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Mentioned in Passing


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#151 Smedley (Geoff)

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 05:56

[quote name='Ray Bell' date='Jun 16 2010, 03:18' post='4419294']
Mal Simpson will be a name known to many...

From Max Stahl:
[/quote

Mal will always remain a friend, We met in 1962 when he was with Stirling Moss at the Farm and over the years our interests from cars to books kept that contact alive, Sad news!!...Smed.

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#152 Ray Bell

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 07:11

Sorry you had to read it here first, Geoff...

If I'd known you had a close association I would have phoned you.

#153 gkennedy

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 22:33

And now I've been informed that Ron Haylen has died too...

He raced a Sprite and then went into Minis, first with a 997 Cooper (entered by Ron Hodgson) and then a 1071 S. He crashed a Mini in the 1965 Gallaher 500 but returned to race a Mini in conjunction with K Hillsdon in Sports Sedans.

He died on the Gold Coast of kidney failure. He was a long-time dialysis patient and was about to lose his second leg when he passed away.

I'd like to add a bit about Ron Haylen.

I grew up in the Sydney suburb of Strathfield, and in 1963, when I was around 14 y.o., Ron was a mechanic at the local BMC dealer, 'Motoria'. Motoria held a couple of promotional film nights, and I met Ron then. Motoria service manager Max Cheeseman assembled a little team of Mini racers, Tony Hill in a Morris 850 (that became Laurie Stewart's first race car), Noel Beeken in a Cooper, and Ron Haylen in his red Cooper. (Don't ask me why, but I remember the rego. no: CTE876.) Ron was a very friendly, amiable bloke, and I followed his racing for the next few years. He and Noel and their Mini Coopers joined Ron Hodgson in 1964 when RH had his first yard on Parramatta Road Auburn and his Downton Mini Cooper.

Ray, at the risk of being pedantic, small correction or two: 1965 was still the Armstrong 500, and Ron shared a (slow) Mini Deluxe with Kevin Bartlett. In 1966 it was the Gallaher, and Ron shared a P & R Williams entered Cooper S with Charlie Smith. He crashed at McPhillamy (blown tyre, IIRC).




#154 Melanie Jones

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 02:02

Mal Simpson was a gentleman like no other.
The world lost one of its best.
We will miss you Mal

#155 Ray Bell

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 10:44

Pedantry is well and truly accepted here, gkennedy...

Your minimal number of posts shows you miss a lot of it. You should join us more often!

#156 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 02:58

As reported in the Formula Vee thread by Bruce Moxon, 90-year old Aub Revell died yesterday morning.

Bruce could possibly expand on this. The poor man had become alienated from his sons, I'm told, but was in good form at a function he attended a year ago.

#157 Jacer

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 06:14

As reported in the Formula Vee thread by Bruce Moxon, 90-year old Aub Revell died yesterday morning.

Bruce could possibly expand on this. The poor man had become alienated from his sons, I'm told, but was in good form at a function he attended a year ago.

Sad day for vees.Known by many as the father of Formula Vee in Australia his legacy is there for all to see today as Formula Vee enters it's 45th year this year still going strong as ever. Thank you from all who have enjoyed the competition and the many life long friends made through Formula Vee.

#158 brucemoxon

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 06:42

As reported in the Formula Vee thread by Bruce Moxon, 90-year old Aub Revell died yesterday morning.

Bruce could possibly expand on this. The poor man had become alienated from his sons, I'm told, but was in good form at a function he attended a year ago.


Yeah, a bad day.

Aub took a fall a while back - his glasses fell off and he couldn't see the phone to dial it. Damon Beck (another TNFer) rang for a chat and was able to alert the Ambulance. Aub went to Katoomba Hospital, was transferred to a hostel down here in Sydney, then went to Ryde Hospital where he died.

He (along with Geoff Sykes) was instrumental in establishing Formula Vee in Australia. Aub designed built and raced his own Revell Vees, with success. Sons Neil, Barry and Phil all raced, Phil with particular distinction.

He became estranged from his sons, sadly and spent his declining years outcast from his family.

I must say, from a personal standpoint, that Aub was always unfailingly polite and gracious to me and my family, and had been helpful to us in a most material way when it was needed. Aub administered the fundraising drive that followed my Dad's accident in 1970. More recently he accepted the role of Patron of the Historic Formula Vee Association and was often at race meetings, always happy to discuss Vee racing and advise when his advice was sought.

