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S.Q.T. (stupid question thread)


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#3351 Risil

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 15:03

Yes, motorbikes? Smaller CC's I think...

 

Afaik quite a few start off in motocross or flat track (dirt ovals) as well.


Edited by Risil, 20 May 2015 - 22:22.


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#3352 toroRosso

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 22:04

So tell me guys, who are you wearing?

#3353 Rasputin

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 22:16

Why is Rosberg all of a sudden outqualifying Hamilton in Spain?


Edited by Rasputin, 09 May 2015 - 22:18.


#3354 flatlander48

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 23:27

So tell me guys, who are you wearing?


Ah.... Khakis?

#3355 RacingDuck

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 04:23

Whats the difference between brake horsepower and horsepower?

If BHP=X*HP or BHP=X+HP, What is X?


Like TC3000 said brake horsepower is useable power and horsepower is more or less theoretical power. This is how I understand it, (and someone feel free to correct me) the horsepower of a car goes from the crankshaft to the clutch and then driveshaft, differential, axle and tires. Transfering the power from the crank to the wheels demands power and the heavier or lighter all those components (as well as overall weight) are affects the brake horsepower (the power getting to the wheels). So thats means an F1 car can use more of its actual horsepower as all the components are specially made to be light, whereas the same components on an American muscule car are not and less power gets to the wheels.

Again this is my understanding and it may not be completely (or at all for that matter!) correct.

#3356 GrumpyYoungMan

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 05:53

Why is Rosberg all of a sudden outqualifying Hamilton in Spain?

Jet Lagged? Too many time zone changes?



#3357 Dolph

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 06:53

Why is Rosberg all of a sudden outqualifying Hamilton in Spain?

 

http://www.autosport...t.php/id/118885



#3358 kapow

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 07:25

Why do F1 cars have small holes on the tip of the nose cones?

Edited by kapow, 10 May 2015 - 07:26.


#3359 KnucklesAgain

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 11:00

Why do F1 cars have small holes on the tip of the nose cones?

 

Driver cooling mostly, and who knows what else they want to direct some air to.


Edited by KnucklesAgain, 10 May 2015 - 11:00.


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#3360 YoungGun

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 11:30

Does Pirelli supply the tyres as set ready to be placed on the car or does the team mix and match them?



#3361 flatlander48

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 11:58

Like TC3000 said brake horsepower is useable power and horsepower is more or less theoretical power. This is how I understand it, (and someone feel free to correct me) the horsepower of a car goes from the crankshaft to the clutch and then driveshaft, differential, axle and tires. Transfering the power from the crank to the wheels demands power and the heavier or lighter all those components (as well as overall weight) are affects the brake horsepower (the power getting to the wheels). So thats means an F1 car can use more of its actual horsepower as all the components are specially made to be light, whereas the same components on an American muscule car are not and less power gets to the wheels.

Again this is my understanding and it may not be completely (or at all for that matter!) correct.


The mass of the parts has nothing to do with power, but everything to do with reaction. Lighter parts will accelerate faster. The difference between horsepower at the crank and horsepower measured at the wheel is due to frictional losses in bearings, etc.

The term Brake comes into play beause a dynamometer (a device to absorb and measure power) is also sometimes called a brake.

Some F-1 teams align themselves with oil companies to benefit from their lubricant research to address frictional losses (Mercedes/Petronas, McLaren/Mobil, etc.).

#3362 blackhand2010

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 17:10

Both a stupid and historical question...: when F1 used to be on ITV, I recall Martin Brundle missing commentating duties of the Canadian Grand Prix (because he was at Le Mans), but also he missed a few Hungarian GP's. Does anyone know why...?



#3363 Risil

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 18:34

Summer holidays I think. Gives you an idea about how much ITV valued him!



#3364 Option1

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 19:56

Summer holidays was one of the speculations, another was some nefarious thing having happened in the past meaning he was essentially "warned off" from returning to Hungary for some considerable time.  I haven't seen anything definitive and so wonder if anyone really knows (other than Brundle).

 

Neil



#3365 Rasputin

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 20:30

What happened to Eurosport's f1 coverage with Ben Edwards and John Watson, that was a delight?



