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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#5001 Giraffe

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 07:32

Anyone familiar with this new book? 'Collage: Jackie Stewart's Grand Prix Album' apparently done by Helen from her personal scrapbooks.
Jeff Weinbren.



http://www.genesis-p...rand-Prix-Album

Out May 1st. Very nice but a bit out of my pricerange, Jeff.

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#5002 Herbert

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 11:12

Awesome!!! :clap: I've been looking for a book on Audi motorsport for a while now. Who's the publisher and will this book be available on Amazon?


The book was produced by Speedpool and will be published by Audi. It will be available soon at amazon.de. But you can already order both the German and English version at racing1.de

German version: http://www.racing1.d...audi-sport.html

English version: http://www.racing1.d...i-sport-gb.html

#5003 pinnacle racing

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 23:01

The book was produced by Speedpool and will be published by Audi. It will be available soon at amazon.de. But you can already order both the German and English version at racing1.de

German version: http://www.racing1.d...audi-sport.html

English version: http://www.racing1.d...i-sport-gb.html

Thanks. :)

#5004 terry mcgrath

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 12:22

Now Available
The long awaited for, second edition of the book "the Jaguar XK in
Australia" is in fact 1/3 of a 3 volume trilogly.
This just on 500 page, large size format 335 x 247mm full colour book covers
the histories of some almost 1000 XK120's in Africa, Asia, Australia/NZ and
South America.
It contains almost 1,100 photos of which only 25 appear in the original volume.

Sample Pages at http://www.jtpublications.com.au/book/
Visit: www.jtpublications.com.au for full details

Posted Image
tmcgrath@bigpond.com



#5005 dewittereus

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 16:27

Derek Lawson's book on F5000

I was wondering how opinons are on this book. I was really looking forward it, but I was very disappointed. Quite a few photos are of mediocre qualitiy. Not sharp, no bright colours, some printed with fax quality.
The captions with the photo's are unbelievebly boring. Top: "Frank Gardner came out out to play" Middle: "and so did Roy Pike" Middle: "KayeGrifittiths had a few outings in 1969" Bottom: "and so did Mike Coombs". And this goes on and on.
The book offers little or no backgound information, a set of old Autosports or Motoring News gives more information and more pleasure in reading.
And twenty two pages on the demo F5000 races was not necessary for me - ok, we now have a picture of Judy Lyons in action - but I guess the title for the book F5000 back then ... and back now had to be justified.

#5006 Giraffe

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 16:48

Derek Lawson's book on F5000

I was wondering how opinons are on this book.


I think it's a very brave attempt at the subject by an amateur author. You obviously don't own 'Sun, Rain....And Even Snow' by Derek? Another gigantic task admirably approached.

PS As long as you didn't pay the cover price of £40 for it! :eek:

Edited by Giraffe, 12 April 2010 - 16:51.


#5007 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 13:33

If you are to 60 or 70's go for Paul Parkers books. I finally got the Sports Car Racing 1970-79. Faboulus pictures and good captions again.
Great to have , and looking forward to the next this year..............

Michel Bollee of France have some alike (or vice versa) books , his latest I mentioned earlier here : Proto/GT 1963-67 , I just got my own copy , and again a lot of great pictures , half of them in colour.

Some superb years and some super cars collected here. The prices of such books are in my opinion fully acceptable , meaning they are NOT expensive.



#5008 Jerry Entin

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 16:42

Posted Image
Paul Skilleter's Lister-Jaguar book
This is by fellow forum member Paul Skilleter and is the bible of Lister-Jaguar books.
A must read and must have for all forum members. Forward by Brian Lister.

Fellow forum member Ted Walker and his Ferrett Fotographics archives played a great part in the making of this book. As did Brian Lister's personal collection of photographs. I know the book launch has been shown earlier on this thread.

I just can't say enough about this Fantastic book however.

Paul Skilleter has done a superb job of bringing this book to life. A must read.

Please visit www.paulskilleterbooks.com or e-mail jagworks1@aol.com

Edited by Jerry Entin, 18 April 2010 - 12:32.


#5009 bradbury west

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 19:34

I must agree fully with Jerry's opinion. My copy arrived from Paul about 10 days ago. It is everything you would want or expect, and is a brilliant partner to the DCN and Edwards books on linked subjects.

The big virtue is that so much of it is straight from Brian Lister, whose photo archive is superb, plus the inevitable top quality stuff from Ted along with good, unexpected, stuff from Dick Barton's archives. The NZ foray is well covered, and is no doubt well edited, and also has some colour shots from down there, incl the transporter rig. The other really unusual gem later on is a colour shot from the paddock showing the Ecurie Ecosse coach, in full colour 3/4 frontal view. There are shots of the Lister transporter.

