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S.Q.T. (stupid question thread)


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#2901 purplehaireddolphin

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 16:26

There have been British drivers competing in every season since 1950. To the best of my knowledge, there hasn't even been a Formula One world championship race without a British entrant. I'm sure though that someone here may well be able to correct me on that. :)

cheers.

 

seems we have a pretty good record, then.

 

Are there any other countries with "permanent" drivers?



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#2902 scheivlak

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 16:38

There have been British drivers competing in every season since 1950. To the best of my knowledge, there hasn't even been a Formula One world championship race without a British entrant. I'm sure though that someone here may well be able to correct me on that. :)

There were several GPs in 1980 where John Watson was the only UK driver on the grid - does he count as British (born in Northern Ireland)?

 

Edit: he didn't Q for the 1980 Monaco GP, so there were anyhow no British drivers in that race.


Edited by scheivlak, 11 July 2014 - 16:42.


#2903 Andrew Hope

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 16:41

Everyone counts as British when there are no real Brits winning races.



#2904 purplehaireddolphin

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 16:57

There were several GPs in 1980 where John Watson was the only UK driver on the grid - does he count as British (born in Northern Ireland)?

 

Edit: he didn't Q for the 1980 Monaco GP, so there were anyhow no British drivers in that race.

I remember Watson and Lauda qualifying at the back of  the grid for one race, which I think was a street circuit, so possibly Long Beach and then driving through the field. I think one of them won or was on the podium. Those were the days  :)



#2905 Atreiu

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 16:59

Everyone counts as British when there are no real Brits winning races.

 

Or tennis.



#2906 Fastcake

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 20:06

There were several GPs in 1980 where John Watson was the only UK driver on the grid - does he count as British (born in Northern Ireland)?

 

Edit: he didn't Q for the 1980 Monaco GP, so there were anyhow no British drivers in that race.

 

I don't see why he wouldn't, unless he was a secret nationalist.

 

I did also stress that every Grand Prix had a British entrant, so even if he wasn't in the race there was still a Brit in the paddock. :)

 

Or tennis.

 

Hey as far as we're concerned, if Britain once owned your country you're British.  ;)


Edited by Fastcake, 11 July 2014 - 20:06.


#2907 flatlander48

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 00:44

There are times when Lewis crosses so far into super-douche territory that it becomes kinda cool again


Interesting that you assume that Lewis decided to use this term. There are lots of people working for Mercedes AMG you know...

#2908 Brother Fox

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:22

I think we have different definitions of 'interesting'

#2909 scheivlak

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:01

I don't see why he wouldn't, unless he was a secret nationalist.

 

I did also stress that every Grand Prix had a British entrant, so even if he wasn't in the race there was still a Brit in the paddock. :)

 

 

 

I had intended to post an answer to Clatter who wondered if there was ever a GP with less thna two British drivers on the grid but mistakenly posted it as an answer to your post  :blush:

 

Apart from that my question about Northern Ireland being British is a genuine one as we talk about a "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" which suggests that Northern Ireland is not a part of Great Britain - as pointed out earlier (by British posters) in some thread a few years ago.


Edited by scheivlak, 12 July 2014 - 09:02.


#2910 Amphicar

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:36

I had intended to post an answer to Clatter who wondered if there was ever a GP with less thna two British drivers on the grid but mistakenly posted it as an answer to your post  :blush:
 
Apart from that my question about Northern Ireland being British is a genuine one as we talk about a "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" which suggests that Northern Ireland is not a part of Great Britain - as pointed out earlier (by British posters) in some thread a few years ago.

Quite true - but no-one from the UK ever describes himself or herself as "United Kingdomish" - so British is the default adjective. John Watson is proud to be an Ulsterman but given his age and background, I'm sure he would describe himself as British. By contrast, Eddie Irvine, who comes from the same side of the politico-sectarian divide in Northern Ireland but a generation or so later, was happy to describe himself as Irish and despite having a British passport, raced under an Irish republic licence.

#2911 flatlander48

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 12:39

I think we have different definitions of 'interesting'


As I said, there appears to be an assumption built into what you said. We don't know that Lewis first suggested using that phrase, do we? Your only answer here is True, we don't.

#2912 flatlander48

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 12:42

I remember Watson and Lauda qualifying at the back of the grid for one race, which I think was a street circuit, so possibly Long Beach and then driving through the field. I think one of them won or was on the podium. Those were the days :)


It was Long Beach once and Detroit twice. Watson won at Long Beach and Lauda was on the podium. Watson won at Detroit and then finished 2nd or 3rd the following year. Don't remember where Lauda finished. At that point, they were running Cosworth power against the turbos...

#2913 ForeverF1

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 12:47

I had intended to post an answer to Clatter who wondered if there was ever a GP with less thna two British drivers on the grid but mistakenly posted it as an answer to your post  :blush:

 

Apart from that my question about Northern Ireland being British is a genuine one as we talk about a "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" which suggests that Northern Ireland is not a part of Great Britain - as pointed out earlier (by British posters) in some thread a few years ago.

If you read up on British diaspora, half the world could claim to be 'British'.  :lol: 



#2914 Option1

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 14:03

I think we have different definitions of 'interesting'

I think we've now met the ultimate "Lewis is a saint" fan.

 

Neil



#2915 flatlander48

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 15:28

Well, that would be one definition of B/S.

