Jump to content


Photo

The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


  • Please log in to reply
7721 replies to this topic

#451 conjohn

conjohn
  • Member

  • 487 posts
  • Joined: July 03

Posted 08 December 2003 - 06:51

Originally posted by Michael Oliver


Oh my gawd :o Do you know, I never, ever noticed it was spelt differently. I can honestly put my hand on my heart and say that. I've just checked a standard reference book and there it is:

R E G A Z Z O N I

I guess because I always referred to him as 'Regga', my mind made that mental leap :rolleyes:

So don't blame the proofreader (although I suppose it's the kind of thing that should have come up!) shoot the writer instead :lol:


I have written Jaques Laffite as Jacques Lafitte since the seventies; it was only earlier this year that I 'discovered' the right spelling...

Advertisement

#452 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 10 December 2003 - 22:05

The Complete Book of Formula One: All Cars and Drivers Since 1950 by Simon Arron and Mark Hughes

I had high hopes for this. They were only partly met.

The book claims to picture every car/driver combination that competed in the World Championship. It has short well-illustrated articles on each championship season, and then photos of each car/driver combination in championship order - apart from some fifties obscurities to which the authors admit, although I did find another hole in it pretty quickly.

There is very little text or reference information - this is a picture book, unashamedly.

I am not sure what the intended audience is though. The pics are small, and some of them crudely digitally enlarged, so there isn't a lot of good pics for the modeller to work from there. It isn't a "pictorial history of the grand prix car" book - the pics aren't detailed enough to show much of each model of car. It's not a "history of F1", because there's so little text. And it's not really a coffee-table book along the lines of the Konemann Schlegelmilch affairs, which have BIG pictures. And for the real anorak, it's a little weak as it doesn't show all the minor details of liveries that changed race-by-race... although it does have some interesting shots of seventies/eighties tail-enders and privateers, which is the stuff I guess I find most interesting in there.

It is undoubtedly very informative, but it falls between coffee table and reference. I expected a little more from Arron and Hughes, who I've often said are favourite journalists. What's needed is a book that combines this with Steve Small's Grand Prix Who's Who. That would be absolutely superb.

I didn't buy the book - I spent about half an hour looking through it in Borders tonight.

RRP is 35 quid. Amazon are doing it for 25. I think this one will get remaindered in the new year, and I might pay 15 for it...


[1] No pic that I could see of Loris Kessel in the Apollon-Williams in '77 - although the book might deliberately omit DNQ-onlys...

#453 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 13 December 2003 - 21:10

Was just at Autobooks in Burbank California and found that Dalton has reissued Griff Borgeson's Classic Twin Cam book, at $49.95. If you don't already have it, I suggest you pick up a copy somewhere, as this book is a must, IMO

#454 DOHC

DOHC
  • Member

  • 11,860 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 13 December 2003 - 21:27

Originally posted by conjohn
I have written Jaques Laffite as Jacques Lafitte since the seventies; it was only earlier this year that I 'discovered' the right spelling...


Are you into wine, by any chance? There it's Chateau Lafite. ;)

#455 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 36,793 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 13 December 2003 - 22:11

Originally posted by petefenelon
[1] No pic that I could see of Loris Kessel in the Apollon-Williams in '77 - although the book might deliberately omit DNQ-onlys...

Looks like it does at first glance...shame, these are usually more interesting (Kauhsen, Fry-Climax, Kurt Kuhnke, Otto Stuppacher or Willie Ferguson anyone?).

But it also looks like it is worth it for all the uechtels in one place.

#456 conjohn

conjohn
  • Member

  • 487 posts
  • Joined: July 03

Posted 13 December 2003 - 23:54

Originally posted by DOHC
Are you into wine, by any chance? There it's Chateau Lafite. ;)

OT warning!
Yes, I am - and I am a Bordeaux lover, and of Pauillac especially - but Lafite is a little bit out of my league :(

#457 ReWind

ReWind
  • Member

  • 2,345 posts
  • Joined: October 03

Posted 14 December 2003 - 13:55

Originally posted by conjohn
I have written Jaques Laffite as Jacques Lafitte since the seventies; it was only earlier this year that I 'discovered' the right spelling...