The Tiger venture is well covered and there is a very welcome reprint of an article by legendary Phil Scragg, which pushed the buttons for me, as does the comprehensive section with lots of pictures detailing WTM446, the Jack Playford-built coupe, a favoutite of mine from period, plus the bonus shot - there is always one- showing a good 3/4 profile view of Richard Wrottesley in the flat-iron car HCH736, whose exploits are well known, but whose face I have never seen. The US activities also get good coverage

The photos are so broad-church, that it is good just as a picture archive in its own right.
And there is a decent index at the back...
Roger Lund



#5010 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 02:18

Rebel Rebel by Marc Sonnery with Keith Bluemel...has anyone read it yet? It's the story of the Ferrari 250GT SWB "Breadvan."

Jack.

#5011 mikemUK

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 08:41

Just noticed on paulskilleterbooks.co.uk he has a sale on at the moment with reductions on some of his books - might be worth a look - Mike

Edited by mikemUK, 21 April 2010 - 09:00.


#5012 Tuboscocca

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 10:08

Rebel Rebel by Marc Sonnery with Keith Bluemel...has anyone read it yet? It's the story of the Ferrari 250GT SWB "Breadvan."

Jack.


Dear Jack,

to my knowledge it isn't published yet, maybe early summer??? Or did you see it already?? It seems the publisher (Porter House) is a one-man-factory.
There is an another book of Marc Sonnery in the pipeline on racing Citroen-Maseratis....(the V8 SM shown at the Retromobile Paris 2010)

regards Michael

#5013 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 15:03

Dear Jack,

to my knowledge it isn't published yet, maybe early summer??? Or did you see it already?? It seems the publisher (Porter House) is a one-man-factory.
There is an another book of Marc Sonnery in the pipeline on racing Citroen-Maseratis....(the V8 SM shown at the Retromobile Paris 2010)

regards Michael


Marc just mentioned on www.ferrarichat.com that the book should be at the US and UK distributors by May 1.

Jack.

#5014 Tuboscocca

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 15:13

Marc just mentioned on www.ferrarichat.com that the book should be at the US and UK distributors by May 1.

Jack.


Hello Jack

maybe you have seen it already:

VeloceToday.com (Pete Vack) has a book review with photos of Rebel,Rebel...and you can order from them!!

regards Michael

#5015 Giraffe

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 10:40

Gregor Marshall's new book about his dad Gerry is on it's way now.....

http://www.whsmith.c.....mp;cat=\Books

I doubt you'll find it better priced anywhere else......... :wave:

Edited by Giraffe, 23 April 2010 - 10:42.


#5016 Gatmo

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 21:29

Rebel Rebel by Marc Sonnery with Keith Bluemel...has anyone read it yet? It's the story of the Ferrari 250GT SWB "Breadvan."

Jack.


Would that be the same Marc Sonnery who drove in British FF1600 in 1988 for Amity Racing?

#5017 MarcSonnery

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 08:07

Would that be the same Marc Sonnery who drove in British FF1600 in 1988 for Amity Racing?


Yes it was yours truly, am amazed anyone would remember! If you have photos would love to buy them from you. Ah to be young and thin and fast and good looking again....the year when I beat teammate Gil de Ferran very often...well allright 5% of the time if you must ask:-)

Back to the book: it was printed in Hong Kong and the inventory is in a ship right now. Barring any tsunamis or acts of piracy (just my luck) the inventory should be in place at the distributors May 1st.

Tim Parker is a brilliant publisher however he is quite old fashioned and am not sure if his site is active, by the way it is not Porter House as someone posted but Parker House.

The other book to be clear is Maserati the Citroën years 1968-1975 on Bora, Khamsin, Merak, still born Quattroporte II, SM, special SM's, SM V8 one off (which I will drive in a few weeks) and Ligier Maseratis. It is a lot more challenging than the Breadvan book (which I enjoyed doing immensely) and another book (which I finished two years ago but which my co author -who shall like the topic remain nameless- still has not finished) put together, yet very very interesting as no one had researched that era in detail.

It is also the one closest to my heart as my passion started when my late father brought Maseratis home when I was a kid.

best regards,

Marc

Edited by MarcSonnery, 24 April 2010 - 08:09.


#5018 proviz

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 09:52


Marc, I know this may be a bit cheeky to ask, but when would you predict the Maserati/Citroen work to go to print? Will it also be published by good old Tim Parker?

#5019 MarcSonnery

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 10:54

Marc, I know this may be a bit cheeky to ask, but when would you predict the Maserati/Citroen work to go to print? Will it also be published by good old Tim Parker?



