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TNF's 'Worldwide BMC Owners Club'


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#551 GMACKIE

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 22:35

Tell me if these are out-of-era, and I will remove them ...

Taken on a car club visit to an 1883 steam driven pump on a steaming day, it was a popular car club outing ...

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(Mods: I have permission to use these two photos)

I like the blue one.....withe the engine in the correct end. :rotfl:

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#552 Robin Fairservice

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 00:13

I like the blue one.....withe the engine in the correct end. :rotfl:

Do you mean the pale blue or the darker blue?

#553 GMACKIE

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 03:07

Do you mean the pale blue or the darker blue?

There's only one car there with the engine in the correct end. :cool:

Did you get a photo of the beam engine, wagons?......A beautiful bit of machinery, particularly when running. :up:

#554 275 GTB-4

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 07:15

There's only one car there with the engine in the correct end. :cool:

Did you get a photo of the beam engine, wagons?......A beautiful bit of machinery, particularly when running. :up:


Wagons? Circle the Wagons! I think you will find that the beam engine was a Green Machine :)

#555 arttidesco

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 14:50

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A 6/110 Mk II which has i suspect has turned up on a film set as a police car, I have seen pix of this vehicle elsewhere on the net with a bell on the front bumper.

#556 Ian G

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 01:21

I posted in the other thread but some nice BMC/BL cars to go under the hammer in rural NSW. P76 looks in good nick.

http://www.landmarkh...gSales/View/386

#557 Ray Bell

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 04:36

Yeah, but wouldn't you race to buy that A50 with the front end missing?

Nice find, by the way...

#558 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 10:21

Some interesting stuff there, even one for Mr Mackie. Though probably a lot of it will end as scrap.

#559 RTH

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 15:06

Not quite BMC but....

Headline we thought we would never see

Leyland P76 wins the Peking to Paris Rally !

http://www.classican...eader_article_1

It is not a vehicle we are familiar with in uk.

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#560 Ray Bell

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 02:34

I'd imagine Matt Bryson is the son of John Bryson, who navigated the P76 in the '74 London-Munich...

Gerry Crown used to be heavily involved with Bruce Collier, the Renault specialist who rallied and rallycrossed. I think Gerry was in the Rallycrossing for a while and he navigated for Bruce at least on occasion. I think.

I'm also fairly sure he helped fund some of that competition.

Good for them getting the P76 over the line. It certainly does deserve a win of some significance after what happened in the Sahara in '74.

#561 Ian G

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 03:50

Yeah Ray,Matt is John's son,they had a run last year in the States.

http://www.principal...Challenge_2012/

#562 Ray Bell

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 09:20

Originally posted by RTH
Not quite BMC but....

Headline we thought we would never see

Leyland P76 wins the Peking to Paris Rally!


More BMC than you'd think. Built in the BMC plant at Zetland in Sydney, designed by BMC people. Some people get the idea that the P76 has a lot of Rover attributes but that's simply not so.

The Australian industry was stuck in a 'local content' bind (which I don't criticise, by the way). This car had a rear axle and gearboxes (3 & 4-speed as well as an automatic based on the B-W35) from Borg Warner. The blocks were based on the Rover 3.5 block, but were an inch taller, the engine had a longer stroke, different heads and so on.

.....It is not a vehicle we are familiar with in uk.


A few made it over there, I'm sure, and I think even one example of the Force 7 2-door variant that was never released made it there too.

It was built to meet the local competition in our biggest market, family-sized cars around Zephyr size. Holden essentially created this market with the original. 2.2-litre six, but by the late sixties Ford had their Falcon, Holden was still going strong and Chrysler had adapted their Valiants from their American compact range. All had sixes and V8s.

The P76 six was an extended SOHC Marina-type engine running at 2.6-lites while the alloy V8 was 4.4 litres. The designers had been very conscious of the weight as they created the car, so the lighter power train assisted them to make a strong car while it remained full-bodied. It had Macpherson struts on the front and a live rear axle with coil springs.

I think it should be compulsory for everyone on TNF to read A Boot Full of Right Arms, Evan Green's story of that London-Munich event which could have been an enormous victory for a poorly-funded but cleverly prepared and driven P76 had things been different out in the Sahara.

Evan described a lot of the ins and outs of the car's design period and the preparation of the car as well as the story of the event. You'd be well familiar with it once you'd completed the read.

