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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#5901 kayemod

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 17:35

Cheap, or rather less expensive copy of TATS here


And here's another one, we're spoiled for choice with these at the moment.

http://cgi.ebay.co.u...ME:B:SS:GB:1123


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#5902 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 12:51

Just finished David Tremayne's The Lost Generation. A book I can't find enough superlatives to describe. There must have been an incredible amount of research that went into this and I can imagine there must have been quite a bit of courage needed on Mr Tremayne's part to approach and get such frank answers from those who were closest and dearest to the three gentlemen in question. The narrative is fluid and runs in a nice chronological order, it also has it's humorous moments as well as of course as the inevitably tragic and sad conclusion.

Then you'll like his book on Jochen Rindt. The same large-format, glossy-page, heavily illustrated style as The Lost Generation, and the same diligent research - eg, Rindt's fastest practice time is placed in context against his team mate's and the pole time to explain his relative performance, race by race, year by year.

Covering different aspects of the same season in different chapters was a fundamental feature of a book about three drivers. I think it works less well when compartmentalising Rindt's F1 and F2 years up to '69, but Jochen Rindt: Uncrowned King is well worth reading, particularly if you don't have Heinz Pruller's book.

Rgds

Paul

Edited by P0wderf1nger, 18 July 2011 - 12:53.


#5903 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 06:39

Ferrari - Journal d'Une Legende..does anyone know if there are plans to publish this book in English?

Thanks.

Jack.

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 19 July 2011 - 06:40.


#5904 Tuboscocca

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:41

Ferrari - Journal d'Une Legende..does anyone know if there are plans to publish this book in English?

Thanks.

Jack.



Jack you can contact Gérald Guétat (English speaking) .He is the responsible at Anthèse . Editions Anthese : www.editions-anthese.com

Best regards Michael


#5905 hatrat

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:42

Details of how to get hold of Enzo Ferrari's Secret War by TNFer David Manton are now available as below:

http://www.ferrarise...ar.com/buy.html


I have just read this book and it has a lot of interesting new information on both Enzo Ferrari's activities during WW2 and his subsequent relationship with Pat Hoare and the supply of GP cars. There is also a couple of sections on other Italian racing cars that ended up in New Zealand and their often colourful subsequent history - a very worthwhile read.

#5906 David McKinney

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 11:45

For me, one of the positives was the Don Packwood artwork on the front and back covers
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#5907 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 14:51

Jack you can contact Gérald Guétat (English speaking) .He is the responsible at Anthèse . Editions Anthese : www.editions-anthese.com

Best regards Michael



Thank you, Michael. I will contact M. Guetat.

Jack

Edit: Well, I just received a very prompt response that no English edition is planned, more's the pity. The suggestion was made that if I happened to know of a willing publisher.....In the current economic circumstances it seems unlikely that a publisher would take a flier on a >600 page book on Ferrari, but one never knows.....

Jack

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 19 July 2011 - 15:11.


#5908 Tuboscocca

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 15:22

Thank you, Michael. I will contact M. Guetat.

Jack

Edit: Well, I just received a very prompt response that no English edition is planned, more's the pity. The suggestion was made that if I happened to know of a willing publisher.....In the current economic circumstances it seems unlikely that a publisher would take a flier on a >600 page book on Ferrari, but one never knows.....

Jack


Glad to hear that Gerald promptly answered. Pity that no English version is planned...My intention is, albeit a limited print run in French, it is only for the happy Ferrari Paper collectors at 295 Euros!!!.Maybe Anthese (which are doing mainly art-books), should have gone bi-lingual from the start...

But a very nice book, despite some little errors...

Michael

#5909 helioseism

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 00:57

I'm sorry I am motivated to do this, but I have had negative experiences recently with two on-line book sellers, so I thought it would be best to warn those of us who buy books off of the Web. In both cases, the problem is lack of communication, not actual loss of funds, so it can be worse!

