Jump to content


Photo

The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


  • Please log in to reply
7734 replies to this topic

#5351 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 26 September 2010 - 14:09

"Behind the Wheel."......Does anyone have information about this new release? I saw a copy in the UK when I was there for Revival, but it was sealed so I didn't have the opportunity to inspect it.

Jack

Advertisement

#5352 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 36,890 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 26 September 2010 - 14:13

Which one? There's a few...

#5353 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 26 September 2010 - 15:23

Which one? There's a few...



"Behind the Wheel: The Great Automobile Aficionados" by Robert Puyal (unknown to me) and published by Flammarian (never heard of them, either).

Jack.

#5354 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 36,890 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 26 September 2010 - 15:24

Hm, Flammarion was an astronomer...

#5355 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 26 September 2010 - 15:26

Ferrari - A Champion's View" by Phil Hill, published by Dalton Watson.

My copy has been damaged and I would like to find a replacement. Does someone here know of a source? I've checked the usual suspects (ebay, ABE, Amazon, etc, as well as the publisher) and have not been able to find a copy in acceptable condition at a reasonable price. All suggestions appreciated.

Thanks.

Jack.

#5356 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 23,876 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 26 September 2010 - 19:11

"Behind the Wheel: The Great Automobile Aficionados" by Robert Puyal (unknown to me) and published by Flammarian (never heard of them, either).

Jack.

Flammarion are one of the biggest publishers in France, and although there are other books by Puyal this title doesn't appear on their website :confused:

The book seems to be arriving in your part of the world shortly:

http://www.amazon.co...o/dp/2080301543

Although Amazon suggest it's in English, the same book (same ISBN) on Amazon.fr is listed as in French!

#5357 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 26 September 2010 - 21:07

Well, that's something of a mystery, isn't it? I know the book exists because I saw it with my own weary eyes at a very nice little bookshop in Petworth, West Sussex. As I mentioned, all copies were sealed so I wasn't able to thumb through it (and I didn't have the sense to just turn it over to see if there was any information on the back of the dust jacket). Since the title and subtitle are in English I can only assume that the text is as well. If I find out more I'll post it here.

Jack.

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 26 September 2010 - 21:09.


#5358 Colbul1

Colbul1
  • Member

  • 42 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 27 September 2010 - 08:57

I've missed out on opportunities to acquire that, so thanks for the recommendation Colin.

Don't leave it too long before your next post, will you? In fact, why don't you nominate your top 10 right now? Who knows what other treats you'll nominate?

Rgds

Paul


Hi Paul,

Thanks for the generous comment, I do read a good number of books and try to find the more unknown titles rather than the mass sellers. 10 books I've thoroughly enjoyed reading would include;

My Twenty Years of Racing by J.-M. Fangio, published again by Temple Press. The chapter of his 1956 season and relationship with Ferrari is quite illuminating. Also the race at Monza where Fangio is in dispair at breaking down to sheer joy when Peter Collins hands his car over is excellent, especially as it was written within a year of Collins death.

Challenge Me The Race by Mike Hawthorn, published by William Kimber. I prefer this book to Champion Year, it seems to me to be better written and has more warmth to it.

Jochen Rindt by Heinz Pruller, published by William Kimber. This is a fabulous book and you get a real feel for what a stunning racing driver Jochen Rindt was. There is also a very interesting section relating to a thought of Colin Chapman's to do away with the points system and replace it with a medal system for the winner. Now where have we heard that lately?...

Behind The Scenes of Motor Racing by Ken Gregory, published by MacGibbon and Kee. I liked this book primarily as it gives a different insight into the early career of Sir Stirling Moss and covers the time when they went from best of friends to a more strained, professional manager/client relationship.

The Viking Drivers by Frederik Petersens, published by William Kimber. This book is mostly interesting to me as it gives a background on Gunnar Nilsson's career (as well as Ronnie Peterson) and as the author was a close friend of Gunnar you get a real sense of the changing scene of starting our in motor racing through the late 60s and early 70s.

To Draw A Long Line: British Sports and Grand Prix Racers by Johnnie Johnson, published by Bookmarque Publishing. This book took me quite some time to find, but was well worth the effort as it's such a quintesentially English book written in such an informal style. It's also pretty much the only book I know of that covers the years Connaught were active in Formula One and their win at Syracuse in 1955 is the icing on the cake.

