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'Octane' magazine


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#1 ensign14

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 12:26

Well, we have a thread about Motor Sport, so why not one about Octane? There have been comments on it in other threads but mainly as comparison to MS.

The latter seems to be including more and more motor racing - and the March 06 issue (no. 33) includes an excellent interview with Ian Stewart (and an ultra-sideways pic of Ian on an XK120). Wonder if that was in response to a DCN prompt? Great quote in it, about him driving a girlfriend of Ron Flockhart's down to Monaco, only to have her coming on to him, so he passed her on to Mike Hawthorn, "who at the time would take just about anything". :lol:

There's also a fat advertising supplement in the middle that seems to be about motoring holidays as well as stuff about the de Tomaso Vallelunga, which is one heck of a looker.

We've had comments on the extra-curricular nature of the mag (articles on fine wines, watches &c) and an apparent assumption that the readership has a disposable income of seven figures or so, but I don't mind those, indeed I quite like that ego-massaging assumption...

DCN has contributed things of interest over recent months (including on safety in historics) and there's always lots of arty shots. One of the problems in the past was a lack of historic photography but that seems to be being rectified in earnest.

Rowan Atkinson used to contribute an excellent column, alas replaced by Jay Leno; Nick Mason also provides one that's usually of interest and Sir Stirling has been a regular ab initio.

(BTW, I'd like some better book reviews...they have more-or-less one line descriptions that do not assist much...)

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#2 petefenelon

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 12:36

The only book-review column worth the name is C&SCs and even that's too brief. One of the reasons for treasuring the books thread on Atlas!

#3 petefenelon

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 12:37

I don't buy Octane regularly, but when I do there's usually much to impress me in it. The overall mix isn't quite right, it feels like one of those "lifestyle" magazines with historic content grafted on, but that historic content is often extremely good. If Octane were willing to get a bit more oil under its fingernails I'd like it better, I think.

The Lancia LC2 article a while back was superb from the point of view of both history and photography.

#4 simon drabble

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 15:19

I like the idea of Octane and want it to work, however my experiences of it are not so good. Their report of the Spa 6 Hour was factually incorrect making it read like their columnist Mark Hales had a leading car - in fact his sports racer was in the invitation class as it was not pre 65 (despite the year before being declared as pre 65). The 3rd place was won by an Elva Mk7 and I was 4th in a Merlyn Mk6a. When I wrote to Robert Croucher pointing this out and asking for him to print my letter correcting this he said he would - 3 issues later I am still waiting. In the meantime there has been a very glowing article on Hales' Crossle neatly ommitting that it is not eligible for anything other than VdeV and invitation classes due to it being a 68 car!
My second experience was only a couple of weeks ago when I sent an advert to sell a Lotus Cortina for them to price - to date they havent come back to me - Motorsport have and kindly put a free ad in this weeks Autosport and I have 2 very well qualified leads viewing the car next week as a result.
I would say overall I prefer Motorsport, I keep their back issues I dont Octane. However I do think Octane is next best after Motorsport

#5 condor

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 15:31

I bought the March copy a few days ago - there's a nice piece about Ferret photographics as well :)

My impression was that the articles are heavily geared towards promoting the advertising. The David Piper piece because they were advertising 'Steve McQueen' original le mans posters for sale at a forthcoming show. Ian's were because his old C-type is up for auction again next month along with the other Jag, that Ian only owned for a week before it became one of the 3 released to the works drivers. I thought his interview was poor - very stilted and didn't flow at all ( not at all how Ian expresses himself), and there are a couple of blunders and misquotes in there as well.

Nice photographs though :)

#6 EDWARD FITZGERALD

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 16:22

I find Octane a good read and slowly getting better , thhey have a way to go before they catch up with the red top .All the mags run articles linked to promotions , Cars for auction , photo spreads linked to new books , even profiles are used to promote the subject , its the real world and we have to accept it .

#7 condor

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 18:01

How much more interesting it would be - if they ran articles that weren't geared to advertising revenue. Totally new stuff - Ian's own account of his Jersey road race was seen here nearly 2 years ago, and it's been very clumsily edited to provide part of their article.

