Jump to content


Photo

The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


  • Please log in to reply
7743 replies to this topic

#6201 jj2728

jj2728
  • Member

  • 2,777 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 04 December 2011 - 22:38

Thanks for the head's up and I shall avoid like the plague....

Advertisement

#6202 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 24,025 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 04 December 2011 - 22:46

Given Mr Rubython's previous form, I doubt anyone will be surprised by that review. It sounds like the sort of book that one should be dropping hints that it's not something one hopes to find under the Christmas tree. ;)

Perhaps you'd care to also post your review in the Worst ever book on F1 thread? Seems appropriate.



#6203 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,169 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 04 December 2011 - 23:40

Given Mr Rubython's previous form, I doubt anyone will be surprised by that review.


I've never read anything by TR, but has he ever written a book that's worth reading?


#6204 fbarrett

fbarrett
  • Member

  • 1,000 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 05 December 2011 - 00:51

May I be so bold as to state that instead of focusing on books not worth reading we should aim for truly good books. This year's main choices for me are Elva by Janos Wimpffen and 50 Years of Watkins Glen (or something to that effect) by Michael Argetsinger. Porsche by Mailander is another, not to mention Porsche, Genesis of Genius, which appeared in 2010. And, of course, so many older books remain as fine examples.

Frank

#6205 GrumpyOldMan

GrumpyOldMan
  • Member

  • 98 posts
  • Joined: July 11

Posted 05 December 2011 - 06:09

Given Mr Rubython's previous form, I doubt anyone will be surprised by that review. It sounds like the sort of book that one should be dropping hints that it's not something one hopes to find under the Christmas tree.;)

Perhaps you'd care to also post your review in the Worst ever book on F1 thread? Seems appropriate.


Will do.


I've never read anything by TR, but has he ever written a book that's worth reading?


You know what's worse? I bought "Shunt" at the same time! :eek: :cry: I can't bear to open it now...

That'll teach me to impulse-buy in a bookshop when I'm bored! Wish I'd searched his name on this forum before buying...

#6206 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,054 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 05 December 2011 - 07:57

What gets me is how his stuff finds its way into prominent bookshops. Given the amount he has had to pay out in libel damages over the years, is he a trustafarian who can buy his way into publishing?

#6207 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 05 December 2011 - 15:31

May I be so bold as to state that instead of focusing on books not worth reading we should aim for truly good books. This year's main choices for me are Elva by Janos Wimpffen and 50 Years of Watkins Glen (or something to that effect) by Michael Argetsinger. Porsche by Mailander is another, not to mention Porsche, Genesis of Genius, which appeared in 2010. And, of course, so many older books remain as fine examples.

Frank



Frank,

I certainly understand your sentiment, but I think we can do both. It's certainly helpful to be warned off of books that may not be worthwhile, especially at the prices some of them bring, plus today's shipping costs.

Jack.

#6208 fbarrett

fbarrett
  • Member

  • 1,000 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 05 December 2011 - 17:25

Jack:

Good point.

Frank

#6209 Herbert

Herbert
  • Member

  • 340 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 05 December 2011 - 19:52

In Germany a biography of Jochen Neerpasch was recently published. For those who interested here are some more infos:

Jochen Neepasch

After reading it, here is a short review:

In the first part it gives a short, perhaps a little superficial summary of his racing career with Volvo, Shelby Cobra, Porsche etc. After that the book gives nice insights in to the foundation of the racing department at Ford Köln and BMW Motorsport. In the following chapters Neerpasch's unsuccessful attempt to bring Talbot into F1 with BMW engines and the German's years with the FIA (where he neraly took over running of the Sportscar World Championship), with the IMG agency and his role in the motorsports comeback of Mercedes in 1988 and the Mercedes Junior Team (with Schumacher, Wendlinger and Frentzen) are also covered. The book gives some interesting background information with quotes from Neerpasch himself. A lot of pictures and documents from Neerpaschs collection illustrate each chapter. Many former colleagues and drivers like Stuck, Mass, Herd, Dennis, Mosley, Haug or Schumacher give personal accounts of their work with the German.

