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Personal photos of Australian motor racing '50s to '70s


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#5451 Ray Bell

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 20:13

Originally posted by austmcreg
.....This car became the basis in 1965 for Kerry Cox's Paramount Jaguar.....

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Photo by Keith or Brian Roberts


First, it's hard to believe that good looking thing could have become the Purple Petrol eater, but when someone replaces a Jag engine with a Y-block you simply know there's trouble afoot...

And I do hope Geoff posts in relation to these cars, his information is always good and brings to light new facts. By the way, is that in the 'escape road' area at the end of Tannery Straight?

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#5452 David Shaw

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 21:35

By the way, is that in the 'escape road' area at the end of Tannery Straight?


It certainly looks to be, with the farmer's gate left open for just such an occasion. The scenery doesn't seem to fit elsewhere either.

#5453 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 22:09

These are G800s - quite similar....but I'm not 100% convinced...
edit: Sorry - couldn't make the link work

I reckon they are Vredstein. they are 15"[or16"] and in those days the Goodyear G800 only catered for popular 13 and 14" sizes. The Euro tyres [which were fitted to a lot of then popular Euro cars] catered for the less popular [In Oz at the time] sizes. Most of the Euro tyres were quite good performers for the day.
Though in hindsight buffing those tyres to 2mm [3/32" for the correct measurment for the day] would have made them a LOT faster and more consistent.
I used G800s on my FE Holden in about 71, ok tyre in the day but far better [and wider] was soon advailable

Edited by Lee Nicolle, 23 June 2011 - 22:15.


#5454 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 22:16

First, it's hard to believe that good looking thing could have become the Purple Petrol eater, but when someone replaces a Jag engine with a Y-block you simply know there's trouble afoot...

And I do hope Geoff posts in relation to these cars, his information is always good and brings to light new facts. By the way, is that in the 'escape road' area at the end of Tannery Straight?

The Y block was probably lighter!

#5455 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 22:17

Thanks - that's the link I was unsuccessfully trying to put up :)

God, I drove fast on them. WHAT was I thinking!

#5456 GMACKIE

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 22:19

Not sure what 'days' you mean, but G800s were available in 15" in the early '60s, and they were crap........see post #5421.

#5457 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 22:31

Not meaning to throw a spanner in the works regarding the "rubber on Wally's Holden special......But!, several of the Tasmanian tyre companies were retreading tyres to their own design around that time and CAMS was still learning to crawl in those days so these nobbly boots were proving better than the bland over the counter stuff. Tasmanian Tyre Service in Launceston :clap: was marketing their exclusive Suburbanite Tread' which was popular in Trials, Beach racing and even on the circuit on occasions and I drove cars in several events in the 50's on this particular tread while having been envolved through the family engineerig business in making the die segments to set into the mould for this tread and I had access for testing purposes. The tires on the Holden MG are not the TTS tread but are very similar and could be a spiv. tread at the time from another local companyof which there were several top line retreaders in Tasmania, a thought perhaps??..........Smed.

Suburbanites were actually made as new tyre. Though that tread pattern was a very common retread pattern which was very often used in Speedway. The Victorians abd Taswegians tended to use them all round on Supermods wheras most of the other states tended to use them as steers only. Popular 6 40x13 on a 6" rim. was a common set up. through to about 74.
I have a pic of Bill Wigzells Suddenly L88 Chev powered car with them in the early 70s.with 15" wide rears! And that car won a LOT of races.. Iwas going to put it up but have a computer glitch,,, again.

#5458 Ellis French

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 22:43

First, it's hard to believe that good looking thing could have become the Purple Petrol eater, but when someone replaces a Jag engine with a Y-block you simply know there's trouble afoot...

And I do hope Geoff posts in relation to these cars, his information is always good and brings to light new facts. By the way, is that in the 'escape road' area at the end of Tannery Straight?



It didnt become the Purple Petrol Eater....that had SV Ford

It did become the Paramount Jag...still with Jag....and repainted purple with "Lotus 11" body work added

Two separate cars.
and
Geoffs got a new computer which he is coming to grips with


#5459 Ellis French

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 22:55

It certainly looks to be, with the farmer's gate left open for just such an occasion. The scenery doesn't seem to fit elsewhere either.




Certainly is the escape paddock.
It did get a few visitors over the years as tannery was quite long and almost straight
ending with a sharp turn right at the T junction..... or visit the paddock.
They did some timing on Tannery in the early 60's
and one such timed was Geoff Smedley in the LeMans Jag ....at 132mph from memory.

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#5460 austmcreg

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 03:09

It certainly looks to be, with the farmer's gate left open for just such an occasion. The scenery doesn't seem to fit elsewhere either.

Yes, this was taken in the paddock at Tannery corner. That gate was progressively enlarged over the years to act as an escape route. This was taken in 1959 when the Kenley expired in practice or an early race, and was not seen again for the rest of the weekend. I have seen another photo somewhere of Geoff building the body but I dont seem to have a copy.

Just to clarify what others have already said - the Paramount Jaguar came after Kerry Cox sold the Paramount Ford to Ralph Terry and were two seperate cars. Cox bought the Le Mans Jaguar in early 1965 and spent most of that year rebuilding it with Customline diff and his own rear suspension in place of the Jag items. His aim was to be first local home in the Australian TT at Longford in March 1966, a feat which he achieved, despite a fuel stop. With the oil drum fuel tank on the car and primitive refuelling technique no doubt employed, I hate to think of the risks involved in that! There is a writeup in Tasmanian Motorist covering the build of this car. It was later (late 1966 or 1967) given a new fibreglass body moulded from the Lotus 11 replica panels on the (then Brian Bowe owned) HEA Simca.

Rob Saward

#5461 DanTra2858

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 08:48

G800s were available in 15" in the early '60s, and they were crap........


Greg I humbly ask, looking at your Personal Photo are you still running G800 !!!!! :wave:

#5462 GMACKIE

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 09:07

Greg I humbly ask, looking at your Personal Photo are you still running G800 !!!!! :wave:

HA HA, no thanks! The Hoosier Vintage TD [5.00 F, 5.50 R X 15"] do the job........despite the swing-axle, king/link pin, drum brake set-up. :eek:


#5463 Ray Bell

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 10:07

Originally posted by austmcreg
Yes, this was taken in the paddock at Tannery corner. That gate was progressively enlarged over the years to act as an escape route. This was taken in 1959.....


I would be prepared to say that by 1965, when I first went there, it was a steel-framed gate...

Whether or not it was a double gate, I'm not sure, but I think it might have been.

Apologies for the mix-up with the PPE.

#5464 Catalina Park

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 10:33

Even a double gate looks narrow!

#5465 terry mcgrath

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 00:48

The Lemans Jaguar was built from the remains of XK120 chassis no 660049 which was raced by Luxton and later Wager
The Tom Hawkes car which did race in Tasmania in the early 1950's was chassis number 660012 and survives in Sydney
I am very keen to get a picture of the Lemans Jaguar as a standard XK120 which was black in colour before it was stolen crashed and burnt as the story goes.
The history of these XK's and all other XK's in Australia and NZ etc is covered in our XK book see details at
Sample Pages at http://www.jtpublications.com.au/book/
Visit: www.jtpublications.com.au for full details
terry

I am posting here several photos of two cars that Geoff Smedley was involved with in the anticipation that he might add some comments regarding them. The Le Mans Jaguar was racing in Tas from about 1960 driven variously I think by Geoff, Alan Cohen and Brian Dunstan, whom I have read elsewhere were all involved with Le Mans Motors in Launceston. Is it true that it was built using mechanicals from the XK120 lightweight that Tom Hawkes raced in Tas about 1950-51? Who actually owned / built it? This car became the basis in 1965 for Kerry Cox's Paramount Jaguar.

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Photo by Jim Saward

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#5466 ellrosso

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 08:53

Just out of interest this is the Repco head from the Bluey Mitchell MG Holden - fitted to Peter Mather's immaculate humpy. Peter and Barry Mitchell are going to see Mick Watt again to find out a bit more about the history - it wasn't always fitted to the car.
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#5467 eldougo

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 11:11

And it never ran those size wheel and with a low ground clearance it its day that for sure.

#5468 ellrosso

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 12:29

Give you an idea of it in period - Peter's debut meeting at Baskerville 1971
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#5469 eldougo

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 12:41

Like i said a lot lower than it day.

#5470 Ellis French

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 13:44

And it never ran those size wheel and with a low ground clearance it its day that for sure.



13" were legal from late 1967 in Tas


#5471 Ray Bell

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 21:25

Under Sports Sedan rules, which it surely ran, they were always legal...

Or have I missed something here? And wasn't eldougo referring to width, not diameter?

#5472 DanTra2858

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 22:18

What class did the FJ compete in, surly running the Repco head & the 13" rims it must have been a Sports Sedan as these do not conform to Appendix J rules or did Tasmania have it's own rules ??????

#5473 GMACKIE

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 22:35

In the 'Appendix J' days, cars that had mods. outside the rules, usually ran in the 'Appendix K' [GT] class. There were quite a few, such as Leo's Holden etc. that were beyond being worthwhile returning to 'Appendix J' rules.

#5474 Ellis French

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 23:34

What class did the FJ compete in, surly running the Repco head & the 13" rims it must have been a Sports Sedan as these do not conform to Appendix J rules or did Tasmania have it's own rules ??????


In Tas ...They were still under the App J type rules ...3" + 40th with a few allowances such as 12V , 13" wheels in 1968.
Same rules applied at Hume Weir and Calder for the Holden only races


Not sure that anyone said it ran the Repco head when raced.
The pic was taken in 1972...it had iron head.
Peter never purchased the Repco head till 1991/2..see previous post

Quote....
In the 'Appendix J' days, cars that had mods. outside the rules, usually ran in the 'Appendix K' [GT] class. There were quite a few, such as Leo's Holden etc. that were beyond being worthwhile returning to 'Appendix J' rules.

The Geoghegan car came to Tas to Allan Ling and ran as App K. It was then returned to J rules and run by John Zeigler so it was worthwhile at the time.


#5475 GMACKIE

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 00:41

Why 'return' to App. J, when it never ran under those rules?

#5476 sherpa

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 05:29

Does it really matter, the car is a work of art and is a great representation of the type of car that used to grace our racetracks

#5477 Ellis French

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 06:05

Why 'return' to App. J, when it never ran under those rules?


such as Leo's Holden etc. that were beyond being worthwhile returning to 'Appendix J' rules.



"return" is your word not mine
It did run under J rules here in Tas
We are talking in the period not a 50 years after the event resto.

Longford 1965
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Edited by Ellis French, 26 June 2011 - 06:23.


#5478 Ellis French

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 06:15

Does it really matter, the car is a work of art and is a great representation of the type of car that used to grace our racetracks



Peters old race car in its current state is exactly as you describe it above. Its a credit to him.

#5479 GMACKIE

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 06:46

In Tas ...They were still under the App J type rules ...3" + 40th with a few allowances such as 12V , 13" wheels in 1968.
Same rules applied at Hume Weir and Calder for the Holden only races


Not sure that anyone said it ran the Repco head when raced.
The pic was taken in 1972...it had iron head.
Peter never purchased the Repco head till 1991/2..see previous post

Quote....
In the 'Appendix J' days, cars that had mods. outside the rules, usually ran in the 'Appendix K' [GT] class. There were quite a few, such as Leo's Holden etc. that were beyond being worthwhile returning to 'Appendix J' rules.

The Geoghegan car came to Tas to Allan Ling and ran as App K. It was then returned to J rules and run by John Zeigler so it was worthwhile at the time.

Sorry to disagree, but I WAS QUOTING YOU when I used the word "return". The App. J rules were CAMS rules.


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#5480 Ellis French

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 06:57

In the 'Appendix J' days, cars that had mods. outside the rules, usually ran in the 'Appendix K' [GT] class. There were quite a few, such as Leo's Holden etc. that were beyond being worthwhile returning to 'Appendix J' rules.



This is your post I was replying to.

#5481 David Shaw

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 09:08

On the subject of the Geoghegan Holden, I have partial results of the "Courier Mail Saloon Car Trophy Race" at Lowood on October 25th 1959.
Interestingly, it shows Ian Geoghegan finishing second in a Holden #35 behind John French, with Leo DNS with overheating. Unfortunately I can't locate the source document at the moment.
If this was indeed the case, does this mean that the Liverpool Car Sales team built another Holden to possibly assess it as an Appendix J device?

#5482 Ray Bell

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 09:41

David, the car Pete drove was undoubtedly the one he was to go on to drive at the Orange ATCC event the following year (in fact, just a few months later)...

This became the Muir car, then to Max Stahl.

As for 'Appendix J' in the late sixties, there was no such thing. With standard bores plus 0.040" overbores, it was clearly a neat fit with 'Improved Production' rules.

#5483 GMACKIE

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 10:40

Correct Ray.......Appendix J finished at the end of 1964.

#5484 Ray Bell

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 10:56

Probably at Hume Weir on December 26, Greg...

I don't think I was there that day, though. I was at the Farm on the first weekend of December, however, remember that day? Very special tintop races, Beechey out of the hunt, McKeown and the two Geoghegans in Cortinas, Jane versus Muir, Foley versus Manton in Minis. And all of them battling together.

The race descriptions in RCN goes nearly a full page.

#5485 275 GTB-4

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 12:01

Return??? Retune?? ahhhh well

Time for some Dean and Perry :wave:



#5486 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 23:26

Give you an idea of it in period - Peter's debut meeting at Baskerville 1971
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While I do not know the clasifications the early Holden races in SA in the early 70s had big bores, 13x7 or 8 rims but still ran drums and 3 speed boxes. Some of those cars ended up with red motors, 4 speeds, disc brakes and raced as Sports sedans. And some are still around in that form. And one ended up as a fully DEVLCO car with a 6litre Chev
As for ride heights some were lower than that in the early 70s

#5487 GMACKIE

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 00:04

The later rules were far more open. In the original Appendix J days [1960 to 1964] there were very few mods allowed. The FJ in the photo would not have passed scrutineering then, just because of the wheels, advertising, no front overriders, etc. That's without even checking the mechanicals! Any car over 1300cc had to have FOUR doors. Engine components had to be stock, except for balancing etc., capacity had to stay within the class, heads could be modified by REMOVING metal - no adding metal. Intake and exhaust were free.

Some of the Holden intake systems were amazing! Triple SUs were popular, but my favourite was FIVE Amals [I think it was Kingsley Hibbard's car]. The rules were tough, but they were the same for everyone, so that a 'low budget' car could [with a good driver] be very competitive.

#5488 Geoff Smedley

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 04:21

First, it's hard to believe that good looking thing could have become the Purple Petrol eater, but when someone replaces a Jag engine with a Y-block you simply know there's trouble afoot... And I do hope Geoff posts in relation to these cars, his information is always good and brings to light new facts. By the way, is that in the 'escape road' area at the end of Tannery Straight?

The Kenley was started in 1951 by a 20y.o. that become 'inspired' to create something to put his bum in and go racing. The car was modeled from an exploded drawing of the Cooper Mk.5 which featured in IOTA, (The official organ of the half litre car club in Britain and later in 1953 becomming Motor Racing) The ambitious plan was to create a car without the use of subsidury parts other than perhaps the power plant demanding a lot of time in the workhop. Halfway through this one off project I was sort of sidetract by a female of the species and production time was becomming delayed so another quick plan was put in place to save face. The females surname being Kenyon and mine Smedley, Kenley became the pacifyer that allowed me the extra time. The picture posted of the Kenley Vincent resting in the grass at the end of Tannery at Longford was the direct result of a design fault, when making the wheels I had machined the hubs and brake drums as one unit then spoked the rims to the drum consequently high speed stopping was out, the expansion of the brake drum allowed the spokes to loose control making the gateway on that day look very narrow. practical learning is lasting learning, and yes! I got the best result of all by marrying that female hinderance 55 years ago.

#5489 GMACKIE

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 04:37

Nice story, Geoff........Tell me, shouldn't you have changed the car's name 55 years ago then? :lol:

#5490 Geoff Smedley

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 05:54

Nice story, Geoff........Tell me, shouldn't you have changed the car's name 55 years ago then? :lol:

Bit like marriage, some things stick!!

#5491 Ellis French

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 07:12

The Kenley was started in 1951 by a 20y.o. that become 'inspired' to create something to put his bum in and go racing. The car was modeled from an exploded drawing of the Cooper Mk.5 which featured in IOTA, (The official organ of the half litre car club in Britain and later in 1953 becomming Motor Racing) The ambitious plan was to create a car without the use of subsidury parts other than perhaps the power plant demanding a lot of time in the workhop. Halfway through this one off project I was sort of sidetract by a female of the species and production time was becomming delayed so another quick plan was put in place to save face. The females surname being Kenyon and mine Smedley, Kenley became the pacifyer that allowed me the extra time. The picture posted of the Kenley Vincent resting in the grass at the end of Tannery at Longford was the direct result of a design fault, when making the wheels I had machined the hubs and brake drums as one unit then spoked the rims to the drum consequently high speed stopping was out, the expansion of the brake drum allowed the spokes to loose control making the gateway on that day look very narrow. practical learning is lasting learning, and yes! I got the best result of all by marrying that female hinderance 55 years ago.



Geoff has just emailed and asked me to post pic of Kenley...here it is......plus couple of other pics

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Edit...Geoff has told me he wanted to build the complete car and he did just that with exception of the engine/box.

Edited by Ellis French, 27 June 2011 - 07:17.


#5492 Ellis French

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 07:50

Greg Mackie requested I post these for him....
If captions are incorrect Greg will tell me and I'll edit them for him.

Catalina Neptune Advert 1963
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Bathurst Esses 1963
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Catalina 1963
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Oran Park
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Grid 1981 NSW Sports Sedan C'ship Oran Park...Finnished 1st
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Marulan 2009
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#5493 GMACKIE

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 10:06

Thanks for doing that, Ellis.......I'm working on the 'pics' thing.

The captions are spot-on. The 'Neptune' adv. was sent to me by cooper997 - thanks Stephen.

Cheers, Greg


#5494 austmcreg

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 10:31

The Kenley was started in 1951 by a 20y.o. that become 'inspired' to create something to put his bum in and go racing. The car was modeled from an exploded drawing of the Cooper Mk.5 which featured in IOTA, (The official organ of the half litre car club in Britain and later in 1953 becomming Motor Racing) The ambitious plan was to create a car without the use of subsidury parts other than perhaps the power plant demanding a lot of time in the workhop. Halfway through this one off project I was sort of sidetract by a female of the species and production time was becomming delayed so another quick plan was put in place to save face. The females surname being Kenyon and mine Smedley, Kenley became the pacifyer that allowed me the extra time. The picture posted of the Kenley Vincent resting in the grass at the end of Tannery at Longford was the direct result of a design fault, when making the wheels I had machined the hubs and brake drums as one unit then spoked the rims to the drum consequently high speed stopping was out, the expansion of the brake drum allowed the spokes to loose control making the gateway on that day look very narrow. practical learning is lasting learning, and yes! I got the best result of all by marrying that female hinderance 55 years ago.

