Jump to content


Photo
* * * * - 5 votes

S.Q.T. (stupid question thread)


  • Please log in to reply
3181 replies to this topic

#1401 Fastcake

Fastcake
  • Member

  • 6,483 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 22 April 2013 - 15:20

Where can I find those spreadsheats that apply the different point scores to a drivers career?

Basically I'd like to know how many points Prost and Schumacher would have scored if they had always raced under the current system.


Here ya go http://f1-facts.com/...ons-comparison/

Advertisement

#1402 Kalmake

Kalmake
  • Member

  • 519 posts
  • Joined: November 07

Posted 22 April 2013 - 16:58

And why do some races have some guy waving the green flag when all the cars have formed up on the grid to signal to charlie?


All races I think. As you say he is there to make sure the last cars have stopped. It can be difficult to see from the front.

#1403 Dolph

Dolph
  • Member

  • 5,102 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 22 April 2013 - 17:44

Here ya go http://f1-facts.com/...ons-comparison/


Why is there a 2006 column?

#1404 g1n

g1n
  • Member

  • 879 posts
  • Joined: February 11

Posted 22 April 2013 - 18:34

The medical car follows the field around for the first lap.


Are you sure that is true? wouldn't the field catch the medic car before it completes the lap due to superior speed difference?

#1405 ApexMouse

ApexMouse
  • Member

  • 909 posts
  • Joined: January 13

Posted 22 April 2013 - 18:35

Nope.

#1406 Clatter

Clatter
  • Member

  • 27,687 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 22 April 2013 - 22:03

Are you sure that is true? wouldn't the field catch the medic car before it completes the lap due to superior speed difference?


Yes, very sure.

The whole point of the medical car following is to be on the scene very quickly in the event of a first lap accident, and easily complete a lap before the F1 cars do 2.


#1407 Bleu

Bleu
  • Member

  • 805 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 23 April 2013 - 07:43

Yes, very sure.

The whole point of the medical car following is to be on the scene very quickly in the event of a first lap accident, and easily complete a lap before the F1 cars do 2.


Sid Watkins once told that there was at least one time when the field caught medical car - Monaco 1980 as they stopped to make sure that Daly and everyone else was OK after the start crash.

#1408 Kalmake

Kalmake
  • Member

  • 519 posts
  • Joined: November 07

Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:35

The medical car is no slouch either. Almost 500 hp etc...

#1409 Clatter

Clatter
  • Member

  • 27,687 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:36

Sid Watkins once told that there was at least one time when the field caught medical car - Monaco 1980 as they stopped to make sure that Daly and everyone else was OK after the start crash.


No surprise in that case is there. Under normal circumstances they would complete the lap ahead of the field.


#1410 EthanM

EthanM
  • Member

  • 2,480 posts
  • Joined: April 09

Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:39

under normal circumstances the F1 cars will lap the Medical/Safety cars every three laps or so. So yes, doing one lap behind the field is pretty safe, unless there is an accident somewhere.

#1411 BiH

BiH
  • Member

  • 2,340 posts
  • Joined: September 05

Posted 23 April 2013 - 16:51

what would happen if the brake markers were removed? (the 200...100....50 boards leading to corners)



#1412 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 57,885 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 23 April 2013 - 16:58

They'd go the same speed.

#1413 Ravenak

Ravenak
  • Member

  • 939 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 23 April 2013 - 17:00

what would happen if the brake markers were removed? (the 200...100....50 boards leading to corners)


Drivers would find other reference points for braking, although I'm pretty sure most of the F1 drivers don't need tangible reference points, as they usually know exactly when to brake.

#1414 Spamilton

Spamilton
  • Member

  • 42 posts
  • Joined: May 12

Posted 23 April 2013 - 22:23

what would happen if the brake markers were removed? (the 200...100....50 boards leading to corners)


:rotfl: more lock ups. :cat:
I don't think it will make any difference, I think they don't even watch them? Think they mainly watch the road/perfect line, they do some many sim laps that they should not care about these boards.

