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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#501 Dennis David

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Posted 26 January 2004 - 23:44

Thanks Doug I'll have to check the book out. BTW I'm really interested in your impressions of Sir Alfred Owen. Sorry I've not sprug for your BRM books YET.

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#502 Dennis David

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Posted 26 January 2004 - 23:47

0011,

Do you really think it's better than Lurani's book?

#503 11

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Posted 26 January 2004 - 23:51

Originally posted by Dennis David
Thanks Doug I'll have to check the book out. BTW I'm really interested in your impressions of Sir Alfred Owen. Sorry I've not sprug for your BRM books YET.


Hi,

I would just like to say that I love your site! In my original post I mentioned how I knew Nuvolari was buried in his racing uniform and I learned that (and many other interesting facts) from your very informative site wich I relied on for information when I was just started out as a "F1 nut". I just wanted to say thanks for that :)

Have a nice day.

#504 11

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Posted 26 January 2004 - 23:57

Originally posted by Dennis David
0011,

Do you really think it's better than Lurani's book?


I honestly cannot say because I have not read Lurani's book. All I know is that "Nuvolari" by Hilton was fascinating (for me anyway) and even though it was flawed I still found it to be a worth read simply for the historical value and wonderfull race by race accounts.

#505 Dennis David

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 00:04

Fair enough, and thanks for the kind remarks. For me the picture of the great Nuvolari has always been etched in my mind from this quote by Rene Dreyfus...

"He talked to his cars," René Dreyfus remembers, "and they answered! It was incredible. He would jump from side to side, put his whole body into the effort. It seemed to me sometimes that he was himself physically lifting the car - over a curb, for example, to take a corner faster. We'd ask ourselves often, how he can drive that way? That's not right. But then he'd win ..."

"Whenever I think of him today, I feel myself smiling. He was so full of life, almost bursting. We were astounded by him as a driver and loved him as a man."


#506 11

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 00:08

Originally posted by Dennis David
Fair enough, and thanks for the kind remarks. For me the picture of the great Nuvolari has always been etched in my mind from this quote by Rene Dreyfus...

"He talked to his cars," RenEDreyfus remembers, "and they answered! It was incredible. He would jump from side to side, put his whole body into the effort. It seemed to me sometimes that he was himself physically lifting the car - over a curb, for example, to take a corner faster. We'd ask ourselves often, how he can drive that way? That's not right. But then he'd win ..."

"Whenever I think of him today, I feel myself smiling. He was so full of life, almost bursting. We were astounded by him as a driver and loved him as a man."


That is a beautifull quote. There are many similar quotes and stories in the book Nuvolari wich really (to me) portrayed him as larger than life, a legend if you will. The whole purpose of the book was to show you why he was such a legend and it it really worked well.

#507 RX-7

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 00:46

Since the subject is books.I was wondering.What would be the most definitive book on all F1 cars since 1950,with pics and specs? More or less an "A-Z" if you will.

#508 Dave Wright

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 19:19

Originally posted by RX-7
Since the subject is books.I was wondering.What would be the most definitive book on all F1 cars since 1950,with pics and specs? More or less an "A-Z" if you will.


I've not come accross this but would buy it if it did exist. Full specs (weight, track, wheelbase etc) are omitted from many otherwise in-depth books or the figures quoted seem to contradict other sources (perhaps why some don't quote them!).

#509 petefenelon

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 22:32

Originally posted by Dave Wright


I've not come accross this but would buy it if it did exist. Full specs (weight, track, wheelbase etc) are omitted from many otherwise in-depth books or the figures quoted seem to contradict other sources (perhaps why some don't quote them!).


There isn't really one book.

DCN's Autocourse History of the Grand Prix Car 1945-65 and 1966-91 are pretty definitive in many respects.

David Hodges' A-Z of Grand Prix Cars has a lot of good stuff.

Pierre Menard's controversial, flawed but enjoyable "Great Encyclopedia of F1" contains lots of pics and some rather questionable specs.

If it's just pics you want, the new Arron/Hughes picture book is the thing.