Thanks, Geoff, for this information, and I hope you dont mind a few extra questions about the Kenley Vincent. The car was driven at Longford 1958 (without body panels) by Ross Oliver - what was the story there? Was Ross involved with the car in some way? I see the newly posted photo of the car on the trailer was taken at this meeting, in the old paddock area on Flying Mile.

There was a business in Launceston called Kenley Motors - I can only assume after your explanation of the name that it must have been yours?

Would you mind if I PM you to talk about some other Longford subjects like your earlier TR2, and the ex Hine MG (visible in one of the new photos)?

Rob Saward

Edited by austmcreg, 27 June 2011 - 10:35.


#5495 Ellis French

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 12:48

There was a business in Launceston called Kenley Motors - I can only assume after your explanation of the name that it must have been yours?

Rob Saward



Rob.... this pic of Geoffs may help you.

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Edit...Geoffs description added..
This is the complete picture taken by the Examiner I think in 1958 for a thrilling article on the Kenley Racing Team , the largest team in Tamar street at that time. I have also been queried about Kenley Motors and the wall shield tells all in this pic., Smed
PS.... It was a then a new Mobile Service Station 18 Tamar Street. Launceston

Edited by Ellis French, 27 June 2011 - 23:07.


#5496 Ray Bell

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 23:19

I've got to say that there's something about that MG Special makes it look different to a lot of other 'square rigger' MGs of the time...

Could Geoff elaborate on this car, perhaps?

#5497 David Shaw

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 10:30

The later rules were far more open. In the original Appendix J days [1960 to 1964] there were very few mods allowed. The FJ in the photo would not have passed scrutineering then, just because of the wheels, advertising, no front overriders, etc. That's without even checking the mechanicals! Any car over 1300cc had to have FOUR doors.


That doesn't quite marry up with Black Pete's 2-door GT Cortina winning the 1964 ATCC at Lakeside, with McKeown's Lotus Cortina out of action against the fence at Hungry.
Could the 2-door capacity limit have been 1600cc?

#5498 Ray Bell

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 10:47

I never thought of that before, David...

I used to know these things, but Appendix J 'knowledge' was dispensed with back in 1965. I had thought it was a very small capacity like 750cc or something, but Minis kind of blow that out of the water.

As for 'very few mods' being allowed, as Greg has mentioned, capacity increases up to the class limit meant quite considerable overboring in many cases. Holdens from 2160 to 2600cc, for instance.

'Improved Touring' was always considered to be a somewhat milder level of modification allowance.

#5499 seldo

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 12:22

I never thought of that before, David...

I used to know these things, but Appendix J 'knowledge' was dispensed with back in 1965. I had thought it was a very small capacity like 750cc or something, but Minis kind of blow that out of the water.

As for 'very few mods' being allowed, as Greg has mentioned, capacity increases up to the class limit meant quite considerable overboring in many cases. Holdens from 2160 to 2600cc, for instance.

'Improved Touring' was always considered to be a somewhat milder level of modification allowance.

2 doors were allowed under a dimensional sub-clause. So, 2 doors were ok provided that the back-seat area complied with certain dimensions. This is where the Porsches and laterly, the RX7s, came under close scrutiny with some very suss specifications just scraping past the rules....

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#5500 David Shaw

David Shaw
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Posted 29 June 2011 - 12:25

2 doors were allowed under a dimensional sub-clause. So, 2 doors were ok provided that the back-seat area complied with certain dimensions. This is where the Porsches and laterly, the RX7s, came under close scrutiny with some very suss specifications just scraping past the rules....


If 2 average sized adults could lie down on the back seat.......................