Ah! Am drowning in interview transcripts...I wish there was some way to speed it up some new method, voice recognition...and I am too obsessive to just tanscribe key points I want to transcribe everything THEN cut...

I have 4000 relevant photos to choose from: Chinese torture...

I am aiming to finish this early summer but with book work you never know you will be finished and you must draw a line at some point: same old story. Then it is up to Tim Parker when it gets printed: I actually finished the Breadvan book in November 2008 but Tim was busy with other things so it was only printed a few weeks ago...but I don't mind because without him these books would not have been possible, not by a long shot.

best regards,

Marc

Edited by MarcSonnery, 24 April 2010 - 10:54.


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#5020 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 14:20

Marc, welcome to TNF, and the book thread in particular. Having the participation of authors is one of the best things about this.

Jack.


#5021 proviz

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 15:12

Ah! Am drowning in interview transcripts...I wish there was some way to speed it up some new method, voice recognition...and I am too obsessive to just tanscribe key points I want to transcribe everything THEN cut...

I have 4000 relevant photos to choose from: Chinese torture...

I am aiming to finish this early summer but with book work you never know you will be finished and you must draw a line at some point: same old story. Then it is up to Tim Parker when it gets printed: I actually finished the Breadvan book in November 2008 but Tim was busy with other things so it was only printed a few weeks ago...but I don't mind because without him these books would not have been possible, not by a long shot.

best regards,

Marc



I hear what you're saying. Thanks for this, it gives a fair clue and triggers anticipation. It is a subject that needs decent coverage. Here's hoping we'll get to see your welcome work for Xmas!




#5022 Tuboscocca

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 15:59

Yes it was yours truly, am amazed anyone would remember! If you have photos would love to buy them from you. Ah to be young and thin and fast and good looking again....the year when I beat teammate Gil de Ferran very often...well allright 5% of the time if you must ask:-)

Back to the book: it was printed in Hong Kong and the inventory is in a ship right now. Barring any tsunamis or acts of piracy (just my luck) the inventory should be in place at the distributors May 1st.

Tim Parker is a brilliant publisher however he is quite old fashioned and am not sure if his site is active, by the way it is not Porter House as someone posted but Parker House.

The other book to be clear is Maserati the Citroën years 1968-1975 on Bora, Khamsin, Merak, still born Quattroporte II, SM, special SM's, SM V8 one off (which I will drive in a few weeks) and Ligier Maseratis. It is a lot more challenging than the Breadvan book (which I enjoyed doing immensely) and another book (which I finished two years ago but which my co author -who shall like the topic remain nameless- still has not finished) put together, yet very very interesting as no one had researched that era in detail.

It is also the one closest to my heart as my passion started when my late father brought Maseratis home when I was a kid.

best regards,

Marc


Dear Marc--WELCOME!!
It was me with the PORTER House --sorry , I must have been hungry (Porterhouse Steak)!!! I know an (unnamed) person from a tiny country who has already your Breadvan book-we have to wait!!!
Best regards Michael


#5023 tonyb

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 16:22

As mentioned earlier, Paul Skilleter is working on publishing a new book about George Abacassis, written by George's son David. It's scheduled for publication later this year - currently available details are as follows:

To be published September 2010

A Passion for Speed

Posted Image

George Abecassis was one of the last of the amateur drivers whose experience and dedication to the sport made him a semi-professional, and whose successes and efforts both before and after the War made him a household name. His accomplished and courageous driving of his own cars, such as Altas and Bugattis, and in the Aston Martin, HWM and Austin Healey teams, made him an important figure in British racing in its own right. It included major successes both before the War (e.g. the Imperial Trophy and Crystal Palace Cup) and after it (e.g. Class wins at Le Mans and the Mille Miglia). But his contribution to motor racing history as joint-owner of HWM was also important. HWM gave a start to the professional careers of Stirling Moss and Peter Collins, and helped others, including Lance Macklin, develop: in so doing they advanced the move away from amateurism towards the professionalism which now characterises the sport. The story of how George and his business partner, John Heath, began to restore British pride and prestige in continental eyes in the early 1950s is told in detail, as is George's contribution to the wider world of British motor racing competition and safety through his long memberships of the governing committees of the BRDC and BARC.

This book is a visual feast of motor racing images from his career, which ran from 1933 to 1956, and included many of the great races of his day, one of which – the Mille Miglia – is given its own chapter for the four years he entered it. It is lavishly illustrated with 550 photographs from the collections of the finest photographers of the day (Louis Klemantaski, Guy Griffiths and Geoffrey Goddard to name but three), from his personal albums and POW diaries, and from the albums of his family and friends. They help bring to life the story of one man set in the wider context of social, political and motor racing developments at home and abroad at the time. George’s long career in a time of dramatic change is a tale of struggle involving co-operation, friendship and rivalry with all the leading figures in British motor racing at the time, including Geoffrey Taylor, Earl Howe, Tony Rolt, Bira, Reg Parnell, John Heath, Duncan Hamilton, Stirling Moss, Lance Macklin, David Brown and many more. All these figures are drawn carefully, with the detailed story of John Heath’s life and death being covered for the first time in motor racing literature.