#510 Dennis David

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Posted 28 January 2004 - 03:59

Anybody read this book yet? The Michelin Men

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#511 Don Capps

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Posted 30 January 2004 - 22:21

Books are always a popular topic so here is link to the previous thead....http://forums.atlasf...&threadid=55742 ....and a new thread to discuss books.

#512 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 31 January 2004 - 00:49

I strongly recommend for everybody to acquire The Complete History of GRAND PRIX MOTOR RACING by Adriano Cimarosti. My issue was published in New York: Crescent Books, 1990 but there is a later edition and also a German language version, called Autorennen. This book should cost not more than $50.00 and offers tremendous value for your money, covering GP racing from 1895 till the nineties. You will not feel sorry adding this book to your library.

If you cannot get it from your book dealer, try some of these sites.
http://www.abebooks.com/
http://www.abebooks.de/
http://www.abebooks.fr/
http://www.abebooks.co.uk/
http://www.alibris.com/
http://collectors-carbooks.co.uk/
http://www.collector...ooksinStore.htm
http://www.chaters.c...ftoken=96187996
http://www.simonlewis.com/
http://www.tavaresmotorsport.com/
http://www.editions-palmier.fr/
http://www.autoboek.com/
http://www.amazon.co...ats-query-page/
http://www.bookfinder.com/
http://www.ebay.com/
http://www.atlasf1.c...tore/index.html
http://www.eoinyoung.com/
http://www.powells.com
http://www.motorsportcollector.com/
http://www.motorbooks.com/
http://wilkinsonsauto.com/
e-mail: autobooks@autobooks.co.uk Kenneth Ball at Autobooks Limited in England.
http://www.lesezeich...nd/motspor1.htm

http://www.kb.nl/gabriel/ Gateway to Europe’s National Libraries

#513 marat

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Posted 31 January 2004 - 06:18

Ouf! Thanks Don.
We don't have to create "les amis du TNF d'antant".

#514 gerrit stevens

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Posted 31 January 2004 - 10:02

Originally posted by Hans Etzrodt
I strongly recommend for everybody to acquire The Complete History of GRAND PRIX MOTOR RACING by Adriano Cimarosti. My issue was published in New York: Crescent Books, 1990 but there is a later edition and also a German language version, called Autorennen. This book should cost not more than $50.00 and offers tremendous value for your money, covering GP racing from 1895 till the nineties. You will not feel sorry adding this book to your library.

If you cannot get it from your book dealer, try some of these sites.
[http://www.autoboek.com/


I know this editor. They have a larch bunch of autosport books, motorsport books and books about aviation (and video's). I can't say they are cheap but sometimes they have bargains. A couple of years ago they sold (as good as new) copies of Autocourse 1981 until 1984 for 40 guilders (=18 euro). Their opening hours are shown on the website. In general they have all the recent publications in store.
It is in Deventer not that far from the German border. It's worth paying a visit. I visit them regularly, it's easy for me, I live 15 km from this showroomshop.
In earlier days they were also known as editor "Peeters Autoboeken". I believe they still carry this name.

The Cimarosti book in their store costs Euro 61,30.
If you are looking for books. Don't try to look by author. It does not work.
One of the most interesting books they have is "American Road Racing - The 1930s" by Joel E. Finn, but it is quite priceworthy. almost 219 Euro.

If you have problems with the Dutch language on their site or would like to have other info don't hesitate to ask. I don't say I know the answer. But you never know until you ask.


Gerrit Stevens

#515 Don Capps

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Posted 31 January 2004 - 14:54

Does anyone know anything about this book?

Effertz, Heinrich: Motorradrennen im Rheinland 1945 bis 1960

It just caught my attention and looks interesting.

#516 eukie

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 09:00

Does anyone know anything about this book?
Effertz, Heinrich: Motorradrennen im Rheinland 1945 bis 1960
It just caught my attention and looks interesting.