#8 EDWARD FITZGERALD

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 22:20

Following on from my earlier comments , I think Vintage Motorsport is editorially free of advertising dept input .

#9 Paul Newby

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 02:27

Out here in the colonies Vintage Motorsport is twice the price of the English monthlys, so I never buy it.

As for Octane, it is very pretentious, and most of the stuff I've read in C&SC over the last twenty years (yes I have every copy...) For me the best part was Rowan Atkinson's column - he has a great way with words. Stirling Moss's column reads like an extract from his diary ... which it probably is. :)

Thus I only occasionally buy it, when my "favourite" cars are featured.

#10 john ruston

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 07:40

Simon-150000 grand and Coucher cant get it right.Think my car led for two hours .Best part is the Andy Prill inspired coverage.

#11 Ben

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 09:12

I also occassionally buy Octane and usually like it.

I think the reality is that the internet (here being a good example) does the really in depth factual content better than a monthly magazine ever can. Hence to actually offer something different a magazine has to present a lifestyle element along with excellent photography to fill in the gaps that the internet is less good at.

Ben

#12 WDH74

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 01:39

I've still not really bonded with Octane, inasmuch as I like to look through the newest issue when I see it at work (I work at a Borders store) but don't ask our magazine guys if they've seen it. About the only bits I really want to read are the columns (I rather like Jay Leno's, and didn't think I would initially). The only issue I bought was one with a supplement about art, because I was looking for stuff to buy when I moved into a new place a year and a bit ago and thought it would give me some ideas.

-William

#13 Barry Boor

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 14:56

One of these days I might actually SEE an Octane magazine on a shelf somewhere up here!

#14 Vitesse2

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Posted 23 February 2006 - 00:27

Well, April's Octane exceeds expectations.

For the racing hsitory nut, there's an absolute feast, headed (for me at least) by "Gods of the Heroic Age", a six-page photo-essay with commentary by DCN featuring the photographs of Maurice-Louis Branger. Some are familiar to those of us who love pre-Great War racing, but there are some absolutely awesome pictures I've never seen before. :up:

(To Doug: any chance I could have - say - about three days with those glass negs? I promise not to drop any!)

There's also a feature on the 4WD Bugatti 53, another on Baby Bertha and one for dretceterini on Stanguellini.

Excellent stuff: the new team at Motor Sport will have to look to their laurels, since both Octane and The Automobile are stealing their clothes. (Belated congratulations to sometime TNFer Tony Kaye for his excellent two-parter on Arthur Hyde in The Automobile: a wonderful piece, Tony!)

#15 smarjoram

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 15:20

Here here - I really enjoyed that issue too. I've always admired the photography but usually found few articles to interest me (and the watch making/fine pipes pages didn't help either).

The Branger photos were stunning and Dougs captions really helped bring the era to life - if there was a book published along the same lines I'd jump at it (hint hint).

If it carries on like this I'd be tempted to change my motorsport subscription.

#16 hans stuck

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 16:08

I like Sir Stirling's involvement and the article about Auto Union in the latest issue was terrific, great photos too.

#17 Ruairidh

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 17:56

Originally posted by Vitesse2
Well, April's Octane exceeds expectations.


Interesting, I'll stop by the local Borders on my way home tonight and see if I can buy a copy.

#18 Huw Jadvantich

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 12:09

The sooner Octane stop believing they are the automotive equivilent of "Hello" magazine the sooner they will become a very respectable journal - its not a million miles off. There are some good magazines in the southern hemishere which do excellent book and model reviews.

#19 petefenelon

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 13:10

Originally posted by Huw Jadvantich
The sooner Octane stop believing they are the automotive equivilent of "Hello" magazine the sooner they will become a very respectable journal - its not a million miles off. There are some good magazines in the southern hemishere which do excellent book and model reviews.


Agreed with the first point, some of the writing and photography in Octane has been at least as good as anything that's appeared in Motor Sport or C&SC since '97. But I don't like the "aspirational" aspect of Octane - I'm not a "Flash 'Arry", and neither (I suspect) are most of the people who actually read the magazine rather than using it as a lifestyle accessory.

I wish there was a good Northern Hemisphere mag for book reviews, C&SC comes closest but even they're a bit perfunctory -- although to quote Erasmus “When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.”. (Ummmm. Was Weguelin on ERA and Klem Himself in one week excessive?)

