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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#5601 Tuboscocca

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 12:48

Thanks guys , it is partly a question of decades and money , but the word "paddock" might convince me ? But living in denmark will not make it possible for me to see the set. Also are the results with entrants or teams or both (or none) ?.


Bjorn (difficult to sell you a great book??):

You can EXPECT in the result table:

* Finishing Position ( 1st to Not classified for all participants)
* startnumbers
* Cars
* drivers
* Results (covered distance,average speed, class wins, (partly) fastest laps,Reason for retirement and hour)

NOT mentioned are:

*entrant,chassisnumbers,covered laps,starting positions and practice times, lap charts.

But text section contains: fastest laps, non-starters with photos, list of rookie-drivers.

And in some paddock shots are TRANSPORTERS..

with non-commercial regards

Michael



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#5602 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 15:28

Thank you Michael.

#5603 Marticelli

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 20:59

Two recommendations as my first contribution to the book thread, but in view of my wide interest and groaning library shelves, maybe not my last, if you will bear with me.

In late 2009 I found myself browsing Waterstones in Canterbury, a long way from Scotland where I now live. A modest paperback caught my eye and I immediately decided to buy it, but only recently did I actually manage to read it as other books always seemed to take preference. Called 'The Zborowski Inheritance' (ISBN 978-0-9550456-4-6) it recounts the history of the Zborowski dynasty from 17th century Poland to England in the 1920s, when the last of the line, 'Count' Louis, died at the wheel of a works Mercedes at Monza in October 1924. Privately published, the book appears at first glance rather amateurish, but on closer inspection it is a fascinating read and well worth the £8.99 cover price. Author David Paine spent forty plus years writing it and it was worth the wait.

The second book I can wholeheartedly recommend is called 'The Case for Working with Your Hands, or Why Office Work is Bad for Us and Fixing Things Feels Good' (ISBN 978-0-670-91874-4). It was also published in the US under the alternative title 'Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work'. This is a remarkable piece of work by a philosopher called Matthew Crawford who also runs a motorcycle repair shop. In some respects it is everything that Robert Pirsig's cult classic 'Zen and Art of Motorcycle Maintenance' isn't. Firstly it is up to date. Secondly it is unputdownable and thirdly, it explains why we petrolheads (or gearheads as he calls us) are the way we are... I won't spoil the denouement by telling you any more but this book has changed the way I feel about my career and my love of old vehicles and I think is an essential read for anyone interested in vehicles and finding a meaningful way of working. Truly a remarkable little book.

Marticelli

Edited by Marticelli, 17 January 2011 - 21:00.


#5604 Vitesse2

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 21:40

Two recommendations as my first contribution to the book thread, but in view of my wide interest and groaning library shelves, maybe not my last, if you will bear with me.

In late 2009 I found myself browsing Waterstones in Canterbury, a long way from Scotland where I now live. A modest paperback caught my eye and I immediately decided to buy it, but only recently did I actually manage to read it as other books always seemed to take preference. Called 'The Zborowski Inheritance' (ISBN 978-0-9550456-4-6) it recounts the history of the Zborowski dynasty from 17th century Poland to England in the 1920s, when the last of the line, 'Count' Louis, died at the wheel of a works Mercedes at Monza in October 1924. Privately published, the book appears at first glance rather amateurish, but on closer inspection it is a fascinating read and well worth the £8.99 cover price. Author David Paine spent forty plus years writing it and it was worth the wait.

Marticelli

Never seen it anywhere, but WB gave it a very favourable mention, IIRC. I have Wilson's "Racing Zborowskis", which I suppose covers much the same ground but was (initially) much more expensive!

#5605 Marticelli

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 22:01

Never seen it anywhere, but WB gave it a very favourable mention, IIRC. I have Wilson's "Racing Zborowskis", which I suppose covers much the same ground but was (initially) much more expensive!

Victoire Press, Cambridge CB23 8SQ (Tel 01954 781919) should be able to supply. They have a website too - http://www.victoirepress.com/ - in case overseas TNFrs want one. No connection except as a satisfied reader!!

I have also recently bought George Wingard's 'Real Wolves in Sheep's Clothing' which was expensive but worth every penny... Several ex-Zborowski cars appear in this too, of course.

Marticelli

#5606 Tom V

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 22:36

Vitesse:

It might also be strongly suggested that readers support their favorite booksellers and publishers now. These are enormously tough times for these businesses, and if good books are to be continued to written and appear, reader support in the form of sales is absolutely essential. Don't wait for books to be remaindered or show up used and abused on Amazon. Buy and enjoy them now, so that more good books can continue to be created.

