i propose a "great car: a corvette
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for the listing i confirm that the lotus 72 page 39 is by Demand and the mazda 787 page 75 by Hideo Mizokawa

#4337 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:43


A rather exuberant Rolls-Royce Phantom VI State Landaulette By 'Warwickshire Illustrations'

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Edited by werks prototype, 28 April 2010 - 18:14.


#4338 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:49



Lotus Eleven (XI) By 'Theo Page'

(relatively poor quality I am afraid)
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Edited by werks prototype, 28 April 2010 - 18:15.


#4339 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 10:20

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A rather exuberant Rolls-Royce Phantom VI State Landaulette By 'Warwickshire Illustrations'

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I don't know about 'Where's Wally',* where's the Queen?

* That made me laugh, Ibsen!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 01 April 2010 - 10:22.


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#4340 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:28

I don't know about 'Where's Wally',* where's the Queen?

* That made me laugh, Ibsen!


To think, we now only lack a cutaway Pope Mobile inorder to have reproduced the entire gamut of global state transport. :eek:

Did you ever encounter on your travels any of the people/illustrators at 'Warwickshire Illustrations' Tony? I have done a bit of digging regarding specific illustrators but nothing has turned up. I think as an organisation they went bust. I remember the poster Yasmin at post #3846 mentioning perhaps John Beecham working there with regard to a series of TR7 cutaways.

Edited by werks prototype, 01 April 2010 - 16:29.


#4341 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:50

a large collection of weird and wonderful steel devices that, if you didn't know, could be instruments of torture or surgery. I used to use a couple, mainly for hand-lettering team-member names on comemeratve documents for one of Britain's top F1 teams, at a time when they were winning regularly...


You need to get some images of those 'instruments' up on here if ever you get the time.

That team would be Williams? :) :up:

Edited by werks prototype, 01 April 2010 - 18:21.


#4342 smarjoram

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:53

I think I like stationary as much as I like cars - perhaps even more so. All this talk of templates, ships curves, beam compasses has got me quite hot under the collar. How about that cut away of the pen, eh? Wouldn't mind stroking that over a couple of sheets of A3 Bristol Board.

I wonder if I should seek help.

Edited by smarjoram, 01 April 2010 - 11:53.


#4343 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:56

I think I like stationary as much as I like cars - perhaps even more so. All this talk of templates, ships curves, beam compasses has got me quite hot under the collar. How about that cut away of the pen, eh? Wouldn't mind stroking that over a couple of sheets of A3 Bristol Board.

I wonder if I should seek help.


:rotfl:

If you would like me to send you a copy of the cutaway pen at 5000x4000 just say the word!

#4344 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 12:17

That team would be Williams? :) :up:

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#4345 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 12:24

I think I like stationary as much as I like cars - perhaps even more so. All this talk of templates, ships curves, beam compasses has got me quite hot under the collar. How about that cut away of the pen, eh? Wouldn't mind stroking that over a couple of sheets of A3 Bristol Board.

I love it when you talk dirty, smarj! The brittle smoothness of CS10 paper, the silkiness of Imperial drafting film, the texture of CS2, like the down on a young woman's cheek...

#4346 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 16:27

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You must have been busy with those during that part of Williams history Tony?

Were these the historical equivalent of the the McLaren 'Rocket-Red' team colours that come out following a win? Or just aimed at special occasion/contributions etc within the team? Were you ever asked to produce any for other teams?

#4347 IrishMariner

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 19:06

The '86 Williams sure brings back memories. The mid-late '80's represented the peak of my interest in GP cars that were contemporary (1,500 BHP from a 1.5l 4 Pot BMW? Yes, please). One of the articles that I treasured back then was Doug Nye's technical review of the Williams. I learnt so much from it and I credit it with helping inspire me to become an engineer. He repeated the feat 2 yrs later with the ridiculously good MP4/4. Thanks, Tony. Thanks, Doug.

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Edited by IrishMariner, 01 April 2010 - 19:08.


#4348 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 21:44

The '86 Williams sure brings back memories. The mid-late '80's represented the peak of my interest in GP cars that were contemporary (1,500 BHP from a 1.5l 4 Pot BMW? Yes, please). One of the articles that I treasured back then was Doug Nye's technical review of the Williams. I learnt so much from it and I credit it with helping inspire me to become an engineer. He repeated the feat 2 yrs later with the ridiculously good MP4/4. Thanks, Tony. Thanks, Doug.


:up: That is two class acts!

#4349 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 22:31

You must have been busy with those during that part of Williams history Tony?

Were these the historical equivalent of the the McLaren 'Rocket-Red' team colours that come out following a win? Or just aimed at special occasion/contributions etc within the team? Were you ever asked to produce any for other teams?

I did several for Williams GPE, wp, but none for anyone else. The FW11 was the first, although a few years later there was talk of me doing earlier ones - going back to the FW07 and 08 - but there were not many people involved at the time who qualified. It could have been done on the back of another current win, but... WGPE stopped winning! The cutaway of the 11 (11B) is on page 24 - I only know that thanks to Ibsen's fantastic index.

The finished prints, mounted, glazed and framed with the individual names on them looked pretty good, I think, even though hand lettering is not my forte. I found that part nerve-wracking!

#4350 werks prototype

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 23:12

Some of these are very poor quality but I thought I would put them up anyway just for the sake of putting some more names to the faces.

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Austin A99 Westminster 1959 by R.E. Poulton

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Sunbeam Talbot 90 By Sidney E Porter

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1963 Lotus Cortina By John A Marsden

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1964 Vauxhall Victor By John A Marsden

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1965 Vauxhall Victor By Brian Hatton 'The Motor'

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Opel Manta 1970 By Vic Berris 'Autocar'

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'The Light Car' Hillman Minx Chassis Cutaway By D. Andrews

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1945 Jaguar 1.5 litre chassis for the motor magazine By H C LOVELL

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Lotus Elan 1500 Backbone Rolling Chassis Factory Illustration

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1933 Alvis 20 Rolling Chassis by Pratt

Edited by werks prototype, 01 April 2010 - 23:25.