Your original error is excusable. For instance Paul Sheldon in the Formula 2 entry lists of 1974 refers to Laffite as "Lafitte". But above all his own team didn't know better at the time. German magazine "auto motor und sport" (issue 19/1974 p. 103) published two photos obviously taken at the "Gran Premio del Mediterraneo" showing Laffite's helmet with the correct spelling of his name and the side of the cockpit with "J.H. Lafitte" on it. At least BP France seems to have been aware of his second given name... :lol:

#458 d.c.a. mulcahy

d.c.a. mulcahy
  • New Member

  • 16 posts
  • Joined: May 01

Posted 15 December 2003 - 01:38

Thanks to Pete Fenelon for the review of the Mark Hughes book 'The Complete Book of Formula One'. I was thinking of purchasing it but now I will wait and see if it is remaindered.

Now a question that someone can hopefully help me with.

Some months ago on another thread on TNF, Graham2 referred to a book called:

"Motor Racing Team Colours & Markings" by John Baxter

I noted down the author and title but have not been able to find any trace of its existence.

It is not in the Chaters database nor can I find it in the used book database abe books which is unusual in itself.

Does anyone have any information on this book such as the publisher or year published. More importantly is it still available and where can it be purchased?

Any assistance would be much appreciated.

regards

d.c.a. (declan) mulcahy

#459 917

917
  • Member

  • 325 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 15 December 2003 - 05:53

Baxter, John:
Motor racing team colours & markings.
Hemel Hempstead : Model Aeronautical Press, 1967.
(MAP technical publication)
125 p.

Kind regards
Michael

Advertisement

#460 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 15 December 2003 - 11:47

Originally posted by d.c.a. mulcahy
Thanks to Pete Fenelon for the review of the Mark Hughes book 'The Complete Book of Formula One'. I was thinking of purchasing it but now I will wait and see if it is remaindered.

Now a question that someone can hopefully help me with.

Some months ago on another thread on TNF, Graham2 referred to a book called:

"Motor Racing Team Colours & Markings" by John Baxter

I noted down the author and title but have not been able to find any trace of its existence.

It is not in the Chaters database nor can I find it in the used book database abe books which is unusual in itself.

Does anyone have any information on this book such as the publisher or year published. More importantly is it still available and where can it be purchased?

Any assistance would be much appreciated.

regards

d.c.a. (declan) mulcahy


It's quite rare - I saw a copy on Ebay about six months ago but was fairly comprehensively outbid on it. ABEbooks can't find a copy at the moment. If anyone does find a copy I'd be very interested.

#461 2F-001

2F-001
  • Member

  • 2,271 posts
  • Joined: November 01

Posted 17 December 2003 - 13:57

Don't know if this helps or confuses... but I've mentioned that book here in the past too:

Motor Racing Team Colours and Markings
by John Baxter
a ''MAP'Technical Publication"
published in 1967 by Model and Aeronautical Press Ltd

It doesn't have an ISBN number - I'm not sure such things existed then, did they?

It was produced with modelmakers in mind really - I don't know if that suggests a different kind of search or of dealer to investigate. I got my copy by mail order (from the publishers I think, or from a distributor asociated with them) - but it's the only copy I can recall seeing.

edit:
Humble apologies - I must read further back into threads I haven't looked at for awhile - I now see that 917 has already given this info... sorry...

#462 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 21 December 2003 - 20:31

Quality stocking filler material - spotted in the same remaindered bookshop in Leeds that previously had (ick) Strictly Off The Record and Formula One Fanatic:

The Lotus Book: Collectables for £12.99.

Mint copies, too. I think some of the mail-order people have been doing it for about 17.99 in the past. Had to treat myself to a copy, I hate Christmas shopping ;) - same mix of lovely production, interesting photos and and sloppy misprints as the original Lotus Book, but still great fun.

(My other Christmas present to myself was the hypnotically brilliant "Metro Maps of the World" by Mark Ovenden - now that's specialist!)