Don, I`m not quite sure whether I should recommend it or not. First of all: Not only motorbike races but - to a large extend - MotoX. On the other hand: a deep, sometimes personal A-Z of tracks and races all over the Rhineland (north of Koblenz, that is) in the early post-WW2-period. For sure it is not complete and sometimes disappointingly thin (for example the Grenzlandring-section; there are better sources for the Nürburgring, too), but then nowhere else you can find a better description of many forgotten races like for example those at Neuwied (important for the rebirth of the motorsport as a whole in Germany). Very good selection of comtemporary pics, indeed, even some "Motorsport"-TrackTest-like comparisons of trackviews now and then. BTW: Very much text, so it makes more fun if you can read German.

You will have a good reading if you like post-war grass-roots MotoX and motorbikeracing and if you are - like me - interested in the local history of some towns and villages (many of them you will never have heard of) all over the Rhineland.

#517 dretceterini

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 20:32

Amazon has the Stanguellini bookby Orsini for $54.60 if anyone is interested.

#518 petefenelon

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 22:38

As predicted, Amazon are now discounting the Arron/Hughes Complete Book of Formula 1 - the pictorial reference on every car/driver combination to have competed in the world championship. It's now 25 quid. At that price, difficult not to recommend it.

#519 kart_26

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 13:47

Hi!

I am Karthik from hydeabad, India and have been following the forums here for a few months
now. I'd just like to invite your comments on the F1 boks I have. Here's the list...


1. The Art and Science of Grand Prix Racing - Niki Lauda
2. The Grand Prix(1904-1970) - L J K Setright
3. Autocourse 1981
4. Against All Odds - James Hunt (Autobiography)
5. Driven To Win - Nigel Mansell
6. The World of Formula 1(89' Edition) - Alan Henry & David Tremayne

A very small collection compared to the libraries that some of you maybe having.
I hope you could recomend books to add to this tiny collection. The problem here is that no
bookstores stock good F1 books and buying from the internet is too costly. Te books above mentioned were bought for a sum total of about 3 pounds!! :)




Thanx n Regards
Karthik

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#520 PRD

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 22:16

Originally posted by kart_26
Hi!

I am Karthik from hydeabad, India and have been following the forums here for a few months
now. I'd just like to invite your comments on the F1 boks I have. Here's the list...


1. The Art and Science of Grand Prix Racing - Niki Lauda
2. The Grand Prix(1904-1970) - L J K Setright
3. Autocourse 1981
4. Against All Odds - James Hunt (Autobiography)
5. Driven To Win - Nigel Mansell
6. The World of Formula 1(89' Edition) - Alan Henry & David Tremayne

A very small collection compared to the libraries that some of you maybe having.
I hope you could recomend books to add to this tiny collection. The problem here is that no
bookstores stock good F1 books and buying from the internet is too costly. Te books above mentioned were bought for a sum total of about 3 pounds!! :)




Thanx n Regards
Karthik


£3 for that lot- bargain!
I started collecting books in 1968 at the age of 13 so have a head start on you, Karthik. Just keep your eyes open in second-hand bookshops...

Regards
Paul

#521 Vitesse2

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 23:13

Karthik: you should take Hans' advice and try to get hold of the Cimarosti book - it's without doubt the best. If you're short of money, you could probably sell or swap the Autocourse you already have for it - on its own that's worth at least six times what you paid for all your books!

#522 D-Type

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 23:37

Today I saw Formula 1 Unseen Archives by Tim Hill down £ 4.99 in the discount bookshop. Then I saw a couple of copies without dust jackets at £2.48 in Woolworths.

The book is really a collection of photos from the Daily Mail archive, both on and off track with about a page of linking text for each year. And at the price you can excuse the few inaccurate captions.

That's an interesting start to a library you have there Karthik. I don't want to recommend any books to you as the odds are they'll be unavailable and you'll just get frustrated. Anything by the following authors is worth getting:

Doug Nye
Karl Ludvigsen
Adriano Cimarosti
Alan Henry (but some come into the pot boiler category)
David Tremayne
Dennis Jenkinson
Maurice Hamilton
Nigel Roebuck

#523 petefenelon

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 23:43

add to that list:

Mike Lawrence
William Court
Mike Lang
Andrew Whyte
Cyril Posthumus
Richard Williams
David Hodges

Pretty much anything by these guys will be substantially correct, highly readable and very entertaining.