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#20 Clement

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 16:33

Octane is not good at all.
the article of the vallelunga just came after the article of CSC which is very stupid and we learn nothings new about it.
what about the story of the racing vallelunga, what about the prototypes built around the cvallelunga chassis ?
is it so complicate toi find new stories, i don t think so
they always repeat and repeat old stories that everybody have read 1000 times.
without any doubt, CSC is still the best ( even if they can do better )
may be, they don t have the budget to travel and make new stories ?

#21 Clement

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 10:02

why in thoses magazines, it s always the same test ?
they try ferrari 308 and jaguar e type.

we should learn somethings but we don t exept where to buy a new audi tt !

i don t buy it anymore, i prefer motorsport ( but they should try to teach us somethings )

#22 bradbury west

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 22:05

Just resurrecting this from the MS thread.

RL

#23 stuartbrs

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 23:03

My old man really enjoys that magazine. He doesnt have a subscription, other than getting his local news agent to put a copy away for him each month. There was one issue he was really looking forward to, and due to some fire or something his newsagent missed out and Dad couldnt find one anywhere. So he phoned their office in the UK from here in Australia, spoke to the girl on the reception desk, who had a copy of the issue he was after in the office, and she kindly posted it to out to him.

#24 flat-16

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 13:26

Originally posted by condor
How much more interesting it would be - if they ran articles that weren't geared to advertising revenue.


But if they did, the magazine would conform more to Motor Sport's business model, and I doubt there's space on the shelves for 2 magazines of that ilk.

This month's issue has a short summary on Earl Howe. It sets the bar pretty low, so I doubt there's much scope in it for factual inaccuracy, but it's always good to read about the Earl.

I can see exactly why Motor Sport has left a gaping niche in the market for Octane. I do think there's a big danger of Octane trying to be 'all things to all readers', i.e. it packs much more variety of material in there than MS, but in doing so is unable to get beneath the surface.

I like the Esprit buying guide - this is clearly a field where Octane's writers are on-the-ball. No doubt Esprit-aficionados will find a flaw, but for someone interested in taking the first time plunge, I reckon the ingredients are well presented.

The 'Hello' magazine-style articles about which-celeb-wears-which-wristwatch are inexorably boring and pointless...no doubt intended to boost sales amongst the 'Loaded' generation.

Overall, I regard Octane as a hybrid between 'Top Gear' (not that I've ever bought a copy...) and Motor Sport. I can't see myself buying it regularly, but I would do if I were contemplating buying a car that was being profiled a-la Esprit.

With Roebuck getting MS back on track, it would be potentially very damaging for MS to take any leaves out of Octane's book IMHO.


Justin

#25 RS2000

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 13:59

Reading a copy of Octane whilst waiting in a doctor's surgery (why is it more usually dentists who are into motorsport - more time and money?) I chanced upon something that raised the question of editorial integrity, something that arises far too often with such publications, leave alone the modern motorsport comics.

The letters page included one from someone who's name I recognised as a journalist from another "classics" magazine, mentioning that his Mk1 Escort competing Sprints (which I knew to be less modified than most competing in such events) set times at the same venue comparable to the historic ERAs running there, a point that was not new to me but was probably unknown to most and of possible mild general interest.

This letter was followed by an italicised "spoiler" from a well-known modern ERA driver, which included somewhat misleading (if not downright false) claims regarding the comparability of the tyres used.
Why? The original letter made a mildly interesting comparison of the way things move on in the sport. It didn't seek to score points off anyone's cars or driving ability.

Was it all a set up? The response clearly was, since the masquerade of waiting until the next edition was not even used. Why publish the letter in the first place only to then (using an obviously pre-briefed response) seem to attempt to debunk it?
It was one of those cases where a very few people would know the facts and I happened to be one who did. The question then arises as to how much other press manipulation goes on where you do not know better?
Frankly, it only takes one such incident these days for my opinion of such publications to descend into the tabloid gutter. Almost needless to say, an Email correcting the factual aspects of the exchange went unanswered.
I won't be buying Octane.