We'll all miss him terribly, I'm sure. A true gentleman of the old school. Thank you Aub.




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#159 brucemoxon

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 06:44

A personal friend of mine, a good bloke, a highly respected engineer and great teacher...

Owen Wuillemin died Saturday morning 15th May. Very few here would have ever heard of Owen, but he was a motor sportsman of a high order and in particular a great engine man and engineer.

He was in everyday life a manual arts teacher, with a high position at the Kings School. This is a school that attracts high level students in both day and boarding capacities from all over NSW and is one of the 'Great Public Schools' in Sydney. Owen worked there in a head teacher capacity for about twenty years and was very highly regarded.

He also played with Lotus Elans and Peugeots, building race engines for Doug Macarthur's Ralt and a few other FPacific competitors, as well as some Lotus twin cam engines for ANF2.

He didn't seek recognition, just to do a better job, and was always thinking. One area in which he did a lot of this was with tethered cars, which he built from scratch and raced at the Model Park at Luddenham, and he was involved in school projects along the same lines.

For a few years he and his son Adrian shared a Peugeot 205 they ran in the Marque Sports Car Clubs Super Sprint series and he liked to feign disgust that the slightly heavier Adrian would always be a tad faster than he was. He modified and developed this car constantly so it was always a major threat in its class at these events.

His dream was to finish off one of the Peugeot 504 Cabriolets that Roley Pymm (sp?) imported, but that's something that other projects always had him put aside. He did, however, transform his Peugeot 504 pickup with the fitment of a turbo diesel just to show his broad range of interests.

About five or six weeks ago he went for his regular checkup on his Lymphoma, something that's been troubling him for about 13 years. All clear of that, but the doctor was concerned about something that showed up in the tests and sent him for more. Multiple lesions ('More than I can count,' the doctor said) in the liver were found. But a toothache was also bothering him and he went to the dentist.

"I think you'd better go back to the doctor," the dentist told him. He had a tumor in his gum and another was found on his shoulder.

It was at this stage I phoned him and asked how he was. He told me all about this and I called him a week later. He was sounding poor and said he was 'getting feeble'. It was a quick downhill slide from there, even though he retained a positive outlook and radiation beat the tumor in his mouth.

He was surrounded by friends in his final days. People from Club Lotus, the Peugeot Club, friends from all over. Norm Smith, a close friend for over forty years, drove down from near Ballina to visit him in his home at Toongabbie last Monday and spent three or four hours with him. He left there feeling he shouldn't go back. "I don't think it's fair on him, he's got people all around and he needs rest," he said and drove home the long way... via Mudgee. Like many others, I'm sure he's overwhelmed with thoughts of what kind of person Owen was. And how much the world will miss him.

I know I will.

To Dorothy, Claire and Adrian I offer my inadequate condolences.



Dang - I had no idea. I knew Owen had been unwell. I know Adrian better than I knew Owen, but I'd certainly met him and we got along quite well.

Been a bad weekend, really.




Bruce Moxon

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#160 brucemoxon

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 09:32

Aub Revell's memorial service will be at Eastern Creek Raceway, Sydney, on Tuesday June 29, at 10AM




Bruce Moxon

#161 ReWind

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 17:32

Does anyone know on which day Aubrey Charles Revell was born?
I've found year (1918) and place (Rockdale, NSW) but no exact date.

#162 brucemoxon

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 21:00

Does anyone know on which day Aubrey Charles Revell was born?
I've found year (1918) and place (Rockdale, NSW) but no exact date.


We had it as 1919?




Bruce Moxon

#163 Ray Bell

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 21:51

I've been told he was 93...

So neither of those work out. But my informants might have been wrong. Is there a death notice in the SMH?

#164 wagons46

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 22:45

His war service records state D.O.B. 24/6/1918

#165 Ray Bell

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:58

John Medley last week told me he was off to another funeral...

This time it was the happy-go-lucky glazier, (Nasty) Norm Bice.

Historic racer for twenty or more years (he was there at that first All-Historic Amaroo, I'm sure), Norm raced a Lea-Francis Special that was indecently quick for its age and supposed senility.