Sadly Neerpaschs later projects (which wren't successfull like theEUROC series aren't mentioned at all). And in the Mercedes chapter there is one thing concerning the Sauber-Mercedes C291 group C car that is quite questionable. It is mentioned that Mercedes had plans to use the 180 degree V12 of that car in F1 sometime later which cannot be true. Such an engine was far to wide to allow reasonable aerodynamics at the rear of a monoposto.

But apart from that if you interested in the motorsports history of Ford Köln, BMW or Mercedes I recommend the book.

Edited by Herbert, 05 December 2011 - 19:55.


#6210 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 09 December 2011 - 11:55

BOAC 500 and 1000 ,1967-72 book (soon)


Editions Palmier announces two new titles..

On the BOAC 500/1000 races

http://www.editions-...s,fr,4,p156.cfm

And an (updated version) of Bollée's 12 Heures du Reims:

http://www.editions-...s,fr,4,p144.cfm

Both seem to be available within a month.

Best regards

Michael



#6211 helioseism

helioseism
  • Member

  • 1,429 posts
  • Joined: December 05

Posted 10 December 2011 - 00:39

"BMW Ultimate Drives Vol. 1 1937-1982" is now out.

The "Books in the Works" page has been updated to reflect this. As a reminder, this page and its companions can be found here:

books that never were
books with title changes
books in the works

Please post any additions, corrections, etc., and I will make the appropriate changes.

You may now return to the upright position.

#6212 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 24,025 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 10 December 2011 - 10:35

A rather amusing title change, which may also exist in the publisher's original announcement (assuming anyone ever kept old seasonal catalogues or AI sheets): I have an uncorrected proof copy of "Jackie Stewart: World Champion" by Eric Dymock which bears the title "Jackie Stewart '69" on both the cover and title page.

#6213 fbarrett

fbarrett
  • Member

  • 1,000 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 15 December 2011 - 01:34

So, in the spirit of the season, what books (new or old) are you hoping to receive as Christmas presents--even from yourself?

My choice for the top two new books would be Elva and Porsche by Mailander. Used books are tougher and depend more on your interests, but for me a fine copy of the Porsche book, Lieb Zu Ihm, would be a great gift. Or maybe some ancient Autocourse issues.

There's almost nothing I enjoy more than opening a new book on Christmas morning then spending much of the day enjoying it. This year, though, I'm getting married on Christmas Eve, so that is probably not a wise way to spend Christmas Day!

Frank

#6214 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 15 December 2011 - 07:12

Congratulations, Frank!

:clap:

#6215 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,054 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 15 December 2011 - 07:58

If any of you happen to be in Porto, get yourself to the Campanha metro station - there's a remainder bookshop there knocking out a rather decent A4 hardback history of the street races for ten euro. All in Portuguese, of course, but (a) you can muddle through OK pretending it's French or Latin or something and (b) there are loads of great pictures, including a plethora of local specials.

#6216 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 15 December 2011 - 10:05

If any of you happen to be in Porto, get yourself to the Campanha metro station - there's a remainder bookshop there knocking out a rather decent A4 hardback history of the street races for ten euro. All in Portuguese, of course, but (a) you can muddle through OK pretending it's French or Latin or something and (b) there are loads of great pictures, including a plethora of local specials.

Ensign

do you mean:

''Circuito da Boavista, Velocidade na Invicta'' by José Barros Rodriguez published by edicao Talento 2005??????


Regards Michael

#6217 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,054 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 15 December 2011 - 10:22

I do, so please don't tell me that it's available for €1 everywhere else. :D

#6218 B Squared

B Squared
  • Member

  • 3,155 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 15 December 2011 - 12:11

In regards to the 2011 Dean Batchelor Awards from Tuesday evening at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. For those who may have missed this in the 50th anniversary of the USGP at Watkins Glen thread.

Congratulations to Janos Wimpffen for winning the best book award for "Elva,The Cars,The People,The History" published by David Bull Publishing. While disappointed for Michael Argetsinger, it is good to see the Dean Batchelor Award being won within the David Bull "family". Well done to all the winners and to all the nominees for their fine efforts and deserving recognition.

http://www.wfsb.com/...atchelor-awards

#6219 P0wderf1nger

P0wderf1nger
  • Member

  • 307 posts
  • Joined: June 07

Posted 15 December 2011 - 12:51

So, in the spirit of the season, what books (new or old) are you hoping to receive as Christmas presents--even from yourself?