Frank

Did just that! I bought several books yesterday at an Oldtimer show in Maastricht, Holland. It's indeed important we keep on supporting the smaller, independent booksellers. I could have bought some of them on Amazon for a much cheaper price, but I would hate the idea of one day no longer being able to buy books directly at a show.

For those of you who are interested in which books I bought:

-Ten Days in Sicily
-Chapman: inside the innovator
-Scuderia Filipinetti book: amazingly I only paid 30 euros for a brand new copy!


#5607 bradbury west

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 00:10

-Scuderia Filipinetti book: amazingly I only paid 30 euros for a brand new copy!


Do you have any more details of this book, please?
Roger Lund

#5608 Vitesse2

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 00:26

Presumably the Ed Heuvink one published in 2002?

#5609 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 01:50

The second book I can wholeheartedly recommend is called 'The Case for Working with Your Hands, or Why Office Work is Bad for Us and Fixing Things Feels Good' (ISBN 978-0-670-91874-4). It was also published in the US under the alternative title 'Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work'. This is a remarkable piece of work by a philosopher called Matthew Crawford who also runs a motorcycle repair shop. In some respects it is everything that Robert Pirsig's cult classic 'Zen and Art of Motorcycle Maintenance' isn't. Truly a remarkable little book.

Marticelli


I agree. I highly recommend this book and look forward to Crawford's next, which will apparently be about pipe organs.

Jack.

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 18 January 2011 - 01:57.


#5610 Crafty

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 20:15

-Chapman: inside the innovator


Just received this as a late christmas present ! Have you had a chance to look at it yet?


#5611 jj2728

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 20:32

Just added 'Photo Formula 1 The Best of Automobile Year 1953 - 1977'. Haven't seen it yet as I had it shipped to my folks' address so dad could enjoy it before I drove down there for a visit.

#5612 Tom V

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 10:06

Do you have any more details of this book, please?
Roger Lund

Scuderia Fillipinetti: The History of The Swiss Racing Team by Ed Heuvink. It's the only Fillipinetti book that I know off. I couldn't believe it at first either, because this one usually sells for about 100 euros. The seller had a box full of brand new copies at this price.



#5613 Tom V

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 10:27

Just received this as a late christmas present ! Have you had a chance to look at it yet?


Yes, and it looks like a good read. I already have the Crombac and Lawrence books and at first I was a bit sceptical about this one. What more could there be said about the subject? But I soon learned that there is a big difference between those and the Ludvigsen book. As usual the Ludvigsen is more technical than the others. Each chapter is divided in several themes: gearbox, engine, downforce etc. So it's not a biography in the sense of: "and then he did this and then he did that" but more an assessment of Chapman's career.

#5614 Crafty

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 12:47

Thanks Tom, sounds good to me, I have very quickly flicked through and noticed the chapters were theme based and there were lots of technical drawings and photos.

I wonder what Chapman would of thought of Lotus and its cars today.

#5615 Tuboscocca

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 17:38

It's birthday time : ''50 years of Watkins Glen''..

Beside a lot of activities--A BOOK is planned for September--by David Bull??

September~ Sept. 9: Launch of Michael Argetsinger’s new book “Formula One at Watkins Glen: 20 Years of the United States Grand Prix 1961-1980” at the Grand Prix Festival

Regards

Michael

#5616 pilota

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 19:24

Do you have any more details of this book, please?
Roger Lund

For E30 it's well worth it. Size is about 11" x 9". 300+ pages, with plenty of photos, and many that I hadn't seen before (although I really only know Ferrari photos) I found the English text a bit hard-going with some amusing moments. "His lavendish (sic) style of living ... " Also, a list of all the races results would have been helpful, but overall I'm pleased it's in my library.
If you need any specific information about this book please ask. Hope this helps.
Nathan

#5617 Herbert

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 08:52

I'm looking for a book about the history of the Ferrari 250 LM. Any recommondations? I already have the Tanner/Nye book, Scarlett Passion by Pritchard and The Cobra-Ferrari Wars.


#5618 Alan Cox

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 13:05

I'm looking for a book about the history of the Ferrari 250 LM. Any recommondations? I already have the Tanner/Nye book, Scarlett Passion by Pritchard and The Cobra-Ferrari Wars.

I would suggest Marcel Massini's book published by Osprey, but, sadly, it is sadly long out of print and commanding ludicrous sums from internet booksellers. Clearly pretty rare as I could find none available on Abebooks.
http://www.amazon.co...i/dp/0850455278
http://www.amazon.co...;condition=used
One was recently sold on eBay for 139 euros
http://cgi.ebay.it/F...K-/320621387857
It contains a chassis register which was up-to-date at the time it was published (1983).

Edited by Alan Cox, 21 January 2011 - 17:13.


#5619 Vitesse2

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 15:18

Those of you around SE England (Sussex, Surrey, Kent) might find it worthwhile keeping an eye on local branches of British Bookshops (Sussex Stationers as was) - the company has just gone into administration, only ten months after an MBO. From what I've heard they owe a lot of publishers a lot of money, so I'd expect something of a "fire sale" in the next few weeks, even though the administrators are saying "no redundancies" at the moment. In the current retail climate, I really wouldn't expect more than a few of their stores to survive - and not as a chain either. :well:

Happened sooner than I expected. ): The adminstrators are launching a "heavily discounted sale" this weekend and have declared 40 redundancies in the head office and warehouse. "This process is not about ending the BB&S business, rather it is about realising existing stock with a view to making the business as attractive as possible to interested parties." Not looking good ...

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#5620 Tuboscocca

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 15:34

I would suggest Marcel Massini's book published by Osprey, but, sadly, it is sadly long out of print and commanding ludicrous sums from internet booksellers. Clearly pretty rare as I could find none available on Abebooks.
http://www.amazon.co...i/dp/0850455278
One was recently sold on eBay for 139 euros
http://cgi.ebay.it/F...K-/320621387857
It contains a chassis register which was up-to-date at the time it was published (1983).


And what's about the Cavalleria title ''250 LM'' bei a certain Doug Nye?? The Cavelleria series is absolutely stunning, but not having the depth of Massini's work,albeit nearly 30 years old.
Just found one at Palmiers..
http://www.editions-.../cavalleria.htm

non-commercial regards Michael


#5621 ERault

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 18:07

I would suggest Marcel Massini's book published by Osprey, but, sadly, it is sadly long out of print and commanding ludicrous sums from internet booksellers. Clearly pretty rare as I could find none available on Abebooks.
http://www.amazon.co...i/dp/0850455278
http://www.amazon.co...;condition=used
One was recently sold on eBay for 139 euros
http://cgi.ebay.it/F...K-/320621387857
It contains a chassis register which was up-to-date at the time it was published (1983).


I read some months ago (maybe years now) that Massini was working on an update of his book.

#5622 Nick Savage

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 15:34

[quote name='Vitesse2'
Happened sooner than I expected. ): The administrators are launching a "heavily discounted sale" this weekend and have declared 40 redundancies in the head office and warehouse. "This process is not about ending the BB&S business, rather it is about realising existing stock with a view to making the business as attractive as possible to interested parties." Not looking good ...
[/quote]
Vitesse,
Thanks for the tip ... it may just be me unlucky, but I visited BB&S at Harrow today and found little changed. The jigsaws are being discounted but the [very poor] selection of books were still priced as per the Jan Sale and, even then, not particularly advantageously priced.

The staff have not been told when the last day is, so it is possible that there will be more discounts closer to the day. Even so, not worth a visit unless they bring in additional stock.
Nick


#5623 D-Type

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 17:10

Vitesse,
Thanks for the tip ... it may just be me unlucky, but I visited BB&S at Harrow today and found little changed. The jigsaws are being discounted but the [very poor] selection of books were still priced as per the Jan Sale and, even then, not particularly advantageously priced.

The staff have not been told when the last day is, so it is possible that there will be more discounts closer to the day. Even so, not worth a visit unless they bring in additional stock.
Nick

I went to the Redhill shop today and it was exactly as Nick says. Prices were "January Sale" with proper pre-printed stickers. Stock generally, and motor and motor racing stock in particular, was poor (which has been the case in recent years). Staff could only say"we're in receivership" and apparently knew nothing more.

#5624 ryan86

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 22:33

I went to the Redhill shop today and it was exactly as Nick says. Prices were "January Sale" with proper pre-printed stickers. Stock generally, and motor and motor racing stock in particular, was poor (which has been the case in recent years). Staff could only say"we're in receivership" and apparently knew nothing more.