Bruce McLaren: The Man and His Racing Team by Eoin Young. I have the Patrick Stephens editon from the early 90s, but other than an intro by Ron Dennis it is the same as the early 70s book. This again is a book that is so well written by a friend of the man so you get a real insight into what it was like setting up a team in the mid 60s and the innovative ideas Bruce McLaren had. They tried wings on the car in 1965, they didn't appear in races for 3 more years!

Ken Tyrrell: Portrait of a Motor Racing Giant by Christopher Hilton, published by Haynes. Great book on the great man and as it was written after he'd sold the team to BAR you get a real sense of it being the full career from start to finish.

Private Entrant: Racing with Rob Walker by Michael Cooper-Evans. Of the 2 Rob Walker books (the other being the Hazleton Publishing book of the 90s) I find the 60s book much more interesting. I think it gives a real sense of the way racing seemed to be so much easier to do then and that the 'players' were real characters.

16 On The Grid by Peter Garnier, published by Cassell & Co. Although not a driver bio this I thought was a facinating book as it covers the race weekend at Monaco. I found the section on the early GPDA meeting most interesting (Peter Garnier was the secretary) and I can't imagine they're like that now!

Sorry if I've rambled on a bit here, but they are all great books.

Colin

#5359 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,024 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 27 September 2010 - 14:14

Looking for some help!

I am trying to get a better picture than I can find of the different Blitzen Benz cars, and to that effect have got info from several books like "The Incredible Blitzen Benz' by Karl Ludvigsen, and "Brooklands Giants" by Bill Boddy.

Specifically for the later races ran by a number of these Benzes at Brooklands, I have ordered Boddy's 2002 book "Brooklands: The Complete Motor Racing History"
However, I have also seen the following books:

Charles Gardner:
Brooklands Fifty Years of Motor Racing (1956)

Bill Boddy:
The Story of Brooklands Vol. 1, 2 and 3
The history of Brooklands motor course, 1957.
The history of motor racing, 1977.

My question therefore: does anybody know which of these books would useful, i.e. does not duplicate a lot of the "Brooklands: The Complete Motor Racing History" book?


Also on order are Robert Dick's "Mercedes and Auto Racing in the Belle Epoque", the reprinted 1910 "Braunbeck's Sport Lexikon : Automobilismus"and "Vom Semmering zum Grand Prix, Automobilsport Österreich" by Martin Pfundner.

Any help on the Brooklands choice, as well as other books with useful information on the Blitzen Benz history would be very welcome!

Thanks in advance,
Arie



NB:
As I am a newby, I do hope that this post is not out of place, but, if so, please correct me.

You can eliminate The history of motor racing, 1977, if it's the book I think it is, covers GP racing rather than Brooklands. You can also eliminate The history of Brooklands motor course, 1957 as it was his original history and the later books develop it.

I don't know the difference between Boddy's 3-volume set and the 2002 volume you have. I'll leave that question and the question about other books to someone else.

Edited by D-Type, 27 September 2010 - 14:20.


Advertisement

#5360 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,221 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 27 September 2010 - 14:54

You can eliminate The history of motor racing, 1977, if it's the book I think it is, covers GP racing rather than Brooklands.

I've just checked my copy, and can confirm that there's no mention of any 'Blitzen' Benz in it. The 1908 GP Benz and the 1923 'Tropfenwagen' are (briefly) mentioned, and that's it.

#5361 Arieb

Arieb
  • New Member

  • 17 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 29 September 2010 - 10:12

You can eliminate The history of motor racing, 1977, if it's the book I think it is, covers GP racing rather than Brooklands. You can also eliminate The history of Brooklands motor course, 1957 as it was his original history and the later books develop it.

I don't know the difference between Boddy's 3-volume set and the 2002 volume you have. I'll leave that question and the question about other books to someone else.




Thanks D-Type and Tim!
This is useful for me to know as I unfortunately can only spend my limited budget once!

Just today I have received Bill Boddy's "Brooklands: The Complete Motor Racing History" and though no pictures of any Blitzen Benzes, there is information in the text that does come in handy.

Thanks!
Arie


#5362 monoposto

monoposto
  • Member

  • 128 posts
  • Joined: November 04

Posted 29 September 2010 - 16:45

Thanks D-Type and Tim!
This is useful for me to know as I unfortunately can only spend my limited budget once!

Just today I have received Bill Boddy's "Brooklands: The Complete Motor Racing History" and though no pictures of any Blitzen Benzes, there is information in the text that does come in handy.