The first merchant is Lindbergh, the oldest motoring bookshop in Tokyo according to their web site. Apparently established in 1985, they had three books I was interested in, so I ordered them. The order was placed without a problem on May 30. On June 11, I received an e-mail from them that they could only supply two of the books. Fair enough, so I e-mailed back instructing them to send those two books. The books have never arrived, and my subsequent e-mails to them have never been answered. There is no way to check order status on their website. In their favor, my bank account has never been charged for the items.

The other problem merchant is Motorbooks in London, a well-known dealer to many of us. I placed an order on July 5, and I have still not even received an order receipt, let alone any status information or the book. In addition, there is no way I can find on the website to access my past orders. I have also sent subsequent e-mails to every address I could find on the website, without any reply. Here also, I have not been charged for the item, so it could be worse.

Don't these companies want to sell me books? Don't they ever check the functionality of their web sites?


#5910 David McKinney

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 06:07

I've never dealt with Lindbergh, but have on occasion ordered online from Motorbooks, and received the books within a couple of days. It might help that I'm based in the UK. You shouldn't have to email them to check, but that's my suggestion



#5911 helioseism

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 13:53

I You shouldn't have to email them to check, but that's my suggestion


Thanks, David -- I have e-mailed them several times with no answer. My suspicion is that there is something wrong with their web site and that they have not noticed. I think a phone call is in order.




#5912 smarjoram

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 14:46

It's probably been posted before but I just have to mention Andy Granatelli's 'They call me mister 500' which I'm reading at the moment. It's stupendous - packed full of the most amazing stories and offers a really great insight into a large chunk of the history of American motorsport.

#5913 E.B.

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 20:01

How tall are the stories? My experience of the book involved picking it off the shelf, looking at the cover, saying out loud "No they don't", and replacing it. It was a shrink wrapped copy, so I never got to see inside.



#5914 smarjoram

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 20:18

How tall are the stories? My experience of the book involved picking it off the shelf, looking at the cover, saying out loud "No they don't", and replacing it. It was a shrink wrapped copy, so I never got to see inside.

I haven't the faintest idea - but I'd like to think it's all true-ish. I dare say some of the stories have become better over the years as they've been retold many times but there no doubting that Joe, Andy and Vince were fantastically hard working, massively talented and totally devoted to cars and motorsport - that passion really comes across in the chapters about trying to bring the Miller and Novis back to Indy. it's a real rags to riches story, starting in the depression and goes through the hot rod scene, drag racing, stock cars, rocket cars on dirt tracks, Indy, record setting at Bonneville and Daytona - they did it all. You can get it on US Amazon fairly cheaply - I'd definitely give it a chance.

#5915 RA Historian

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 20:22

All probably true, to a degree, but one has to remember that Andy Granatelli is a shameless self promoter. And as E.B. mentions, No, they don't!
Tom

#5916 Chris Bloom

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 05:01

Then you'll like his book on Jochen Rindt. The same large-format, glossy-page, heavily illustrated style as The Lost Generation, and the same diligent research -


Fortunately that book came in the same parcel from Amazon, I will read it next.

In the meantime I have read The Grand Prix Saboteurs by Joe Saward. The amount of research that must have gone into this book is beyond comprehension. Add a lovely fluent writing style to join the incredible amount of information together and you get a book that is almost impossible to put down.

Edited by Chris Bloom, 24 July 2011 - 18:00.


#5917 Kyffin1

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 18:28

Could you put us in touch with Gary as we would like to import a few copies of SUNSET ON KYALAMI for resale in North America?
Thanks. TW

#5918 B Squared

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 19:18

All probably true, to a degree, but one has to remember that Andy Granatelli is a shameless self promoter. And as E.B. mentions, No, they don't!
Tom


I think it was often used to describe him in his prime. As recently as 2006, respected IMS historian and author, Donald Davidson, wrote on page 170 of Autocourse Official History of the Indianapolis 500:

The greatest showman the track has ever seen: Innovator, entrepreneur, impresario, and a tireless marketing genius, Andy Granatelli had as high a profile as anyone at the track for years. After several years of fielding Ford (Mercury)-powered cars outfitted with his company's Grancor heads, Granatelli turned to Offy power and finished second with Jim Rathman in 1952. He purchased the hugely popular Novi team from Lew Welch in 1961, and later grabbed headlines transcending motorsports by campaigning turbine-powered cars. The winning sponsor/entrant in 1969 (with Mario Andretti) and 1973 (Gordon Johncock), he began to fade from the limelight after that. But not by much.