As his racing career spanned the War, the hitherto unknown story of George’s distinguished RAF service is also told with an insight enhanced by the author’s own experience in the RAFVR. George was in Bomber Command, and flew with the secret 161 Squadron, dropping spies and supplies behind enemy lines, for which he won the DFC. He was dramatically shot down and incarcerated in POW camp, a tale told largely in the words of George himself and the other crew members who survived.

The book has been meticulously researched by the experienced author and includes the first full race list, both of George himself (217 races) and of John Heath and the HWM Works team (413 races), together with detailed appendices on the two dozen cars built at Walton and the nearly 30 different cars George raced. It benefits from interviews with the surviving family, friends and associates of George. It explores and expounds George's life, remarkable gifts, sense of humour and colourful personality in a way which only a close family member could do, and even takes the reader to be with him as he breathed his last in 1991. Wherever possible, George speaks for himself through extensive quotes from his many published articles and interviews and from the anecdotes recalled by his many friends and his family. The result is that by the end of the book, the careful reader will feel that he has really got to know this remarkable man.

A Passion for Speed will be available in both standard and leather-bound limited editions; prices will be announced later but the limited edition may now be reserved in advance via the Contact form on the web site.



Paul also has a limited duration Spring Sale on with prices reduced on cover down to 50% on some titles! Amongst the offers are the Norman Dewis, Mike Hawthorn, Ecurie Ecosse and Lister-Jaguar books.

The German version of Volume 2 of Urs Schmid's XK120 book will be available around mid-May - I have an English translation of the intro that I'll post here shortly but it is available on his Web Site if anyone is in a hurry to see it. See previous posts for page examples and further details.

Edited by tonyb, 06 June 2010 - 10:12.


#5024 tonyb

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 16:49

Posted Image
Paul Skilleter's Lister-Jaguar book
This is by fellow forum member Paul Skilleter and is the bible of Lister-Jaguar books.
A must read and must have for all forum members. Forward by Brian Lister.

Fellow forum member Ted Walker and his Ferrett Fotographics archives played a great part in the making of this book. As did Brian Lister's personal collection of photographs. I know the book launch has been shown earlier on this thread.

I just can't say enough about this Fantastic book however.

Paul Skilleter has done a superb job of bringing this book to life. A must read.

Please visit www.paulskilleterbooks.com or e-mail jagworks1@aol.com

It's jagworld1@aol.com :|

#5025 MarcSonnery

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 09:16

Marc, welcome to TNF, and the book thread in particular. Having the participation of authors is one of the best things about this.

Jack.


Thanks Jack, have been lurking here on and off for some time ans this is a much higher flying forum than most so very interesting.

Proviz: always good to hear of eager anticipation: like an espresso's worth of motivation!

Tuboscocca: I learned patience by buyings Maserati automobilia from the other side of the world on Ebay so I guess this waiting for the post every day has a therapeutic quality!

best regards,

Marc

Edited by MarcSonnery, 25 April 2010 - 09:18.


#5026 Tuboscocca

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 16:05

Thanks Jack, have been lurking here on and off for some time ans this is a much higher flying forum than most so very interesting.

Proviz: always good to hear of eager anticipation: like an espresso's worth of motivation!

Tuboscocca: I learned patience by buyings Maserati automobilia from the other side of the world on Ebay so I guess this waiting for the post every day has a therapeutic quality!

best regards,

Marc


Dear Marc

thanks for the encouragement--I know exactly what you mean!!