Anything by Christopher Hilton about "the past" is usually good. His biographies of contemporary drivers are usually woefully thin.

#524 dretceterini

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Posted 04 February 2004 - 03:43

I would add to the list A.T.Anselmi and Luigi Orsini, if you are interested in Italian cars.

#525 Ron Scoma

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Posted 04 February 2004 - 04:04

Pomeroy.


Ron Scoma

#526 kart_26

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Posted 04 February 2004 - 06:00

Thans for all the suggestions and recommendations! The only book on F1 available here in the bookstores is the Formula 1 Annual Yearbook 2000. I could try and get it for a bargain price but I'd like to know if it's worth it. Also, I've 2 more books that I forgot to add to the previous list.


1. Behind The Scenes - Louis T. Stanley
2. Michael Schumacher : Driven To Extremes - James Allen


I would also like to know if there are any good books on Colin Chapman, Jim Clark and Ayrton Senna.



Thanks n Regards
Karthik

#527 Geza Sury

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Posted 04 February 2004 - 07:50

Originally posted by Vitesse2
Karthik: you should take Hans' advice and try to get hold of the Cimarosti book - it's without doubt the best. If you're short of money, you could probably sell or swap the Autocourse you already have for it - on its own that's worth at least six times what you paid for all your books!

The Cimarosti book is excellent, I've just named it my favourite book and wrote a short review about it for a national magazine. You can get the book from Chater's for just 10 Pounds, which is a real bargain for a work like this!

I'm planning to purchase some of the recently published books. Has anyone read the new bio on Jackie Stewart? I'm reluctant to buy it, since the previous book I read from Mr Collings (The Eddie Jordan bio) was... ahem.... uninformative, to say the least.

#528 petefenelon

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Posted 04 February 2004 - 11:58

Originally posted by kart_26
Thans for all the suggestions and recommendations! The only book on F1 available here in the bookstores is the Formula 1 Annual Yearbook 2000. I could try and get it for a bargain price but I'd like to know if it's worth it. Also, I've 2 more books that I forgot to add to the previous list.


1. Behind The Scenes - Louis T. Stanley
2. Michael Schumacher : Driven To Extremes - James Allen


I would also like to know if there are any good books on Colin Chapman, Jim Clark and Ayrton Senna.



Thanks n Regards
Karthik



There are two good Colin Chapman books - "Colin Chapman: The Man And His Cars" by Jabby Crombac, and "Colin Chapman: Wayward Genius" by Mike Lawrence.

Both are good books. Note however that the Crombac book is an authorised biography approved by his family, and tends to idolise its subject (and soft-pedals a number of issues); the Lawrence one is very much unauthorised and is uncomfortable reading for anyone uncritical of Chapman. To gain a balanced picture of Colin I think you need to read both.

Jim Clark - there are good books by Graham Gauld ("Jim Clark Remembered") and Eric Dymock ("The Jim Clark Book").

Ayrton Senna is the subject of a lot of crappy books trying to cash in on his memory; by far the best I've read is Richard Williams' "The Death of Ayrton Senna", although Christopher Hilton's "The Hard Edge of Genius" is very good by his standards.

#529 2F-001

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 16:31

Hello Karthik -
For the sheer joy of a good read, combined with what I think is regarded as being substantially correct history, you might look out for Mike Lawrence's "The Story of March (Four guys and a telephone)".

#530 ensign14

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 16:57

The best and most literate books to read are those by William Court. "Grand Prix Requiem", despite its morbid title, MAY be available comparatively cheaply (the Power & Glory books cost around £50 each). Accurate, at times iconoclastic, and wonderfully erudite.