#463 Ruairidh

Ruairidh
  • Member

  • 1,073 posts
  • Joined: November 02

Posted 22 December 2003 - 01:10

Originally posted by petefenelon
Quality stocking filler material - spotted in the same remaindered bookshop in Leeds that previously had (ick) Strictly Off The Record and Formula One Fanatic:

The Lotus Book: Collectables for £12.99.

Mint copies, too. I think some of the mail-order people have been doing it for about 17.99 in the past. Had to treat myself to a copy, I hate Christmas shopping ;) - same mix of lovely production, interesting photos and and sloppy misprints as the original Lotus Book, but still great fun.

(My other Christmas present to myself was the hypnotically brilliant "Metro Maps of the World" by Mark Ovenden - now that's specialist!)


At uk12.99, this is a good buy for Lotus devotees (not sure it is really worth much more - says he who paid near full price for his!)

#464 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 22 December 2003 - 01:37

Yes, I didn't think it was worth the full price (30? 35? I can't remember). At uk12.99 though it's difficult to resist if you're in any way a Lotus devotee. There is bound to be something about a Lotus you've owned, lusted after or just owned toys of in there.

Most of the historic documents are too small to read easily, rather too many are sales brochures, and although it's amusing to look at horrid plastic toy Lotii instead of pics of real ones, there's a limit to how long that joke lasts!

I suspect some of the modellers and slot car racers will find this one very much to their tastes as there are some rather weird and wonderful miniature Lotuses in there!

That said, there are enough snippets that didn't make it into The Lotus Book to make it interesting. I had an enjoyable evening reading it.

#465 WGD706

WGD706
  • Member

  • 956 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 23 December 2003 - 19:02

Donald Campbell - The Man behind the Mask
By David Tremayne

Bantam Press, hardback, 415pp, £20.00
ISBN 0593 050584
To be published in January 2004
Reviewed at grandprix.com
http://www.grandprix...ft/ft12290.html

'If you need further convincing then you should read the foreword to Tremayne's book from Campbell's own daughter Gina. She never reads anything about the family, she said, because because of the numerous inaccurate and fictitious accounts that have appeared over the years. She admits that by reading the book she learned things about her family which even she did not know and concludes that "this is a marvellous piece of work."

The brilliance of the book is the fact that unlike so many motor racing books it has not been churned out to meet a deadline but rather is the result of a passion to tell a story properly and unravel a complex character with total honesty. It not only catalogues the life and times of Donald Campbell, who set both land and water speed records and survived at accident on Bonneville Flats at 360mph, but also assesses the character of this complicated man: warts and all but without a hint of sensationalism. Such things can only be achieved with intense care, painstaking research, an enormous amount of thought and great sensitivity to extract the right information from the people who were involved. One can only marvel at how Tremayne managed to get so much from people who have jealously guarded the memory of Campbell since his death at the controls of the Bluebird boat on Coniston Water in 1967.'

#466 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,881 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 23 December 2003 - 19:35

On a more general note…

This year I have bought books by four TNFers….David, Karl, Michael and Doug. Foolishly I am trying to read them all at the same time. (they are placed at various locations around the house according to size and other convenience factors).

Of late I have been kidding myself that I can write too, and have written a few articles of less than 2000 words for a small circulation club magazine. This has been a major task for me, I can assure you. As a result of my efforts, I find myself even more in awe of the sheer volume and quality of work in these books, in terms of style, research and keyboard effort, than I might have been previously.

But on top of that…we have the privilege of reading the spontaneous thoughts of these esteemed gentleman on our computer screens, almost at our prompting, every day.

Isn’t TNF brilliant?

#467 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 23 December 2003 - 21:22

Originally posted by WGD706
Donald Campbell - The Man behind the Mask
By David Tremayne

[...]

The brilliance of the book is the fact that unlike so many motor racing books it has not been churned out to meet a deadline but rather is the result of a passion to tell a story properly and unravel a complex character with total honesty.


Tremayne really knows record-breaking and writes about it very well - his update of Cyril Posthumus' book on the LSR, his work with Richard Noble on Thrust and the chapters on record breakers in Racers Apart all show that he's uniquely qualified to write about record breaking and record breakers. Sounds like a must to me!

#468 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 24 December 2003 - 21:00

Anyone have/read the book on Marzotto yet? Thoughts please...