regards Michael

#5027 kayemod

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 20:00

I've just finished and greatly enjoyed Michael Oliver's Tales From the Toolbox, this book has only been mentioned once or twice in this thread, so here’s a brief appreciation that I hope will persuade a few TNFs to go out and buy a copy. The book is essentially a collection of reminiscences and anecdotes, and although these are grouped into chapters, the whole thing is a little disjointed and episodic, though I suppose that given its subject matter, it could hardly be otherwise. It’s mainly about the 50s, 60s and 70s, stories, mostly previously unpublished tales from the mouths of the men, mechanics for the most part, who did much of the behind the scenes work, in the days before F1 changed into the somewhat esoteric high-tech and high cost exercise that it is today. Everything in the book rings true, Colin Chapman features quite a lot, and I was especially pleased with the way in which he’s portrayed, it's the most accurate and mostly sympathetic portrayal of 'The Old Man' as he was almost always referred to, by men who knew and worked with him that I've ever read, as everything did come out of the mouths of men who knew and worked with Chapman, it could hardly have been otherwise I suppose, but he's depicted in exactly the way I remember him. I was mostly on the road car side at Lotus, and my involvement with Team was fairly limited, though I knew a few of the mechanics slightly on a social level. Although I was there, I had no idea how hard those poor buggers had to work, I thought all-nighters were largely gone by the 1970s, but clearly not. One thing about the book that surprised me a little was the paucity of Bernie Ecclestone stories, I've been in a few F1 workshops, but never anything like Brabham in the Bernie era, I can't think he was all that much fun to work for. I once went there for a job interview, the place was very badly lit, mechanics were using torches to see inside monocoques etc, and while most such places were clean and tidy, Brabham was obsessively so, and the atmosphere wasn't exactly cheerful like McLaren for instance. Each time the door from the offices clicked open, everyone got their heads down and tried to look busy, I've never seen that anywhere else, no windows and time switches on the loo lighting so no-one could linger to read a paper. A strange atmosphere, I did wonder if they were all made to sign contracts, saying they wouldn't talk about their experiences after they left. I have raised this with Michael Oliver, and he thinks that Bernie’s ex-employees are just too loyal to say anything against the small one, even years after they’ve left his employ. It’s hard to see this very worthwhile book having a wide appeal, other than to people like TNFs, but maybe there’s some reason for optimism. When I was young, maybe 12 or 13, a book that inspired me was Racing Mechanic, the story of Alf Francis, the man who looked after the cars driven by Stirling Moss. I discovered this in the local library, all I knew at that age was that Stirling was the greatest racing driver who ever lived, an opinion that hasn’t changed much over the years, and I read this book cover to cover several times. I didn’t know a lot about racing, but I found it absolutely fascinating, for many years it was probably my favourite book of all time. If Tales from the Toolbox can attract the attention of one or two of the young of today, let’s hope that it might inspire them in the same way. If there are those on TNF who haven’t come across Tales From the Toolbox yet, they owe it to themselves to track down a copy ASAP, I’m sure they won’t regret it.

Edited by kayemod, 26 April 2010 - 20:02.


#5028 proviz

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 05:16


My copy of "Tales from the Toolbox" is currently travelling with Finland's F1 TV-crew. They'll find plenty there to deepen their knowledge and appreciation of the problems people in the pit garages have dealt with for ages. The book sheds light to some subjects, which are very pertinent today, such as "the mechanic's gallon".

#5029 Giraffe

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 12:10

My copy of "Tales from the Toolbox" is currently travelling with Finland's F1 TV-crew. They'll find plenty there to deepen their knowledge and appreciation of the problems people in the pit garages have dealt with for ages. The book sheds light to some subjects, which are very pertinent today, such as "the mechanic's gallon".


Just ordered this from WH Smith for free delivery to my local store -£12.99 down to £8.05, a saving of £4.94! :)

http://www.whsmith.c...D=9781845841997


#5030 kayemod

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 12:14

Just ordered this from WH Smith for free delivery to my local store -£12.99 down to £8.05, a saving of £4.94! :)


That's about what I paid buying direct from Veloce themselves, they were selling them on eBay quite recently.


#5031 Alan Cox

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 12:15

I've just finished and greatly enjoyed Michael Oliver's Tales From the Toolbox...
...If there are those on TNF who haven’t come across Tales From the Toolbox yet, they owe it to themselves to track down a copy ASAP, I’m sure they won’t regret it.

Hear, hear. I think it was a great idea of Michael's to present the mechanics' side of the story, and he does seem to have tracked down virtually everybody of note, who is still around, to tell the tales. My vote would be five stars.

#5032 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 07:44

Got my new book yesterday - well pleased, so apologies for the self-publicity!! :p
http://www.haynes.co.../...7&langId=-1
For anyone interested, Jeremy Walton and I are doing a book-signing at Brands Hatch this Sunday, 1pm outside Chaters book store.

#5033 John Ginger

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 11:40

I've just finished and greatly enjoyed Michael Oliver's Tales From the Toolbox

Certainly enjoyed first couple of chapters, until I lent it to a friend :rolleyes:


Got my new book yesterday - well pleased

Ordered my copy a few days ago, looking forward to receiving it

Don't think I can make the signing, never mind, maybe some other time

#5034 tonyb

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 07:37

Jaguar XK120 - Anatomie eines Kultobjekts BAND 2'

Posted Image

Below is an English translation of the introduction to Urs Schmid's new book. The German language version of the book will be available directly from Urs as soon as it is published around the 18th May. The English Language version will follow and should be available in the UK later this year.