Thanks!
Arie


Karl Ludvigsen's "The Mercedes-Benz Racing Cars" has 14 pages and 21 photographs in a chapter titled "Blitzen Benz"



#5363 P0wderf1nger

P0wderf1nger
  • Member

  • 307 posts
  • Joined: June 07

Posted 29 September 2010 - 22:24

Hi Paul,

Thanks for the generous comment, I do read a good number of books and try to find the more unknown titles rather than the mass sellers. 10 books I've thoroughly enjoyed reading would include;

My Twenty Years of Racing by J.-M. Fangio, published again by Temple Press. The chapter of his 1956 season and relationship with Ferrari is quite illuminating. Also the race at Monza where Fangio is in dispair at breaking down to sheer joy when Peter Collins hands his car over is excellent, especially as it was written within a year of Collins death.

Challenge Me The Race by Mike Hawthorn, published by William Kimber. I prefer this book to Champion Year, it seems to me to be better written and has more warmth to it.

Jochen Rindt by Heinz Pruller, published by William Kimber. This is a fabulous book and you get a real feel for what a stunning racing driver Jochen Rindt was. There is also a very interesting section relating to a thought of Colin Chapman's to do away with the points system and replace it with a medal system for the winner. Now where have we heard that lately?...

Behind The Scenes of Motor Racing by Ken Gregory, published by MacGibbon and Kee. I liked this book primarily as it gives a different insight into the early career of Sir Stirling Moss and covers the time when they went from best of friends to a more strained, professional manager/client relationship.

The Viking Drivers by Frederik Petersens, published by William Kimber. This book is mostly interesting to me as it gives a background on Gunnar Nilsson's career (as well as Ronnie Peterson) and as the author was a close friend of Gunnar you get a real sense of the changing scene of starting our in motor racing through the late 60s and early 70s.

To Draw A Long Line: British Sports and Grand Prix Racers by Johnnie Johnson, published by Bookmarque Publishing. This book took me quite some time to find, but was well worth the effort as it's such a quintesentially English book written in such an informal style. It's also pretty much the only book I know of that covers the years Connaught were active in Formula One and their win at Syracuse in 1955 is the icing on the cake.

Bruce McLaren: The Man and His Racing Team by Eoin Young. I have the Patrick Stephens editon from the early 90s, but other than an intro by Ron Dennis it is the same as the early 70s book. This again is a book that is so well written by a friend of the man so you get a real insight into what it was like setting up a team in the mid 60s and the innovative ideas Bruce McLaren had. They tried wings on the car in 1965, they didn't appear in races for 3 more years!

Ken Tyrrell: Portrait of a Motor Racing Giant by Christopher Hilton, published by Haynes. Great book on the great man and as it was written after he'd sold the team to BAR you get a real sense of it being the full career from start to finish.

Private Entrant: Racing with Rob Walker by Michael Cooper-Evans. Of the 2 Rob Walker books (the other being the Hazleton Publishing book of the 90s) I find the 60s book much more interesting. I think it gives a real sense of the way racing seemed to be so much easier to do then and that the 'players' were real characters.

16 On The Grid by Peter Garnier, published by Cassell & Co. Although not a driver bio this I thought was a facinating book as it covers the race weekend at Monaco. I found the section on the early GPDA meeting most interesting (Peter Garnier was the secretary) and I can't imagine they're like that now!

Sorry if I've rambled on a bit here, but they are all great books.

Colin

Some interesting choices there Colin. I don't know To Draw A Long Line at all.

I'd only question Hilton's book on Ken Tyrrell, preferring Hamilton's.

I'm a great fan of Pruller's book on Rindt (will you be getting Tremayne's?), and will take another look at Chapman's thoughts on medals for winners. Who could blame him, after Clark's three wins to Surtees' two in '64, and his four to Hulme's two in '67...

#5364 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 29 September 2010 - 22:50

Not about racing or even about automobiles in general, but .....can someone recommend the best work on IK Brunel? I'd like to get a good accurate story of his life in one volume, if it exists.

Thanks.

Jack.

#5365 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,024 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 29 September 2010 - 23:10

Not about racing or even about automobiles in general, but .....can someone recommend the best work on IK Brunel? I'd like to get a good accurate story of his life in one volume, if it exists.

Thanks.

Jack.

LTC Rolt's biography which is naturally titled Isembard Kingdom Brunel is well spoken of and readily available at affordable prices.

Incidentally Rolt was also a founder of the Vintage Sports Car Club

Edited by D-Type, 29 September 2010 - 23:17.


#5366 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 30 September 2010 - 00:16

LTC Rolt's biography which is naturally titled Isembard Kingdom Brunel is well spoken of and readily available at affordable prices.