My choice for the top two new books would be Elva and Porsche by Mailander. Used books are tougher and depend more on your interests, but for me a fine copy of the Porsche book, Lieb Zu Ihm, would be a great gift. Or maybe some ancient Autocourse issues.

There's almost nothing I enjoy more than opening a new book on Christmas morning then spending much of the day enjoying it. This year, though, I'm getting married on Christmas Eve, so that is probably not a wise way to spend Christmas Day!

Frank

She's a very lucky woman. Congratulations to you both.

Paul

Advertisement

#6220 Bjorn Kjer

Bjorn Kjer
  • Member

  • 3,623 posts
  • Joined: February 06

Posted 15 December 2011 - 13:16

Any suggestions to which book or books I should buy on the Nurburgring , preferably with lots of pictures , mainly 1930's -70's , please ?

#6221 Michael Ferner

Michael Ferner
  • Member

  • 2,164 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 15 December 2011 - 16:52

Congratulations, Frank!

:clap:



She's a very lucky woman. Congratulations to you both.

Paul


May I join the chorus? :up: :)

#6222 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 15 December 2011 - 17:43

I do, so please don't tell me that it's available for €1 everywhere else. :D

Have no 'angst'--I found it nowhere (in the web!!)
I got mine from a friend in Portugal (TNFer too)...

Regards Michael

#6223 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 15 December 2011 - 17:48

May I join the chorus? :up: :)



Me TOO!! wedding bells are ringing...

Michael

#6224 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 15 December 2011 - 17:57

Any suggestions to which book or books I should buy on the Nurburgring , preferably with lots of pictures , mainly 1930's -70's , please ?



Bjorn

Kings of the Nurburgring: A History 1925-1983 by Chris Nixon , is very good (but o.p.--so not cheap).
If you can read German (I assume) --there are some Heel-titles from Födisch..)

http://www.amazon.de...

I.E. 80 Jahre or older ones Der Nürburgring...

That's for the start!!

Best regards Michael



#6225 Michael Ferner

Michael Ferner
  • Member

  • 2,164 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 15 December 2011 - 20:13

So, in the spirit of the season, what books (new or old) are you hoping to receive as Christmas presents--even from yourself?

My choice for the top two new books would be Elva and Porsche by Mailander. Used books are tougher and depend more on your interests, but for me a fine copy of the Porsche book, Lieb Zu Ihm, would be a great gift. Or maybe some ancient Autocourse issues.

There's almost nothing I enjoy more than opening a new book on Christmas morning then spending much of the day enjoying it. This year, though, I'm getting married on Christmas Eve, so that is probably not a wise way to spend Christmas Day!

Frank


Having no affinity for or with Christmas, it's merely a coincidence, but I got my Bescherung already in the form of seven (seven! :clap:) new books a week or two ago. Naturally, they all deal with Sprint Car racing :D, so if this is not your cup of tea, you may skip this entry. Of course, in the shortness of time that I have these books now, I can't come up with an in-depth review, merely a few footnotes of what to expect:

- Tow Money Vol. II - History of the URC, by Buzz Rose & Jim Chini

I bought the first volume, dealing with the first thirty years (1948-77) of the URC, some years ago, and even if this second volume reaches into an era that is of little to almost no interest to me, I still felt it was time to complete the picture (... AND I got the book at a discount!  ;)). URC started as a AAA "satellite" running Class B Sprint Cars in the forties, but soon developed into the major independent club in the East, retaining its core in the Penn-Jersey area but also reaching north into New England and south to the Carolinas. In some ways, the URC ran its own little show with little effect on the outside world, but the outside world didn't always ignore the URC, especially not since the "Pennsylvania Posse" was never far away, and it was at a URC meeting that Jan Opperman had his final, career-ending crash in 1981. I think I'll enjoy the book, more for pleasure browsing than for research, and first impressions are good, with lots of background stories (as usual in Buzz Rose's books) and good photography, showing that at least the Eastern trophy girls (:love:) keep easily abreast... er... keep up in their professional ethos with the "left coast" girls! :)


- The Wingless Warriors, California Hot Shoes, Volume II CRA Sprint Cars 1970-1994, by Buzz Rose