#26 bradbury west

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 15:33

I am surprised that Justin did not mention a couple of other things.
A nice buyer's profile for the V8 Facel Vegas
A compact piece on a Zagato otto Vu restoration, nice if you like both models as I do and
Whilst I have not read it fully yet, Tony Dron's detailed account of the Mercedes silver arrows theory and the 1934 Eifelrennen gives much detail of the info from the MB symposium, but he is somewhat dismissive of any research on the Internet, quote " what I found could not be dignified with the word "rubbish" ", although he did not cite sources or sites.
On a separate tack, he is, however, championing the cause of incorrectly modified cars in historics, and very vociferously, so more power to his keyboard for that.
I think MS have a very clear view of their format for the future, and I notice, purely subjectively, that Octane seems to have upped its game in the past 8 or 9 months.
Roger Lund.

#27 ensign14

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 16:00

Originally posted by bradbury west
Tony Dron's detailed account of the Mercedes silver arrows theory and the 1934 Eifelrennen gives much detail of the info from the MB symposium, but he is somewhat dismissive of any research on the Internet, quote " what I found could not be dignified with the word "rubbish" ", although he did not cite sources or sites.

There must be plenty out there that just regurgitate the Neubauer story, F1 Racing this month ascribes the paint stripping to von Brauchitsch at the 1934 Eifelrennen or something.

#28 SWB

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 16:42

I buy Octane on an ad hoc basis much as I do Motor Sport these days.

I stopped buying Motor Sport when a thinly disguised journo freebie jolly driving a BMW around Europe went under the title of discovering old racing circuits. Oh how I loved the description of how well it handled and how big the glove box was, it added so much to the history. Octane isn't far off this standard of journalism and they always fights shy of actually doing a really good article on anything. But they do more half good articles than Motor Sport, so on balance it just about makes the best of a bad job.

I'm not always bitter about the standard of magazines though, and one I do always learn something from is Vintage Motorsport, although I always skip the Tony Dron 'roaring log fire and a pint of ale down at the Green Man Inn with some top notch racing blokes' page......

#29 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 21:38

Originally posted by bradbury west

Whilst I have not read it fully yet, Tony Dron's detailed account of the Mercedes silver arrows theory and the 1934 Eifelrennen gives much detail of the info from the MB symposium, but he is somewhat dismissive of any research on the Internet, quote " what I found could not be dignified with the word "rubbish" ", although he did not cite sources or sites.
Roger Lund.

When you get to it, Roger, you'll find he quotes Chris Draper. Funnily enough, Mr Draper was enquiring about this over at Pre-War Car .....

http://www.prewarcar...cle.asp?id=2773

#30 Rob Miller

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 01:47

January 2009

Mercedes-Benz W196

With two-stage supercharging....

:rolleyes:

#31 Barry Boor

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 09:19

Single-stage, surely?  ;)

#32 Doug Nye

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 09:57

Remember Mercedes-Benz always tend to supercharge every customer...

DCN

#33 Barry Boor

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 09:58

:lol:

#34 doc knutsen

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 18:42

Originally posted by Rob Miller
January 2009

Mercedes-Benz W196

With two-stage supercharging....

:rolleyes:


It was Bobby Rahal's choice of racing car...wonder if the headline was an editorial blooper. No wonder the W196 was superior, everybody else ran atmospherical 2.5 litres ;)

#35 David Birchall

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 19:34

It still isn't as bad as the treat that appeared in C&SC a few years ago: "Even after driving the 4.3 Alvis for several days I couldn't tell it was front wheel drive"!!

Generally I like Octane. I find it is the replacement for Supercar Classics that I missed so much after it's demise. I find the journos in C&CS to be too young and ill informed. Harrumph!

#36 LotusElise

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 21:28

I rarely buy magazines, preferring the internet for my motorsport information.

I think I bought Octane once, but I am far from their target market and felt a bit silly reading it, to be quite honest. I prefer C&SC or Practical Classics for long train journeys, because they don't assume you're a middle aged man on an executive salary. ;)

#37 SWB

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 21:53

I now buy magazines based on what I can cut out and keep for reference, and every other copy or so of Octane tends to have something 'new-ish'.