#3366 wrcva

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 01:00

Does Pirelli supply the tyres as set ready to be placed on the car or does the team mix and match them?

 

During the production process, each tyre is allocated a barcode provided by the FIA. This barcode is the tyre’s ‘passport’, which is embedded firmly into the structure during the vulcanisation process and cannot be swapped. The code contains all the details of each tyre, making it traceable throughout the race weekend with Pirelli’s RTS (Racing Tyre System) software, which can read and update all the data.

 

Pirelli itself is not involved in this process at all, meaning that the Italian firm cannot influence which tyres are allocated to which teams.   Once at the circuit, the tyres are then allocated to the teams in strict compliance with the list that has been previously prepared by the FIA.

 

http://f1pressarea.p...s/pdf/14708.pdf

 

 

I was reading somewhere while back that Pirelli makes the barcodes contiguous within a tire production batch so that the compound between tire pairs are consistent.  As far as the allocation, I would venture to guess that FIA even knows exactly which tires will be running in which car... 



#3367 KnucklesAgain

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 06:54

What happened to Eurosport's f1 coverage with Ben Edwards and John Watson, that was a delight?

 

Eurosport did not renew the F1 contract? But yes, It was a delight.



#3368 HistoryFan

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Posted 16 May 2015 - 16:38

How expensive is refueling in F1? I often heard that it's very expensive because of the system to refuel the cars very fast.



#3369 Rasputin

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Posted 16 May 2015 - 16:43

How expensive is refueling in F1? I often heard that it's very expensive because of the system to refuel the cars very fast.

Naah, it was far more complicated with the customized high-pressure rigs in the past, in recent times, those have been standardized and supplied by the FIA.

 

There are some extra guys and fire-proof outfits, but peanuts in the context.



#3370 Kalmake

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Posted 16 May 2015 - 23:13

Costs talk was mainly about transporting the fuel rigs.



#3371 August

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Posted 16 May 2015 - 23:57

What happened to the rule not allowing major mid-season livery changes in F1? Because changes in McLaren's livery weren't really minor.



#3372 Exb

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 01:21

What happened to the rule not allowing major mid-season livery changes in F1? Because changes in McLaren's livery weren't really minor.


Sporting regs:
21.1 The provisions of the Code relating to national colours shall not apply to the Championship.
Both cars entered by a competitor must be presented in substantially the same livery at each Event, any change to this livery during a Championship season may only be made with the agreement of the Formula One Commission.

#3373 kkieraa

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 07:35

My question is do the riders who hang around in moto2 or moto3 for season after season not really getting results eg. Ant West actually gain much from it? Money wise or in any way?

#3374 Kalmake

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 07:57

My question is do the riders who hang around in moto2 or moto3 for season after season not really getting results eg. Ant West actually gain much from it? Money wise or in any way?

There are well paid riders in the lower classes too. Few years ago Mika Kallio was highest earning non-exile Finnish athlete with nearly 700000e income.


Edited by Kalmake, 17 May 2015 - 07:57.


#3375 Risil

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 10:55

A lot of them aren't well-paid. Marc VDS is unusually flush with cash, possibly due to their billionaire owner and decent sponsor/hospitality operation (I saw a Marc VDS racing calendar on the wall of an office in a Belgian factory once).

 

But ultimately all they need is enough to live on from race to race and something (riding schools, business interests, family money, whatever) to tide them over in the off-season. It's the love of a sport that most of them have been doing since childhood.


Edited by Risil, 17 May 2015 - 10:55.


#3376 Nonesuch

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 18:01

Why is it quite common in the United States to refer to non-endurance cars by their number, rather than the driver? Is this something that was common all over in the past, or something that the US-based series developed on their own? In Indycar and other series there everyone seems to be going on about the numbers, while I don't think I've ever heard someone in F1 refer to Hamilton by saying 'the #44 car'.



#3377 Nemo1965

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 18:06

I've got a stupid question: why is F1 still an open-wheel series? The Mercedes F1 cars of yesteryear sometimes had closed bodyworks... See the W196 on the right... It always confused me as a child: 'That? A F1 car?'