I'll leave it to John to fill in more details. Norm was a friend of Healey 100S racer, Ray Roberts, as I recall... possibly neighbours?

#166 David McKinney

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 08:03

Not one of the all-time greats, perhaps...

http://www.telegraph...n-Crampton.html

#167 Red Socks

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 16:56

Anne Martin, wife of Berdie Martin, died on Friday night in Chicago region after a short illness. She had been Berdie's constant companion for nearly 50 years when he was race director of both Can Am and Trans Am and latterly for many years worked with him in the ACCUS FIA office looking after licence issues etc., before their retirement in 2005. Since then she was working still with Berdie looking after ACCUS Historic matters.

#168 gouldo

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 14:20

For those from the NSW Hillclimbing fraternity, and those Novacastrians, I heard today that John Brooks passed away on the 8.8.2010. John raced a mini cooper s in the 70's & was quite successful. On top of that he was a true gentleman.

John was from Elermore Vale, and was 75 years. He is survived by his wife Joy, daughter Janelle & son in law Grant, and grand kids Jay & Amy.
RIP mate. You will be missed.

The Gouldings.

#169 Dick Willis

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 22:11

Thanks for letting us know Brad, John was a distant relative of mine and I saw him quite a bit while he was active in hillclimbs a couple of decades ago with Cooper S etc. but had lost touch with him in recent years.

#170 Allen Brown

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Posted 20 August 2010 - 16:04

Multiple French hillcimb champion Lionel Regal was killed in a crash at Saint-Ursanne-Les Rangiers last Sunday (15 Aug).

#171 Nanni Dietrich

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 15:16

Popular motorcycling journalist and book writer Ezio Pirazzini passed away at Imola on 05 August 2010. He was 86.
http://www.motosprin... Ezio Pirazzini

#172 David McKinney

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 05:35

I've just been told of the passing of double NZ saloon champion Ray Archibald, at the age of 88

Sq Ldr R J N Archibald raced a MkI Jaguar 3.4 and later a MkII 3.8, both always presented and driven immaculately. He won the title in 1962 and again in 1963, but his 1964 defence was thwarted by the arrival on the scene of the Lotus-Cortinas and hotrod Zephyrs which were trailered to the circuits while he still drove his race-car between meetings. He also won the first Pukekohe 6hr race in 1963 at the wheel of another 3.8, and repeated the effort in 1966, both times with the late Tony Shelly as his No.2

Notwithstanding his RNZAF officer status he was a member of the family which ran Archibalds Garage in Christchurch, and competed in his first events in the 1940s at the wheel of Citröens for which they were local agents

He came to national prominence not in saloons but in a highly modified XK120 which he raced in the big events, winning the Mairehau race on handicap in 1955, beating a C-Type on scratch.

His interest in racing continued after he retired from regular competition, racing the C-Type in historic events for 15 or 20 years

A sad loss, and my condolences go to his family, fellow competitors and other friends

#173 Sharman

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 13:46

I have recently heard that one time sports car driving solicitor (Healey 100, Marcos, Elan, Chevron B2, Cobra 7 Litre) John Carden, died 11 July after being iron lung dependent since 1993. This following a terrible fall whilst competing as an amateur in an evening hurdle race at Southall. We had our differences but I always wished him better than he suffered

#174 Coral

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 14:51

I'm very sorry to hear about John Carden. I didn't know he drove sports cars but I well remember seeing him riding as an amateur in the 1977 Grand National, aboard his own horse "Huperade". The horse started at about 100-1 and he took such a heavy fall that John ended up unconscious in Walton Hospital. His further participation in the National was banned, though he continued to ride as an amateur for several years afterwards. A real plucky contender. R.I.P. John. :(

Edited by Coral, 24 August 2010 - 14:58.