I seem to remember the Indianapolis papers in the '60's referring to him as Mr. 500 in print. I may be a bit biased as anytime I've had the opportunity to talk racing with Mr. Granatelli, he has always been kind, thoughtful and still thinks that he could turn IndyCar racing around if he were a much younger man. I think that he is as passionate about racing as any on this forum. Did he find wealth from it? Of course. I wish we all could be so driven.

#5919 RA Historian

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 19:30

He was the sponsor/entrant for Andretti in 1969, but as I recall, the 1973 winning car was sponsored by STP, but owned and entered by Patrick Racing.

As far as being "Mr. 500", I must say that I never heard him described as such. My reaction when his book came out was that Granatelli was over stepping, claiming a title for himself that nobody had given him. That ties in with what I earlier called 'shameless self promotion'. Now I am not denigrating what Granatelli has done at the Speedway, both as an entrant and as a sponsor, but I always thought that his slapping his own back and banging his own drum all the time was a tad over the top and after a while tiresome. His 'hey look at me' approach with the silly suits, etc., struck me as being a bit buffoonish.

Can't speak for the Indianapolis newspapers, but as I said, I never heard him called "Mr. 500" by anyone but himself. I still agree with E.B.; no, they don't.

Of course, I may well be wrong and am the only person who thinks this way.

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#5920 E.B.

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 19:39

I seem to remember the Indianapolis papers in the '60's referring to him as Mr. 500 in print. I may be a bit biased as anytime I've had the opportunity to talk racing with Mr. Granatelli, he has always been kind, thoughtful and still thinks that he could turn IndyCar racing around if he were a much younger man. I think that he is as passionate about racing as any on this forum. Did he find wealth from it? Of course. I wish we all could be so driven.


It certainly wasn't my intention to take a swipe at Granatelli, who has achieved far more than I ever will. I was just well aware of his self-promotion capabilities, and had never heard anyone else refer to him as Mr 500 (indeed I'm quite surprised to learn that anyone did).

A moot point, but didn't Rick Shaffer write that section of the Autocourse book rather than DCD?




#5921 smarjoram

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 23:06

It bugs me when people shout about themselves when they haven't got anything worth shouting about but in the case of Andy Granatelli I reckon he has has plenty to feel proud of. That said, the tone of the book isn't in the least bit brash or boastful. It's just a riveting collection of jaw dropping (and often heart breaking) stories about three brothers who had a real passion for cars and motor racing.

#5922 bradbury west

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 12:21

Could you put us in touch with Gary as we would like to import a few copies of SUNSET ON KYALAMI for resale in North America? Thanks. TW


As I have said previously, I recommend this book very highly, not only for what it does, but in the quality of presentation.
Roger Lund.


#5923 Tuboscocca

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 12:55

Could you put us in touch with Gary as we would like to import a few copies of SUNSET ON KYALAMI for resale in North America?
Thanks. TW



Please look at your PM.

Michael

#5924 fbarrett

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 16:36

Could you put us in touch with Gary as we would like to import a few copies of SUNSET ON KYALAMI for resale in North America?
Thanks. TW


Tom:

Welcome to TNF!

Frank

#5925 Mark Godfrey

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 17:37

Andrew Ferguson gives a flattering picture of how Andy Granatelli adroitly dealt with Colin Chapman in his fine (now out of print) book, Team Lotus: The Indianapolis Years. Salutations TW.
Mark
- - -




#5926 B Squared

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 13:59

Can't speak for the Indianapolis newspapers, but as I said, I never heard him called "Mr. 500" by anyone but himself. I still agree with E.B.; no, they don't.

