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May 8th: Gilles Villeneuve


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#1 GeorgeTheCar

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 02:51

In honour of the career of Gilles Villeneuve 25 years on, the Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame is presenting the Art of Gilles Villeneuve.

I would greatly appreciate anyone who has a persaonal story of pictures to add

Please contact me at archives@cmhf.ca

Salut Gilles!

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#2 Eddie Knipe

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 07:28

I am from South Africa - now living in Kent, UK. Wonder if you know about the incident at a non-title race that took place in South Africa at the not-too-well-known racetrack near Cape Town, called Killarney as opposed to the larger and more famous Kyalami near Johannesburg:- Gilles Villeneuve was taking part in this race and somehow his car had flipped and an oncoming car narrowly missed colliding with Gille's car as he sat trapped upside down. I have a 'foggy' memory of this incident - the year escapes me now ..................... Good luck with your thread. Hope you get loads of responses for another fine F1 racer.
By the way, did you know that it is 30 years ago today that Tom Pryce lost his life at Kyalami in the 1977 SA Grand Prix?

#3 Tim Murray

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 19:12

Originally posted by Eddie Knipe
I have a 'foggy' memory of this incident - the year escapes me now .....................

1977 - there's a good account of that Atlantic series here

#4 GeorgeTheCar

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 15:11

Thanks guys, I did not have those details.

Please spread the word about my desire for unique photos of Gilles for our art exhibit.

Salut Gilles!

#5 Pedro 917

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 15:21

Hello George, I'll get back to you tonight as I'm at work. I have some great Gilles pictures for you.
I've put some on the 'Personal pictures from the paddock' thread (a long time ago, can't remember when). They were taken by my brother at Monza in 1971. Are these pictures for a website or an exhibition? Please send me a pm with your home e-address.

#6 Twin Window

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 15:35

Originally posted by Pedro 917

They were taken by my brother at Monza in 1971.

1981? ;)

#7 Fiorentina 1

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 15:47

Oh wow, it's today 25 years ago, isn't it? :(

#8 Pedro 917

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 15:49

Oops, 1981 it is.
In 1971 we lost Pedro so I guess I was pre-occupied...

#9 Twin Window

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 15:55

Originally posted by Fiorentina 1

Oh wow, it's today 25 years ago, isn't it? :(

No!

#10 Rosemayer

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 16:39



#11 GeorgeTheCar

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 00:29

I would greatly like to acquire a copy of both the 1978 Canadian Grand Prix and The French Grand prix for use at the Art of Gilles Villeneuve because the titel of the event is a pun referring to the art we are exhibiting and the art that made Gillles magic.

Any help would be greatly appreciated

#12 Rosemayer

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 13:22

Gilles Villeneuve
Canadian | Years = 1977 - 1982 | Team(s) = McLaren, Ferrari | Races = 68 Gilles Villeneuve entered 68 GP, but only started 67[1] Retrieved 9 July 2006| Championships = 0 (2nd in 1979) |
Wins = 6 | Podiums = 13 | Poles = 2 | Fastest laps = 8 |
First race = 1977 British Grand Prix | First win = 1978 Canadian Grand Prix | Last win = 1981 Spanish Grand Prix| Last race = 1982 Belgian Grand Prix|For other members of the family, see Jacques Villeneuve and Jacques Villeneuve (elder). For other meanings, see Villeneuve.

Joseph Gilles Henri Villeneuve (Gilles Villeneuve []) (January 18, 1950 – May 8, 1982) was a Canadian Formula One racing driver. An enthusiast of cars and fast driving from an early age, he started his professional career in snowmobile racing in his native province of Quebec. He moved into single seaters - winning the US and Canadian Formula Atlantic championships in 1976 before being offered a one-off drive with McLaren at the 1977 British Grand Prix. He was taken on by reigning world champions Ferrari for the end of the season - in only his fifth season racing cars - and from 1978 to his death in 1982 drove for the Italian team. He won six Grand Prix races in a short career at the highest level. In 1979 he finished second by four points in the championship to teammate Jody Scheckter.

Villeneuve died in a 140 mph crash with the March of Jochen Mass during practice for the 1982 Belgian Grand Prix at Zolder (see more below). The accident came only two weeks after an intense argument with his team-mate, Didier Pironi, over Pironi's move to pass Villeneuve at Imola. At the time of his death, Villeneuve was extremely popular with fans and with many journalists, on whom his death had a profound effect. Since 1982 he has become an iconic figure in the history of the sport, renowned for his car control and for a 'never give up' attitude. His son, Jacques Villeneuve, became Formula One world champion in 1997.
Personal and early life
Villeneuve was born in Richelieu, a small town in the French-speaking province of Quebec in Canada and grew up in the nearby town of Berthierville.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.11-13 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 He married Joann, a girl from a nearby town, with whom he had two children, Jacques and Melanie.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.27-29 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 During his early career Villeneuve took his family on the road with him in a motorhome during the racing season, a habit which he continued to some extent during his Formula One career.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve pp.50-51, 114 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 He often claimed to have been born in 1952. By the time he got his break in Formula One, he was already 27 years old and took two years off his age to avoid being considered too old to make it at the highest level of motorsports. Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.11 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471

Like certain other great drivers, including Clark and Senna, Villeneuve was a curious mixture of seemingly disparate personality types. Lauda wrote of him, "He was the craziest devil I ever came across in Formula 1... The fact that, for all this, he was a sensitive and lovable character rather than an out-and-out hell-raiser made him such a unique human being". Flying, snowmobiling or driving, he was a risk-taker of classic proportions. Yet his fellow drivers said that on the track he was scrupulously fair and did not put anyone's safety other than his own in jeopardy and those who worked with him usually referred to him as introverted. This combination of traits made him exceptionally popular not only with fans but with teammates and opponents as well.

His younger brother Jacques, known as "uncle Jacques", also had a successful racing career in Formula Atlantic, Can Am and CART. Gilles' son, also named Jacques, won the Indianapolis 500 and CART championships in 1995 and became Formula One World Champion in 1997.
Racing career
Pre-Formula One
Villeneuve started competitive driving in local drag-racing events, entering his road car, a modified 1967 Ford Mustang. He was soon bored by thisDonaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.21 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 and entered the Jim Russell Racing School at Le Circuit Mont Tremblant to gain a racing license. He then had a very successful season in Quebec regional Formula Ford, running his own two year old car and winning seven of the ten races he entered.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.30-31 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 The next year he progressed to Formula Atlantic, competing there for four years, running his own car again for one season. He became very successful, dominating the 1976 season by winning all but one of the races and taking the US and Canadian titles. He won the Canadian championship again in 1977.

Money was very tight in Villeneuve's early career. He was a professional racing driver from his late teens, with no other income. In the first few years the bulk of his income actually came from snowmobile racing, where he was extremely successful and could demand appearance money as well as race money. His second season in Formula Atlantic was part-sponsored by his snowmobile manufacturer, Skiroule.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.41 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 In fact, he credited some of his success to his snowmobiling days: "Every winter, you would reckon on three or four big spills - and I'm talking about being thrown on to the ice at 100 mph. Those things used to slide a lot, which taught me a great deal about control. And the visibility was terrible! Unless you were leading, you could see nothing, with all the snow blowing about. Good for the reactions - and it stopped me having any worries about racing in the rain." Grand Prix Hall of Fame [2] Retrieved 9 July 2006
Formula One

Villeneuve in his first full season of Formula One

In 1976 Villeneuve impressed McLaren driver James Hunt by beating him in a non-championship Formula Atlantic race at Trois Rivieres. Partly based on Hunt's report, McLaren offered Villeneuve a deal for five races in a third car during 1977Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.67 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 and the young Canadian made his debut at the 1977 British Grand Prix. Villeneuve qualified an impressive 9th in McLaren's old M23, splitting the regular drivers Hunt and Jochen Mass. Delayed for two laps by a faulty temperature gauge he ran competitively, setting fifth fastest lap and finishing 11th. Despite this the team decided not to opt for Villeneuve's services again. Then in August 1977, Maranello called. When Ferrari first met Villeneuve, he was immediately reminded of the legendary Tazio Nuvolari. The obvious interest shown by Ferrari towards Villeneuve prompted Niki Lauda to leave at Mosport, having already clinched his second championship. In the race, Gilles retired, after going off on another competitor's oil. He also raced in Japan, but also retired. On lap five of the race, Gilles tried to outbrake the Tyrrell P34 of Ronnie Peterson, but the pair banged wheels. Gilles' Ferrari went airborne and crashed down onto two spectators watching the race from a prohibited area. Both were killed. 1977 Japanese Grand Prix report [3] Retrieved 9 July 2006

After making his debut for Ferrari, he would later remark that: "If someone said to me that you can have three wishes, my first would have been to get into racing, my second to be in Formula 1, my third to drive for Ferrari..." Grand Prix Hall of Fame [4] Retrieved 9 July 2006

The 1978 season saw a succession of retirements for Villeneuve, often after problems with the new Michelin radial tyres, but also due to his own inexperience - this was his fifth season of car racing. Despite calls in the Italian press for him to be replaced, Ferrari persisted with him and Villeneuve scored his first Grand Prix victory at his home race at the end of the season in front of an ecstatic crowd.

Villeneuve was joined by Jody Scheckter for 1979 after Carlos Reutemann moved to Lotus. The pair finished first and second in the championship, with Scheckter beating Villeneuve by just four points. Villeneuve won three races during the year. The 1980 season was a complete disaster. Villeneuve had been considered favourite for the drivers championship by UK bookmakers,Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.223 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 but would only score six points in the whole campaign in the unwieldy 312T4 which had only partial ground effects. His world champion team-mate could manage only a single point and retired at the end of the season.

In 1981 Ferrari's first turbo engined car, the 126C1, was hardly an improvement. Although it produced tremendous power its handling was poor. Villeneuve, partnered by Didier Pironi, managed two wins during the season, both against the odds. For 1982 Villeneuve's first few races were blighted by mechanical failures and accidents. At Imola he was overtaken by his team-mate near the finish, while leading. Gilles Villeneuve died in an accident in qualifying for the next race at Zolder.
Notable races

Perhaps one of Villenuve's most memorable races, the 1979 French Grand Prix, where he and Rene Arnoux had a memorbale race, even if it was "just" for second place.

Dijon 1979: Remembered for his frenetic style which seemed more like that of a rally driver, Villeneuve's wheel-banging duel with René Arnoux in the last laps of the 1979 French Grand Prix at the Dijon circuit, when he stubbornly refused to accept his 312T4 was slower than Arnoux's faster Renault was one of the most intense moments in Formula One racing.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.184 - 187 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471

Zandvoort 1979: Remembered for Villeneuve's determination, as he had gone off the track and his rear-left wheel had come off; instead of retiring on the spot, he continued racing on three wheels, and in some moments on two wheels. He retired later on during the race.1979 - Gilles Villeneuve cruises on 2 wheels YouTube.com. Retrieved 4 August 2006

Jarama 1981: Perhaps Villeneuve's greatest achievements came in 1981 at Jarama, where he wrestled an unwieldy turbo Ferrari 126C1 to victory in a classic of defensive driving at the 1981 Spanish Grand Prix, keeping 5 quicker cars behind him using his tactical acumen and the superior straightline speed of his car. After an hour and 46 minutes of racing, Villeneuve led second placed Jacques Laffite by only 0.22 seconds; fifth placed Elio de Angelis was only just over a second further back.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.253 - 256 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471
Argument with Pironi
Villeneuve went into 1982 a clear favourite for the crown. He was widely regarded as the best Formula One driver in the field, and Ferrari, with new designer Harvey Postlethwaite, produced an excellent design. After glimpses of promise in the opening races, Villeneuve was back at the front for the FOCA-boycotted San Marino Grand Prix only for his team-mate Didier Pironi to disobey team orders and beat him to the line. It is Villeneuve's widely believed claim that he was merely coasting at that point, in the knowledge that victory was in the bag and trusted Pironi to do likewise under orders. Feeling betrayed and angry, Villeneuve vowed never to speak to Pironi again. Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.289 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471
Death
Tragedy struck at the next race on the calendar. On May 8, 1982, on his final qualifying lap for the Belgian Grand Prix at Zolder, the front left wheel of his car came into contact with the right rear wheel of Jochen Mass's car, which was on a slow 'in' lap. Villeneuve's car was launched into the air before nose-diving into the soft earthen embankment just outside the armco and somersaulting along the side of the track. The violence of the accident reduced the car to its cockpit, and ripped Villeneuve's seat from the back of the monocoque. Villeneuve, still strapped to his seat, was thrown across the track and into the catch fencing just outside the corner. When the medical team arrived, he was not breathing. Villeneuve was resuscitated at the scene, but his injuries were mortal. He died in a local hospital that evening. Mercifully, his fatal injuries were likely caused by the force of his car landing for the first time after the initial impact.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.296-298 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 If his death was not greeted with great shock and surprise (everyone knew his style), that was more than offset by the profound sadness it produced. Even René Arnoux, his adversary in the Dijon epic, confessed that he cried the day Gilles died and the day after.
Legacy
Villeneuve had already become an iconic figure before his death. His determination to win was obvious from outside the cockpit in the frequent oversteer and wheel-banging with his competitors. This endeared him to the crowd, and combined with his unusually open and honest approach, to many of the press as well. After the tragic death of Ronnie Peterson, Villeneuve was seen as his natural successor as the fastest natural driver on the grid.

At the funeral in Berthierville, former team-mate, Jody Scheckter, delivered a simple eulogy: "I will miss Gilles for two reasons. First, he was the fastest driver in the history of motor racing. Second, he was the most genuine man I have ever known. But he has not gone. The memory of what he has done, what he achieved, will always be there."

More than a decade later, Scheckter's prophecy remains true. His spectacular driving is still considered an art form among Formula One fans. He is still remembered at Grand Prix races, especially those in Italy. There is a bronze bust of him at the entrance to the Ferrari test track; a challenging corner at the Imola Track, site of the San Marino Grand Prix, is named Curva Gilles Villeneuve; a Canadian flag is painted on the spot where he started his last race.

The racetrack on ÃŽle Notre-Dame, Montreal, used for the Molson Indy and Grand Prix du Canada, was renamed in his honour at the Canadian Grand Prix of 1982 after his death. His homeland has continued to honor him. In Berthierville, a museum was opened in 1992 and a lifelike statue stands in a nearby park named in his honour. Villeneuve was inducted into the Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame at their inaugaural induction ceremony at the Four Seasons Hotel, Toronto, Ontario, August 19, 1993. In June 1997, Canada issued a postage stamp in honor of its favorite racing son.

There is still a huge demand for Villeneuve memorabilia at the race-track shops, and several books have been written about him. A film based on the biography by Gerald Donaldson was announced in 2005, intended for release in 2007.Villenueve (2007) www.imdb.com Retrieved 6 July 2006

"Gilles was the perfect racing driver ... with the best talent of all of us." This was the assessment of Niki Lauda whom Villeneuve replaced in 1977 as a member of the Ferrari team of Formula One drivers. It is an opinion shared by many other Grand Prix drivers and veteran journalists who covered the sport.
Helmet
Villeneuve's helmet carried a stylised 'V' in red on either side - an effect he devised with his wife Joann. The base colour was black.Donaldson, Gerald (1989, 2003) Gilles Villeneuve p.95 Virgin Books ISBN 0753507471 His son, Jacques, uses the same basic design, but like his contemporary, Christian Fittipaldi, has changed the colours.
Complete Formula One results
(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position)Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Team WDC Points
1977 McLaren
Ferrari ARG
DNP BRA
DNP RSA
DNP USAW
DNP ESP
DNP MON
DNP BEL
DNP SWE
DNP FRA
DNP GBR
11 DEU
DNP AUT
DNP HOL
DNP ITA
DNP USA
DNP CAN
12 JPN
ret McLaren
Ferrari N/A 0
1978 Ferrari ARG
8 BRA
ret RSA
ret USAW
ret MON
ret BEL
4 ESP
10 SWE
9 FRA
12 GBR
ret DEU
8 AUT
3 HOL
6 ITA
7 USA
ret CAN
1 Ferrari 10 17
1979 Ferrari ARG
ret BRA
5 RSA
1 USAW
1 ESP
7 BEL
7 MON
ret FRA
2 GBR
14 DEU
8 AUT
2 HOL
ret ITA
2 CAN
2 USA
1 Ferrari 2 53
1980 Ferrari ARG
ret BRA
16 RSA
ret USAW
ret BEL
6 MON
5 FRA
8 GBR
ret DEU
6 AUT
8 HOL
7 ITA
ret CAN
5 USA
ret Ferrari 12 6
1981 Ferrari USAW
ret BRA
ret ARG
ret RSM
7 BEL
4 MON
1 ESP
1 FRA
ret GBR
ret DEU
10 AUT
ret HOL
ret ITA
ret CAN
3 LAS
DSQ Ferrari 7 25
1982 Ferrari RSA
ret BRA
ret USAW
DSQ RSM
2 BEL
DNS MON USAE CAN DUT GBR FRA GER AUT SWI ITA LAS Ferrari 16 6

#13 GeorgeTheCar

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 17:29

Thanks to Perdo917 for the snaps.

One of my favourite Gilles stories was meeting him in the pits at Mosport during the 1976 Canadian GP.

He was thrilled to be soughtb out with all the famous GP drivers around and chatted with us for about 15 minutes, talking about what he hoped to do next year. Very much the race fan even thouhghg he was totally dominating the Atlantic series and very fresh off his beating a couple of GP drivers at Trois Riviers.

#14 cheesy poofs

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 13:59

FYI - Gilles' widow, Joanne, is currently working on her memoirs in honor of their time together. The book is scheduled to be released in the fall of 2007.

Also, here is an in depth 3 part interview with Joanne Villeneuve. The interview is in french: http://video.cyberpresse.ca/

#15 zakeriath

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 14:54

Posted Image

A long time ago

#16 Rosemayer

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 19:17

Posted Image

As I remember him.

#17 David M. Kane

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 20:38

Cheesy Poofs you need to translate for us, just a brief synopsis...thanks.

#18 Alan Lewis

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Posted 28 April 2007 - 11:20

Originally posted by Rosemayer
Posted Image

As I remember him.


The desktop of my PC, that picture.

APL

#19 Bruno

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Posted 28 April 2007 - 11:31

Villeneuve. "Gilles" Villeneuve. . .

http://s7.photobucke.....s Villeneuve/

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#20 FLB

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Posted 28 April 2007 - 13:10

This Ferrari 126CK was on display during the weekened of the 1992 Canadian Grand Prix. It was part of a larger display to honor Gilles's memory on the 10th anniversary of his passing.

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#21 alansart

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Posted 28 April 2007 - 21:03

Gilles first F1 was at Silverstone in I think 1975.

He was hauled before the Clerk of the Course after practice.

"You have spun at nearly every corner at the circuit - what are you doing"

"Finding my limit - when I spin then I know where the limit is!"

"Are you serious"

"Yes"

He did'nt spin again and finished (I think 6th) in an outdated McLaren.

The legend was growing
:)

#22 Maldwyn

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 13:09

Re-reading the articles in this week's journal makes me realise again what, as much as who, we lost all those years ago, and why Gilles should never be forgotten.

I think it was Clive James who said "he was a poet of a driver".

#23 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 13:34

Originally posted by Rosemayer
The 1978 season saw a succession of retirements for Villeneuve, often after problems with the new Michelin radial tyres, but also due to his own inexperience - this was his fifth season of car racing. Despite calls in the Italian press for him to be replaced, Ferrari persisted with him and .....


Not that I want to spoil this party, but not only the Italian press called for him to be replaced. It is little known but Enzo Ferrari nearly replaced Gilles during 1978. Il ingegnere was not so bemused with the material damage inflicted during the first part of the season. Hence the Eddie Cheever and Elio de Angelis tests at Fiorano.

#24 Maldwyn

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 13:58

Originally posted by Arjan de Roos
It is little known but Enzo Ferrari nearly replaced Gilles during 1978. Il ingegnere was not so bemused with the material damage inflicted during the first part of the season. Hence the Eddie Cheever and Elio de Angelis tests at Fiorano.

Riccardo did tell me that he was in line for a Ferrari seat for the 1979 season, perhaps for the reasons you've given, but that the win in Canada secured the seat for Gilles.

#25 Hieronymus

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 14:00

Originally posted by Eddie Knipe
I am from South Africa - now living in Kent, UK. Wonder if you know about the incident at a non-title race that took place in South Africa at the not-too-well-known racetrack near Cape Town, called Killarney as opposed to the larger and more famous Kyalami near Johannesburg:- Gilles Villeneuve was taking part in this race and somehow his car had flipped and an oncoming car narrowly missed colliding with Gille's car as he sat trapped upside down. I have a 'foggy' memory of this incident - the year escapes me now .....................


Eddie, I was there.

Was disappointed when I saw Villeneuve in the pits. Thought he was a whimp and not possibly the great "French driver" that the local press told me about. Here was this small character that was about the same size as me. Must state I was at primary school at the time. My immediate thoughts...this man can't be a racing driver. My idea of racing drivers were boys like the Scheckters, Charlton, Nols Nieman and other local toughies. I was so disappointed I did not even asked for his autograph.