The fact is that more often than not, reactions to whatever Hamilton does or doesn't do are out of proportion. I wonder about the thought process, assuming there is any, behind that. Fact is, the man has flaws like everyone else and many folks seem to delight in pointing those out. Complete rubbish when you look at it in the context of those who lied and cheated in the course of Spygate and Crashgate. Anything that Hamilton says you can consider to be a speed bump in the Grand Scheme, but as I said, reactions are often out of proportion.

As a piece of information, the topic of McLaren support frequently comes up and it can leave one with the impression that it has been almost life-long. Fact is, support from McLaren AND Mercedes started when Hamilton was 13. As infrequently as that is mentioned, even less frequently mentioned is that Vettel has been supported by Red Bull since he was 11.

Edited by flatlander48, 13 July 2014 - 23:29.


#2916 ollebompa

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 19:00

Why was such big diameter wheels used in the BTCC back in the nineties?

I assume there was some technical reason for this. Maybe limited gear ratios or final drive?

Edit:
I think it was 19 and 20" rims that they were running.

1996_Volvo_850_BTCC_Touring_Car_Tom_Walk
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Edited by ollebompa, 14 July 2014 - 03:42.


#2917 HaydenFan

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 19:07

Technology for the times? Today's touring car racing seems to be more about the stock aspect of the cars seen in BTCC and WTCC. That era was the SuperTouring period. 

 

p1532509134-3.jpg



#2918 flatlander48

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 23:33

Wheel size has nothing to do with gear ratios. Only the outside diameter of the tire matters for those calculations. Low profile side walls tend to stiffen up the tire which tends to make the handling crisper. Also, larger wheels mean you can run larger brakes.

#2919 ollebompa

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 03:41

Wheel size has nothing to do with gear ratios. Only the outside diameter of the tire matters for those calculations. Low profile side walls tend to stiffen up the tire which tends to make the handling crisper. Also, larger wheels mean you can run larger brakes.


To me wheels are rims and tires together.

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#2920 purplehaireddolphin

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 16:06

It was Long Beach once and Detroit twice. Watson won at Long Beach and Lauda was on the podium. Watson won at Detroit and then finished 2nd or 3rd the following year. Don't remember where Lauda finished. At that point, they were running Cosworth power against the turbos...

cheers, I knew I hadn't imagined it  :)



#2921 flatlander48

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 21:08

I was at Detroit both weekends and actually all of them run in downtown; including CART...

#2922 flatlander48

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 21:11

To me wheels are rims and tires together.


Not when you can have the same tire outside diameter but have tires that use different rim sizes. Check sites like the TireRack.com to see how tire diameter, rim diameter and aspect ratio work together.

#2923 Owen

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 18:39

Could you get FRIC in a road car?

#2924 ollebompa

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 19:42

Could you get FRIC in a road car?

I think some old FIAT or MINI cooper had it in the 70's



#2925 SpartanChas

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 20:16

The Citröen 2CV was the first car to have it. For different reasons than F1 cars though.



#2926 Amphicar

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 20:49

I think some old FIAT or MINI cooper had it in the 70's

Not just Mini Coopers - the first car I ever owned was a bog-standard Austin Mini 850, with Hydrolastic suspension, invented by Dr Alex Moulton. Hydrolastic suspension was also used in Joe Huffaker;s MG Liquid Suspension Specials that raced in the Indy 500 in the mid-60s. However, in that case, the Hydrolastic units were linked side to side rather than the fore and aft connection in road cars.

#2927 Beamer

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 13:38

Could you get FRIC in a road car?

 

Depends how you define FRIC. Active stability is pretty common in premium car brands. My LR Discovery has active suspension and keeps it straight in corners en prevents diving while braking.  



#2928 djned

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 19:54

stupid question: why do you never see f1 mechanics with dirty uniforms? unlike the stereotype of greased-up mechanics in the 'real world', the staff in pit garages are always spotless.



#2929 Ricciardo2014

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 20:07

stupid question: why do you never see f1 mechanics with dirty uniforms? unlike the stereotype of greased-up mechanics in the 'real world', the staff in pit garages are always spotless.


Back in 2005 I watched the Williams mechanics change the gearbox in the show car.
(It was a couple of years old and was there for the speed comparison).

One guy got oil on his shorts, and as soon as the job was finished he went out back and changed.

Even though they were almost surgical as far as cleanliness, they did spill some oil.
I think it's more to do with presentation than anything.

#2930 Fastcake

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 20:21

Would you want to get a dirty uniform with Bernie and Ron Dennis roaming the paddock? The two of them are well renowned fanatics for tidyness.

 

It really would not surprise me if Bernie has strong-armed the teams into keeping themselves and the garages spotless at all times. Obviously, McLaren needed no prodding!



#2931 flatlander48

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 22:46

stupid question: why do you never see f1 mechanics with dirty uniforms? unlike the stereotype of greased-up mechanics in the 'real world', the staff in pit garages are always spotless.


Greased up mechanics in the real world don't have TV cameras pointed at them.

#2932 Fonzey

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 01:22

These guys aren't working on cars that do 15k miles a year on wet and dirty roads!

Most of the trackside engineering you see is the adjustment of adjustable parts, not changing grease filled CV boots or replacing leaky rocker cover gaskets!

#2933 Brother Fox

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 01:30

Now I'm picturing the car coming in and the mechanic saying "yeah mate I can see your problem, but it's going to take me a couple of days to get the parts and it's not going to be cheap"

#2934 john_smith

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 01:42

The McLaren 12c/650S and the P1 have hydraulic suspensions, although I'm not sure if they work in the same passive way as what has recently been banned.