Of course, I may well be wrong and am the only person who thinks this way.


I spent a bit of time yesterday digging through my mid to late 1960's Indianapolis papers and... :blush: , my memories as a 10 year old proved to be unfounded. The only Mr. 500 reference that I found was in the Saturday evening edition of The Indianapolis News, May 31, 1969. By Wayne Fuson, sports editor:

Andy Hits Jackpot

Then there is the matter of his (Andretti's) car-owner and sponsor, Andy Granatelli, the rotund STP man. Granatelli has been trying to win a 500 one way or another for nearly 25 years. All of his previous efforts were in vain, although he catapulted his association with the Speedway and the 500 into a multimillion-dollar oil additive business. But that wasn't enough for the guy who had enough nerve to write a book entitled , They Call Me Mr. 500".

He wanted to prove that the title was right. His efforts to win with turbines were thwarted twice - Parnelli Jones conked out two years ago four laps from home and Joe Leonard's car failed nine laps from the finish in '68. In both cases Andy's cars were in the lead. Then the United States Auto Club kayoed the turbines with its rule book, limiting the size of the engine to the point they weren't competitive.

But the rotund man was determined. He bought 11 race cars and entered them in the 500. Three were new Lotus-Fords. Andretti was the hottest thing at the Speedway in one of them. But a few days before qualifying a wheel hub failed and Andretti's car screamed into the wall. They needed a basket to pick up the car, but Mario miraculously walked away with minor burns on his face.

At that point Granatelli had to withdraw the other two Lotuses, scheduled to be driven by former world champion Graham Hill and Jochen Rindt. A dark cloud stayed over the STP encampment for a day or two until Andretti got out his backup car, a two-wheel drive job they call a Hawk and which was built by Brawner and McGee. It didn't take the little Italian long until he was back up to qualifying speed and eventually qualified second fastest.

His comeback certainly had to be considered one of the greatest in 500 annals.

But there were those who still thought that he might be jinxed by it all, not the least reason being Granatelli. Why, the skeptics were still holding their breath with 25 miles to go yesterday.

But the impossible dream came true for Mario, for Andy and for Brawner, who has been grooming cars for the 500 for years but never before had had a winner.


As far as you being the only one who thinks this way, no you are not. Colin Chapman wasn't too enamoured with him either, although Mr. Chapman certainly seemed to like Andy's money.

A moot point, but didn't Rick Shaffer write that section of the Autocourse book rather than DCD?


I forgot they each wrote sections of the book, apologies.

Andrew Ferguson gives a flattering picture of how Andy Granatelli adroitly dealt with Colin Chapman in his fine (now out of print) book, Team Lotus: The Indianapolis Years.


Another excellent source that I spent part of yesterday re-reading in applicable sections. From pages 130-131:

From the day we first met and throughout the next seven years of our association, I found STP's head man, Anthony ("Andy") Granatelli, one of life's rich characters. Along with his brothers, 'Big Vince' and Joe, and Andy's son, 'Little Vince', they presented the very essence of American-Italian immigrants who had 'made it' in the New World..............Andy himself later acknowledged that their schemes employed the 'low-budget, high-confidence' approach, but he himself was to prove to be a business executive-cum salesman extrodinaire.

A man that provokes many different views from those who were associated with him and those of us who were in the stands certainly makes for an interesting read. I know from being in the crowd at Indianapolis during these years that he was a polarizing figure. He brought the magic of the turbine cars and that forward thinking is one of the reasons why I liked him. Thanks for the great memories of that irreplaceable era.