Granted I have little knowledge of adminstration practices, but it always amazes me when you walk into places advertising closing down sales and "everything must go" sales and then you leave, thinking how expensive everything was. I remember when Zaavi went under a few Christmases ago, I went in there and whilst they probably eventually had a great deal of the stock acquired when HMV took over the stores, whilst the previous summers blockbuster was signed at the door and they appeared to have overstocked by perhaps 1000 copies, once you got into the shop, nothing appeared to have changed.

Edited by ryan86, 22 January 2011 - 22:34.


#5625 Allan Lupton

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:26

Granted I have little knowledge of adminstration practices, but it always amazes me when you walk into places advertising closing down sales and "everything must go" sales and then you leave, thinking how expensive everything was.

Somewhere I have a photo of a shop covered in "closing down sale" and "everything must go" signage with a notice on the door advertising for staff! Similarly another store had such success with the discounted "everything must go" sale that they announced the business was viable after all so they wouldn't close (i.e. their original prices had been unsustainably high). Back to the thread's subject, at present we have a strange "bookshop" which from the start offered all its stock at "up to 60% off published price" and for about a month has had its "closing down - everything must go" signs up. Since it is a few doors from one of the best bookshops in the area for new and second-hand books, I'll be happy when it does go as its stock has never included anything worth having (and did include the Ben Hunt book voted here as "the worst book on F1" at a higher price than Amazon).

#5626 BRMfan

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:49

Bought Ten Days in Sicily at Chaters yesterday good price and stunning photos

#5627 MCS

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:56

Somewhere I have a photo of a shop covered in "closing down sale" and "everything must go" signage with a notice on the door advertising for staff! Similarly another store had such success with the discounted "everything must go" sale that they announced the business was viable after all so they wouldn't close (i.e. their original prices had been unsustainably high). Back to the thread's subject, at present we have a strange "bookshop" which from the start offered all its stock at "up to 60% off published price" and for about a month has had its "closing down - everything must go" signs up. Since it is a few doors from one of the best bookshops in the area for new and second-hand books, I'll be happy when it does go as its stock has never included anything worth having (and did include the Ben Hunt book voted here as "the worst book on F1" at a higher price than Amazon).


:lol: Every time I go to the lovely east coast seaside town of Aldeburgh I make a visit to the bookshop that is "closing down" on the High Street. I invariably buy a couple of books at massively discounted prices. I've been doing this for three years...

#5628 Tom V

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:14

Bought Ten Days in Sicily at Chaters yesterday good price and stunning photos

Also bought Ten Days recently and was seriously impressed. Thinking about buying Weekend Heroes as well.


#5629 bradbury west

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 19:47

Thinking about buying Weekend Heroes as well.


It is a wonderful book, although the upper case printing is cumbersome to read IMHO, but the research seems fantastic.
Roger Lund.


#5630 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 18:15

It is a wonderful book, although the upper case printing is cumbersome to read IMHO, but the research seems fantastic.
Roger Lund.



Agree on all counts. I don't understand the exclusive use of upper case either. It seems something of an affectation. I think there have been studies which show that reading speed and comprehension are both impaired by the use of upper case.

Jack.

#5631 Marticelli

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 15:34

Through TNF I have learned a lot about Australian speedway, and the Maroubra Speedway in particular seems particularly interesting, with the FIAT Mephistopheles being taken out to Aus to run there until they realised it was far too big a car for a mile concrete speedbowl - it was bad enough at Brooklands!

I then stumbled across Tony Loxley's book about Aus soeedway but am I right in thinking this is about more recent stuff, ie post war only? Had considered trying to buy a copy until I suspected it might not cover the earlier period.

Thanks in anticipation

Marticelli

#5632 Michael Ferner

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 20:17

Through TNF I have learned a lot about Australian speedway, and the Maroubra Speedway in particular seems particularly interesting, with the FIAT Mephistopheles being taken out to Aus to run there until they realised it was far too big a car for a mile concrete speedbowl - it was bad enough at Brooklands!


Sheesh, what sissies! In America, they wouldn't have qualms about racing it on a dirt quarter mile! :lol:

#5633 Marticelli

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 21:33

Sheesh, what sissies! In America, they wouldn't have qualms about racing it on a dirt quarter mile! :lol:

I think a dirt quarter-mile oval would have been kinder to the car than the narrow, steeply banked concrete bowl with no infield run-off and nowhere to go if unfortunate enough to run off the top edge of the banking. To compound the problem, Maroubra was an odd shaped three corner, no straight design unlike the brickyard with two straights and two bends. You could also say the car was fairly flimsy for its large engine - 21 litres - and extended chassis to accommodate the engine, and unreliable tyres which often resulted in its failure to finish races it started in.