Incidentally Rolt was also a founder of the Vintage Sports Car Club



Thanks for the recommendation. Is that Tony Rolt?

#5367 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 30 September 2010 - 05:46

No, Tony was A P R
L T C was Tom
I don't think they were related

#5368 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 23,876 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 30 September 2010 - 08:35

LTC Rolt's biography which is naturally titled Isembard Kingdom Brunel is well spoken of and readily available at affordable prices.

Incidentally Rolt was also a founder of the Vintage Sports Car Club

But make sure it's the one published by Longmans (or by Grey Arrow, Pelican or Penguin in paperback). There are others by Rolt, published by Methuen (recently reissued by Sutton) and Shire.

John Pudney's "Brunel and his World" sits nicely alongside it.

I also notice that Adrian Vaughan has done a new Brunel book recently: possibly a reworking of his "Isambard Kingdom Brunel: Engineering Knight-Errant", which was well-received, as I recall.

#5369 Colbul1

Colbul1
  • Member

  • 42 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 30 September 2010 - 10:26

Some interesting choices there Colin. I don't know To Draw A Long Line at all.

I'd only question Hilton's book on Ken Tyrrell, preferring Hamilton's.

I'm a great fan of Pruller's book on Rindt (will you be getting Tremayne's?), and will take another look at Chapman's thoughts on medals for winners. Who could blame him, after Clark's three wins to Surtees' two in '64, and his four to Hulme's two in '67...


I've never thought of reading Hamilton's book on Ken Tyrrell, I've taken a look on Amazon and see that it was published at the same time as Hilton's, but is the authorised biography. I guess therefore it's a more in-depth story of his life and career.

I'm hoping to get the Jochen Rindt book by Tremayne for Christmas (yes, I plan presents with my family!) and with any luck the new Jo Siffert book too. I've read the Jaques Deschenaux book on Jo Siffert from 1972, which although covering Siffert's facinating career, as English wasn't the authors first language it sometimes feels a bit strained and disjointed to read.

To Draw A Long Line is a book I'd strongly recommend if you can find it. As Bookmarque Publishing is only a small scale publisher they appear very rarely for about £40. The author was the cheif draughtsman at Connaught and the book covers the time from his de-mob in the late 40's through to the demise of the team when the funding dried up in 1956. At the end of the book is a reproduction of the auction documents when they sold off the team lock, stock and barrel. It's amazing to think the team was dismantled in such a way.

I've just this week started reading Can-Am Challenger by Peter Bryant and I have to say I'm already finding it a real page turner!

Please do let me know of any of the more obscure motor racing books that you'd recommend to read as I'm always on the look out for the next title to grab my attention.

#5370 Arieb

Arieb
  • New Member

  • 17 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 30 September 2010 - 12:49

Karl Ludvigsen's "The Mercedes-Benz Racing Cars" has 14 pages and 21 photographs in a chapter titled "Blitzen Benz"



Do you know in how far the info and pictures are different from what is in his book "The Incredible Blitzen Benz" which I have?

Thanks in advance,
Arie


#5371 monoposto

monoposto
  • Member

  • 128 posts
  • Joined: November 04

Posted 30 September 2010 - 13:18

Do you know in how far the info and pictures are different from what is in his book "The Incredible Blitzen Benz" which I have?

Thanks in advance,
Arie


I do not have "The Incredible Blitzen Benz" but perhaps a PM to TNF member Karlcars may get you the information . . .  ;)

#5372 Arieb

Arieb
  • New Member

  • 17 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 01 October 2010 - 17:31

I do not have "The Incredible Blitzen Benz" but perhaps a PM to TNF member Karlcars may get you the information . . .  ;)


Thanks monoposto, will do that!
Cheers,
Arie


#5373 ReWind

ReWind
  • Member

  • 2,346 posts
  • Joined: October 03

Posted 01 October 2010 - 17:38

You should send him an e-mail instead of a PM because Karl Ludvigsen's last visit on TNF was in August.
(To be aware of a PM you have to visit this forum. As long as karlcars doesn't visit TNF he will not read your PM.)

#5374 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,136 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 01 October 2010 - 18:14

You should send him an e-mail instead of a PM because Karl Ludvigsen's last visit on TNF was in August.
(To be aware of a PM you have to visit this forum. As long as karlcars doesn't visit TNF he will not read your PM.)


Surely that depends on his settings? I receive more or less instant notification of PMs in Outlook, doesn't make any difference whether I'm on the forum or not.


#5375 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,221 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 01 October 2010 - 18:30

Agreed. Also, I found that on the couple of occasions I did try emailing direct through the forum, the mails didn't get through, for some reason.