#5927 john glenn printz

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 19:33

THEY CALL ME MISTER 500 by Anthony Granatelli (1969). There exists a fine line between expedient exaggeration and an outright false presentation of material. Andy's 1969 tome is where he walks this fine line almost everywhere. When the work first appeared nobody, but nobody, in Gasoline Alley could ever remember Mr. STP being ever called "Mr. 500". Basically Mr. Granatelli always remained a snake oil salesman of immense proportions. The genius, if you will, of his book however is that you can not really ever accuse him of deliberate lying! Since the book consists of 341 pages, that has got to be a real accomplishment!

On the other hand, Granatelli's promotion and sponsorship of the STP turbine cars of 1967 and 1968 was a major achievement by anyone's standards. Andy here certainly deserves the greatest of credit. Seeing a loop hole in the existing USAC rules, he almost won the 500 in both 1967 and 1968, with the oddest vehicles in the 500's entire history. In 1967 I said the turbine couldn't win, but by lap 190, I was convinced it would. I had then guessed wrong twice. In 1968 I couldn't see how he could lose, and was proven wrong again. Although Mr. Granatelli (b. 1923) didn't win the 500 with the turbines, I still think he provided some of the greatest moments in 500 history, with his 1967 and 1968 odd-ball tries which were, after all, real and genuine threats.

A lot of Andy's book is certainly just self promotion. And it is not of much real use for a critical historian now trying to record the 1946 to 1970 era of Indianapolis or American Championship racing. The book is not a detailed or a scholarly account of past history, but rather smacks more of pop culture. Despite all his past hokum, Mr. Granatelli was truely great and still belongs among the racing great, for his doings at Indianapolis in 1967 and 1968. The turbines were no joke and with a little more luck probably would have won it all in just two tries.

A year or two ago I came across a used copy of Mr. Granatelli's book, addressed to a Colonel Louis L. Schlosser, Jr. (who he?), which contains the autographs of all three of the Granatelli brothers, Andy, Joe, and Vince. At $25 I couldn't resist it.

Edited by john glenn printz, 31 August 2011 - 20:15.


#5928 E.B.

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 19:58

A year or two ago I came across a used copy of Mr. Granatelli's book, addressed to a Colonel Louis L. Schlosser, Jr. (who he?), which contains the autographs of all three of the Granatelli brothers, Andy, Joe, and Vince. At $25 I couldn't resist it.


Thanks John - the one I put back on the shelf was 55 pounds sterling, and presumably without autographs. A decision I don't regret after reading your review.



#5929 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 20:21

Thanks John - the one I put back on the shelf was 55 pounds sterling, and presumably without autographs. A decision I don't regret after reading your review.

Actually, John's splendid review makes me want to buy it - but preferably at US$25 rather than GBP55!

#5930 fbarrett

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 20:54

The paperback is available on Amazon (US) for $8 and up...

Frank

#5931 kayemod

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 21:22

The paperback is available on Amazon (US) for $8 and up...

Frank



There are quite a lot of copies available on AbeBooks for rather less than that.

#5932 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 21:27

The paperback is available on Amazon (US) for $8 and up...

Frank

Sadly, Frank, in spite of my recent comments about making room on the shelves for a quality paperback like Michael Oliver's Tales from the Toolbox, in this case it will have to be a hardback with a decent dust jacket. You pays your money, you takes your choice.

In fact the front cover intrigues me. Michael is one of several authors to use that famous head-on shot of Jim Clark in the wedge-shaped Lotus 56 in the deserted Indy pitlane, and Ferguson's chapter 9, '1968: Tragedy upon Tragedy', opens with one of Chapman, Granatelli, Clark in the 56 and Jones in the '67 STP turbocar, but I've never seen a colour image of those drivers in their helmets in those cars, with Big Andy in that garish red STP jacket.

Or is the cover, like the text beneath it, a little 'touched-up'?

#5933 fbarrett

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 21:35

OK, a hardback will set you back $23. At least Andy didn't have his "full STP decal" suit on.

Darn, now I'll have to read the book again to figure out what STP stands for...

Frank

#5934 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 21:38

OK, a hardback will set you back $23. At least Andy didn't have his "full STP decal" suit on.