#1415 FPV GTHO

FPV GTHO
  • Member

  • 850 posts
  • Joined: March 08

Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:02

If the FiA proposed an optional spec front wing, that was more efficient than contemporary designs (likely achieved by being designed outside of the rules) but cost 10% of what the teams would spend, could the teams block it?

#1416 BiH

BiH
  • Member

  • 2,340 posts
  • Joined: September 05

Posted 24 April 2013 - 13:48

They'd go the same speed.


Not doubting that.

Just thinking they might miss their reference point for braking.

#1417 Clatter

Clatter
  • Member

  • 27,687 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 24 April 2013 - 14:02

Not doubting that.

Just thinking they might miss their reference point for braking.


They would just pick a different reference point. I've seen marker boards get destroyed during races and the drivers didn't miss their stride at all.

#1418 tjkoyen

tjkoyen
  • Member

  • 103 posts
  • Joined: November 12

Posted 24 April 2013 - 14:15

Once a driver is in the heat of the race and "in the zone", they don't use the braking markers much anyway. Drivers instinctively can determine how much distance is needed to slow the car in time. Reference points help, but they'll not totally necessary. A lot of tracks outside the F1 world don't have braking signs at all. So you look for a bump in the track or specific skid mark or a change in tarmac as a reference point and over time you just learn the distance you need to slow down.

#1419 froggy22

froggy22
  • Member

  • 804 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 24 April 2013 - 15:10

Did i hear Martin Brundle say that they had taken down some of the marker boards during commentary?


Advertisement

#1420 HaydenFan

HaydenFan
  • Member

  • 2,107 posts
  • Joined: February 09

Posted 24 April 2013 - 15:23

If the FiA proposed an optional spec front wing, that was more efficient than contemporary designs (likely achieved by being designed outside of the rules) but cost 10% of what the teams would spend, could the teams block it?


Yes. And they would. You said proposed. Now if they FIA made it a rule for a spec wing, then teams would have to oblige. And they'd just focus that 90% savings to other parts of the car, the underbody, the rear wing, sidepods. Sadly, cost saving in F1 are not that simple.



#1421 wingwalker

wingwalker
  • Member

  • 6,333 posts
  • Joined: September 06

Posted 24 April 2013 - 16:57

Not doubting that.

Just thinking they might miss their reference point for braking.




I think we would see more lock ups and drivers over shooting certain corners during FP's and that would be it. Drivers pick whatever is closest to their line of sight around the braking point, it's not always a board, and I really don't think anyone would struggle to adapt.

#1422 Darrenj

Darrenj
  • Member

  • 1,476 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 24 April 2013 - 18:03

SQ # 5

Where does the little man in the TV go after you turn it off?



can I tweet that?

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

#1423 Darrenj

Darrenj
  • Member

  • 1,476 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 24 April 2013 - 18:06

stupid question #45
WHat would happen If a modern day F1 car comes to a complete stop on its own, without crashing or failure of any kind, just stops, after like about 45 full race laps. What will be effect on the machinary?

#1424 Atreiu

Atreiu
  • Member

  • 10,077 posts
  • Joined: May 07

Posted 24 April 2013 - 18:29

It'll become dust in a billion years?

#1425 Kalmake

Kalmake
  • Member

  • 519 posts
  • Joined: November 07

Posted 24 April 2013 - 18:32

stupid question #45
WHat would happen If a modern day F1 car comes to a complete stop on its own, without crashing or failure of any kind, just stops, after like about 45 full race laps. What will be effect on the machinary?


Worst case scenario: Very hot brakes start a fire that spreads and burns the entire car. Other than that it should be ok.

Since qualy-race parc ferme the cars are designed to be fine sitting unattended. I remember Coulthard worrying his car might go bad overnight when the rule was introduced.

#1426 SpartanChas

SpartanChas
  • Member

  • 792 posts
  • Joined: February 11

Posted 24 April 2013 - 18:37

No I believe the worst thing that could happen is being mobbed by fans and taken apart. Or being freely viewed by rival team technical officers.