#469 joriswouters

joriswouters
  • Member

  • 269 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 26 December 2003 - 11:01

Originally posted by petefenelon


It's a superb book. Buy it. Probably not the last word on how Bernie's made his money, and not written by a racing expert, but it's as near to a definitive portrait of Bernie as we're likely to get while he's still alive.

I'm reading the book during the cold days and it IS a superb book. Unfortunately made the Dutch translator some major language mistakes. ): But it will remain a good book, but complicated as hell.

#470 D82

D82
  • Member

  • 1,391 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 27 December 2003 - 21:26

This book is not F1-related but it is the only published motorsport book in Turkey:

Baslangictan Bugune Anilarla Turk Otomobil Sporu Tarihi*
Author: Akgun Tekin
Publisher: Gunaydin Ralli Yayinlari (1984)


On the book, it tells us the story of auto racing in Turkey, which started in 1920's. There are interviews with the racers of that days and old photos. I think the author kept the writings short because he thought this would be an introduction and other people would write new books. But no one did. It's a shame that there is only one book about Turkish motorsport history and it is mostly brief. But old witnesses of history are gone now, so BBATOST is one of its kind.

This book is out of print and cannot be found easily. In recent years, i found two in second hand shops and gifted one of them to a friend of mine.

-Deniz Can Celik


(*Turkish Automobile Sport History From the Beginning with Memories)

#471 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 08 January 2004 - 10:57

I know it's a controversial book in these parts, but the new (4th French, 2nd English) edition of Pierre Menard's "Great Encyclopedia of F1" covering 1950-2003 is now out. Amazon are offering it for 42 quid - the RRP is 60 which is interesting as the previous edition was 75 (but typically sold for 50-60). This is a big pile of paper - two very large volumes totalling 900+ pages this time.

Now, for 42 quid it's quite appealing just for the lap charts (it has them for every GP), the photography (although some of it's reproduced quite small) and for Menard's drawings of the cars. The text almost becomes irrelevant! (although some of it was quite pithy in the first edition - the team-by-team approach means that Menard's book is probably the most extensive history of teams like Shadow or Arrows or Surtees that have never had books written about them!)

I have a copy of the first edition, which was poorly-translated and contained some horrid production errors (the text of four pages about Ligier was duplicated - but the publishers issued corrected pages on request!) - not a vital primary F1 reference but a nice set of books to have around. If this second English edition fixes some of the translation and production problems it should be well worth getting hold of.


http://www.amazon.co...SIN/2847070516/

#472 Dave Wright

Dave Wright
  • Member

  • 267 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 08 January 2004 - 15:53

Thanks for the heads-up Pete

#473 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 08 January 2004 - 17:20

Good-looking copy of DCN's Racers: The Inside Story of Williams Grand Prix Engineering (history of Williams to 1981) on Ebay, currently at a fiver with no bids:

http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=30134


A cracking read with some good photos and excellent insight into the team - well worth a bid.
(No connection with the seller at all!). Cheapest copies on abebooks are about fifteen quid, so get in there now!

#474 Ruairidh

Ruairidh
  • Member

  • 1,073 posts
  • Joined: November 02

Posted 08 January 2004 - 21:09

Originally posted by petefenelon
I know it's a controversial book in these parts, but the new (4th French, 2nd English) edition of Pierre Menard's "Great Encyclopedia of F1" covering 1950-2003 is now out. Amazon are offering it for 42 quid - the RRP is 60 which is interesting as the previous edition was 75 (but typically sold for 50-60). This is a big pile of paper - two very large volumes totalling 900+ pages this time.

Now, for 42 quid it's quite appealing just for the lap charts (it has them for every GP), the photography (although some of it's reproduced quite small) and for Menard's drawings of the cars. The text almost becomes irrelevant! (although some of it was quite pithy in the first edition - the team-by-team approach means that Menard's book is probably the most extensive history of teams like Shadow or Arrows or Surtees that have never had books written about them!)

