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Tim Cash


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#1 roger saretzki

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 06:32

who was TIM CASH ??
a lot off people tell me he was a very nice person , but not a racedriver .
and there are not many photos i have seen so far...........................

all the best , roger

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#2 Cirrus

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 07:14

By all accounts Tim Cash was a larger than life character with poor eyesight, moderate ability and an outrageous sense of humour. Try to get hold of a copy of the Jurg Dubler F3 books - they are packed with anecdotes about Tim Cash.

The circumstances of his death (in Portugal?) in 1967 led Dubler to question whether his crash was truly an accident. 1967 was a dangerous year in F3 - I can think of at least five drivers who died.

#3 Catalina Park

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 09:27

All I know about Tim Cash is what Barry Collerson has written in his book "Mount Druitt to Monza"

Everyone on the F3 circuit knew Tim; he was a colourful, yet modest, character who proudly proclamed himself to be "The best known unsuccessful racing driver in Europe"



#4 roger saretzki

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 05:57

has anybody a picture from tim ??????????????????

regards roger

#5 Cirrus

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 07:13

There is a picture of Tim Cash in the first Dubler book - you really must try to get hold of a copy Roger! I don't think I can post it for copyright reasons.

Whilst looking for the picture, I read again some of the anecdotes relating to TC. This is fairly typical.

Tim Cash transported his Merlyn around in the back of an ancient Bedford truck. The car was too long for the truck, so TC drove it around with the doors folded back along the sides of the body, with the nose of the car sticking out of the back. The result was that the car arrived at races much dirtier than if it had been transported on a trailer. Tim and Jurg Dubler had decided to take the train to Imola due to snow-covered roads in Switzerland. Unfortunately, the framework on the train coaches were a little too narrow for the truck.

This is my attempt at translating from the book

"Tim arrived, and took a run at the coach, with the back doors of his truck still open, remember. You can guess what happened next - he hit the first arch with one of the doors, realised at the second arch that something made a noise, slammed on the brakes at the third, and ended up stopping at the fourth. Result - the Saint Gothard car/sleeper train suffered a two hour delay, a rather seriously damaged carriage, and the Bedford no longer had any rear doors.

When the train finally got through the tunnel, its arrival at Airolo was also not without drama. The handbrake of the Bedford was not exactly the finest example of its kind, but Tim had conscientiously engaged a gear when he loaded the truck onto the train.

But, of course, diesel engines require very little to get them started. The stopping of the train was accompanied by a jolt, violent enough to cause the Bedford to start. It got underway, and promptly rammed the Volvo estate car parked in front. That Volvo estate car was mine! An invoice from the Swiss Railways fairly big (but never paid), for some metal arches, is tangible proof of the truth of this story
"