#1427 wingwalker

wingwalker
  • Member

  • 6,333 posts
  • Joined: September 06

Posted 24 April 2013 - 20:19

stupid question #45
WHat would happen If a modern day F1 car comes to a complete stop on its own, without crashing or failure of any kind, just stops, after like about 45 full race laps. What will be effect on the machinary?



Well an F1 car stopping after 45 laps implies it was an either GP weekend or a teat session so the car would be back in the garage before anything could happen (other than brake discs catching fire, as already mentioned). But in a hypothetical situation of an race-ready but unattended F1 car.... I guess all sorts of leaks would start to appear and KERS batteries could.. don't know... leak? Explode?

#1428 Clatter

Clatter
  • Member

  • 27,687 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 24 April 2013 - 20:50

Well an F1 car stopping after 45 laps implies it was an either GP weekend or a teat session so the car would be back in the garage before anything could happen (other than brake discs catching fire, as already mentioned). But in a hypothetical situation of an race-ready but unattended F1 car.... I guess all sorts of leaks would start to appear and KERS batteries could.. don't know... leak? Explode?


Why would leaks appear on an unattended car, but not on an attended one?

#1429 wingwalker

wingwalker
  • Member

  • 6,333 posts
  • Joined: September 06

Posted 24 April 2013 - 21:03

I should have wrote "untended and left alone for days/weeks". I think most if not all liquids are only in the car for the duration of GP weekend so I imagine they could change their characteristics way quicker than in a regular car and start to leak. Just my guess.

#1430 Fonzey

Fonzey
  • Member

  • 278 posts
  • Joined: January 12

Posted 24 April 2013 - 21:20

It's commonly accepted that after driving a turbocharged performance car you should always give it time "off boost" before shutting the engine down and ceasing oil pressure. I'm not sure if the same will apply to the TC engines next year and beyond in F1.

On a similar note, we're all familiar with gearbox and engine change penalties - but are there any other restrictions on auxiliary components (which are subject to mileage wear) of an engine/transmission such as turbo's (when they're in), differential, driveshafts, etc?

#1431 KTF1

KTF1
  • Member

  • 120 posts
  • Joined: March 13

Posted 25 April 2013 - 08:25

http://www.formula1....s/8699/fia.html
Article 5.20
5.20 Replacing engine parts:
The parts in lists A and B below may be changed without incurring a penalty under Article 28.4 of the F1 Sporting Regulations. If changing any of these parts involves breaking a seal this may be done but must carried out under FIA supervision. The parts in List B may only be replaced by identical homologated parts in accordance with Appendix 4 of the F1 Sporting Regulations.
List A
- Clutch
- Clutch basket
- Hydraulic pumps
- Engine electronic boxes (ECU's, power modules, control boxes)
- Fuel filters
- Fuel pumps
- Oil filters
- Oil tank systems
- Pneumatic bottles, regulators, pumps and pipes for valve actuation
- Exhaust systems
- Supports and brackets related to the auxiliaries, mentioned above
- Screws, nuts, dowels or washers related to the auxiliaries, mentioned above
- Cables, tubes or hoses related to the auxiliaries, mentioned above
- Oil or air seals related to the auxiliaries, mentioned above
- Spark plugs
List B
- Throttle system (including but not limited to throttle device, linkage, actuator, hydraulics)
- Intake system external to cylinder head (including but not limited to trumpets, trumpet tray, air box, air filter)
- Ignition coils
- Injection system
- Alternators
- Oil scavenging pumps
- Oil supply pumps
- Oil air separators
- Water pumps
- Electric and electronic sensors