Big mistake...!!! How do you chaps say in English, "Never judge a book by its cover".

#26 Kpy

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 14:39

Originally posted by alansart
Gilles first F1 was at Silverstone in I think 1975.


It was 1977. He qualified 9th

Originally posted by alansart
He did'nt spin again and finished (I think 6th) in an outdated McLaren.


He finished 11th, two laps down, but had spent nearly two laps in the pits when a faulty gauge indicated that the engine was overheating.

#27 Kpy

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 14:52

Originally posted by Maldwyn

Riccardo did tell me that he was in line for a Ferrari seat for the 1979 season, perhaps for the reasons you've given, but that the win in Canada secured the seat for Gilles.


According to Gerald Donaldson, Villeneuve and Ferrari signed the 1979 contract on 6th September 1978, four days before the Italian GP. The Canadian GP was held on 30th September.

#28 Maldwyn

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 15:31

That may very well be correct Kpy. I don't know the specific reasons for RP not getting the seat, or exactly when he was informed his services were not required for the 1979 season, but it was under discussion at some point, and he may very well have concluded that GV's win meant he would not be a Ferrari driver on the basis of the information available to him at the time.

Who knows? With Cheever & de Angelis testing as well, the mix of Ferrari, politics and drivers makes for a foggy view at the best of times, let alone 29yrs after the events!

#29 Phil Rainford

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 18:11

Originally posted by Kpy


It was 1977. He qualified 9th



He finished 11th, two laps down, but had spent nearly two laps in the pits when a faulty gauge indicated that the engine was overheating.


Not a great picture (Taken from the outside of Club) But it does prove he did keep it on the grey stuff during practice at Silverstone in 1977.

Posted Image

From this meeting he became and has always remained my all time hero

#30 Frank S

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 20:30

Gilles Villeneuve stops to chat with photographers at Long Beach, 1982:

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#31 Bruno

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 05:01

I do not understand this discution about replacement of Gilles for the season 1979, to see 1978!!! … all this is false.
if Cheever and De Angelis were there, it is because has the time, they were test drivers. Eddie was the first to make tests, in at the end of Fiorano 77, for replacement of Lauda. then it is Gilles who took his place and was retained. he had been warmly to recommend by John Wolf, and Patrick Tambay.



je ne comprends pas cette discution au sujet du remplacement de Gilles pour la saison 1979, voir 1978!!!... tout ceci est faux.
si Cheever et De Angelis étaient là, c'est parce qu'a l'époque, ils étaient pilotes d'essais.
Eddie a été le premier à faire des tests, à Fiorano fin 77. en vue du remplacement de Lauda. puis c'est Gilles qui a pris sa place et a été retenu. il avait été chaudement recommander par John Wolf, et Patrick Tambay.

#32 cheesy poofs

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 13:43

http://www.gilles.villeneuve.com/

#33 David M. Kane

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 14:06

Cheesy Poofs:

Thank you!

#34 Maldwyn

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 14:11

There is also http://www.ventisetterosso.com/

#35 Frank Grimes

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 16:18

Originally posted by FLB
This Ferrari 126CK was on display during the weekened of the 1992 Canadian Grand Prix. It was part of a larger display to honor Gilles's memory on the 10th anniversary of his passing.

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Does anybody know if anything like this planned for this year's Canadian Grand Prix?

#36 cheesy poofs

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 16:57

Originally posted by Maldwyn
There is also http://www.ventisetterosso.com/


Thanks Maldwyn. That's a really nice site dedicated to Gilles.

#37 cheesy poofs

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 16:58

Originally posted by David M. Kane
Cheesy Poofs:

Thank you!


Hi David,

When I get a few moments, I'll try and translate the Joann Villeneuve interview for you guys.

Cheers!

#38 FLB

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 19:30

Originally posted by Maldwyn
That may very well be correct Kpy. I don't know the specific reasons for RP not getting the seat, or exactly when he was informed his services were not required for the 1979 season, but it was under discussion at some point, and he may very well have concluded that GV's win meant he would not be a Ferrari driver on the basis of the information available to him at the time.

Who knows? With Cheever & de Angelis testing as well, the mix of Ferrari, politics and drivers makes for a foggy view at the best of times, let alone 29yrs after the events!

Although it's about 1980, I have a 1979 interview by Pino Allievi where RP says that he didn't have an option with Ferrari for 1980, but rather a 'promise to talk at mid (1979)-season'. The interview was published in the Monza issue of the French edition of Grand Prix International.