Foreword
When the German language edition of this book, Volume 1, was published in the year 2000 (the English version following in 2002) I intended to bring out Volume 2 shortly afterwards. Most of the photographs were to hand and the text was more or less complete.

Ten years have passed since and once again the subject under scrutiny seems to be limitless. As far as the XK 120 goes, Sir William Lyons and his team appear to have deliberately planned to test the patience and research capabilities of future generations. Anyone who attempts to unravel the complex sequence of production modifications and the constructional secrets of the iconic XK 120 sportscar is faced with new issues and queries over and over again. These do not only concern the technical components and the construction of the cars, both of which aspects were covered in Volume 1, but also the characteristics of the equipment and model finishes under investigation hereafter. The appearance and aesthetic aura of the XK 120 are primarily influenced by the design and construction of its equipment, the choice of materials and the colour and trim finishes. In a car's lifetime however, it is exactly these elements which suffer most from wear and tear and changing tastes in fashion. The XK owner who seeks originality above all else will pay particular attention to these points, in the full knowledge that the XK can only fulfil its function as a means for a trip back in time to the sportscar culture of the Fifties when it is as close as possible to the original.

The anatomy of the XK 120 as a cult object would be incomplete without an understanding of the documentation which accompanied the vehicle on delivery to its first owner, of the manuals, catalogues and contemporary advertising material distributed to dealers and garages.

Finally, I feel that a closer look at XK drivers from a historical standpoint would not be out of place: A large part of the XK 120 legend is based on the successes which were attained all over the world in countless sporting competitions. To go into too great a detail of the XK's racing history would exceed the capacity of this book. Yet, using Swiss privateers as examples, it will be demonstrated that the XK 120 could claim to have achieved its own social and cultural value as part of the social elite of its day. Working on the stories of the Swiss privateers discussed in the Appendix turned out to be a fascinating challenge, especially as this part of the XK myth has received until now far too little attention in XK literature.

Kind readers will forgive me that hunting down and following up on all these tracks took longer than anticipated. I hope that the readers of Volume 1 whose patience I have stretched to the extreme with the late publication of Volume 2 have retained their interest for the material and maintained their enthusiasm for the labour of love to which I have devoted my spare time. The overwhelmingly positive reactions of readers to Volume 1 have acted as an encouragement and incentive to carry on with the project and to finally bring it to a conclusion.

The completion of the work would not have been possible without the valuable support of numerous voluntary helpers. In this connection I would like to repeat my thanks to the persons and companies named in the Introduction to Volume 1 who have also contributed to Volume 2. I would like to thank them wholeheartedly. They have all helped to keep alive the legacy of an exceptional automotive creation.

Urs Schmid
Solothurn / Switzerland, Spring 2010

XK Book.Com

#5035 green-blood

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 08:57

Got my new book yesterday - well pleased, so apologies for the self-publicity!! :p
http://www.haynes.co.../...7&langId=-1
For anyone interested, Jeremy Walton and I are doing a book-signing at Brands Hatch this Sunday, 1pm outside Chaters book store.



great to see it ouot Gregor, well done. Looking forward to getting a copy in teh post to this side of the Irish Sea.

#5036 Giraffe

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 08:48

Got my new book yesterday - well pleased, so apologies for the self-publicity!! :p
http://www.haynes.co.../...7&langId=-1
For anyone interested, Jeremy Walton and I are doing a book-signing at Brands Hatch this Sunday, 1pm outside Chaters book store.


Available from the WH Smith website at £21.70 inc delivery; just ordered it! :wave:

http://www.whsmith.c...D=9781844256488




#5037 Rob Semmeling

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 08:44

Posted Image

The Other Green Hell: the Story of the Nürburgring Südschleife 1925-1964
Rob Semmeling & Burkhard Köhr
24 x 22 cm / 195 pages
full-colour / hardcover / in english
Shaker Media, Netherlands
ISBN: 978-90-489-0045-9

The Nürburgring is among the world's most famous racing circuits, thanks to its Nordschleife or North Loop, also known as the Green Hell. Much lesser known is the former Südschleife or South Loop, where many interesting races took place as well. Now for the first time, a book tells the story of this 'other Green Hell'.

Our book The Other Green Hell covers the history of the Südschleife from 1925-1964 with detailed race reports, and includes top-3 results for all important events. Races on the combined North- and South Loop are covered as well. In addition, a comprehensive appendix lists all known events on the Südschleife from 1927-1982, over 350 in total, as well as all fastest laps on the race course.

The book contains around 200 images, of which about 120 are historical photos. Many of these come from private archives and were never published before.