http://www.formula1....s/8710/fia.html
Article 9.5.2

9.5.2 In this context the following parts are not considered part of the gearbox and may be changed without incurring a penalty under the F1 Sporting Regulations. If changing any of these parts involves breaking an FIA applied seal this may be done but must be carried out under FIA supervision :
- the clutch assembly and any shaft connecting the clutch to the crankshaft or first motion shaft of the gearbox, provided this is located prior to any mechanical speed reduction from the engine ;
- the clutch actuator and clutch release bearing(s) ;
- inboard driveshaft joints and seals but not their housing if that housing is integral with the gearbox output shaft and therefore part of the sprung mass ;
- the hydraulic system prior to the point at which it produces direct mechanical movement of the gear selection mechanism by means of hydraulic actuator(s) ;
- oil, oil pumps, oil filters, oil seals, oil coolers and any associated hoses or pipes ;
- electrical sensors, actuators, servo valves and wiring ;
- any parts associated with the suspension or functioning of the sprung suspension that are attached to the gearbox casing ;
- the rear impact structure provided it can be separated from any gearbox casing ;
- any other component mounted to the casing whose primary purpose is unconnected with the transmission of power or selection of gears.


Hope that helps.

#1432 7MGTEsup

7MGTEsup
  • Member

  • 391 posts
  • Joined: March 11

Posted 25 April 2013 - 13:56

under normal circumstances the F1 cars will lap the Medical/Safety cars every three laps or so. So yes, doing one lap behind the field is pretty safe, unless there is an accident somewhere.


How could a safety car get around a lap before being caught by a formula 1 car? It's starting at the back remember and as far as I can remember even a pretty powerfull road car would take more than a minute longer to get around an average lap of most circuits. I thought the medical car is there for first corner incidents? If the car does do the first lap (which I'm pretty sure it doesn't) then I would like to see video footage of it doing so.

#1433 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 57,885 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 25 April 2013 - 14:22

It does.

And it'd have to be more than twice as slow as an F1 car to get lapped. Ie if an F1 car does a 2 minute lap it'd need to be slower than 4 minutes for an F1 car to do two laps before it has done one.

#1434 HuddersfieldTerrier1986

HuddersfieldTerrier1986
  • Member

  • 1,974 posts
  • Joined: May 11

Posted 25 April 2013 - 14:26

why do some races have some guy waving the green flag when all the cars have formed up on the grid to signal to charlie?


No idea, as generally he can see anyway (it wasn't needed in years gone by) and generally by the time the guy waving the flag is on the track, the lights are already coming on. Makes no sense to me, as let's be honest, he can see at every track or has the medical car able to let him know at somewhere like Monaco for example where it curves round. Just looks daft to me, I don't want to be looking at the 5 lights and 22 cars and seeing some random guy waving a flag saying "ok you can start now" when the process has already started.

#1435 BoschKurve

BoschKurve
  • Member

  • 1,153 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 25 April 2013 - 14:53

There was a time when the medical car wouldn't even make it through the first lap before being caught.

#1436 7MGTEsup

7MGTEsup
  • Member

  • 391 posts
  • Joined: March 11

Posted 25 April 2013 - 16:22

It does.

And it'd have to be more than twice as slow as an F1 car to get lapped. Ie if an F1 car does a 2 minute lap it'd need to be slower than 4 minutes for an F1 car to do two laps before it has done one.


Watch the video from OZ this year of the street car V an F1 car, its a 500hp merc and it has a 45 scond head start and still gets caught by the last corner. So how could it do it starting from behind at the same time as the F1 car?

#1437 ApexMouse

ApexMouse
  • Member

  • 909 posts
  • Joined: January 13

Posted 25 April 2013 - 16:26

Why cant you simply accept as a fact that it happens? It is the case that the med car follows them round.



#1438 wingwalker

wingwalker
  • Member

  • 6,333 posts
  • Joined: September 06

Posted 25 April 2013 - 16:30

The medical car is about 45 seconds per lap slower (compared to F1 car). So it takes circa 130 seconds for it to drive the track and dive into the pits. Fastest car of the grid should do the opening lap in about 88 seconds and be about in the middle of the second lap at the time medical car reaches the pit entry.

#1439 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 57,885 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 25 April 2013 - 16:49

Watch the video from OZ this year of the street car V an F1 car, its a 500hp merc and it has a 45 scond head start and still gets caught by the last corner. So how could it do it starting from behind at the same time as the F1 car?