I have a copy of the first edition, which was poorly-translated and contained some horrid production errors (the text of four pages about Ligier was duplicated - but the publishers issued corrected pages on request!) - not a vital primary F1 reference but a nice set of books to have around. If this second English edition fixes some of the translation and production problems it should be well worth getting hold of.


http://www.amazon.co...SIN/2847070516/


and $62.97 in the US

http://www.amazon.co...=glance&s=books

By the way Pete, thanks for your frequent recommendations and comments on books, I find them very useful.

#475 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,306 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 08 January 2004 - 21:51

Originally posted by petefenelon
Good-looking copy of DCN's Racers: The Inside Story of Williams Grand Prix Engineering (history of Williams to 1981) on Ebay, currently at a fiver with no bids


:rolleyes: ...thanks a bunch Pete...story of my life...

DCN

#476 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 23,836 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 09 January 2004 - 00:04

Originally posted by Doug Nye


:rolleyes: ...thanks a bunch Pete...story of my life...

DCN


:lol:

.... and I just picked up a copy of My Cars My Life for £15 - five quid under the original price!

FWIW, Doug, copies of your McLaren book go for a big premium!

#477 Ruairidh

Ruairidh
  • Member

  • 1,073 posts
  • Joined: November 02

Posted 09 January 2004 - 00:08

Originally posted by Vitesse2


:lol:


FWIW, Doug, copies of your McLaren book go for a big premium!


.........as do copies of your Jimmy Clark profile

#478 Geza Sury

Geza Sury
  • Member

  • 936 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 09 January 2004 - 06:49

Originally posted by petefenelon
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/2847070516/

From Amazon.UK:
Hardcover 904 pages (24 December, 2003)
Publisher: Chronosports; ISBN: 2847070516

Originally posted by Ruairidh
and $62.97 in the US
http://www.amazon.co...=glance&s=books

From Amazon.US:
Hardcover: 896 pages
Publisher: Motorbooks International; (January 2004)
ISBN: 2847070516

So there's the usual problem with the differences between the European and the American edition. Why is the latter 8 pages shorter than the former, whereas their respective ISBNs are the same?

#479 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 23,836 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 09 January 2004 - 10:12

The Amazon US details are probably taken from preliminary announcements made by the publisher in their catalogue, while the UK details have been checked against a finished copy and corrected.

In this case, Motorbooks International is not the publisher, merely the distributor: they publish some titles themselves, co-publish under joint imprints and also distribute foreign titles.

Oh, and the 2 at the beginning of the number indicates a French (or French Swiss) publisher.

Advertisement

#480 O Volante

O Volante
  • Member

  • 291 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 10 January 2004 - 11:48

In late 2002 I reported in a now closed thread about an article on the fate of Auto Union racing cars after WWII. Apparently this story has now grown into a whole book, to be published in German, of course, by Motorbuch in March:

Nicolai Alexandrow & Peter Kirchberg, Im Osten verschollen. Die abenteuerliche Suche nach den Rennwagen der Auto Union. (Lost in the East. The adventurous search for the Auto Union race cars)

Should be something for some of you!

#481 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 10 January 2004 - 17:48

Originally posted by Doug Nye


:rolleyes: ...thanks a bunch Pete...story of my life...

DCN


LOL -- go figure, a few years ago it was 40-50 quid for a copy, if you could find one!

Ebay's a law unto itself though - you find people listing stuff in the "wrong" category with no idea of what it's worth...

#482 Don Capps

Don Capps
  • Member

  • 5,933 posts
  • Joined: May 99

Posted 10 January 2004 - 18:26

Originally posted by petefenelon
Ebay's a law unto itself though...


And it can roll along quite nicely without me, I can assure you. I really have no use for the place. Generally a waste of time and effort from my viewpoint. Life is too short to dance with ugly women or wait around for items on Ebay.... :down:

#483 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,306 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 10 January 2004 - 21:56

I've just invested in some tree pulp too. Not all brand-new issues and some have been reviewed more fully above but here's my two-penn'orth in any case...

The Pete Coltrin 'Racing in Colour 1954-1959' book - acquired at long last. Lovely apart from the slightly veiled colour repro on some pages. Pix would have benefited from a gloss coated page paper I think. I'd have loved to have put that one together. I recall going through many of these transparencies with Pete in his little flat around the back of the Real Fini hotel in Modena, with his wife Lella playing a cardschool with her local friends in the dining room, wrapped in a woolly cardigan, stockings rolled down over her slippers and a fag dangling from her lower lip...bless her (for the septics, 'fag' = cigarette, OK?). Text usual Nixon - perfectly adequate.