#175 maoricar

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 15:02

I've just been told of the passing of double NZ saloon champion Ray Archibald, at the age of 88

Sq Ldr R J N Archibald raced a MkI Jaguar 3.4 and later a MkII 3.8, both always presented and driven immaculately. He won the title in 1962 and again in 1963, but his 1964 defence was thwarted by the arrival on the scene of the Lotus-Cortinas and hotrod Zephyrs which were trailered to the circuits while he still drove his race-car between meetings. He also won the first Pukekohe 6hr race in 1963 at the wheel of another 3.8, and repeated the effort in 1966, both times with the late Tony Shelly as his No.2

Notwithstanding his RNZAF officer status he was a member of the family which ran Archibalds Garage in Christchurch, and competed in his first events in the 1940s at the wheel of Citröens for which they were local agents

He came to national prominence not in saloons but in a highly modified XK120 which he raced in the big events, winning the Mairehau race on handicap in 1955, beating a C-Type on scratch.

His interest in racing continued after he retired from regular competition, racing the C-Type in historic events for 15 or 20 years

A sad loss, and my condolences go to his family, fellow competitors and other friends


David, thanks for the 'heads-up'. Ray Archibald's passing is another link to a time and style of NZ racing, that due to the passage of time, is vanishing.
He was indeed, a clean and very fast driver at a time, in NZ ( and I would imagine, elsewhere) when motor racing was STILL, largely, participated in by sportsmen, rather than businessmen.
There is little to compare to the sight and sound of a big Jaguar being driven with the enthusiasm and skill that Ray Archibald demonstrated
He WILL be missed, especially by those of us of a 'certain' age; it is indeed a sad loss and I also offer my condolences and thanks, to family and friends.

#176 Ray Bell

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 22:33

Some time over this past weekend, Ken Mitchell passed away...

Kenny was Peter Brock's partner in building and (originally) racing the A30, but the pair soon split and he built his own Sports Sedan using a Holden engine and a 100E Prefect (or Anglia?) body. They had been friends for years and Kenny was with Peter when they came to Sydney for the 1966 Warwick Farm Tasman meeting, as was the third member of what appeared to me to be a constant trio, Al (whose surname I've once again forgotten!).

I met up with the three again the next week at Sandown and from time to time over the next couple of years saw them (the October Sandown, from memory), but once Peter started racing I don't recall them being around at all.

Ken turned to Historic racing a few years ago with a Milano Holden, which seemed to suit him. He was always a happy-go-lucky kind of person and enjoyed racing to the full. Schooled in the after-meeting high speed lapping of places like Winton and Tarrawingee, he knew he wasn't as fast as Brock, but he was certainly out for some fun.

I don't believe I ever met his wife, but to her I offer my condolences. I trust John Medley will fill in more details.

#177 Dick Willis

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 03:28

Thanks for that, Ray. Even though I had sold him the Milano and followed his progress in it I was unaware of his past such as the Peter Brock connection.

#178 Michael Ferner

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 21:33

Tommy Dickson apparently has died from cancer. He was the brother of Larry Dickson, and a very good driver in his own right.

RIP.

#179 David McKinney

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 21:38

Not the Tommy Dickson from Perth, then

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#180 Michael Ferner

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 21:42

Nope. Marietta, Ohio.

USofA.

:)

#181 Ray Bell

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 22:08

Originally posted by Dick Willis
Thanks for that, Ray. Even though I had sold him the Milano and followed his progress in it I was unaware of his past such as the Peter Brock connection.


I've actually quoted he and Al in my magazine about Brock, Dick...

"Peter's a real ace! Our cars are all much the same, but when we're out on the track after a Tarrawingee, what's nine or ten tenths to us is only seven tenths to him."

Also connected to the group, perhaps more loosely, was former Vee driver Dave Turnbull.

#182 Clark Watson

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Posted 04 September 2010 - 01:08

The last chequered flag for Kenny

Ken Mitchell who campaigned the Milano for many years after restoring the car to it's past glory has sadly passed away while enjoying the Belgian Grand Prix late last Sunday Night 29/8/10 . While the Doctors will no doubt say it was due to a heart attack or stroke I'm fairly confident it was caused by Mark Webber slipping from 2nd to 6th place before the La Source Hairpin on Lap 1.

Kenny loved a Beer, a Smoke and a laugh. He was a fierce racer and cooked a mean potato.
Ken will be sorely missed by all.

For those who would like to attend and help us farewell Kenny his Funeral will be held at John Hossacs Funerals Wilson St Albury 2:00 Monday 6th Sept followed by drinks at the Albury SSA club.

Posted Image

Posted Image


Edited by Clark Watson, 06 September 2010 - 06:20.