#563 Dick Willis

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 11:49

It should also be compulsory for everyone on TNF to read "Building Cars in Australia" the story of the BMC factory at Zetland near Sydney from 1948 to 1973.

#564 Gary Davies

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 12:15

Compulsoriness too, for anyone wanting to know the complete story of the P76 and its development - "Leyland P76: Anything but Average" by Gavin Farmer.

This book additionally provides some interesting insights to the vexations visited by BMC and, later, BL upon their Australian colleagues.

#565 275 GTB-4

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 23:27

Compulsoriness too, for anyone wanting to know the complete story of the P76 and its development - "Leyland P76: Anything but Average" by Gavin Farmer.

This book additionally provides some interesting insights to the vexations visited by BMC and, later, BL upon their Australian colleagues.


and compulsorily, complemented, completely by The Carmakers perhaps?

http://bmcexperience...-p76-story.html

#566 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 23:56

Once upon a time in Oz we had it seemed to many car manufacturers, now soon we will have none!
In the 70s it seems that the lower ranked manufacturers had problems getting components from Borg Warner. Reputedly Chrysler had real problems getting diffs and or transmissions which did not help the sales figures.
Leyland too were in that dilemma, though the car they produced was Leylands version of the Edsel. And complete with quality problems too boot!
It seems that the uglys to a degree have brought down manufacturers, Leyland the P38, and Mitsubishi the 380.
Whatever people wax lyrical about the P76 they were an underpowered big ugly box. And when they got generally tired, at about 3 years old! they drove like a sponge. And the sponge had better resale value too. Late 70s a basic 6 cyl was making 3-500 dollars. V8s a little more though quite a few of those were bought for the engines alone.
The 380 however seemed to keep reasonable resale, I went to a government auction 3 years ago and they were making more money than Camrys and even some plain Jane VE Commodores

#567 Ian G

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 00:20

In the 70s it seems that the lower ranked manufacturers had problems getting components from Borg Warner


Evan Green always maintained that Ford & Holden were pushing them out of the Oz market,everything from slow delivery from local suppliers thru to planted anti-BMC/BL media stories and industrial problems.

#568 Ray Bell

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 02:40

Ahhh...

What did they call it? Wage push inflation?

Where wages skyrocketed during 1973, people were buying lots, the manufacturers couldn't keep pace on the newly-instituted 'Just In Time' supply system. Things got way out of whack.

Chrysler even started importing transmissions from the US to keep up supply.

Don't blame Holden, though, they were not yet using anything from Borg-Warner.

#569 Dick Willis

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 02:42

From my days as a Datsun/Nissan dealer in the 1970s/1980s we experienced a heap of trouble with Borg Warner diffs which the company had to adopt to maintain a decent portion of Australian content. Nearly every car sold with a BW diff had to have it replaced or rebuilt which must have cost BW a squillion.

#570 Ray Bell

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 09:35

It's really odd, Dick...

Both those seventies Datsuns as well as the R31 Skylines of the late eighties and early nineties had noise problems with Borg-Warner rear axles.

But the hundreds of thousands of Cortinas, Sigmas, P76s, Valiants, Falcons and even the VL and later Holdens had no real issues with them at all.



#571 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 23:33

Ahhh...

What did they call it? Wage push inflation?

Where wages skyrocketed during 1973, people were buying lots, the manufacturers couldn't keep pace on the newly-instituted 'Just In Time' supply system. Things got way out of whack.

Chrysler even started importing transmissions from the US to keep up supply.

Don't blame Holden, though, they were not yet using anything from Borg-Warner.

Chrysler used torqueflights on all V8 engines to the end. And some CH CJ Chrysler by Chryslers used torqueflights also, as did a few cabs of the era. Though that was for reliability not supply. The BW 35 was at its maximum behind the 265 and the heavier cars tipped the edge. And they were smoother too.

The small BW diff used in Sigmas, 200Bs, Cortina 4s and the like had problems. Like many I have done the side bearings on a lot of Sigma diffs and a couple of 200B/ Bluebird ones too. Though for some reason never on a Cortina.
The 6 cyl cars used the 75 series diff. As did most Falcons, Valiants, P76s, Centuras through 60s 70s and 80s.

And no Holden did not stress BW, They used mostly Traumatics, US Powerglides, GM diffs and their own manual gearboxes too. Rightly or wrongly in many circumstances. They started using BW diffs in 84, The 5 speed used in VKs was BW, though the smaller version used on Sigmas, 200Bs as well as 3.3 Falcons.

Even now GM use their own auto transmissions, though manuals are BW/BTR/ Spicer

Edited by Lee Nicolle, 03 July 2013 - 23:33.


#572 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 07:28

Of course, Lee, the V8s had Torqueflites, just as the Fords had C4s etc, never the 35 behind a V8...

35s were also used in Peugeot 504 from about 1972 onwards, but not the 604 which had a Belgian (IIRC) Trimatic.

Perhaps the Cortinas used the bigger version, as some had the 6-cylinder engine.

Regarding the B-W boxes behind 215s, 225s, 245s and 265s, I'm told that the supply situation came into it. Remember that the 904's bolt pattern (along with the small block 727's) was nearly identical to that on the Hemi 6. A change in the casting and they made the Hemi bellhousing patterns the same as the small block for the purpose of mounting them in trucks as well as the cars you mention. Additionally, if you ordered a 265 with a factory 'tow pack' you got a 727, I'm told.

#573 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:26

Of course, Lee, the V8s had Torqueflites, just as the Fords had C4s etc, never the 35 behind a V8...

35s were also used in Peugeot 504 from about 1972 onwards, but not the 604 which had a Belgian (IIRC) Trimatic.

Perhaps the Cortinas used the bigger version, as some had the 6-cylinder engine.

Regarding the B-W boxes behind 215s, 225s, 245s and 265s, I'm told that the supply situation came into it. Remember that the 904's bolt pattern (along with the small block 727's) was nearly identical to that on the Hemi 6. A change in the casting and they made the Hemi bellhousing patterns the same as the small block for the purpose of mounting them in trucks as well as the cars you mention. Additionally, if you ordered a 265 with a factory 'tow pack' you got a 727, I'm told.

Early 265s used a 727 only on the 265s, as I said only on some Chrysler x Chryslers and a few special order cabs. Tow packs, utes, wagons all got 35s which did a good job but the 218hp motor in particular [used on Chryslers normally] tore them up. Though that motor disappeared with VH and was only used in Pacer, RT, and 770s besides the 6 cyl Chryslers. A car that should only have been 360ci as the hemi was a bit harsh for a luxury, and quite heavy car.

The Hemi was a bit harsh in ANY car, though were a big powerful and noisy lump.
Fords used C4 as the heavy duty 6 cyl trans right through to BW40s in XE. And I think sometimes as a source of trannys on a slow day at BW! But never in Cortina 6 as it is a different trans, A 35 but the selector is on the other side and a couple of other variations. They do not readily exchange. The Cortina is a bit lighter anyway. 2 litres used a different 35 again and the pushrod Cortinas [TC on] used a smaller BW sourced from the UK I believe.

Half the motoring world used BWs in the 70s in front and rear drive cars. About a 100 different versions so my auto bloke tells me.

Edited by Lee Nicolle, 04 July 2013 - 08:29.


#574 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:45

I made it easy for you to misunderstand, Lee... sorry...

The Cortina bit was about the rear axle, not the automatic. The C4 was in reference to the V8s only.

#575 arttidesco

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 17:01

I think it should be compulsory for everyone on TNF to read A Boot Full of Right Arms, Evan Green's story of that London-Munich event which could have been an enormous victory for a poorly-funded but cleverly prepared and driven P76 had things been different out in the Sahara.

Evan described a lot of the ins and outs of the car's design period and the preparation of the car as well as the story of the event. You'd be well familiar with it once you'd completed the read.


I read it along time ago and thought it was excellent, I saw the London to Munich P76 first hand during my travels in 1974 and it along with the MG Marina V8 looked the business :up:

#576 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 23:36

I made it easy for you to misunderstand, Lee... sorry...

The Cortina bit was about the rear axle, not the automatic. The C4 was in reference to the V8s only.

The later TE on 2 litres used the full size diff. So if you want 3.9s for your 75 series diff that is where to look, R31 Pintara for 4.11s

#577 Ray Bell

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 00:15

Originally posted by arttidesco
I read it along time ago and thought it was excellent, I saw the London to Munich P76 first hand during my travels in 1974 and it along with the MG Marina V8 looked the business.


Good to know you enjoyed it...

There was a spare car built for that Marina V8 effort and it made it to Australia... unrallied... and it had a great life here in the stewardship of Gordon Mitchell from Perth.

Lee... didn't some of the Cortinas have a 3.7? My brother was an expert on that little Ford stuff and he told me that.

The Skylines were 3.9 in manuals, 4.1 in automatics (these had a higher overdrive top), these having 28-spline axles while the Pintaras had 25-splines. They can be recognised from the outside if you know what to look for... the brakes, external fittings etc are all the same.

#578 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 08:01

Good to know you enjoyed it...

There was a spare car built for that Marina V8 effort and it made it to Australia... unrallied... and it had a great life here in the stewardship of Gordon Mitchell from Perth.

Lee... didn't some of the Cortinas have a 3.7? My brother was an expert on that little Ford stuff and he told me that.

The Skylines were 3.9 in manuals, 4.1 in automatics (these had a higher overdrive top), these having 28-spline axles while the Pintaras had 25-splines. They can be recognised from the outside if you know what to look for... the brakes, external fittings etc are all the same.

I was having a seniors moment! TE TF Cortina 2 litre are 3.7, Pintara 4.1 and Skyline 3.9. And on the ones I have looked at autos and manuals were 3.9. And 75 series which are all 25 spline.
All 78 series are 28 spline and the first of those are VL Turbo. Really late 6 cyl VLs also used them. Most were 75 series with 25 spline. VN were all 78. Ford never used them until EB, and some EB 1s still have 75.
In the last few years I have learnt these things after playing with speedway Modified Sedans and now with my XE Improved Production. That car came with a VERY daggy diff. 25 spline with VL 3.45 gears and the side gears welded to the hemisphere. I did one hillclimb and twisted 2 axles Saturday and two Sunday. Since then using EB ED diffs and 28 spline I have had no troubles whatsoever. Though still check things before every event. Preperation!

#579 275 GTB-4

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 08:41

This thread is wandering and nearly out of control....

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#580 arttidesco

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 18:28

This thread is wandering and nearly out of control....


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Keep Calm and feast your eye's on this 1955 Morris Oxford  ;)


#581 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 19:17

Yeah...

That's much better!

#582 arttidesco

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 23:41

Yeah...

That's much better!


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And for those who like to swing with the sixties, a '66 ADO 17 recreation Landcrab competition car  ;)

#583 DennisTobin

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 23:28

It should also be compulsory for everyone on TNF to read "Building Cars in Australia" the story of the BMC factory at Zetland near Sydney from 1948 to 1973.

By pure chance,many years ago, i was handed a pile of photo`s and some paper folders. they had been the property of a the (at that time ) recently deceased John Frew.
Mr Frew had been the Service Factory Liaison officer for BMC / Leyland at Zetland. (Sorry Ray if these facts are not 100% correct as a lot of this imformation is hear say).
I never met Mr Frey, more is the pity, he would have been one of those unique persons one only comes across occassionally. he was presumably a very intelligent man with an incredible mechanical savy.
He would also have been a BMC man to the core--I believe.
The photo`s I have are all BMC, presumabley oringinal although they may have been copies, many oy them promotional/ advertivisment photo`s, going back to TF`s Magnette`s, J vans, Minis etc etc. There is also a good number of motor racing photo`s, primarily minis, and Bathurst. They are all of high quality. There was a photo of one of Barry Riebuild (?) creation`s ---I believe John was a friend of Barry`s.
Although I feel I am only the custodian of these photo`sI am reluctant to let them out of my sight as the two have been lost already.
Amongest some of the other paper work is a Folder full of copies of letters John had written answering queries from customers as to modififing their vehicles.
Believe me --this is not a small folder and some of the queries are fasinating---as are some of the names that crop up, Bob Tweetie, Jim Sullivan being just two from memory. Fasinating reading!
There are a number of note books with mathermatical equations and formula`s which mean notiing to one who failed infants school.

(Dick, if you are interested in viewing these---give me ring.)
Sorry this is getting a bit long winded---still related to BMC -Ray!
Some years ago I had contact with a guy who had a very large Mini collection, of which most of them were turning to rust as they were in the open and in tropical climate.
However the one car he cherished was a original Cooper S with a unusual bore size (1071?) He knows his Mimi`s and I believe this car had a number of unusual features. Unfortunately, some P---- also wanted some of these rare bits and irreplacable parts were stokel. (Hence no name)

Further BMC --I have recently been gifted From a mate of mine who has passed on, his 1952 Morris SIX.
Now the first car I ever owned (15 yrs old) was a 52 Morris Six. Although a car nutter I was not in to the dreaded Six--It wsa cheap and yher previous owner was going on holidays at his majesty`s pleasure.I tinkered with it, drove it when no one was looking and eventually swapped it for a down in the heels 21/2 Riley.
This Six is the ex Gordon Stewart, builder of the first succesful rear engined race car in Aust the Wheeler MG (oh dear --am I in trouble -RAY?) DiCk Willis has this bueat device in his collection.
This car was first registered in 52 and last registered in 20005. It is remarkable coringinal ondition., minumum rust, average paint. Not an exciting car in fact "cold porridge", I guess, but it sounde magnificent, great exhaust not lovely engine rumbles. oh, and it has the 6'80 Wolseley twin carb set up-
Not going to restore just keep it as oringinal as possible, it will go into my daughter and my humble collection ..it will be used
Finally--say what you like about the Leyland P76, but the greatest memoriesa I have of my time in quiet a large number of rally cars in the 70`s, without a doubt the most spectacular rides as a navigator( ?) was with Harold Maloney in his V8 P76. Big, brutish noisie, and bloody fast and driven extremely well---there is not alot of room on a forrestry road, even less with a sblock of flats travelling sideways and it sure took punishment--aaah memories!

Cheers DT ohh I am a MGB of some 40 yrs ---a Alpine for even longer (oop`s NOT BMC ---sorry Ray!)

#584 275 GTB-4

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 23:44

Dennis,

Craig Watson would likely be very interested to help and advise you on this package...

http://bmcexperience.com.au/home.html

Similarly, the people who wrote the Zetland tome...and this is one way to get in contact with them

http://www.leylandp7...clubs/heritage/

Also! Don't forget your local state library and their connection to the National Library of Australia

http://www.nla.gov.au/

Cheers, Mick



#585 Ray Bell

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 01:47

Dennis, that all sounds like great stuff... priceless!

I don't know where you get the idea that I'm negative about a little cross-marque talk in this thread, but I'm not. I am keen to see some of the wilder cross-marque talk disappear, but P76s were built at Zetland and designed by people who were BMC Australia through and through.

Alpines, however, remind me of Mike Savva...

With regard to the material you are holding, might I make a suggestion?

Grab a reasonable digital camera (not necessarily a high resolution one, even 2mp is fine) and place your photos on the floor of a spot where they get good light, but aren't in the sun. Then practice in getting them square in the viewfinder taking up most of the frame with the camera on half-zoom only. Not wide angle, not full zoom, but in the middle. This is the easiest and quickest, and I find also most reliable, way of copying the photos. Then you can reduce them in Irfanview (a free dowloadable programme), naturally you also save the full size version in case it's needed in higher resolution, and you can e-mail them to anyone interested or post them here with little fuss.

The same applies to the letters, but it sounds like there might be a lot of them. They would make great reading and maybe putting them on one of those free web pages somewhere would make them available to others. If you have a desire to do that.

The Morris 6 sounds like a great thing, I always liked the look of that model more than the Wolseley,

With regard to some of those names...

Bob Tweedie, Barry Reibelt, Jim Sullivan - all raced BMC products in the early sixties. Jim is still in Newcastle of course. It would surely be Hal Maloney (Thornton, Maitland area) who rallied the P76?

Finally, the 1071cc Cooper S was the first model 'S' we saw here. They were imported models with a relatively short stroke and were raced by the likes of Brian Foley and Peter Manton.