Porsche 904 book - Jurgen Barth and others - disappointing - poor print quality, awful colour - 304 pages, bags of rivettingly dull detail. Intriguing individual histories of each car (thinks - wonder if they're true?). Don;t like the book's over-busy design.

Les Grands Prix de Provence et Marseille - Maurice Louche - short on maps for Miramas and environs but well illustrated and as usual nicely produced. I like his work. Sepia tint on photography is annoying since it tends to mask detail unless VERY cleverly applied - the book's definitely recommended by me anyway -
ISBN 2-9500738-4-0

Stanguellini - by Orsini and Zagari - out for a while now - naff colour reproduction, the sepia problem again on good and interesting selection of monochrome photographs - book rather pretends to offer more than it really does - somewhat disappointing text - scope for better - but still worthwhile in absence of anything more comprehensively detailed, especially where individual race reports and model development histories might be concerned...I would also have liked to have learned more about the people involved.
ISBN 88-7911-306-2

ADAC 1,000Kms by Fodisch and Behrndt - I had high hopes for this one when I spotted it and put it in my box but I'm very disappointed by it. Poor picture selection, worse reproduction - over-designed - fussy to look at. I feel really let down by it - hopes were too high. There is real scope for a better effort here.

Les Monoplaces Pygmee - by Didier Martin - a 112-page paperback covering the Pygmee cars of Marius Dal Bo and his son Patrick. Only 38 cars in all but Pygmee were very early in racing car monocoque manufacture and this is a fascinating little French language book - duff reproduction but some lovely family album photographs and some interesting side-elevation line drawings of each model. Right up my particular strasse, I like obscuritybooks like this. Recommended, despite being only a slim volume. ISBN 2-9149 20-15-6

Willy Mairesse - Le Chevalier Meurtri by Christophe A. Gaascht - another slim volume, great photographic choice reproduced disappointingly small but the text more than compensates in my view - English text as well as French - a very, very touching and moving story detailing the life, triumphs, tortures and tragic death of a truly driven racing driver. 152 pages and another one I would seriously recommend as being worthy of consideration for your bookshelves...
ISBN 2-930277-09-2.

DCN

#484 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 23,836 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 10 January 2004 - 22:29

Originally posted by Don Capps


And it can roll along quite nicely without me, I can assure you. I really have no use for the place. Generally a waste of time and effort from my viewpoint. Life is too short to dance with ugly women or wait around for items on Ebay.... :down:

I see your point Don, but there are some nuggets - I got three FIA Yellow Books yesterday for 99 pence each! 1973, 1971 and the real plum: 1969.

There's a very reasonably priced copy of Power and Glory going at the moment too.

#485 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 11 January 2004 - 06:20

In the past I have tended to belong to the Don Capps school regarding Ebay.

However, people keep telling me about these bargains they've bought.

Perhaps there is scope here for the experts to explain how to find the relevant items on Ebay, how to bid, and how to win said items, without using up so much time a freelancer can go broke.

Then again, perhaps the experts don't want to encourage people to bid against them.

My experience so far is a lot of time lost, nothing tangible gained.

I prefer a set price, pay the money, get the item in the mail deal.

But I am willing to be educated.

#486 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 11 January 2004 - 06:37

A big "Thank you" to Doug Nye for the excellent book reviews, and particularly for bringing our attention to books we might not otherwise stumble on to. :clap:

I have a huge number of books descend upon my home constantly and often feel I should do similar reviews on those I think would be of interest to TNFers. But lack of time makes it difficult.

However, here is one I received in the last few weeks:

"Driven: The Racing Photography of Jesse Alexander 1954-1962"

I am not really into books that have lots of pictures and very little information, although when they are 1950s photos, and are magnificent action and atmosphere shots, I weaken.

And when the book eventually becomes available at around a third or less of its original price, they've got me.