 

schumacher-rosberg-mercedes-w196-1954.jp



#3378 Option1

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 18:43

Why is it quite common in the United States to refer to non-endurance cars by their number, rather than the driver? Is this something that was common all over in the past, or something that the US-based series developed on their own? In Indycar and other series there everyone seems to be going on about the numbers, while I don't think I've ever heard someone in F1 refer to Hamilton by saying 'the #44 car'.

I don't know a definitive answer, but I suspect it is closely tied with the use of these at US tracks and the associated history:

2004-11-07--NASCAR_Tower.jpg



#3379 Clatter

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 18:49

I've got a stupid question: why is F1 still an open-wheel series? The Mercedes F1 cars of yesteryear sometimes had closed bodyworks... See the W196 on the right... It always confused me as a child: 'That? A F1 car?'

 

schumacher-rosberg-mercedes-w196-1954.jp

The extra drag helps keep speeds down. 



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#3380 BlinkyMcSquinty

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 19:48

Why is it quite common in the United States to refer to non-endurance cars by their number, rather than the driver? Is this something that was common all over in the past, or something that the US-based series developed on their own? In Indycar and other series there everyone seems to be going on about the numbers, while I don't think I've ever heard someone in F1 refer to Hamilton by saying 'the #44 car'.

 

In most US major racing series, drivers retain the same number (and sponsors) over many years. So when you hear "24", Jeff Gordon and Dupont springs to mind, or Richard Petty with "43" and STP. Just ask any educated NASCAR fan the name of each driver, and they can name their number and major sponsor.

 

In the USA they are VERY GOOD at marketing and thus brand identity.



#3381 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 19:48

Why is it quite common in the United States to refer to non-endurance cars by their number, rather than the driver? Is this something that was common all over in the past, or something that the US-based series developed on their own? In Indycar and other series there everyone seems to be going on about the numbers, while I don't think I've ever heard someone in F1 refer to Hamilton by saying 'the #44 car'.


Because numbers don't often change so the drivers or at least the team become associated with certain numbers. Hell they used to do that in F1 until the mid 90s. It's where the Mansell Red 5 thing came from.

#3382 Rasputin

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 19:53

Why is it quite common in the United States to refer to non-endurance cars by their number, rather than the driver? Is this something that was common all over in the past, or something that the US-based series developed on their own? In Indycar and other series there everyone seems to be going on about the numbers, while I don't think I've ever heard someone in F1 refer to Hamilton by saying 'the #44 car'.

 

Perhaps because the general US audience find it somewhat easier to identify the cars than individual drivers or color of helmets?



#3383 Kalmake

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 04:37

I've got a stupid question: why is F1 still an open-wheel series? The Mercedes F1 cars of yesteryear sometimes had closed bodyworks... See the W196 on the right... It always confused me as a child: 'That? A F1 car?'

Brand identity is important. Even a child can tell what's an F1 car.



#3384 flatlander48

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 05:10

Why is it quite common in the United States to refer to non-endurance cars by their number, rather than the driver? Is this something that was common all over in the past, or something that the US-based series developed on their own? In Indycar and other series there everyone seems to be going on about the numbers, while I don't think I've ever heard someone in F1 refer to Hamilton by saying 'the #44 car'.


In NASCAR, the number stays with the team. Drivers may change teams, but the car number stays with the team until given up or the team is sold.

In many US open wheel series, the numbers go by the previous season's points standings (maybe for the first 10 places).

Not sure how they do it in sports cars...

#3385 flatlander48

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 05:13

I've got a stupid question: why is F1 still an open-wheel series? The Mercedes F1 cars of yesteryear sometimes had closed bodyworks... See the W196 on the right... It always confused me as a child: 'That? A F1 car?'


When Mercedes ran previously, there was no rule against closed bodywork. If closed bodies were still legal, how would you differentiate them from sports cars?

#3386 August

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 10:20

In many US open wheel series, the numbers go by the previous season's points standings (maybe for the first 10 places).

 

Nowadays in IndyCar it's only 1 for the defending champ, if he/his team choose to use it.

 

When Mercedes ran previously, there was no rule against closed bodywork. If closed bodies were still legal, how would you differentiate them from sports cars?

 

F1, IndyCar, etc. are single-seaters, sports cars are made to allow space for two seats.



#3387 Nonesuch

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 10:24

Thanks for the various answers to my question. :up: