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#601 GMACKIE

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 22:03

Thanks GreenMachine - sorry about the name mix-up.....nice photos of some wonderful machinery. :wave:

 

To see, hear, and feel those engines running is a real buz.



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#602 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 22:23

I stopped off and talked to the owner of the 1100 truck yesterday...

 

The chassis is from an Austin A40, it goes forward as far as the main body crossmember (under the front seat?) and the front end has had the A40 springs grafted in along with dampers.

 

The whole thing was created back in 1983 and he couldn't get it registered. "You don't have the qualifications make those mods!" was the attitude, so it's sat around all these years.

Seemingly he did a good job. The work on the cab seems very professional. The A40 chassis makes that look professional too. Though I still wonder why.



#603 Ray Bell

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 09:39

You just need to put the image codes at each end...

 

[img] at the beginning, no gap, your link and then no gap to the closing image code at the end.



#604 Ray Bell

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 09:56

The closing code is:

 

[/img]

 

The software forbids it all being in a single post without a proper image link between them!



#605 Catalina Park

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 05:12

I stopped off and talked to the owner of the 1100 truck yesterday...

 

The chassis is from an Austin A40, it goes forward as far as the main body crossmember (under the front seat?) and the front end has had the A40 springs grafted in along with dampers.

 

The whole thing was created back in 1983 and he couldn't get it registered. "You don't have the qualifications make those mods!" was the attitude, so it's sat around all these years.

 

It seems a shame that he didn't go through with the engineering process. It looks good though! 
I would love to see how he got the front suspension to work.



#606 GreenMachine

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 00:38

Thanks CP and Ray, I have edited the original post and the photos now show. :clap: :clap:

 

Greg, no problem, I am glad you enjoyed them.



#607 BRG

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 18:30

End of the road for the Morris Oxford?

 

This must be one of the longest production runs ever?



#608 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 22:24

End of the road for the Morris Oxford?

 

This must be one of the longest production runs ever?

I am amazed that the things ever sell these days. There is quite a few cars made in India these days.

And if nothing else one would have though that design rules alone would have finished this car earlier. I doubt any passenger design from the 50s would comply anywhere in the world these days.



#609 Charlieman

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 22:58

And if nothing else one would have though that design rules alone would have finished this car earlier.

"Grand father rights" often allow designs and services to continue in forms which would not be permitted for new companies. Examples beyond the motor trade/sport might include fairground equipment, theatres or circuses. For all of them, it is important to keep going -- to never close their doors -- in order to provide colour to life. 



#610 Dipster

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 06:59

I stopped off and talked to the owner of the 1100 truck yesterday...

 

The chassis is from an Austin A40, it goes forward as far as the main body crossmember (under the front seat?) and the front end has had the A40 springs grafted in along with dampers.

 

The whole thing was created back in 1983 and he couldn't get it registered. "You don't have the qualifications make those mods!" was the attitude, so it's sat around all these years.

Just running back over this thread I re-read this. It raises one of the very few things that disappoint me about the wonderful country that Oz is. Surely those who are "qualified" to undertake those mods could judge the results, no? But it does seem that without what my old Dad would have called the "sostificate" hands are tied and projects (dreams?) stymied. How did this situation come about?A massive accident involving a self-modded vehicle leading to second thoughts or vested interests looking after themselves?

 

Typos corrected. I hope.........


Edited by Dipster, 26 May 2014 - 07:00.


#611 GMACKIE

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 07:11

Good point, Dipster.....how did "this situation" come about ?

 

How many similar projects have been banished to the back of the shed, or worse, to the tip ?



#612 BRG

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 11:01

I am amazed that the things ever sell these days. There is quite a few cars made in India these days.
And if nothing else one would have though that design rules alone would have finished this car earlier. I doubt any passenger design from the 50s would comply anywhere in the world these days.



#613 BRG

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 11:03

Apparently, according to recent stories, India does not bother much with such considerations.

#614 275 GTB-4

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 11:33

Just running back over this thread I re-read this. It raises one of the very few things that disappoint me about the wonderful country that Oz is. Surely those who are "qualified" to undertake those mods could judge the results, no? But it does seem that without what my old Dad would have called the "sostificate" hands are tied and projects (dreams?) stymied. How did this situation come about?A massive accident involving a self-modded vehicle leading to second thoughts or vested interests looking after themselves?
 
Typos corrected. I hope.........


Just being the devils advocate, would you prefer that people were allowed on the roads in "self-engineered" death traps that could cause death and injury to themselves and others?

The Ute looks reasonably well constructed to my non-engineering eye and if the fella had taken it to a ginger beer early to get his work approved...it may well have been registered.

This was my 5c but Tony took 2c so now its only 3c...sorry

#615 Dipster

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 13:27

Just being the devils advocate, would you prefer that people were allowed on the roads in "self-engineered" death traps that could cause death and injury to themselves and others?

The Ute looks reasonably well constructed to my non-engineering eye and if the fella had taken it to a ginger beer early to get his work approved...it may well have been registered.

This was my 5c but Tony took 2c so now its only 3c...sorry

No, obviously not.  In my teens I saw the result of far too many cut'n shut abominations falling to bits on the road to want that.  But unless I have got it quite wrong I understand that, in Oz,  there is no system for a home-built car to be submitted to officialdom for inspection that, if found satisfactory, would lead to registration. Am I wrong there?



#616 BRG

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 20:05

As this is clearly a place where there is mucho BMC knowledge perhaps someone can cast some light on a minor point.  A Morris Minor point in fact, or rather an Austin Minor point.  In the AA Heritage display at the FoS, there was an AA Minor van, but it was badged as an Austin.  Apparently all the AA's Minors were Austins.  What was that about, and were there any other badging oddities?  A Morris Commercial A35 van for instance, or a MG Minor.



#617 Vitesse2

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 20:39

The AA website says the reason is now lost:

 

http://www.theaa.com...stin-minor.html

 

According to this, it was because they'd finally dropped the A35 van:

 

http://www.mmoc.org....hp?f=13&t=37330

 

However, I have a vague memory that the Austin-badged ones continued after the Minor saloon was finally retired, by which time they were for fleet buyers only - AA, Post Office, PO Telephones etc - perhaps because they all wanted to stick to a British-owned make. There wasn't really much else around at the time that would fit the bill. Macfisheries apparently bought 500 in 1968:

 

http://www.mmoc.org....t=18223&start=0

 

There were of course all sorts of strange badge anomalies in the colonies ... do I remember reading something about Wolseley utes?



#618 Dipster

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 05:49

I just took a peek at the AA site link. The rims on the Minors pictured there look wider than normal to my eyes.



#619 RCH

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 06:09

My memory may be playing me tricks but was there not also A55/60 (Austin Cambridge) vans badged as Morrises? Similarly for reasons of brand loyalty. Or am I just being far too logical for BMC?



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#620 D-Type

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 07:14

Remember that at the time, say mid-sixties, there were still separate Austin and Morris dealers who would both need appropriately badged vans to sell after BMC rationalised the range.  Hence the badge engineering.



#621 Ray Bell

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 15:14

Originally posted by Dipster
.....But unless I have got it quite wrong I understand that, in Oz,  there is no system for a home-built car to be submitted to officialdom for inspection that, if found satisfactory, would lead to registration. Am I wrong there?


The system that's in place places the power in the hands of 'approved' engineers who charge (usually) quite large sums to make sure that everything is over-built.

I'm really only sure about this when it comes to modifications, but there must be some kind of similar system for complete cars.
What does sadden me is when I see that a piece of 10mm steel plate is used to bracket two pieces of 14g production pressings together. That is a common sight. 10mm brackets and gussets on 14g or 12g pressed chassis parts... overkill.