#183 ReWind

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 13:36

I've just been told of the passing of double NZ saloon champion Ray Archibald, at the age of 88

In fact he just failed to reach 88.

An obituary by Mike Crean from Christchurch’s “The Press” (28 August 2010) under the headline ”A life lived in the fast lane”:

The names Archibald and Jaguar are almost synonymous in New Zealand.

Ray Archibald, car dealer and racing driver, built his Jaguar agency into one of Christchurch's best-known businesses. His performances in Jaguars on road circuits and race tracks brought him star status in New Zealand motor sport.

Archibald died last week, aged 87.

He told The Press in 1985: "Racing did a tremendous amount for the company. I have no doubt it contributed to our successful sales record".

His career behind the wheels of racing cars followed an even faster pursuit as a pilot in the air force. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his service in World War II.

Archibald's love of speed culminated in a 1981 air show at Wigram air force base. Driving a 3.8 litre Jaguar saloon, he beat an air force Harvard plane in a lap of the airfield.

His father Alexander established Archibald's Garage in former hotel stables on Oxford Tce after he returned from World War I. So Archibald grew up in a motoring environment.

He attended Cashmere Primary School and Christ's College.

He joined the army straight from school, early in World War II. He found service as a motorbike dispatch rider too slow and transferred to the air force in 1941. He flew five tours of six weeks each against the Japanese in the Pacific.

Much of his flying involved escorting American bombers on raids over Japanese airfields and bases in Kittyhawk and Corsair planes. He also made low-level flights over the jungle, seeking targets for the bombers.

His DFC citation commended the many successful bombing and strafing attacks he led against heavily-defended areas. He displayed "fearless leadership," and often flew "at little more than tree-top level".

After the war, Archibald was keen to stay in the air force but felt he was needed in his father's business. So he joined the Territorial Air Force (TAF), as a squadron-leader. He enjoyed flying the fast and maneuverable Mustang fighters and referred to the weekend exercises as being "paid to play". He was aide-de- camp to the Governor General on the Queen's tour of New Zealand in 1953.

Archibald continued flying after the disbandment of the TAF, hiring and borrowing planes for trips around New Zealand.

After what his wife Kate, nee Elworthy, calls "a glorious bachelorhood", Archibald hitched a ride in an air force plane to their wedding in London, in 1955. He was always frugal, she says.

By then he was managing director of Archibald's Garage in Christchurch. He had secured the Jaguar agency and raced Jaguar cars.

Jaguar headquarters supplied him with an XK140 roadster for his honeymoon on the continent.

Jaguar bosses asked him to stay in England and drive for them. Kate says he would have loved to but, as always, he put family and business first. He recruited one of Jaguar's top mechanics, Cyril Bunn, to be his service manager.

Bunn moved his family to Christchurch and took over the service department. He personally prepared Archibald's race cars. Archibald was not mechanically-minded, and so Bunn became his right-hand man.

Son David says his father never looked at a rev-counter or touched a motor. He listened carefully to his engine and drove by its sound. Daughter Anna recalls the family could never have a radio going in the car, because their father always listened to the engine.

Two brothers joined Archibald in taking the firm over from their father in 1946. Archibald cared deeply for his staff. The business boomed through the 1960s and 70s. It was sold in 1982, and Archibald retired three years later.

He raced a Citroen and a Jowett before he moved to Jaguars. One of his 3.8-litre models was built to his specifications at Coventry, England. He retired from racing about 1970, but a successful comeback eight years later in a Chevrolet Camaro embarrassed younger drivers.

He completed 91 of the 100 laps of the first New Zealand Grand Prix at Ardmore in 1954 before his engine overheated. He raced in many saloon and sports car events, winning the Wills six- hour race three times and the national saloon car championship twice.

Kate says he was competitive from the drop of the starter's flag, but otherwise calm and self-effacing. He was a private man who enjoyed his friends. These included top international drivers Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Jackie Stewart.

Anna says the family feels lucky to have had a father who took them on many adventures. If the camping and skiing trips were not thrilling enough, the fast driving was. However, he was always calm and reacted instantly to potential dangers on the road.