#531 petefenelon

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 16:58

Originally posted by 2F-001
Hello Karthik -
For the sheer joy of a good read, combined with what I think is regarded as being substantially correct history, you might look out for Mike Lawrence's "The Story of March (Four guys and a telephone)".


Seconded.

It really forms part of a "folk history of the British production racing scene" when read with some of Mike's other books - Brabham, Ralt, Honda: The Ron Tauranac Story, The Reynard Story and Colin Chapman: Wayward Genius. Mike also wanted to do a book with Eric Broadley about Lola, but Eric isn't interested :( - so we're left with John Starkey's worthy but dull books on that marque. Mike's also apparently talked to Len Terry about doing something...

#532 Vicuna

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 01:10

Originally posted by petefenelon
Anything by Christopher Hilton about "the past" is usually good. His biographies of contemporary drivers are usually woefully thin.


Life is just too short to waste time on reading anything by Hilton

#533 Don Capps

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 02:37

Originally posted by Vicuna
Life is just too short to waste time on reading anything by Hilton


After working with Christopher Hilton on his Nuvolari book, I admit to changing my tune. He was really great to work with since he does his homework plus he asked some very astute questions and actually listens. It was an interesting experience. I would be happy to work with him again.

#534 Anorak Man

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 05:29

I enjoy these book threads, they help me choose the best motor-racing titles to stock in our bookshop.

I'm thrilled to see that one I suggested be written, about a year ago, has been published.
Vanwall: Green for Glory by Ed McDonough. (I'm not claiming that my post prompted it!) At the time, I thought I was nudging Mr. Capps, but perhaps you had a hand in Ed's manuscript Don ... does it do the story justice?

Somebody mentioned Coventry Climax Racing Engines, which have now been thoroughly covered by Des Hammill.

I'm still waiting for somebody to write:

* John Surtees: The Full Monty (The stories he must have locked in his grey matter).
* Sir Frank: Between the Lines (The stories he must have secreted in his cerebral hemispheres).
* The Complete Works of Jenks, Haynes paperback edition for Anoraks (Clink ... rattle ... Clink ... Dooooglas)
* Ron's Diary: Getting the Best Out of Drivers: He'll need help on the English translation
* Oulton Park: (It's a long time coming you lot ...)
* How about a 'Profile' type series on UK circuits, as mentioned elsewhere. Aintree, Donington, Brands, etc.
* If only Luca 'Monty' could be persuaded to tell the truth about his time breaking-in the Scuderia Stallion
* The Rise and Fall of Ecurie Ecosse by 'Our Ian' et al. (respectful nudge)


AM

PS. Books I do not want to see:

Another Senna book
Another on M$
"My Tempestuous Time at ... Renault ... BAR ... Sainsburys, and Frome Comprehensive" by Jenson Button (At least win one race before you tap again Jense.)

#535 David McKinney

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 06:42

You're a bit behind the times there, AM
An Oulton Park history was published last year and a profile of British circuits has been out for two or three years

#536 Anorak Man

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 11:25

Certainly am DMck! :)

That's why I come here.

ISBNs please. Up to scratch? Any photos of the crowd at Lodge Corner in the early 70s ... spot the bloke in a bowler and anorak?

AM

#537 petefenelon

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 11:39

Originally posted by Anorak Man
Certainly am DMck! :)

That's why I come here.

ISBNs please. Up to scratch? Any photos of the crowd at Lodge Corner in the early 70s ... spot the bloke in a bowler and anorak?

AM


Can't find the ISBN for the Oulton book, but the title is Sun, Rain and Even Snow by Derek Lawson

For English circuits, you want Peter Swinger's "Motor Racing Circuits In England: Then and Now". ISBN 0-7110-2796-X.

Doesn't venture North of the Border, across the Irish Sea or into the small, mountainous and rather dull wastes of Wales though ;P

[edit: fixed the author's name. I was thinking 'Peter Lawson', but it was 'Derek Lawson'!]