This book offers fans of the Nürburgring innumerous facts so far never made public. Starting with the construction of the Nürburgring and the South Loop in particular, The Other Green Hell then covers the famous races of the circuit's early years. The Eifelrennen and German Grand Prix are of course included as well, but you will also read about long forgotten yet fascinating events such as the 'Preis der Roemryke Berge', 'Goldener Kranz des Nürburgrings' and 'Rund um das Bayerkreuz'.

Also included are two laps around the Südschleife as described by Kurt Ahrens junior, winner of the 1970 Nürburgring 1000 km race, and privateer Paul Bergner.

Our book represents volume one of the Südschleife's history with the years 1925-1964. It brings one of the quintessential 'lost' racing circuits back to life. It is also only the second book about the Nürburgring published in english!


With great pleasure I can announce that my book "The Other Green Hell" is now available. The book brings back to life one of the quintessential 'lost' racing circuits, the Nürburgring Südschleife, through numerous stories, facts, photos and maps never published before.

"The Other Green Hell" is a full-colour hardcover of 195 pages. It is available directly from our publisher Shaker Media at the price of Euro 49,95.

The easiest way to order is by e-mail or fax. Of course you can also use the book's ISBN number, 978-90-489-0045-9. For all info, please visit http://sudschleife.8200rpm.com.


#5038 Simon Davis

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 10:16

I would like to take this opportunity of commenting on Rob Semmeling’s and Burkhard Köhr’s new book ‘The Other Green Hell’.

If like me you have been frustrated by books that concentrate on the Nürburgring Nordschleife at the expense of the Südschleife then this is the book for you. It documents the creation of the Nürburgring; describes in great detail the Südschleife circuit; charts the modifications to the circuit over the years; has driving impressions from the likes of Kurt Ahrens Junior; describes the various races that have taken place over the Südschleife (including those that combined the Nordschleife); and has an extensive calendar appendix which goes up to 1982 even though the scope of the book is 1925 – 1964.

It is clear that a lot of intensive research has gone into this work and there are many fresh photographs, including amateur shots. The layout of the book is very appealing and I particularly like the extensive reproduction of period programme and magazine covers.

Here you will find details about the various motorcycle races for both amateurs and professionals alike. You will also read about the 1931 Eifelrennen which was won by Rudi Caracciola and yet totally ignored in Chris Nixon’s ‘Kings of the Nürburgring’ because it was run exclusively over the Südschleife. Each of the race meetings described are backed up with results tables usually showing the top three finishers, the fastest lap and the winner of the Golden Nürburg-Ring.

I came away from reading this book with a new respect for the Südschleife, such is the detail conveyed by Rob and Burkhard. This is an important addition to the motor racing library on a subject which has lain dormant under the shadow of the Nordschleife.


#5039 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 23:30

Rob,

This sounds like a great book. Congratulations! Is there, or will there be, a US distributor?

Thanks.

Jack

Posted Image

The Other Green Hell: the Story of the Nürburgring Südschleife 1925-1964
Rob Semmeling & Burkhard Köhr
24 x 22 cm / 195 pages
full-colour / hardcover / in english
Shaker Media, Netherlands
ISBN: 978-90-489-0045-9



With great pleasure I can announce that my book "The Other Green Hell" is now available.



Advertisement

#5040 Rob Semmeling

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 09:12

Jack, not that I am aware of, sorry. But the book is of course shipped worldwide. Just send Shaker Media an e-mail and they'll be able to help you. Thanks for your interest.

#5041 Mark Godfrey

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 19:45

"The Other Green Hell" is not listed with the transportation book wholesalers in the UK or USA. Yesterday I sent an email to Shaker regarding trade distribution, no word yet.

Mark
Carpinteria, CA


#5042 MarcSonnery

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 07:44

Rob:

Congratulations on a wonderful idea: the Südschleife had been ignored far too long. Had a great conversation with Franz Konrad who gave me a ride from Milwaukee airport to Elkhart Lake in 2002 and he really waxed lyrical about the south loop. He said an F2 car was the ideal car for the old Ring by the way which was interesting. Last August during the Oldtimer GP I went and drove round what was left of the south loop: not easy with destroyed tarmac and bushes creeping in. I have photos but not sure how to post here.

Look forward to seeing your book!

best regards,

Marc

#5043 Michael Ferner

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 08:46

Excellent! :)

#5044 red stick

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 15:09

For those who enjoy Burt Levy's racing novels, the latest word, via e-mail, on his next book[s]:

Latest news on perhaps the latest book in publishing history

from World’s Fastest Novelist “BS” Levy



Okay, so maybe I got a little optimistic and ahead of myself telling folks that my new novel, The 200MPH Steamroller, would be ready in time for Christmas (and we're talking Christmas 2008 here!) and then spring and then at Road America in July ’09 and then Watkins Glen in September and then Christmas again and then Amelia Island and….