#622 275 GTB-4

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 23:38

No, obviously not.  In my teens I saw the result of far too many cut'n shut abominations falling to bits on the road to want that.  But unless I have got it quite wrong I understand that, in Oz,  there is no system for a home-built car to be submitted to officialdom for inspection that, if found satisfactory, would lead to registration. Am I wrong there?

No, obviously not.  In my teens I saw the result of far too many cut'n shut abominations falling to bits on the road to want that.  But unless I have got it quite wrong I understand that, in Oz,  there is no system for a home-built car to be submitted to officialdom for inspection that, if found satisfactory, would lead to registration. Am I wrong there?


Dip...you are close but there are ways and means to have a one-off or special car registered...

Hell! you could even become a certifier yourself (NSW only maybe)

http://www.rms.nsw.g...cs_eoi_dl1.html

#623 Ray Bell

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 01:34

I'm not sure, but I think that if a car is certified and registered in one state it is then able to be registered in other states.

You only go through the process once, I think...

#624 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 05:38

I'm not sure, but I think that if a car is certified and registered in one state it is then able to be registered in other states.

You only go through the process once, I think...

With custom, left hook and modified cars it is different in every state.

 

The reason I never buy those sorts of cars. What is ok in one state is not in the next. And if you do own them you have to have a folder full of letters, approvals and engineers reports. Sometimes just to transfer the reg in the same state.

Here in SA we are a backwater, bring in a hotrod and it is nearly a war to get registered, after being registered in another state, even just modified cars too. This on glass, seat belt anchorages, door locks and the like.All supposedly done to a national standard.  And left hook also. Here in SA they must be more standard than standard to be registered at all. Though the rules change regularly even with that. eg you are now allowed to use the brake lights flashing as they do on most 50s & 60s US models instead of installing amber flashers.

 

Though Euro cars were coming in with little compliance and being registered at one stage. US cars were treated differently. Why??

 

Hot rods properly engineered cause the owners dramas to register here as they want them done differently. And every engineer disagrees with the next too. One Govt approved would never pass any new car,,, he does not get much work!

 

Even LPG vehicles are a problem. eg Factory Ford LPG has the  mixer on the spring tower, and they will pass that, but any aftermarket systems must be  behind the spring towers. Dumber than dumb, and a trap for people buying cars interstate, as is window tint too.

 

I believe some other states have similar lunacy too, often in different areas.

 

Though too be fair some of it does make sense, and a lot is just an abuse of power.

 

Be very wary of buying rebuilds too, every state is different there too. Cars from NSW are un able to be registered here. Even undamaged cars, such as stolen, written off then  recovered undamaged. Which is bloody stupid. And increases everyones insurance premiums too, a 30k car is worth maybe 8k with a 1000km on it. As it will ever only be parts and not a car. But if it comes from another state it can be after all the hoops are jumped through, 2 inspections and nearly $700 later! for about 2 hours work, that done in slow motion by a govt inspector!


Edited by Lee Nicolle, 11 July 2014 - 05:49.


#625 Dipster

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 05:59

You all make it sound like motoring heaven...................



#626 275 GTB-4

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 12:29

Spot on Lee...you drilled it! :up:

There are people trying to get the whole mess rationalised...but I believe they are probably trying to push *%#$ up hill with a pointy stick :rolleyes:


Edited by 275 GTB-4, 11 July 2014 - 12:29.


#627 GMACKIE

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 20:23

And you can bet Ricky Muir [Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party] won't be any help, even though he virtually has 'control' of the senate. It won't be long before he turns into a 'politician',and becomes useless like all the others. :cry:



#628 BRG

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 20:35

Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party

Is that some sort of Aussie equivalent to Britain's beloved Monster Raving Loony Party?



#629 Vitesse2

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 20:55

Is that some sort of Aussie equivalent to Britain's beloved Monster Raving Loony Party?

I assumed it must have been something to do with 'Britain's most eminent motorist' J Bonington Jagworth and the Motorists' Liberation Front - or perhaps his ambitious  crypto-Marxist Chief of Staff Royston Cylinder.