On the other hand if you bought a copy of C&SC ten years ago and you can buy it again today, just change the prices. So I never buy C&SC, because I already have it in my files.

Motor Sport I regret to say hovers somewhere between the two, nice for a few words but nothing that is worth keeping, so I'll buy it and bin it.

The only mag I can confidently say always offers something new and fresh is Vintage Motorsport.


Steve

#38 Pils1989

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Posted 02 December 2008 - 15:43

My experience of Octane is they do deliver their magazines on time or at least they do arrive when you are a subscriber.

#39 bradbury west

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Posted 02 December 2008 - 18:49

Interview with Felix Dennis in today's Telegraph
http://www.telegraph...her-Dennis.html
Roger Lund.

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#40 elansprint72

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 20:24

Well... I have been subscribing to this rag for over two years now and finally had enough. It is all about money, rather than cars. The only two pages worth reading are Nick Mason (for the amusement factor) and Tony Dron (for telling it like it is).
This month- August!!!! is just so full of factual errors that I've really had it with them. The magazine, not Nick and Tony.

Any suggestions as to where I could better spend my pension?

I have taken C&SC since day one, with only a couple of Buckley-related cancellations and look forward to Cars for the Connoisseur avidly. Took the green-un from '65 until I got heartily sick of the WW1 thing that Bill Boddy dredged up in the 80s, supposedly the diary of an RFC chap who seemed to spend his war shagging in Paris and drinking Champagne (not unlike Octane then) whilst my relatives were being wiped out in the mud.

#41 GMACKIE

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 00:15

After having my eyes tested, and even buying new glasses, I realised that Octane Mag. was the problem. What's wrong with printing BLACK on WHITE, for goodness sake? Why should I PAY to work that hard? I cancelled my subscription!

#42 Bauble

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 06:32

The best thing about the Octane magazine is that it once featured a picture of Bauble!!!

bauble.

#43 Giraffe

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 14:31

The best thing about the Octane magazine is that it once featured a picture of Bauble!!!

bauble.


Was it a caption competition?

#44 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 18:30

Was it a caption competition?



I never say "LOL" but that made me :lol: !!



Jack

#45 elansprint72

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 20:16

Was that the issue which was pulled because it was frightening young children? :rolleyes:

#46 jj2728

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 21:14

Read the magazine once, didn't like it, haven't read it since.

#47 David Birchall

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 22:29

Read the magazine once, didn't like it, haven't read it since.


That must have been the issue Bauble was featured in!!

Generally I quite like the magazine. The writers seem to have qualifications unlike many car mags that seem to print any tripe that foments to the top of the 'brain' of their writers. If I see one more photo of Mick Walsh leaning out of a car as though he is doing 150 mph I think I may puke!

#48 Giraffe

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 08:32

If I see one more photo of Mick Walsh leaning out of a car as though he is doing 150 mph I think I may puke!


Pass the bucket.

#49 Nev

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 09:07

I see the Octane International Historic Motoring Awards nominations are out with some interesting choices in the various categories.

Octane Historic Motoring Awards 2012

I do have a personal bias for Peter Wilson's XJ13 book in the "books" category (largely because it includes various elements from my own XJ13 project :blush: ) but I see it is up against some very stiff competition from excellent books such as David Cross' Racing Car Transporters at Work :up: . I haven't read any of the others but I suspect they are all of an equally high standard.

Quite an eclectic judging panel too. What do you reckon to Octane's choices in the various categories? "Best in the World for 2012"?

#50 RDV

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 22:02

One of the recent articles sheds interesting light on some rum going ons in Dalmatia...to whit=

Where one elucidates one of the great mysteries of the past....
FIA rules first binding only in the French version.
Which caused serious problems when the English assumed the dimensions stated in the rules were in inches, not centimeters....

The resulting confusion as the Threpplewhyte Special (n.45 in this daguerrotype) driven by the Honorable Cedric Bayswatter-Phiffe turned up for the 18th Coppa Dalmatia (Kup Dalmacije), run in Bosnia-Herzegovinas only tar-macadamed roads between Bibinje, Zemunik Donji and Skabmja can only be described as a klastera zajebavati.
( And was indeed in the local press, who said amongst other things: Prisutnost britanskih Racing Team, prouzročio je mnogo veselja zbog svoje idiotske čitanjapravila, čime je mučko Albion osujećeni , but we digress..)