Are you sensing a pattern here?

But it’s not like I haven't been working on it.

In fact, as my small squadron of fact checkers, tense censors, run-on sentence wranglers and punctuation patrolmen will readily attest, the damn thing was getting so thick (closing in on 900 manuscript pages!) that we were going to have to put wheels on the damn thing like a wheelbarrow just to move it around. Which was no good at all. The problem was that I'd bitten off an awfully huge chunk of motorsports history and, to be perfectly honest, that history was threatening to smother (not to mention take the fun out of) the hopefully entertaining and amusing fictional story I was attempting to tell.

As those who have been following this project are aware, I toyed with the notion of splitting the story into two books, but I just couldn't make it work. And believe me, I tried. So I went back to the Single Book concept. But, like the Warren Commission’s famous “single bullet theory,” it was fraught with problems. To begin with, I worried that many of my wonderful and faithful readers (is there a polite way to say creaky old farts?) were going to have trouble with the tiny typeface we'd have to use in order to keep the page count down to a size they could carry without a boy scout to assist them. And that still didn't address the underlying problem of too many side stories and too much relentless historical detail overpowering the central narrative.

And then, a few months ago, it suddenly came to me: split the book into THREE volumes (like an old “Three Musketeers” candy bar, you know?), which would allow me to leapfrog over large chunks of time and history that really weren't germane to the story. So The 200MPH Steamroller is now a trilogy, and I'm genuinely thrilled with the way it’s coming together. The first volume (“RED REIGN”) will hopefully be off to the printer in several weeks and we plan to introduce it at the BRIC at Road America in July.

And I mean THIS July!

The second volume (“THE FASTEST HORSE ON EARTH”) may possibly be ready before the end of the season, but surely by Christmas, and the third (“ASSAULT ON 4 O'CLOCK”) should arrive sometime next summer. They're all substantial books, and the third volume will come with an optional slipcase to hold the entire set.

* * *

Thanks so very much!!!!!



#5045 fbarrett

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 01:32

"The Other Green Hell" is not listed with the transportation book wholesalers in the UK or USA. Yesterday I sent an email to Shaker regarding trade distribution, no word yet.

Mark
Carpinteria, CA


If any of you Euro publishers want an excellent US importer/distributor, contact Rick Seymour at Iconografix, rmseymour@iconografixinc.com. They bring in the most esoteric and low-volume titles and have served me (as a bookseller and enthusiast) very well for years.

Frank

Edited by fbarrett, 06 May 2010 - 01:34.


#5046 fbarrett

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 01:33

For those who enjoy Burt Levy's racing novels, the latest word, via e-mail, on his next book[s]:

Sorry, but Burt Levy most aptly demonstrates the value of a good editor.

Frank

#5047 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 02:29

Frank, there's a web site that aggregates books on the web through its search engine. In other words, type Genesis of Genius into the search box and it will display all the books of that title for sale on the internet...Amazon, ABE, ebay, etc. Anyway, I thought I had bookmarked the site but I guess I didn't....Do you know what it is, by any chance?

Thanks.

Jack.

#5048 tonyb

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 07:13

Frank, there's a web site that aggregates books on the web through its search engine. In other words, type Genesis of Genius into the search box and it will display all the books of that title for sale on the internet...Amazon, ABE, ebay, etc. Anyway, I thought I had bookmarked the site but I guess I didn't....Do you know what it is, by any chance?

Thanks.

Jack.


Is it:

Booksaleforu

Not that accurate though, one book I tried is on Amazon but says zero for Amazon via this site using correct author/title.

There's also

Bookfinder

Has same problem as above though. I also get the impression that neither facility searches eBay despite the number of books for sale on there - 'Harry Potter' doesn't give any results for eBay despite in excess of 1000 book listings.

For the UK only, you could try

http://www.booksprice.co.uk/

No eBay again but did find the Amazon book the others didn't. The lack of eBay might be due to eBay policies - they used to cause problems for automated searches from 3rd parties trying to repeatedly access their listings, preferring them to search via eBay directly.

Edited by tonyb, 06 May 2010 - 07:39.


#5049 red stick

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 14:02

Sorry, but Burt Levy most aptly demonstrates the value of a good editor.

Frank


Frank:

I think his e-mail supports your theory. Nevertheless, I enjoy the books.

Mark


#5050 MattKellett

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 21:52

I would have to agree with Frank here, the first 2 books were so much better, but I still find myself reading the others and will no doubt buy the next installment - The 200mph Steamroller (is that correct title?).


Cheers Matt