Marticelli


#5634 D-Type

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 10:36

Through TNF I have learned a lot about Australian speedway, and the Maroubra Speedway in particular seems particularly interesting, with the FIAT Mephistopheles being taken out to Aus to run there until they realised it was far too big a car for a mile concrete speedbowl - it was bad enough at Brooklands!

I then stumbled across Tony Loxley's book about Aus soeedway but am I right in thinking this is about more recent stuff, ie post war only? Had considered trying to buy a copy until I suspected it might not cover the earlier period.

Thanks in anticipation

Marticelli

Come on! This is the book thread - what is the title of the book you are referring to?

Edited by D-Type, 28 January 2011 - 10:36.


#5635 Marticelli

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 10:55

Come on! This is the book thread - what is the title of the book you are referring to?

Funnily enough, its called Australian Speedway and is written by Tony Loxley... I thought that was what I already wrote... OK so I didn't capitalise Australian Speedway and had a typo too. Its ISBN is 0975245201.....

Marticelli

#5636 Tuboscocca

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 11:09

Porsche Argentina

a new great book from whitefly.(Bertschi and Iacona)

Will be presented at Paris' retro (2-6 Feb. 2011)

Preview in Classic drivers:

http://www.classicdr...00.asp?id=14930

Seems to have content on local (Argentina) built specials or small series..

Best regards Michael

#5637 Macca

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 15:08

Bought Ten Days in Sicily at Chaters yesterday good price and stunning photos


At £120? Good for them, maybe......

Paul M


#5638 PRD

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 15:28

At £120? Good for them, maybe......

Paul M


Mine was 100 euros delivered direct from the publisher including carriage

#5639 Marticelli

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 16:40

Mine was 100 euros delivered direct from the publisher including carriage

This seems to be a trend. When a book is still in print (ie new copies are available from the original publisher at his proper price) you would imagine that there would little or no interest in secondhand copies at grossly inflated prices being offered by book dealers. But recent searches on Bookfinder and Abebooks show otherwise, by sometimes jaw dropping amounts!! Unless a book is way out of date, I always check the publisher first.

Similar caveat applies to bidding for books on eBay where people compete for books at crazy prices when they are freely available for lower prices through regular channels... Caveat emptor applies more than ever!

Marticelli

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#5640 LittleChris

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 22:07

Didn't someone previously suggest that selling at an extortionate price though Amazon or eBay is possibly a good way of laundering dirty money ?

#5641 jonnylayze

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 08:18

I recently received as a gift Grand Prix by Marvano . Published by Dargaud it covers the early - mid 1930s period of continental Grand Prix racing and the rise of the so-called 'Silver Arrows'. What makes it interesting is that its illustrated in full in a comic book style, reminiscent of Herge, following such characters as Carraciola, Stuck and Rosemeyer. Consequently, it's quite short on text (which in any case is in French) but I really enjoyed thumbing through it. It was cheap too - only about £10 I think.

There are two further volumes to come covering the immediate pre-war period. All in all thoroughly recommended.

There's a link to the publisher here if anyone is interested

http://www.dargaud.c...log/grand-prix/

PS - i haven't posted in this part of the forum before so I thought I should add that my favourite motoring and motor racing books are Doug Nye's BRM trilogy (how long until number 4 Doug?), Guy Grifffiths 1946 and all that and David Weguelin's ERA 'bible'

Edited by jonnylayze, 29 January 2011 - 08:21.


#5642 Frank S

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 20:26

This seems to be a trend. When a book is still in print (ie new copies are available from the original publisher at his proper price) you would imagine that there would little or no interest in secondhand copies at grossly inflated prices being offered by book dealers. But recent searches on Bookfinder and Abebooks show otherwise, by sometimes jaw dropping amounts!! Unless a book is way out of date, I always check the publisher first.

Similar caveat applies to bidding for books on eBay where people compete for books at crazy prices when they are freely available for lower prices through regular channels... Caveat emptor applies more than ever!

Marticelli

It may not be common elsewhere, but around here there will be offers by relatively anonymous owners to sell cars of ordinary or a little better interest for unlikely prices. Then the sellers, without having sold, offer the same or a similar item and point to the previous adverts to say "See what they are going for now? In a few more months you can double your money!", or "These things can only get more expensive: if you want one, you better get this one now while it's still cheap!"

I can envision booksellers doing the same.

Only a little less reprehensible than another (allegedly common) practice: selling a winning racing car but removing the race-winning parts before delivery.