#538 David McKinney

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 13:02

Thanks Pete
For AM's benefit, I think the OP book was published privately, which might explain the lack of ISBN. It also means it might not be easy to track down from southeast Asia :)

#539 Dave Wright

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 13:25

Originally posted by Anorak Man


Somebody mentioned Coventry Climax Racing Engines, which have now been thoroughly covered by Des Hammill.


According to the publishers site, this still isn't out. Do you know any different?

Dave

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#540 D-Type

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 14:13

A-M as Graham Gauld has done a history of Ecurie Ecosse, I can't see room for another. Having said that I would love to see Ian S.'s memories.

#541 Ian Stewart

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 20:38

Originally posted by D-Type
A-M as Graham Gauld has done a history of Ecurie Ecosse, I can't see room for another. Having said that I would love to see Ian S.'s memories.


I believe another history of Ecurie Ecosse has been considered, but as far as I know it has been shelved because there would be a very small market for it. Graham got there first, and despite all the work he put into it the book simply didn't sell.

It would be hard for any author to succeed with a virtually identical title, even though much more is now known about the early years leading up to the Le Mans success. Graham was hampered by his absence on National Service, and naturally concentrated on the subsequent era.

David Murray's circumstances ultimately led to the dispersal of a great deal of useable material, and to draw the whole story together into something coherent would be more than difficult. A great pity, because the team's 'atmosphere' will soon be lost forever, and David's own personal story remains a mystery.

Ecurie Ecosse was unique then and now, so if you're prepared to put your money on the table I'll have a go at the 'other' author!! Failing that, opinions on the wisdom of publishing a second effort would be very interesting.

#542 JonC

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 21:36

I recently bought the new Schlegelmilch "Formula 1 1950:today" book which I think is great - the latest in a long line of great-value (£20) big photographic books. The format is quite similar to the small-format Ferrari book that was published last year - the first section is a year-by-year album of action images, then there are sections on teams (lots of wonderful detail shots of the cars), drivers, helmets, personnel etc, although there seems to be much more content from the last 10 years or so than from before.

However, does anyone have, or have seen, the new book and the older "Grand Prix Fascination Formula 1" book and if so, what are the differences (other than there being newer photos), and what is the overlap in pre-90's photographs between the two books?

#543 dretceterini

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 18:43

The new Stanguellini book is for sale for $54.60 INCLUDING shipping from their place to your home. I would estimate, based on the weight of the book, that the postal chages would have to be $5 or more.

The "suggested" retail price on the back of the book is 68 Euros, or 50 pounds or 78 dollars (although at the current rate of exchange, 68 Euros is more like 85 dollars).

It seems to me that Amazon has to be buying the book for $45 or less INCLUDING shipping charges AND US customs duties from Italy, or there would not be enough profit to bother with.

I seriously doubt that Amazon will sell more than 100 copies, so why would they bother importing a book on which they will make only around $5 per copy, and a total profit of only around $500? Seems like a lot of work for that little.

Book dealer/publishing experts...is my thinking off?

#544 Anorak Man

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 06:22

Thanx Pete and DMcK, I'll get ferreting.

Dave: The Coventry Climax book is due out this month, you can pre-order, and you'll get it as soon as the ink's dry (and glue set : ouch!)

I've not seen GG's book on Ecurie Ecosse, but it's very exciting to witness ' Our Ian' keen to fill in the gaps, and get an updated edition out. As I've said elsewhere: it doesn't have to be in the traditional book format: there's many more publishing alternatives without any financial burden or risk. Assuming the motive is not 'flithy lucre' (as I'm sure it wouldn't be in Ian's case), but rather recording a fascinating sliver of motor racing history.

Let the true story be told!

AM

>>edit to add>>>

Doc: I can answer you Amazon conundrum for you.
As an Amazon Affiliate for the last seven years, I can assure you that Mr. Bezos will indeed both, sell far more than a 100 copies, and make more than you guestimated!

Must get 'Strangler's and Smeggy's' books in stock kwick ...