Darn, now I'll have to read the book again to figure out what STP stands for...

Frank

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#5935 B Squared

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 23:14

Darn, now I'll have to read the book again to figure out what STP stands for..


After two spins in the 1966 Indy 500, team driver, Jim Clark, said it meant "Spinning Takes Practice".*

*Team Lotus: The Indianapolis Years Chapter Seven title - page 130. Jim Clark after race quote - page 145

Edited by B Squared, 29 July 2011 - 15:10.


#5936 Alan Cox

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 14:43

I have no hesitation in recommending to readers Paul Parker's latest volume in the Haynes "...in Camera" series, "Formula 1 in Camera 1950-1959". Following the pattern of the previous titles in the series, it comprises approximately 250 black and white and colour photographs culled from the world's greatest photo libraries (i.e. LAT, GP Library, Klemantaski Collection, Ludvigsen Library, Ferret Fotographic, Bernhard Volker and the Spitzley Collection), many of which I have not seen published before, together with Paul's very full captions containing an incredible amount of detail which, unlike many photo books, repay time spent in study. Particulary fascinating, as ever, are the non-racing scenes taken in and around the paddocks which capture the atmosphere of a now-departed age.

http://www.haynes.co...tegory_rn=34566
Curently available via Amazon at £24

#5937 bradbury west

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 17:26

Andrew Ferguson gives a flattering picture of how Andy Granatelli adroitly dealt with Colin Chapman in his fine (now out of print) book, Team Lotus: The Indianapolis Years. Salutations TW.
Mark - - -

The book, of course, completed and edited, unsung, by a well known TNFer.
Roger Lund

Edited by bradbury west, 01 August 2011 - 15:00.


#5938 Jesper O. Hansen

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 19:33

I have no hesitation in recommending to readers Paul Parker's latest volume in the Haynes "...in Camera" series, "Formula 1 in Camera 1950-1959". Following the pattern of the previous titles in the series, it comprises approximately 250 black and white and colour photographs culled from the world's greatest photo libraries (i.e. LAT, GP Library, Klemantaski Collection, Ludvigsen Library, Ferret Fotographic, Bernhard Volker and the Spitzley Collection), many of which I have not seen published before, together with Paul's very full captions containing an incredible amount of detail which, unlike many photo books, repay time spent in study. Particulary fascinating, as ever, are the non-racing scenes taken in and around the paddocks which capture the atmosphere of a now-departed age.

http://www.haynes.co...tegory_rn=34566
Curently available via Amazon at £24


Just ordered it from Amazon - but the site says it's available from August 4. Having the other Haynes Formula 1 decades books, the 1950s book sort of recommended itself. Now, how about a 1980s book on sportscars to follow up previous work by Paul Parker!

Jesper

#5939 Alan Cox

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 10:45

Just ordered it from Amazon - but the site says it's available from August 4.

Definitely available now, Jesper. My copy arrived on Thursday.

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#5940 jj2728

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 22:49

Just ordered Formula 1 in Camera 1960-69 from Amazon CA for $31.00

#5941 Tuboscocca

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 13:30

Philip Porter's E-type book:

Just received the updated 2nd edition of Porters E-type bible:Jaguar E-Type: The Definitive History
very , very good, lots of new photos. Highly recommended!

http://www.amazon.co...1...8-1&seller=

regards Michael

#5942 VWV

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 16:41

There is a new Pete Lyons Book FAST LINES: Memorable Moments in Motorsports

http://www.petelyons.com/

I'm pleased to announce a new book. Launching on August 18 at the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion, "FAST LINES: Memorable Moments in Motorsports" is a selection of 55 of my monthly columns from Casey Annis' Vintage Racecar magazine, for which I've been writing since its inception in 1998.