#5643 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 03 February 2011 - 12:02

I have bought a "Golden Nugget" and it arrived today :

The next great book in the series Archive d'un passione :

LA MASERATI DU COLONEL by Michel Bollee : Not just more great pictures of these monsters ( plus a few other great pictures of other cars) , but also Johnny Simones story with nice sports car pictures from the 50's on the first 10 of the approx. 100 pages , in total 140 stunning pictures . Only in French , but even I , non French speaking can extract a good deal from the text.

A must to any Maserati or sportscar fan up to 1965 !

#5644 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 03 February 2011 - 18:03

Having read David Tremayne's very detailed book on Jochen Rindt, I took Heinz Pruller's down from the shelf to see how it stood up 40 years on. Very well is the answer, particularly as an eye witness account of the Lotus years. The book abounds in wonderful, pithy observations from Rindt on Bernie's negotiating prowess with Chapman in '69, or on exploiting what he saw as Amon's weakness at Clermont-Ferrand in '70.

But it's very light on what came before. The three Cooper years get fewer than 25 paragraphs. Each 1965 GP receives no more than a sentence, and even Rindt's heroic drive at Spa the following year only warrants a paragraph.

So I'm interested if any German-speaking TNFers can throw some light on the 1966 book on which Rindt and Pruller collaborated. What insight does this provide on growing up in Graz, and on the Alfa, Formula Junior Cooper and F2 years? Does the content of this first book explain the apparent imbalance of the second?

Thanks

Paul

#5645 Colbul1

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 11:45

I have a question and I'm hoping someone might have an answer or 2.

I have this week been very fortunate to purchase both Volumes 1 and 2 of William Court's Power and Glory books. Although I only started to read them last night ,I have already been drawn in by the wonderful and prosaic way the books have been written. I can see very quickly why they are seen as classic texts and why they are so sought after. My question is though, did the third volume mentioned on the dust jackets ever near the stage of being published? The 2 volumes I have are the both the Patrick Stephens editions from around 1990 and they clear state they're part of a hoped for 3 volume set. Does anyone know why the third volume never materialised, especially after Volumes 1 and 2 were so well received?

#5646 RS2000

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 13:58

The Works (Shrewsbury branch) had the other day:

The Science of Safety - David Tremayne £1.99
My Life Full of Cars - Paul Frere £1.99
Fast Lady - Joy Rainey £1.99
Murray Walker, The Very Last Word - Christopher Hilton (Paperback) £0.59

#5647 PRD

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 14:09

I have a question and I'm hoping someone might have an answer or 2.

I have this week been very fortunate to purchase both Volumes 1 and 2 of William Court's Power and Glory books. Although I only started to read them last night ,I have already been drawn in by the wonderful and prosaic way the books have been written. I can see very quickly why they are seen as classic texts and why they are so sought after. My question is though, did the third volume mentioned on the dust jackets ever near the stage of being published? The 2 volumes I have are the both the Patrick Stephens editions from around 1990 and they clear state they're part of a hoped for 3 volume set. Does anyone know why the third volume never materialised, especially after Volumes 1 and 2 were so well received?


I've always assumed that a combination of age and infirmity overtook the author :(

#5648 Vitesse2

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 17:21

The Works (Shrewsbury branch) had the other day:

The Science of Safety - David Tremayne £1.99
My Life Full of Cars - Paul Frere £1.99
Fast Lady - Joy Rainey £1.99
Murray Walker, The Very Last Word - Christopher Hilton (Paperback) £0.59

It would seem The Works have bought quite a few other Haynes titles. In Bath today they had all those, plus Chris Hilton's Regazzoni book for just £4.99 (which I bought) and his Montoya book (which I didn't). Several season reviews (mainly bikes), workshop manual for early Porsche 911s (!!!), an illustrated Barry Sheene biography, two or three rallying titles the names of which escape me, a few other modern F1 titles and - for only £1.99 - David Mason's Freddie Dixon biography, which I've recommended here before: at two quid it's an absolute steal!

#5649 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 20:34

If anyone could get me a Freddy Dixon copy at £2.00 , I will bow and say many thanks!

#5650 COUGAR508

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 22:30

The Works (Shrewsbury branch) had the other day:

The Science of Safety - David Tremayne £1.99
My Life Full of Cars - Paul Frere £1.99
Fast Lady - Joy Rainey £1.99
Murray Walker, The Very Last Word - Christopher Hilton (Paperback) £0.59


Thanks for the info. I will take a look at my local branch!