The gentleman with his back to the camera and the trendy haircut is the chief designer of Thepplewhyte Horseless Carriage Manufacturers and Fettlers, Stan Still MMEng.PPTe, BSc, here holding his head in despair as the enormity of the mistake (and car) sunk in, contemplating doing the right thing and honourably quitting this mortal coil, as he surely would get the cut direct when returning to The Sceptred Isle. ( Car n.8, incidentally, was the locally built Hrom puž, driven by Captain Bakir Izetbegović of the Fifth Bosnian Light Bicycle Brigade, who sportingly did not protest the disparity in cubic capacity, although he did warn The Honorable Cedric that the use of both their trouser belts on The Honorable Cedric's Thepplewhyte's bonnet was hardly cricket, plus entailing the risk of losing their trews, but as all the British contingent surrounding the car did not have moustaches, he, as the only Bosnian not to have one, would not demand a handicap in the spirit of comradeship (Said moustache having been ripped off in an unpleasant incident as a student, when duelling at Universität Heidelberg, but as not germane to this tale we will elide the details.)).

The rules on belts and straps have been unclear ever since, and played no small part in louche stories about Mr. Mosley in future years.

Further embarrassment was providentially avoided the following day, as the Great Banja Luka Earthquake of 1938 (Бањалука velikog potresa 1938) destroyed the road between Zemunik Donji and Skabmja, so the competition was transformed into The First Drinking Coppa Dalmatia (Prvo piće Kup Dalmacije ), consisting in drinking the cups 4.5 liter capacity filled with Rakije in one gulp.

This played right into British hands, as, in the usual ingenuous 'perfidious Albion' way, the teams' timekeeper, Seymour Legg, insisted the British, as guests, should avail themselves of the loophole, and take as a given that the afore stated cubic capacity would be in the time-honoured Imperial British pub pints ( 1 pt (Liq) = 0.473176 L) for them, allowing the team members to be the only survivors of the contest, although the singing of Jerusalem by the inebriated crew post victory would not have fared very well at the European Song Contest had it existed then (These were more cerebral and less philistine times)...but one digresses.... For this Seymour Legg was knighted in the 1939 Christmas Honours List. (The perspicacious spotting of a loophole, not the singing.)

No such pleasant destiny for the unfortunate Stan Still, as he was mauled by a bear he mistakenly took to be a game trophy at the inn where the Prvo piće Kup Dalmacije prize giving was held, and sadly found himself dead when checking out.
No sensible explanation for the presence of a member of the Ursidae family at the inn was given. ( There is some controversy wether it was a Ursus rossicus or an Ailuropoda melanoleuca melanoleuca, although one would be very surprised to find an Ailuropoda melanoleuca melanoleuca in the region, it being native to the Urals.)

Notable historians are still undecided if this incident eventually led to the break-up of the British Empire in the unpleasantness that followed, as the Herzegovinian ambassador, a great friend of certain German politicians (sporting moustaches), secretly informed the 3rd Reich that he would release the aggrieved Fifth Bosnian Light Bicycle Brigade to aid and abet any military action envisaged by them, with the results we now know, and the further development of the Axis of Speed (Audi-Porsche-Mercedes-BMW), leading to the utter destruction of the once proud British motor manufacturing industry. (One will not go into mentioning debacles like the Allegro or the Maxi, as there might be Ladies and Horses present.)

Unattributed sources suggest that the Hrom puž (Chassi n.1/2) was subsequently used as the basis for the unraced 1942 Pappamobile Speziale, seen in all its Pontifical splendor at this years Goodwood Reunion. No trace has been found of the Threpplewhyte Special, last seen departing Cuernavaca in the Carrera Panamericana of 1947 with the Brothers Bracegirdle at the helm, disappearing during the race between Cuernavaca and Ciudad Juarez. Bears are not thought to be involved as not native to the region. Perhaps Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum)?


Hoping this will enlighten you, faithfull readers of the Horseless Carriage Digest
One remains, pedal to the bulkhead
Sir Julius Fflang Tilly, RAC, BRDC and AA