I found this one at Amazon.com while looking for something else. Can't remember if they have it new, or if it is listed as "out of print", but the bargains are beyond the "buy used" button. Apparently it has been remaindered in USA and there are many bookshops selling it at bargain prices, via their link with Amazon, and the one I bought is in virtually new condition. My "one third of new price" includes the cost of handling and shipping from the US to Australia.

Can't find the book at the moment to give descriptions of any of the pics, or further information, but I know my opinion of it, when it arrived, was "better than expected" and "very happy with it at that price".

#487 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,306 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 11 January 2004 - 16:10

I forgot some - including the best of all - 'Bill Lomas - World Champion Road Racer' by Redline Books - 304 pages being the biography of British motor-cycle racer Bill Lomas's racing car through the 1940s and '50s. I found this wonderful stuff - a real insight into the parallel world to that we perhaps know so much better - and a world inhabited by more giants, amongst whom Lomas was certainly one. Highly recommended.
ISBN 0 9531311 98

'Trieste-Opicina sessant'anni di epopea' - introduced by Egon R. Hanus - published by legenda srl - Edizioni dell'Opificio - 2 landscape volumes including English text detailing annual running of the Trieste-Opicina hill-climb competition - - some very nice pix - decent text - arranged in the 2 large hard-backed volumes plus a stiff paper-backed third volume containing full results classifications, names, cars, times, 1911-1971. Again I'd recommend it. Not least because there's no pretentious fakey sepia here...
ISBN88-88165-02-9

Then there's the monster '40 Anos de Historia del Automovilismo en el Circuito de Montjuic - 40 Years of Motor Racing History at the Park Circuit' - (catchy title isn't it?). It must have been mentioned here before. Very pleased with it - huge, hefty and yet affordable (under £40). 588 pages - covers cars, motor-cycles, karts in competition at the Park with grids, results, good narrative and some pretty decent photographs - the best of which (for me) shows Jimmy Clark totally airborne over the notorious hump in the Formula 1 works Lotus 48. Another lovely shot shows John Fitzpatrick three-wheeling his Broadspeed Ford Anglia saloon around the place.
Highly recommended. Haven't found an ISBN but there's an e-mail contact - Javier del Arco.

Finally - just for a nice 'machinery' book - Konemann's 'The Hulton-Getty Picture Collection Liners - the Golden Age' - seems to be generally available at knock down prices. It's narrated by Robert Fox and if you have an interest in ocean liners of the great age this is an unmissable picture book...
Hugely recommended.
ISBN 3-8290-2862-8

DCN

#488 dolomite

dolomite
  • Member

  • 947 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 11 January 2004 - 21:29

Originally posted by Doug Nye


:rolleyes: ...thanks a bunch Pete...story of my life...

DCN



Well Doug, there will be a few more pennies trickling your way, thanks to my having treated myself to BRM Vol 2 at the NEC today. :wave:

#489 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 11 January 2004 - 23:42

Thanks for the reviews Doug - I assume you had a good time doing the stalls at the NEC?;)

T'other half and I spent more time trawling the model stalls looking for any Stefan Johansson cars she didn't already have than the bookstalls - (as an aside, looks like a job-lot of Onyx 1:43 Japanese F2 March 792s has hit the UK as there were all sorts of the damn things up for sale!)

#490 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,306 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 12 January 2004 - 11:46

Originally posted by petefenelon
Thanks for the reviews Doug - I assume you had a good time doing the stalls at the NEC?;)


Nope - quarterly visit to Chaters book shop, London Road, Isleworth...catch me at the NEC??? No --------- way....!

DCN

#491 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 12 January 2004 - 12:13

Originally posted by Doug Nye


Nope - quarterly visit to Chaters book shop, London Road, Isleworth...catch me at the NEC??? No --------- way....!

DCN


grin - bit far North or a bit too Haymarket for you?;) - apologies for the confusion!

#492 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,306 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 12 January 2004 - 14:05

Originally posted by petefenelon
...or a bit too Haymarket for you?;) -


:stoned:

#493 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 13 January 2004 - 01:50

What's the NEC?

I thought it was a brand of television set.

:confused:

#494 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 13 January 2004 - 01:57

Originally posted by Barry Lake
What's the NEC?