#39 Maldwyn

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 10:21

Originally posted by FLB
Although it's about 1980, I have a 1979 interview by Pino Allievi where RP says that he didn't have an option with Ferrari for 1980, but rather a 'promise to talk at mid (1979)-season'. The interview was published in the Monza issue of the French edition of Grand Prix International.

That would be this interview?

Patrese's first contact with Ferrrari came after the 1978 South African GP. Jackie Oliver said RP was "hounded from May to July by Ferrari" and "asked to see him three times in Italy". Towards the end of 1978 Ferrari told him there was not a seat available for 1979 but that he "was first in the waiting list".

According to Riccardo in another interview "At the end of ’79, I met again with ingegner Ferrari. Basically, he said: “look, Patrese, the team has done very well this year”. I lost all faith, but I saw the light again in March 1980, when I received a request: “Patrese, how much do you want to race for us in 1981?”. I was given 24hrs to respond. It was not a difficult response. “It’s not a question of money. You make your offer”. No, I had to do the first step. In the end I said: “the same money I’m making now, nothing more”. I went to the South African GP with high spirits. When I came back, at Ferrari they told me: “Consider yourself free, Patrese. We cannot guarantee you a seat”. End of story."

I believe he was also approached by his former Lancia team boss, Cesare Fiorio, to join Ferrari in the early 90's, but saw Williams as a more competitive proposition and so stayed with them.

There are many stories about many drivers over the years who nearly joined Ferrari (a book could be written!), but in the context of this thread the fact remains that Villeneuve stayed and wrote his own piece of the Ferrari legend.

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#40 Bruno

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 10:56

in 1990 Ferrari wanted Riccardo.
but it is FIAT which chose Prost. …
bad choice. verry much bad

#41 Breadmaster

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 15:52

It's only a few days short of 25 years ago....

#42 Coral

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 17:20

It will be 25 years ago tomorrow... :cry:

#43 Henri Greuter

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 08:09

And now it is that horrible day again. May 8.
Up until 1981 I loved the month of May.
Since 1982 some of that love went away because May always brought May 8, another anniversary of....

I still can't believe that even after 25 years I still miss that little guy and all his bravado behind the wheel. He was not perfect, certainly not. But for me he was more than good.

Rest in Peace Gilles. As your friend Jacques Laffitte said so perfectly about you: I am so sad you're gone but I am so glad you were here

And I am glad I have seen you drive and don't rely on stories, tales and paperwork alone.


Henri

#44 LOLE

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 11:09

Gilles, long ago but never forgotten.
Thanks for all those thrilling moments...
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Monza, August 1981...


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#45 seruga

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 13:19

http://www.infobae.c...-puerta-Ferrari

#46 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 14:26

Gilles vivo

#47 Maldwyn

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 15:36

I've just come across this piece by Peter Windsor on Gilles, which includes this:

Had he not had his accident I guess he would have won the 1982 championship. And then, I think, he would have retired.

Gilles may very well have won the '82 title, but retirement :confused: I find it hard to imagine him walking away from the sport he loved so soon.

#48 cheesy poofs

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 15:43

Originally posted by Maldwyn
I've just come across this piece by Peter Windsor on Gilles, which includes this:
Gilles may very well have won the '82 title, but retirement :confused: I find it hard to imagine him walking away from the sport he loved so soon.


Fact was, GV was supposed to leave Ferrari and start his own team with the backing of Rothmans and Alfa-Romeo.

#49 canon1753

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 17:40

I hadn't heard that...

I guess I ought to get the Donaldson book. He is the F1 legend who lived closest to where I do. I wasn't following F1 at the time, but read my dad's Road and Tracks and realized that the sport had lost a legend at the time, who grew up 100 miles from me, separated by a border.

Another question- what is the Donaldson book the goldstandard book or are there others out there that are better in English?

#50 cheesy poofs

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 18:32

Originally posted by canon1753
I hadn't heard that...

I guess I ought to get the Donaldson book. He is the F1 legend who lived closest to where I do. I wasn't following F1 at the time, but read my dad's Road and Tracks and realized that the sport had lost a legend at the time, who grew up 100 miles from me, separated by a border.

Another question- what is the Donaldson book the goldstandard book or are there others out there that are better in English?


I don't think so. The Donaldson book remains the best thing written on GV.