#5376 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 01 October 2010 - 19:00

Agreed. Also, I found that on the couple of occasions I did try emailing direct through the forum, the mails didn't get through, for some reason.

Ah, that explains something
I'll PM him instead
:up:


#5377 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,136 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 01 October 2010 - 19:05

Agreed. Also, I found that on the couple of occasions I did try emailing direct through the forum, the mails didn't get through, for some reason.


Yes, I've found the same thing with e-mails through the forum, so PMs seem to be a much more reliable way of contacting a fellow TNF.


#5378 Arieb

Arieb
  • New Member

  • 17 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 02 October 2010 - 12:04

Yes, I've found the same thing with e-mails through the forum, so PMs seem to be a much more reliable way of contacting a fellow TNF.



Well, I sent the PM as I had already emailed him at the address given on his website.

He has received both!

Thanks for the tip though, but it all seems to go ok. Just hoping he has some information that would be of help to me.

Cheers,
Arie


#5379 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 980 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 02 October 2010 - 13:44

The Golden Age of Formula 1 by Rainer Schlegelmilch (te Neues Publ) 216 pp (60s photos)

No hurry ,publication earliest 30 Oct 2010.

There is an exhibition in Cmaden at 'Proud'

http://proud.co.uk/exhibitions.aspx

Link to amazon
http://www.amazon.co...;pf_rd_i=468294
Hope this overlong link works..
(All from Autosport 30 Set 2010)

Regards Michael



Advertisement

#5380 Richard Peck

Richard Peck
  • New Member

  • 9 posts
  • Joined: January 06

Posted 03 October 2010 - 19:40

Bought "Shunt - The story of James Hunt" by Tom Rubython today.

It covers much the same ground as Gerald Donaldson's biography and also draws from Christopher Hilton's "Memories of James Hunt", as Rubython rightly acknowledges.

There are some annoying errors which should have been picked up in proof reading - witness the last picture section where 2 of Hunt's brothers are both separately described as "the youngest of the Hunt brothers" but to the author's credit, I believe he has a genuine admiration for Hunt.

It is not an "authorised" biography like Donaldson's was but the author interviewed many of the great and the good of motor racing, most of whom speak with great affection & some emotion about Hunt (particularly Tony Dron).

It expands on what was in Donaldson's book, hence 700 plus pages!!

It probably won't be everyone's cup of tea but Hunt was coming to prominence just when I started to get interested in motor racing in the seventies, so I was eager to get it, despite the author's controversial reputation.

Once I get through it, I'll know whether it was overlong or not. Maybe a quarter of the book is devoted to the trials and tribulations of Hunt's life post retirement.

Edited by Richard Peck, 03 October 2010 - 19:55.


#5381 MoMorris

MoMorris
  • New Member

  • 14 posts
  • Joined: December 09

Posted 04 October 2010 - 09:52

Found in Poundland on Saturday:

Montlhery - The story of the Paris Autodrome by Bill Boddy.
Veloce Classic Reprint Series.

It is hardback and produced on good quality paper c/w the original illustrations.

I read Bill Boddy for 40 years before I gave up on Motor Sport magazine so to me this is an easy read but it has many typo errors.

Grab it if you can.

#5382 P0wderf1nger

P0wderf1nger
  • Member

  • 307 posts
  • Joined: June 07

Posted 05 October 2010 - 22:07

Please do let me know of any of the more obscure motor racing books that you'd recommend to read as I'm always on the look out for the next title to grab my attention.

One pretty obscure title for you Colin, then two others you probably know, but all three are among my firm favourites.

'The Other Bentley Boys' by Elizabeth Nagle (Harrap, 1964). The Bentley tale has been told many times, and the WO and Birkin autobiographies have perhaps become the 'set textbooks'. This approaches the story from the point of view of some of WO's earliest employees, most notably Nobby Clark, whose CV included being WO's first mechanic, then foreman, manager of the Bentley pits at Brooklands and Le Mans, then works service manager through to the R-R days. The recollections of anyone with that pedigree are well worth reading, from the birth of the first 3-litre to why the Blower was always going to be a disaster. Ms Nagle didn't need to write very much, as eight-tenths of the text is made up of quotes from the men she interviewed. The index is very poor, so that sometimes I've had to scan the whole book to find the story I wanted, but this is still a wonderful, alternative insight into a great story.

