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Goodwood; home of English cricket


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#1 bradbury west

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 23:01

In the recent programme about Goodwood House last week, there were various snippets about the motor racing, usual clips etc, but, for those of you who delight to the sond of leather on willow, a couple of interesting facts emerged about Goodwood's place in the history of the summer game, notwithstanding the traditional match on the Goodwood pitch.

Records show that cricket was played at Goodwood back in 1702, as the archived accounts show a receipt for a barrel of brandy for the winning team.

The second Duke of Richmond provided the necessary wherewithal for a certain Mr LORD to go to north London to purchase a field or land suitable for the sport of cricket, hence the eponymous Lord's cricket ground.

In 1720 something (1726?) the same second Duke, with a Mr Brodrick, put down in writing the rules for cricket, previously not done. Rule 11 apparently specified that if any gamester , ie player , should choose to express his views to the umpires, that person would then be dismissed the field. That rule also stated that such a ruling did not apply to either the Duke of Richmond or to Mr Brodrick.

Nothing to do with cars, but thought you might like to know of Goodwood's long, broad-church, tradition with sport.

Roger Lund.

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#2 condor

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 13:28

Roger :) so that's how the cricket pitch got it's name :)

Are you going to the Fos?
There's a half-hearted attempt to gather TNFers here
http://forums.autosp...&threadid=86478

Probably still a bit early to wake the old un's up :lol:

#3 Geoff E

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 16:12

The 2nd Duke died in 1750, five years before the birth of Thomas Lord. It seems that it was the 4th Duke that had dealings with Lord.

http://en.wikipedia....uke_of_Richmond

#4 bradbury west

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 20:02

Many thanks for the correction. I did it from memory as I only watched the programme in passing, but thought the cricket connection relevant in view of the annual drivers' match. IIRC DCN posted some pictures from last year's event on the Revival photo thread.

The gist of it is the same.

RL

#5 Doug Nye

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 20:30

It IS a lovely place to play the wonderful game - even if one plays it as badly as I can. But I can't help still seeing in my mind's eye the imprinted vision of Ray Hanna waggling the wings of his archetypal Spitfire as he soared away from his last low pass over the stumps, and climbed away towards the west...and into the lowering evening sun....

Will it be quite the same again? I hope so.

DCN

#6 Stefan Ornerdal

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 20:59

Forgive me, I am not an expert on English history...
But was not a regiment or something named "Goodwood" for D-day 1944?
Or maybe a Normandy beach was named Goodwood by the Brits, like "Utah Beach" or "Omaha Beach" by the Americans?

Please tell me and correct me!

Stefan

#7 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 21:10

Operation Goodwood was the codename for the armoured thrust towards Caen after the initial invasion had become bogged down due to the difficulties of fighting through the Normandy bocage.

It was not entirely successful .....

http://www.strategos...ay/Goodwood.htm

#8 Doug Nye

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 21:38

Late ex-works Ferrari Dino 196SP owner/driver John Godfrey actually took part in the ill-fated Operation Goodwood, in a tank unit which included Piers Courage's father, he told me. His Sherman tank was one of the many knocked out by the dreaded German '88s' - John was terribly injured when the shells struck home, and dragged himself away from the burning tank hand over hand, grasping the corn stumps. Recovery from his burns took many, many months. The day he was injured had been his 21st birthday.

DCN

#9 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 22:50

Off topic, but since the subject has already been raised....After our annual Revival visit my wife and I will be going to Normandy for the first time. Tribute should be paid to those who gave so much.

Jack

#10 LOTI

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:24

The trick is, of course, to write the rules! Then poeple will think you invented the game. I have a feeling that cricket has been around a lot longer than that although I do like the bit about arguing with the umpire! I have seen a nice letter from Mr Lillywhite [who later went on to open a sports shop in Piccadlly Circus] who lived at Westerton, near Goodwood, asking my great uncle's third son, Frederick Murray Lucas to go and play cricket against Australia in what would have been the first test match. Sadly F.M. declined as he was going to India [I believe to shoot something, probably tigers.... we will gloss over that] he died there of cholera, age 29.
Luke was a good cricketter in his day and both his sons play for posh teams but not at Goodwood as far as I know.
Loti

#11 bradbury west

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 09:11

Off thread but related;

Originally posted by Doug Nye
Late ex-works Ferrari Dino 196SP owner/driver John Godfrey actually took part in the ill-fated Operation Goodwood,

DCN


John Godfrey's book on the 196/206 Dinos is a worthwile addition to anyone's library, for the pictures alone, albeit with good narrative. Still one of the prettiest cars ever. IIRC, there is another book on Dinos available..........................


RL

#12 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 23:30

Originally posted by Doug Nye
It IS a lovely place to play the wonderful game - even if one plays it as badly as I can. But I can't help still seeing in my mind's eye the imprinted vision of Ray Hanna waggling the wings of his archetypal Spitfire as he soared away from his last low pass over the stumps, and climbed away towards the west...and into the lowering evening sun....

Will it be quite the same again? I hope so.

DCN


At cocktails before dinner at Goodwood House at the 2002 Revival there was a lone Spitfire doing strafing runs over the revelers in the gathering dusk. Would that have been Ray at the controls? He's so missed...

Jack

#13 Twin Window

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 23:44

Around five years ago my cricket club - or rather the available members thereof - were hired to take part in an episode of the BBC drama Down to Earth.

This was shot on what we believed to be the original cricket ground. But I'm buggered if I can recall where it was... :mad:

'Ginger Spice' Geri Halliwell lived nearby, I remember... :rolleyes:

I ended up being the captain of the 'enemy' away team for the prog in question.

#14 ian senior

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 08:12

Originally posted by Twin Window
This was shot on what we believed to be the original cricket ground. But I'm buggered if I can recall where it was... :mad


Hambledon?

#15 Twin Window

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 08:15

Originally posted by ian senior

Hambledon?

Yes!

Nice one, Ian!