Kate says he put family first, even giving up golf to be with them. MIKE CREAN

* Raymond Jack Nelson Archibald, born Christchurch, September 7, 1922; died Christchurch, August 21, 2010. Survived by wife Kate, sons Peter and David, daughters Deedee and Anna and nine grandchildren.





#184 David McKinney

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 16:10

In fact he just failed to reach 88.

87 years and 50 weeks is near enough to 88 for me :) I knew his DOB when I posted

Thanks for posting the obit, though

Edited by David McKinney, 11 September 2010 - 16:11.


#185 Ray Bell

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 21:23

Originally posted by Clark Watson
Posted Image


Clark, I do thank you for posting this pic... and for a couple of reasons...

First, because I never saw Kenny's Prefect. I merely read about it in RCN (where else?) and Brocky told me about it.

It is, obviously, the car he built for himself after the split with Peter. It was probably built with some recognition of the lessons of the construction of the A30, it's wider, a bit longer and therefore not as tortured as the A30 was... and probably not a lot heavier if it is at all.

It's also a great atmospheric pic of the Hume Weir circuit and surrounds, evoking some great memories... and on top of that, it tells me you must have more in the same vein.

I look forward to learning what they are!

#186 D-Type

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 21:58

Being picky: that's an Anglia. The Prefect was a 4-door car and the Anglia a 2-door.

Anglias made better competition cars as they were lighter, stiffer, and ... cheaper.

#187 Ray Bell

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 22:48

I was actually wondering about that...

But I recall (with a memory as faulty as some can be) that it was spoken of as a Prefect. Not long ago I was looking at an Anglia in one paddock and a Prefect in another and recognised that difference, so that gave me cause to wonder.

Nevertheless, and I thank you for the correction, it is great to see a colour picture from that time. I believe it would have been 1968?

#188 john medley

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 23:34

The 29/12/68 Hume Weir programme shows
"67 Watsonia trailer Service (K R Mitchell) Anglia 2614cc". The day looks Hume Weir hot, but the number is different, so....



#189 Clark Watson

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 00:42

It's also a great atmospheric pic of the Hume Weir circuit and surrounds, evoking some great memories... and on top of that, it tells me you must have more in the same vein.



If only! I have been puting the feelers out for photos of the Hume weir for ages now through the local car clubs and have come up with very little. It was a beautiful little track and it's heatbreaking that all that remains is faint shadow where the track once was. Kenny sent me this photo only 5 weeks ago after he discovered a couple of albums he'd forgotton about. Sorry to dissapoint as I know the feeling of anticipation when it comes to these elusive photos. So on your behalf Ray "Bugger"


#190 bradbury west

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 08:01

The 29/12/68 Hume Weir programme shows
"67 Watsonia trailer Service (K R Mitchell) Anglia 2614cc". The day looks Hume Weir hot, but the number is different, so....


Was that a Holden motor in the car? Any details of the rest of the spec?
Just to repeat, what a lovely colour photo; car and driver doing something, paddock/park scene, overall atmosphere, colour clarity-although bright sunshine helps.......
Roger Lund


#191 Catalina Park

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 08:41

Were they called an Anglia in Australia? I can only remember them with Prefect badges. :confused:

#192 David McKinney

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 08:56

Even the two-door ones?

The Prefect had a vertically-slatted grille, the Anglia broader horizontal bars (or - later? - mesh)

#193 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 09:04

While probably not in the spirit of this thread i agree with Catalina. 95Es were both Anglia and Prefect. 100Es were all Prefects and 105Es were all Anglias. At least here in Oz.

#194 john medley

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 09:35

For info only for those who didnt see Hume Weir: the circuit was set partly in a quarry, the walls of which you can see in the background, linked by the Lukey Bridge. Under the Lukey Bridge, the back straight went away from us(ie just this side of the white posts on our left), out to Globe and Stratford Corners around the white telephone box and back directly towards us, coming through the same gap directly under the LERS on the blue sign, separated from the back straight by only a slim concrete wall. The circuit then turned hard left around the quarry wall just in front of that spectator grandstand ie behind Kenny Mitchell 1968 model, then swung right behind that white wooden gate into the start/finish straight and down the slope to Scrub Corner the sharpest hairpin in Australia. Cars went through that white wooden gate to get to the start which was in a sort of layby off the circuit( I recall 2bob showed us some good pics of that start area ages ago)
Kenny looks pretty good in that pic, doesnt he, but for some reason or other he doesnt have the everpresent cigarette.
Vale, Kenny. Thanks for the memories

#195 Clark Watson

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 10:16

Kenny looks pretty good in that pic, doesnt he, but for some reason or other he doesnt have the everpresent cigarette.