#586 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 03:32

By pure chance,many years ago, i was handed a pile of photo`s and some paper folders. they had been the property of a the (at that time ) recently deceased John Frew.
Mr Frew had been the Service Factory Liaison officer for BMC / Leyland at Zetland. (Sorry Ray if these facts are not 100% correct as a lot of this imformation is hear say).
I never met Mr Frey, more is the pity, he would have been one of those unique persons one only comes across occassionally. he was presumably a very intelligent man with an incredible mechanical savy.
He would also have been a BMC man to the core--I believe.
The photo`s I have are all BMC, presumabley oringinal although they may have been copies, many oy them promotional/ advertivisment photo`s, going back to TF`s Magnette`s, J vans, Minis etc etc. There is also a good number of motor racing photo`s, primarily minis, and Bathurst. They are all of high quality. There was a photo of one of Barry Riebuild (?) creation`s ---I believe John was a friend of Barry`s.
Although I feel I am only the custodian of these photo`sI am reluctant to let them out of my sight as the two have been lost already.
Amongest some of the other paper work is a Folder full of copies of letters John had written answering queries from customers as to modififing their vehicles.
Believe me --this is not a small folder and some of the queries are fasinating---as are some of the names that crop up, Bob Tweetie, Jim Sullivan being just two from memory. Fasinating reading!
There are a number of note books with mathermatical equations and formula`s which mean notiing to one who failed infants school.

(Dick, if you are interested in viewing these---give me ring.)
Sorry this is getting a bit long winded---still related to BMC -Ray!
Some years ago I had contact with a guy who had a very large Mini collection, of which most of them were turning to rust as they were in the open and in tropical climate.
However the one car he cherished was a original Cooper S with a unusual bore size (1071?) He knows his Mimi`s and I believe this car had a number of unusual features. Unfortunately, some P---- also wanted some of these rare bits and irreplacable parts were stokel. (Hence no name)

Further BMC --I have recently been gifted From a mate of mine who has passed on, his 1952 Morris SIX.
Now the first car I ever owned (15 yrs old) was a 52 Morris Six. Although a car nutter I was not in to the dreaded Six--It wsa cheap and yher previous owner was going on holidays at his majesty`s pleasure.I tinkered with it, drove it when no one was looking and eventually swapped it for a down in the heels 21/2 Riley.
This Six is the ex Gordon Stewart, builder of the first succesful rear engined race car in Aust the Wheeler MG (oh dear --am I in trouble -RAY?) DiCk Willis has this bueat device in his collection.
This car was first registered in 52 and last registered in 20005. It is remarkable coringinal ondition., minumum rust, average paint. Not an exciting car in fact "cold porridge", I guess, but it sounde magnificent, great exhaust not lovely engine rumbles. oh, and it has the 6'80 Wolseley twin carb set up-
Not going to restore just keep it as oringinal as possible, it will go into my daughter and my humble collection ..it will be used
Finally--say what you like about the Leyland P76, but the greatest memoriesa I have of my time in quiet a large number of rally cars in the 70`s, without a doubt the most spectacular rides as a navigator( ?) was with Harold Maloney in his V8 P76. Big, brutish noisie, and bloody fast and driven extremely well---there is not alot of room on a forrestry road, even less with a sblock of flats travelling sideways and it sure took punishment--aaah memories!

Cheers DT ohh I am a MGB of some 40 yrs ---a Alpine for even longer (oop`s NOT BMC ---sorry Ray!)

I feel there is a pic of the Gordon Stewart Morris on this forum, in the day! towing a racecar. Contact whoever submitted it for a copy to add to your collection.

#587 DennisTobin

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 08:59

I feel there is a pic of the Gordon Stewart Morris on this forum, in the day! towing a racecar. Contact whoever submitted it for a copy to add to your collection.

Thanks Lee - I have sighted a photo on one of the links (?), sorry I not computor savvy The photo shows Gordon, with three other adults standing around the car and trailer with the Wheeler MG on it. However, the Morris is a Oxford not his Six, which I found amazing as the photo was taken in the Blue Mountains. To think the Oxford towed all that weight over the Mountain blows me away. As a dopy kid I became involved with an Oxford owned by a good looling older "bird". Have to say it was not the Oxford I was interested in. (Unfortunately I was attempting to batt above my average)
I have distnct memories of being "burnt off" in a traffic light GP by a Government Bus in that Oxford.
Would have been pre 20005, Gordon turned up at a GEAR meeting, Wakefield Park. He apparrently liked what he saw went home and build a replica of the Wheeler MG, all but, Gemini powered (supercharged TC engine`s would be hard to find)
Some 8 mths later he was back at Wakefield with his replica for his neice to drive
True to tradition he towed it down with the Morris Six. It would have been a 3 1/2 to 4 hour drive each way.
Ray--thanks for the info. on reproducing the photo`s. They have been hidden away for far too long. I wiil have to call in my long sufferring son in law to assist, as can stuff ihe Lord`s prayer and the 6 palms atfter it.
The "info folder" is perhaps of more importantance from a historical point. Handed it over THE Brian Lawler today to have a read. He knew John Frew through his work with the Technical Colledge`s. (It will be Brians 87 birthday Sun)
And yep--that Hal Maloney (Rally Historian.)
Please don`t take my 'dig`s" as being serious. I am usually the one having my fingers wacked for being in the wrong place or being the "village idiot'. i LIKE IT THAT WAY
Cheers DT