'Inside Formula 1' by Nigel Roebuck (Patrick Stephens Limited, 1989). I devoured Roebuck's 'Fifth Column' pieces from 1980 to the day he left Autosport, and I still enjoy taking this collection of 'Fifth Column' articles down from the shelf, to savour not only the original pieces again, but also the considered introductions Roebuck gives each one in the book. The famous 'Bad Blood at Maranello' piece, published 48 hours before Villneuve was killed, is there of course, but 'Tambay's day of days', about Patrick winning at Imola 12 months later, or 'Making plans for Nigel', about Mansell coming good at Silverstone in the first Ducarouge Lotus, are equally rivetting, and, more than 25 years after they were written, leave me wondering where the time goes. Why Roebuck and Haynes don't get together on a second volume is a mystery to me.

'Enzo Ferrari' by Richard Williams (Yellow Jersey Press, 2001). The bar by which all motor racing biographies should be judged. Williams is a brilliant researcher and a joy to read. He was sufficiently trusted by the Ferrari family to be permitted inside the mausoleum, yet was objective in his assessment of Enzo at all times. Williams is not a great one for illlustrating his books - his 'Death of Ayrton Senna', in my view the best of the plethora of Senna books, contains none at all and didn't need any - but the images in the first edition of the Ferrari book are poorly reproduced, and worse still, on three occasions he writes about photographs which aren't in the book at all! A minor gripe however; I still contend this is an excellent book.

I hope these take your fancy.

Paul

#5383 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 06 October 2010 - 04:27

'Enzo Ferrari' by Richard Williams (Yellow Jersey Press, 2001). The bar by which all motor racing biographies should be judged. Williams is a brilliant researcher and a joy to read. He was sufficiently trusted by the Ferrari family to be permitted inside the mausoleum, yet was objective in his assessment of Enzo at all times. Williams is not a great one for illlustrating his books - his 'Death of Ayrton Senna', in my view the best of the plethora of Senna books, contains none at all and didn't need any - but the images in the first edition of the Ferrari book are poorly reproduced, and worse still, on three occasions he writes about photographs which aren't in the book at all! A minor gripe however; I still contend this is an excellent book.

I hope these take your fancy.

Paul


I agree with your assessment, Paul. The Ferrari biography really is an outstanding work, hugely satisfying for the reader. It is let down by the photographs, just as you say, but there is such a large store of Ferrari-related photographs in publication that I can overlook this fault. (I do remember that I had to pay up for the hardbound edition!)

Jack

#5384 Colbul1

Colbul1
  • Member

  • 42 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 06 October 2010 - 07:34

'The Other Bentley Boys' by Elizabeth Nagle (Harrap, 1964). The Bentley tale has been told many times, and the WO and Birkin autobiographies have perhaps become the 'set textbooks'. This approaches the story from the point of view of some of WO's earliest employees, most notably Nobby Clark, whose CV included being WO's first mechanic, then foreman, manager of the Bentley pits at Brooklands and Le Mans, then works service manager through to the R-R days. The recollections of anyone with that pedigree are well worth reading, from the birth of the first 3-litre to why the Blower was always going to be a disaster. Ms Nagle didn't need to write very much, as eight-tenths of the text is made up of quotes from the men she interviewed. The index is very poor, so that sometimes I've had to scan the whole book to find the story I wanted, but this is still a wonderful, alternative insight into a great story.

Paul


I'm totally with you on the books by Nigel Roebuck, I too believe 'Inside Formula 1' to be an excellent title and would buy a new edition without hesitation. I just can't say enough how much I admire his style of writing, 'Mario Andretti: World Champion' is another intriguing read, especially the way you really feel Andretti opens up and lays bare his relationship with Ronnie Peterson.

The book on Enzo Ferrari by Richard Williams is another good call and I agree totally with yourself and Jack there. I have a couple of Williams' historical texts, 'The Last Road Race' being my favourite book of his. I'm not so sure about his more contemporary titles though. I don't have 'Racers' as the reviews I've read on that are not as positive as I'd hope.

I am very interested in your review here of 'The Other Bentley Boys' by Nagle. That book has completely passed me by and it sounds fascinating. You're spot on in noting the Birkin book 'Full Throttle' as the one many go for (and I'm guilty of that too) so to read the story from the view of "those who were there" rather than competing is an interesting way of doing it. I shall start to search for that one now.

#5385 Michael Ferner

Michael Ferner
  • Member

  • 2,153 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 06 October 2010 - 13:24

'The Other Bentley Boys' by Elizabeth Nagle (Harrap, 1964). The Bentley tale has been told many times, and the WO and Birkin autobiographies have perhaps become the 'set textbooks'. This approaches the story from the point of view of some of WO's earliest employees, most notably Nobby Clark, whose CV included being WO's first mechanic, then foreman, manager of the Bentley pits at Brooklands and Le Mans, then works service manager through to the R-R days...