#545 Ron Scoma

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 09:43

Originally posted by Anorak Man
I've not seen GG's book on Ecurie Ecosse, but it's very exciting to witness ' Our Ian' keen to fill in the gaps, and get an updated edition out


I would wholeheartedly recommend this book, few people have the contacts or knowledge to write about EE as Graham does.
It's getting difficult to find but I believe Graham might have a few copies left.
He can be reached by sending me a private email.



Originally posted by dretceterini
The new Stanguellini book is for sale for $54.60 INCLUDING shipping from their place to your home. I would estimate, based on the weight of the book, that the postal chages would have to be $5 or more.
It seems to me that Amazon has to be buying the book for $45 or less INCLUDING shipping charges AND US customs duties from Italy, or there would not be enough profit to bother with.


There are no duties on books coming into the USA.
In fact books MAY be Duty-free throughout the world. Something about the pursuit of knowledge being free....
Cheers,

Ron Scoma

#546 petefenelon

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 09:51

Originally posted by JonC
I recently bought the new Schlegelmilch "Formula 1 1950:today" book which I think is great - the latest in a long line of great-value (£20) big photographic books. The format is quite similar to the small-format Ferrari book that was published last year - the first section is a year-by-year album of action images, then there are sections on teams (lots of wonderful detail shots of the cars), drivers, helmets, personnel etc, although there seems to be much more content from the last 10 years or so than from before.

However, does anyone have, or have seen, the new book and the older "Grand Prix Fascination Formula 1" book and if so, what are the differences (other than there being newer photos), and what is the overlap in pre-90's photographs between the two books?


I don't have the new book, but I do have GP - Fascination Formula 1.... the organisation you describe for the F1 1950-Today sounds very similar. GP-FF1 concentrates on 1970-1993 - Schelgelmilch's colour photos.

My favourite Schlegelmilch book is "Portraits of the Sixties" with gorgeous b&w photo-essays on individual drivers.

#547 Anorak Man

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 11:00

Originally posted by Ron Scoma


I would wholeheartedly recommend this book, few people have the contacts or knowledge to write about EE as Graham does.


Ta Ron,

But I think we all know a certain distinguished Visitor who does ... why not nudge GG y'self to 'matchmake', after all, it is the season for collaboration.


AM

In passing: Y'might think about editing out GG's Email address. I'm sure I wouldn't want mine available to every Spam spider visiting here. Folks can always PM you to get it.

Just noticed by own boob : Flithy lucre ...*Chuckle*

#548 Dave Wright

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 12:15

Originally posted by Anorak Man
Dave: The Coventry Climax book is due out this month, you can pre-order, and you'll get it as soon as the ink's dry (and glue set : ouch!)


Thanks very much for the advance notice.

Dave

#549 Ian Stewart

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 14:36

Originally posted by Anorak Man
I've not seen GG's book on Ecurie Ecosse, but it's very exciting to witness ' Our Ian' keen to fill in the gaps, and get an updated edition out

Please don't misunderstand me. I said that another author had considered an Ecurie Ecosse book. It is inevitable that when a book is published memories are stirred after publication, and the 'other' author in question probably had the benefit of additional information from half-a-dozen sources.

To that extent, yes, I would like to see a definitive history, particularly in relation to the enigmatic David Murray, starting with his early racing days and ending with his demise. David was Ecurie Ecosse and Ecurie Ecosse was David, and the team's rise and fall went hand in hand with the rise and fall of its founder.

I didn't say that I could fill in the gaps, because I couldn't! My knowledge of the story is nothing more than a few personal recollections, many of them nudged to the surface by Graham himself thanks to his comprehensive archive of press cuttingsand other records.

The fact remains that there are a number of 'survivors' from that era, and with the upsurge of motor racing nostalgia it seems a pity that their combined input will be lost.


P.S.
Although I have no idea whether or not Graham would welcome the publication of his personal email address on an open forum, I can confirm that he still has copies of his book available. He kindly let me have a couple some weeks ago following an inquiry from friends.

#550 dretceterini

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 19:29

Ron:

Even if there is no customs duty, the price that Amazon is selling the Stanguellini book for makes no sense to me. It doesn't seem like it would be worth it for the amount of profit to be made.