#588 GMACKIE

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 09:24

Dennis, I would not be surprised if Gordon had given the Oxford's engine a 'bit of a work-over'. :)

#589 275 GTB-4

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 09:57

Dennis, I would not be surprised if Gordon had given the Oxford's engine a 'bit of a work-over'. :)


Possibly an Oxenford conversion Greg? :p

#590 Ray Bell

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 10:12

Didn't Gordon use a Marina engine in his replica?

I have the details of the car somewhere here, photos and all, we did something about that in the HRR Newsletter, it would have been about 1998 or so.

#591 GMACKIE

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 10:33

I think it was a Marina engine. Gordon hated Holdens....almost as much as he hated Volkswagens.

After I sold my VW, and bought a cheap station wagon, in 1963 - co-incidentally a Morris Oxford - Gordon started talking to me. :lol:

#592 DennisTobin

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 04:57

I think it was a Marina engine. Gordon hated Holdens....almost as much as he hated Volkswagens.

After I sold my VW, and bought a cheap station wagon, in 1963 - co-incidentally a Morris Oxford - Gordon started talking to me. :lol:

Yeh, sorry to many dead brain cells---it was a Marina engine. Brian Lawler was the last person I know who had thayt Replica. Not sure who he passed it on to.
DT

#593 Ian G

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 23:01

......anyone got Diff. dramas...


http://www.ebay.co.u...=item3383be26c6

#594 Ray Bell

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 13:19

eBay links are no good after a couple of months...

 

The other day I spotted this unlikely device:

 

yi0q.jpg

 

r910.jpg

 

gdhq.jpg

 

Note that the new rear chassis section has no facility for the rear end of the Hydrolastic suspension, I wonder how the front end works out?



#595 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 02:57

That seems a well engineered device, seemingly not a backyarder type one of build,,, but why? Or is it some BMC test bed?  The 1800 ute sold very few so an 1100 ute would sell less. 

Hindsight is wonderfull but really it is surprising all the manufacturers did not build more traytop type utes. Even as half tonners they are often more practical than a bed type ute.

And yes Ray I do know Peugoet did just that!


Edited by Lee Nicolle, 23 February 2014 - 09:09.


#596 Catalina Park

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 05:12

That is a very interesting bit of gear Ray. I would like to know more about it!
There is no real way of keeping the hydro suspension on a commercial vehicle, it would need some form of self levelling system to make it work with a load on it.
The front end units would just be blanked off and pressurised individually.

#597 2Bob

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 20:29

The front end units would just be blanked off and pressurised individually.

 

That is how I raced my Cooper S (Australian Hydro car when it started life).  No need for shocks either!  (Probably would have better with shocks I guess but they cost money).    



#598 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 22:18

Mini Sports Sedans generally use a beam axle with coil overs on the rear, and use coil overs on the front too. Hydrolastic or rubber cone was a little out of date for motorsport even in the day.



#599 Ray Bell

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 13:00

I stopped off and talked to the owner of the 1100 truck yesterday...

 

The chassis is from an Austin A40, it goes forward as far as the main body crossmember (under the front seat?) and the front end has had the A40 springs grafted in along with dampers.

 

The whole thing was created back in 1983 and he couldn't get it registered. "You don't have the qualifications make those mods!" was the attitude, so it's sat around all these years.



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#600 GreenMachine

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 00:11

Did you get a photo of the beam engine, wagons?......A beautiful bit of machinery, particularly when running. :up:


Greg, sorry for the delay, but your request is my command ...

Two of the Appleby

IMGP4567-2-M.jpg

IMGP4571-2-M.jpg

and a blue one too

IMGP4588-2-M.jpg

Sorry they are only links, maybe one day I will be able to post photos again :-( 

 

EDIT: Well, it looks like it is today :clap:, thanks to CP and Ray and their advice on the next page, they are photos, not just links!


Edited by GreenMachine, 03 March 2014 - 00:30.