I reckon It's hanging out his mouth John, obsured by the Jug full of Petrol!

#196 David McKinney

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 11:35

While probably not in the spirit of this thread i agree with Catalina. 95Es were both Anglia and Prefect. 100Es were all Prefects and 105Es were all Anglias. At least here in Oz.

The first all-English Ford was the side-valve 933cc Eight, which appeared in 1932, and was followed three years later by the 1172cc Ten, respectively Models Y and C in Ford parlance. By 1939 these had developed into the Anglia and Prefect respectively, known jointly as the E93A range and replaced by 100E versions, with more modern bodywork in (I think) 1954; the old Anglia, now with 1172cc engine, continued under the name of Popular until 1959. In that year the ohv 997cc 105E Anglia was introduced, followed iin 1961 by the 1340cc 109E Consul Classic and two years later by the 1200cc and 1500cc 116E Cortina.


#197 Ray Bell

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 15:10

Originally posted by bradbury west
Was that a Holden motor in the car? Any details of the rest of the spec?
Just to repeat, what a lovely colour photo; car and driver doing something, paddock/park scene, overall atmosphere, colour clarity-although bright sunshine helps...


I'm sure it was a Holden motor, Roger... but I don't know which Holden motor...

At the time the popular one was the 179, but obviously that was 2.9-litres and more. The 149 is a possibility, but even more likely is an early motor, the 4-bearing 'sideplate' grey motor. They ran about this capacity in Appendix J and he could easily have bought an ex-Appendix J motor that had been bored out a tad more after wearing the cylinder walls a bit. Class limit was 2600cc in the older class.

Originally posted by the Mountain Man
Were they called an Anglia in Australia? I can only remember them with Prefect badges.


Originally posted by Lee Nicolle
.....95Es were both Anglia and Prefect. 100Es were all Prefects and 105Es were all Anglias. At least here in Oz.


Originally posed by David McKinney
Even the two-door ones?

The Prefect had a vertically-slatted grille, the Anglia broader horizontal bars (or - later? - mesh)


David's on the money...

Here, from my collection of pics taken at Gum Flat last month, is the proof:

Posted Image
Horizontal broad grille bars (painted bars with a narrow chrome trim in the middle).

Posted Image
Side-on, the 2-door body is shown. Clearly I didn't set out to photograph the Anglia, I never would have done, but it was there in the background of other pics.

The Prefect was far and away the better seller here, four doors being a huge advantage in a 'family' car. The 100E Anglia may well have been phased out before 1959, but I don't think so.

#198 bradbury west

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 17:29

Not sure what you ended up with down under, but here, post 105E introduction, the old slabsided 2 door 100E bodies were run out as sv Populars and the 4 doors stayed as Prefects, but with the 997cc 105E motor. My father had 2, prior to a 105E Anglia estate then 2 Corsairs, 1.7ltr and 2.0ltr. The joys of the Heron BIP heads...........
Roger Lund

#199 Ray Bell

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 21:42

You're right, Roger, and David before you...

The Prefect did continue here for a very short time with the 105E engine. But I would think it's out of date styling would have severely limited sales alongside the Anglia.

Additionally, this was at a time when Ford Australia were gearing up to build the Falcon here, so 'rationalising' it out of the range in short order would have been logical.

As for bowl-in-piston Heron headed engines, these didn't appear in the Ford range until after 'Auntie' had them in the 2000, they emerged in 1968 (possibly late '67?) in phase 2 of the Mk 2 Cortina... the 1300 and 1600cc engines.

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#200 D-Type

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 21:51

Being picky: that's an Anglia. The Prefect was a 4-door car and the Anglia a 2-door.

Anglias made better competition cars as they were lighter, stiffer, and ... cheaper.



While probably not in the spirit of this thread I agree with Catalina. 95Es were both Anglia and Prefect. 100Es were all Prefects and 105Es were all Anglias. At least here in Oz.

My apologies to everybody for taking this thread off topic.