Drawn from my years of covering races of many kinds in many countries, my topics include "Heroes" I've known like Sir Stirling Moss, Denny Hulme, Phil Hill, Mario Andretti, Dan Gurney and Denis Jenkinson; such "Cars" I admire as Aston Martin, Cobra, Lotus, Maserati, Jaguar, etc.; and great "Events" I've experienced: the fabulous old Targa Florio, Goodwood, Pikes Peak, Sebring, Monterey itself. There's a catchall category, "This N That," while I also couldn't resist adding a few "Rants."

In addition to nearly 60,000 words, there are 69 b&w period photos by myself and my late dad, Ozzie Lyons. Published in soft cover by Octane Press, this 268-page book is priced at $24.95, plus applicable tax and shipping.

Our initial stock of just 50 copies will be in our petelyons•com booth on vendor row at Monterey's Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. Please pre-order through our website and pick up your copy at the event (whereupon we'll refund the shipping cost that's built into our "buy button" software). If you can't make the RMMR this year, we'll ship your book directly to you shortly afterward.

Visit www.petelyons.com to pre-order “FAST LINES: Memorable Moments in Motorsports, by Pete Lyons from Vintage Racecar Magazine”

REMEMBER — only 50 copies are available for Monterey!

Thank you,


Pete and Lorna Lyons


#5943 Colbul1

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 12:05

Definitely available now, Jesper. My copy arrived on Thursday.


My copy of Formula 1 in Camera 1950-59 arrived yesterday and as Alan has noted is extremely good. I as ever am impressed by both the quality of the black and white as well as colour photographs, but in addition the captions provided by Paul Parker as simply sublime at times. I have so far only managed to devour the pictures from 1950, but my particular favourite has to be the one with an ad for the Rootes Group in the background and Paul's caption giving a potted history of how they slowly disappeared.

In addition, I also received my copy of the updated autobiography by Derek Bell with Alan Henry, 'Derek Bell: My Racing Life'. Again I have to date only had the chance to read through the introduction, but from what I can see this is a fabulous reworking and updating of the original 1987 edition and is a glossy and colourful A4 sized book. I have to say the introduction has already drawn me in to the career of a champion I thought I knew quite a bit about. Well worth the cover price in my opinion and another excellent tome from Haynes.

Colin

#5944 RA Historian

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Posted 03 August 2011 - 21:36

Just received my copy of Terry O'Neil's latest book, Runways and Racers, subtitled, "Sports car races held on military airfields in America, 1952-1954" in the mail. I obviously have not read it yet, but have paged through it to get a feel of the book. As I am off shortly for a long weekend at the big Mid Ohio Indy Car/ALMS double header, I will not be able to start reading it thoroughly until next week. However, I do have a few observations to offer based upon my leaf-through and reading of selected chapters.

First of all, as with Terry's great Nassau Speed Weeks book, it is very well done. Fine presentation, lots of photos, extensive results charts from every race. Seeing as results sheets from those early days of US road racing are so sketchy, if not lost, the results boxes provided are remarkable. They are not only for the 'feature', but also for all preliminary races. While results of the day rarely went beyond the first three overall, O'Neill was able to find lists of all who participated in the events, so we have the top three not only overall, but also in each class, and all others who were in the race. Having searched for early results myself, I find the results of Terry's research quite astounding.

A narrative is provided about each race. This gives not only the usual who passed whom, but also the background of the event, the organization, the weather, interesting anecdotes, and even the balance sheets of many events.

As the focus of the book is on the airport races on military airfields, other US road races of the day are not covered, though some are mentioned in passing. The main thrust of the book is on the SAC era, that time in US road racing history when sports car racing moved off the streets but before the purpose built courses came into being. It reinforces once again the tremendous role that the Strategic Air Command under General Curtis LeMay played in the preservation and advancement of sports car racing. Suffice to say, it is likely that if it had not been for Gen. LeMay and the SAC, sports car racing in the US would have died out at this time.

A running commentary is given to the politics involved. While the beneficiary of these SAC races was the recreational facilities, service clubs and the like for the airmen, there was the inevitable bitching by a couple disgruntled enlisted men that got to the attention of a publicity seeking congressman. What was a good thing was eventually brought down by one grandstanding member of Congress. O'Neill gives all the sad details.