#630 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 23:52

And you can bet Ricky Muir [Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party] won't be any help, even though he virtually has 'control' of the senate. It won't be long before he turns into a 'politician',and becomes useless like all the others. :cry:

He is not a politician! He cannot continue the same rhetoric day after day. He seems to struggle to say two words!

He is a puppet of the bloke that did all those preference deals that got all of these independents elected. 


Edited by Lee Nicolle, 11 July 2014 - 23:56.


#631 Ray Bell

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:18

Sounds just like a politician to me...

Is it also true that nobody actually voted for him?

#632 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 00:46

Sounds just like a politician to me...

Is it also true that nobody actually voted for him?

Very few, a few hundred first preference, all preferences. With all the other independents. Though some Greens and Palmer cantidates to a less degree got in the same way.



#633 2Bob

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 03:13

To help our UK and other none Oz forum followers (and by the look of the last election maybe for some Oz voters (and including me it turns out)...).

 

Voting in Australia for federal and state elections is compulsory (well marking your name off at a voting booth is).  Voting is also preferential not 'first past the post'.  You can vote 'above the line' where you vote for a party with votes going to the individuals in the order that the party determines or 'below the line' where you have to number each candidate in the order that you wish to vote for them.  For the lower house (house of commons in UK) you vote for one person in your electorate (or for the party who nominates a candidate for that area).  For the upper house (House of Lords in UK) you vote for a group of candidates (or party nominations) to represent your state.  If 'your' candidate gets the the most votes on the first count then that is the end of it.  If not then your second preference gets counted (or the party preference if you voted for a party gets counted).....

 

Actually, I don't really understand it either! 

 

 

Look up http://en.wikipedia....em_of_Australia or similar for a better explanantion.  

 

What it means is that somehow a person who actually only received some thing like 0.5% of first preference votes managed to attract enough second (or third or forth..) preference votes from other very candidates who didn't support the major parties and ended up with enough preference votes to gain representation for their state.  (Ricky Muir for the Australian Motorists Enthusiast party). :down:  :rotfl:  :confused:  :mad:



#634 Ray Bell

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 07:03

It's important to include in there, with regard to this discussion, that for the Senate (where this is all happening) the system of voting is called 'Proportional Representation'. Tasmania also has this for their regular elections IIRC.

#635 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:03

To help our UK and other none Oz forum followers (and by the look of the last election maybe for some Oz voters (and including me it turns out)...).

 

Voting in Australia for federal and state elections is compulsory (well marking your name off at a voting booth is).  Voting is also preferential not 'first past the post'.  You can vote 'above the line' where you vote for a party with votes going to the individuals in the order that the party determines or 'below the line' where you have to number each candidate in the order that you wish to vote for them.  For the lower house (house of commons in UK) you vote for one person in your electorate (or for the party who nominates a candidate for that area).  For the upper house (House of Lords in UK) you vote for a group of candidates (or party nominations) to represent your state.  If 'your' candidate gets the the most votes on the first count then that is the end of it.  If not then your second preference gets counted (or the party preference if you voted for a party gets counted).....

 

Actually, I don't really understand it either! 

 

 

Look up http://en.wikipedia....em_of_Australia or similar for a better explanantion.  

 

What it means is that somehow a person who actually only received some thing like 0.5% of first preference votes managed to attract enough second (or third or forth..) preference votes from other very candidates who didn't support the major parties and ended up with enough preference votes to gain representation for their state.  (Ricky Muir for the Australian Motorists Enthusiast party). :down:  :rotfl:  :confused:  :mad:

Very well done Bob! Sounds like you understand it and can articulate better than the Australian Electoral Commision. 

The cantidate with the least first preference votes gets a seat.

Probably why we have such stupid laws in this country, that and minority Labor governments continually buying power with deals with independents. Who then have to be catered for as if they won government, not just the seat.  :mad:  :mad:



#636 wagons46

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:39

.......and they all drive around in Commonwealth cars that sadly aren't made by BMC anymore, or ever were.