I thought it was a brand of television set.

:confused:


National Exhibition Centre - a collection of dimly-lit and rather tatty exhibition halls some distance outside Birmingham (itself a collection of dimly-lit and rather tatty buildings in the English Midlands).

#495 Ruairidh

Ruairidh
  • Member

  • 1,073 posts
  • Joined: November 02

Posted 13 January 2004 - 02:17

Originally posted by petefenelon


National Exhibition Centre - a collection of dimly-lit and rather tatty exhibition halls some distance outside Birmingham (itself a collection of dimly-lit and rather tatty buildings in the English Midlands).


But what on earth is that new shiny building they stuck in the middle of Brum since I came to the USA? The one that looks like a backcloth to a 1950's Dan Dare comic strip?

#496 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 36,793 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 13 January 2004 - 06:19

Originally posted by Ruairidh


But what on earth is that new shiny building they stuck in the middle of Brum since I came to the USA? The one that looks like a backcloth to a 1950's Dan Dare comic strip?

Selfridges.

#497 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 25 January 2004 - 02:15

I have to agree with DCN regarding the Stanguellini book; it could be better. I consider myself to be fairly knowldgeable on the small displacement Italian cars, and am always looking to learn more. This book is typical of most books that come out on the subject...better than having nothing, but ultimately disappointing..

#498 Frank S

Frank S
  • Member

  • 2,157 posts
  • Joined: September 02

Posted 25 January 2004 - 07:03

I bought the Schlegelmilch Grand Prix "Fascination" book for the many, many pictures. Now I find an enterprising .ru web site with all the pictures thumbnailed and linked. Practically as easy to do my lessons there as with the heavy book on my lap or a table. Easier, actually.

Frank S

#499 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,306 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 26 January 2004 - 23:18

Donald Campbell - The Man behind the Mask
By David Tremayne

Bantam Press, hardback, 415pp, £20.00
ISBN 0593 050584

Just acquired - scan read today - loved it. I think David Tremayne has got entirely the wrong impression of Sir Alfred Owen during his dealings with Campbell on 'Bluebird CN7' and I've explained to him why but I'll not knock his work for that. It really is hugely readable, detailed, engaging, poignant...pretty much tells it warts and all while the author's innate respect for and interest in Campbell positively sizzles from every page. Told me a great deal I didn't know - a fraction of the incidentals amongst which are wrong - no, 'Enola Gay' did not take off on the Hiroshima raid from mainland USA - but absolutely nobody is Perfect. You don't have to be in agreement with everything an author writes to recognise what I happily recommend as a really darned good 20 quid's worth. It's just such a pity that for that price these days you don't get the photo coverage the story deserves.

DCN

Advertisement

#500 11

11
  • Member

  • 33 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 26 January 2004 - 23:43

Originally posted by Don Capps
Today I got home and found a great surprise in the mailbox: Christopher Hilton's new book on Nuvolari entitled appropriately, Nuvolari. I think that it is well worth a look.

Ahem, that TNF gets mentioned should not be construed as a reason to recommend it. The free book didn't hurt either.

I think that it is a good thing to see Hilton taking the time to produce not just a book on Nuvolari, but a good book on Nuvolari.


I just finished reading Nuvolari a few weeks ago and found it to be a fascinating look at some of Tazio's best races and it did a wonderfull job of making the reader feel like they were actually at the races, complete with timing sheets, maps of the circuits, driver interviews and more!

It does however have it's flaws. I cannot recall Hilton every saying what happened to Nuvolari's first sone, he mentioned (briefly) that his second son died of a Kindey (or was it liver?) problem but to my reccolection he never told us what happened to his first son. This same trend continues later on in the book where he tells the reader Nuvolari's wife was going for an operation but he never tells you what happened to her. The worst of these mistakes are when he says Nuvorari was "sick" and bed ridden but (agian) never mentions exactly why (he suffered a stroke) and he never mentions a very important bit of information that Nuvolari was buried in his racing uniform and I found that ommiting that fact was almost unforgivable.

Although I found the book to be flawed it is by far the best book about Nuvolari in the English language and still a must read for any of his fans.