Because in that demo it has a 45 second lead, the medical card has a lead of whatever laptime an F1 car does from a dead stop. So on a 90 second hot lap you'd have to think at least a 95 second gap to close to lap it.

Advertisement

#1440 7MGTEsup

7MGTEsup
  • Member

  • 391 posts
  • Joined: March 11

Posted 25 April 2013 - 18:22

Sorry my brain wasn't working earlier, I had just seen so many of those videos than I was confusing myself.

What is the normal spread of the field after 1 lap? About 20 seconds? It must be pretty tight on a long fast circuit like spa.

I always thought they drove the first corner and then just pulled off.

#1441 7MGTEsup

7MGTEsup
  • Member

  • 391 posts
  • Joined: March 11

Posted 25 April 2013 - 18:25

Why cant you simply accept as a fact that it happens? It is the case that the med car follows them round.


You should't always accept everything you hear :kiss:


#1442 Afterburner

Afterburner
  • Member

  • 3,560 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 25 April 2013 - 18:28

It does.

And it'd have to be more than twice as slow as an F1 car to get lapped. Ie if an F1 car does a 2 minute lap it'd need to be slower than 4 minutes for an F1 car to do two laps before it has done one.

Is that the same as 'half as fast'? :p

#1443 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 57,885 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 25 April 2013 - 18:30

You should't always accept everything you hear :kiss:


So we've been imagining the medical car follows the field around?

#1444 encircled

encircled
  • Member

  • 772 posts
  • Joined: July 12

Posted 25 April 2013 - 18:36

Actually, you could imagine that the medical car almost has a 1-lap gap to F1 cars as the GP commences, while those videos you usually see, the road car only has a gap of around half-lap of the circuit, which is why the F1 car could catch up to the road car within the lap.

Edited by encircled, 25 April 2013 - 18:37.


#1445 Kalmake

Kalmake
  • Member

  • 519 posts
  • Joined: November 07

Posted 25 April 2013 - 18:58

What is the normal spread of the field after 1 lap? About 20 seconds? It must be pretty tight on a long fast circuit like spa.


Track length doesn't matter. :drunk: As long as the med car does at least half the average speed of the leader it will never get caught. Fastest ever lap average was 262 km/h in Monza, so it's not hard even there.

#1446 7MGTEsup

7MGTEsup
  • Member

  • 391 posts
  • Joined: March 11

Posted 25 April 2013 - 19:13

So we've been imagining the medical car follows the field around?


I have never seen it in person so wasn't sure if it was true. Just because people say it on the internet doesn't make it automatically true is all I was trying to say.

You never been wrong about anything?


#1447 ApexMouse

ApexMouse
  • Member

  • 909 posts
  • Joined: January 13

Posted 25 April 2013 - 19:28

It's stonefield. He hasn't been wrong since July 99.

#1448 froggy22

froggy22
  • Member

  • 804 posts
  • Joined: February 10

Posted 25 April 2013 - 19:28

Interesting all this talk of the medical car vs an F1 car. I'd imagine it varies from track to track. An F1 car creates much more downforce than a road car so it obvious advantage would be in the corners, so using that logic I would have thought there would be a bigger distance between the f1 car and medical car at a track with a lot of corners e.g. Spa and maybe even Barcelona than there would be at a track like Monza. I'm assuming the medical car has its speed limiter taken off so top speed isn't so much of a factor.

I don't know, that's how I see it anyways

#1449 Brother Fox

Brother Fox
  • Member

  • 5,373 posts
  • Joined: January 01

Posted 25 April 2013 - 22:51

I have never seen it in person so wasn't sure if it was true. Just because people say it on the internet doesn't make it automatically true is all I was trying to say.

You never been wrong about anything?

But you could reasonably assume that a handfull of people on here may have seen it in the flesh and know what they saw.

#1450 OfficeLinebacker

OfficeLinebacker
  • Member

  • 14,022 posts
  • Joined: December 07

Posted 26 April 2013 - 02:49

It's stonefield. He hasn't been wrong since July 99.

Not since the accident.