However it ended, the fact is that in that short period of time sports car racing moved from being a foot note in the sports pages to gaining major coverage. The sport flourished, and O'Neill chronicles all the events very well, thus preserving an almost forgotten time.

To me, the early years of sports car racing came before I got involved, or for that matter, even knew about sports car racing. Thus this book will fill a gap in my knowledge, and I am sure that when I complete reading it, it will occupy a place on my shelf to which I shall refer periodically for reference to a bygone era.

From what I have seen so far in, admittedly, just a couple hours of leafing through the pages, this is a book of value and one that I can recommend.

Tom

Edited by RA Historian, 03 August 2011 - 21:38.


#5945 B Squared

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 10:02

Order information follows for acquiring Michael Argetsinger & David Bull's new book on the history of Formula One at Watkins Glen. Thanks for your interest.

A new motorsports book from David Bull Publishing that focuses on 20 years of Formula One racing at Watkins Glen is available now for advance order from the International Motor Racing Research Center at Watkins Glen. Shipment will begin by September 1.

Formula One at Watkins Glen: 20 Years of the United States Grand Prix, 1961-1980 from David Bull Publishing is written by award-winning author Michael Argetsinger with a foreword by Mario Andretti. The book is a rich photographic record of the drivers, cars and teams that competed at Watkins Glen.

All proceeds from sales of the book will benefit the Racing Research Center. The author has waived any remuneration and Bull Publishing has produced the book at cost. Advance sales prior to September 1 will include handling and shipping (within North America) in the book price of $49.95.

The 160-page book includes approximately 250 color and black and white photographs. The vivid narrative chronicles the action and events of each year’s race, and it also tells the story of the organizers who brought Formula One to Watkins Glen and the forces that led to its eventual demise.

Requests can be telephoned to the Center at (607) 535-9044 or sent via email to research@racingarchives.org

Information also is available on the Center’s website at http://www.racingarchives.org/

Posted Image

#5946 COUGAR508

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 17:54

Order information follows for acquiring Michael Argetsinger & David Bull's new book on the history of Formula One at Watkins Glen. Thanks for your interest.


Thanks for the information about the book, B Squared!

#5947 vashlin

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 21:02

Brian, thanks for the information on the Glen book. We knew this would be a must-have for us as soon as we heard about it.

Can't wait to see it.

LinC

#5948 Alfieri

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 10:08

Jack C. Fox produced a copiously illustrated book on the history of the Indianapolis 500, which appeared in at least two editions.
The first seems to have appeared in 1967 entitled “The Indianapolis 500, a Pictorial History of the Greatest Spectacle in Automobile Racing”
There was then a second edition in 1984 called “The Illustrated History of the Indianapolis 500 1911-1984”
There may even have been a third edition in the 1990s.
Can any TNF members advise as to which edition has better photo reproduction?
I am particularly interested in the 1940s / 1950s period.


#5949 B Squared

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 10:17

Jack C. Fox produced a copiously illustrated book on the history of the Indianapolis 500, which appeared in at least two editions.
The first seems to have appeared in 1967 entitled “The Indianapolis 500, a Pictorial History of the Greatest Spectacle in Automobile Racing”
There was then a second edition in 1984 called “The Illustrated History of the Indianapolis 500 1911-1984”
There may even have been a third edition in the 1990s.
Can any TNF members advise as to which edition has better photo reproduction?
I am particularly interested in the 1940s / 1950s period.


The first covered through 1966, which is in my collection. Then an edition which included the 1967 race, which my Dad owns. I don't have the 1984, but I do have the last (?) edition which includes the 1994 race.

My untrained eye can't visually distinguish any difference in the photo quality

#5950 proviz

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 11:19


I'm pretty sure there was also a 1976ish edition, which was the one I first laid eyes on in 1978. Later got the newer edition, which made me think the photo reproduction may have been better in the "1976ish", but no way to make comparison, so...