Why, I never...

I presume this is not the same Nobby Clark some of us knew as the quintessential motorcycle racing chief mechanic!?! :drunk: :confused:

#5386 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,221 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 06 October 2010 - 17:23

Definitely not the same man. Nobby Clarke (with an 'e') was a mechanical engineer with Margate Corporation before joining the Royal Naval Air Service in 1914. At the end of the war he joined WO Bentley as his first mechanic in 1919. He stayed with WO until the take-over by Rolls-Royce, with whom he continued as Service Works Manager until his retirement in 1958.

#5387 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 36,890 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 06 October 2010 - 18:12

There are lots of Nobby Clark(e)s from the early 20th century and before...the simple reason is that "nabhi" was (is?) the Hindu word for "clerk", and so was heard a lot in the Raj...

#5388 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 07 October 2010 - 01:28

There are lots of Nobby Clark(e)s from the early 20th century and before...the simple reason is that "nabhi" was (is?) the Hindu word for "clerk", and so was heard a lot in the Raj...


That's interesting. My childhood best friend's father used to call me "Nobby", but it had nothing to do with being a clerk and certainly nothing to do with the Raj.....It was a reference to my knees as I almost always wore shorts in those days. And no, I won't post pictures!

While we're at it.....

I've always wonderd about the origin of the word "pukka", and since I sometimes see it used to describe an automobile, I might as well ask about it right here!

Jack.

#5389 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 07 October 2010 - 05:41

From Hindi pakkā and Urdu پکا (pakkā), from Sanskrit pakva, meaning cooked, roasted, baked, from pácati, to cook, bake, roast

#5390 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 53,756 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 07 October 2010 - 08:34

Talking to Bob Watson yesterday, he told me he will probably have copies of his new book at the Tasman Revival meeting at Eastern Creek later in the year...

The book is the history of the Light Car Club, the club which organised the first races to become known as the Australian Grand Prix and which prevailed for a good many years both in Melbourne and in Ballarat and Bendigo.

They organised that Ballarat meeting where Dan Gurney got his sole BRM win, took over the running of Sandown Park and had a lot to do with the Tasman Cup's latter years.

Should be an interesting read, it's not Bob's first book as he's written an autobiography about his rallying etc... I think he might have done another, details of which would be on his website.

#5391 Canon14

Canon14
  • Member

  • 31 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 07 October 2010 - 12:47

Found in Poundland on Saturday:

Montlhery - The story of the Paris Autodrome by Bill Boddy.
Veloce Classic Reprint Series.

It is hardback and produced on good quality paper c/w the original illustrations.

I read Bill Boddy for 40 years before I gave up on Motor Sport magazine so to me this is an easy read but it has many typo errors.

Grab it if you can.


Thanks for the heads up. I popped into my local Poundland this lunchtime and grabbed one, and while I was there I picked up the Andy Priaulx biography in hardback.

Usually the recommendations on this particular thread cost me far more than a couple of pounds!

Steven

#5392 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,136 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 07 October 2010 - 13:31

...and while I was there I picked up the Andy Priaulx biography in hardback.


I can pretty much guarantee that you'll wished you'd saved your money on that one, the dullest, worst written and most boringly self-centered driver biography I've ever read. Think I paid about £2.99 for my copy in somewhere like The Works, I wish I'd done more than skimmed a couple of pages before handing over my money. One thing that makes it so poor is the fact that there's almost nothing about his racing in it, his hillclimb career is hardly mentioned, it's all about his 'personal struggles', it could have been the story of a double-glazing salesman who wrote publicity for the Guernsey Tourist Board, and did the odd track day.

On second thoughts, ignore everything I've said above, it's an excellent book, one of the best I've ever read, any sensible offers for an as-new copy?

This book was such a disappointment that it reminded me of an old review, I think by Oscar Wylde. "This is not a work to be just pushed lightly aside, it should be thrown with great force".




#5393 Colbul1

Colbul1
  • Member

  • 42 posts
  • Joined: September 10

Posted 07 October 2010 - 13:55

I spotted this on the Bookseller webpage today;

Faber signs biography of Bernie Ecclestone
07.10.10

Faber has signed up the biography of Formula One supremo and billionaire Bernie Ecclestone. Faber’s non-fiction publishing director acquired UK and Commonwealth rights (including Canada) to Tom Bower’s 'No Angel: The Secret Life of Bernie Ecclestone' from Jonathan Lloyd at Curtis Brown.

Ecclestone reveals in the book his journey from selling secondhand cars in London’s Warren Street to becoming the F1 boss. The book will also detail his personal highs and lows, his marriages, his deals in Downing Street and his successes and failures on the race track.

Ecclestone is telling his story to Bower, a former “Panorama” reporter and author of unauthorised biographies of Gordon Brown and Richard Branson. Despite Ecclestone describing Bower as “The Undertaker” for his notoriety in burying reputations, the billionaire gave Bower access to all his contacts and instructed them to "Tell him the truth, good or bad".

Bower told Ecclestone: "I’ll accept your facilities but if I find evidence of wrongdoing or hear any criticism, it will be published." Ecclestone replied: "Tom, I’m no angel."

Faber plans to publish No Angel in March 2011 to coincide with the start of the F1 season.

So how many Bernie biographies does that make it now? Isn't there one due out next month?


#5394 LordAston

LordAston
  • Member

  • 34 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 07 October 2010 - 14:36

I was in my local WH Smith this morning and they had Ben Collin's ''The Man in The White Suit'' at half price I didn't buy it because an alarm went off in my head to see if any one had and what their opinions of it were and if this discount is WH Smith just trying to get rid of their copies. So what do you guys think? I'm uncertain from what I'm skimmed through.

Edited by LordAston, 07 October 2010 - 14:38.


#5395 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,221 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 07 October 2010 - 16:31

I can pretty much guarantee that you'll wished you'd saved your money on that one, the dullest, worst written and most boringly self-centered driver biography I've ever read.

I grew up in Guernsey. I went to school with one of Andy's uncles, lived next door to his aunt, and once did a holiday job working for his parents. I've been an Andy Priaulx fan since he started out, and would love to be able to say that Rob's assessment is wrong. Unfortunately, it's absolutely spot on. As Rob says, an extremely disappointing book. :well:

#5396 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,136 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 07 October 2010 - 16:44

I've been an Andy Priaulx fan since he started out, and would love to be able to say that Rob's assessment is wrong. Unfortunately, it's absolutely spot on. As Rob says, an extremely disappointing book.


Andy writes badly but enthusiastically about Guernsey in the book. I know the Island well, and I've certainly got no argument with him, or I'm sure Tim, on that score, but there are probably better Guernsey travel guides, some of which might actually have some motor racing content.


#5397 fbarrett

fbarrett
  • Member

  • 998 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 07 October 2010 - 16:51

Andy writes badly but enthusiastically about Guernsey in the book. I know the Island well, and I've certainly got no argument with him, or I'm sure Tim, on that score, but there are probably better Guernsey travel guides, some of which might actually have some motor racing content.


I happen to be reading The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society. What do you think of it?

Frank

#5398 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,136 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 07 October 2010 - 17:15

I happen to be reading The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society. What do you think of it?

Frank


I haven't read that one, but on the subject of Guernsey, I can't recommend highly enough The Book of Ebenezer LePage. It's about the Island, and in common with that Andy Priaulx book, there's almost nothing about motor racing in it.


#5399 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Member

  • 14,221 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 07 October 2010 - 17:30

It's a fine book, very funny and moving. As a record of what Guernsey went through during the German occupation, it fully deserves comparison with Rob's recommendation The Book of Ebenezer Le Page by G B Edwards. They are both excellent books.

Advertisement

#5400 Canon14

Canon14
  • Member

  • 31 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 08 October 2010 - 12:16

I can pretty much guarantee that you'll wished you'd saved your money on that one, the dullest, worst written and most boringly self-centered driver biography I've ever read. Think I paid about £2.99 for my copy in somewhere like The Works, I wish I'd done more than skimmed a couple of pages before handing over my money. One thing that makes it so poor is the fact that there's almost nothing about his racing in it, his hillclimb career is hardly mentioned, it's all about his 'personal struggles', it could have been the story of a double-glazing salesman who wrote publicity for the Guernsey Tourist Board, and did the odd track day.

This book was such a disappointment that it reminded me of an old review, I think by Oscar Wylde. "This is not a work to be just pushed lightly aside, it should be thrown with great force".



For some stange reason that review did not feature on the cover! I wonder why?

I can console myself with the thought that I may have wasted a pound but I've saved sevaral hours of my life. I was looking forward to reading soemthing about the Renault Spiders, he was mighty in them. Now I'll just look at the pictures.