In much the same way, I originally skipped this book when I ordered Vol. I, feeling that it was "too modern" for my taste, but by now my research reaches well into the seventies and even the eighties, so I had to finally get it. Again, the "formula for success" are the background stories and driver profiles, which add to the rather simple narrative of the season-by-season recaps, and the basic statistics that Rose's books usually contain. I always enjoy the facsimile reprints of contemporary magazine articles, and this time Rose has added a date to most of the articles, the absence of which was, for me at least, a very weak point of the first volume - but I guess it's just me, trying to use the book for research. In contrast with the URC book, it's also evident that Rose was far more "connected" with the Western racing scene, and this shows in some personal comments, not all of which are, uhm, "sound". He definitely has some skewed views which he isn't afraid to air, and this fact sometimes grates with me, but overall I still enjoy his books. I just sometimes wish he'd learned how to keep schtum.


- Johnnie Parsons "Never Look Back", with Gary Delph & Charles C. Bolton

Picked this one up as a sales item, otherwise I wouldn't have bothered, having had "mixed" experiences with US driver biographies. Browsing through it, I must say this one looks like I might enjoy it, more as an evening read for relaxation and/or entertainment. Its research value will probably be close to nil, but it appears to have a "human touch" to it that should be endearing. Might take a few weeks until I finally pick it up in earnest, though.


- The Bill Schindler Story, by Nat Kleinfield

Like the Parsons bio, this one was cheap so I just added it to my bulk order. Just as I feared, this one deals mainly with Schindler's Midget exploits, and it's also more a hagiography than a biography. One for the bin.


- Indy Cars on Short Tracks, Buzz Rose & Joe Heisler

Another sales item, which is unlikely to have interested me at its cover price, but which turned out to be a pleasant surprise. The subject is a rather esoteric sample of races: two at Ascot in the thirties, one at Dayton in 1956 and eleven at Williams Grove in the fifties! Rose has taken Eastern historian Joe Heisler aboard for this one, and as always, Jim Chini makes his contribution, but overall, the narrative doesn't look to be too impressive. But this is offset in a BIG way by the spectacular photography featured in the book!! Many interesting cars that get short shrift in other publications, plus absolutely stunning action photographs by the established masters of the lenses, like Walt Imlay, Dave Knox or Frank Smith. A most valuable reference book!


- Tommy Hinnershitz, The Cushion Artist, by Carl Sweigart

The late Carl Sweigart is something of a legend to Eastern racing historians, and enthusiasts. Back in the fifties, he produced hand-typed yearbooks that were unique, both in format and content - Joe Heisler has been kind enough to copy samples of those for me, a real treat! This Hinnershitz "biography", published while the "Flying Farmer" was still alive, follows a similar path, although it's presented in a more "traditional" format, unlike the unwieldy oversize yearbooks. It attempts to list every race the "Flying Dutchman" ever competed in, and does a pretty good job at it. With today's internet access to a wide range of US publications, I have been able to find a few more, but Sweigart's list, harvested in a more traditional way, is very impressive, indeed! Else, the book contains a goodly number of b&w pictures, a few anecdotes here and there, and some short driver biographies of Tommy's rivals, mostly gleaned from contemporary publications, but apparently all (?) penned by Sweigart in the first place. This book will not be everybody's cup of tea, especially not at USD 40, but I enjoyed it immensely.


- Big Car Thunder, Sprint Cars on America's Fair Circuits, Vol 1, by Bob Mays

This turned out to be the highlight of the lot, even though its content is quite esoteric, too: the seven chapters deal with IMCA (1946-62), UMCA (1952-57), NRA (1954-57), MSRA (1958), the other MSRA (1952-53), USA (1954-60), BCRA (1958-77) and NCRA (1982-87) Sprint Car racing, and if this alphabet soup doesn't mean a thing to you, you may go and finish your supper, this being my last entry for this post. It's quite a wide range that's covered here, not only in territory but also in years, yet there are always connections between all those groups, racing anyplace but near the oceans. The general concept is not unlike the Buzz Rose books, but without statistics (other than a listing of the various champions) and with fewer facsimile reprints. The narrative is fascinating, mostly because the subject is quite obscure, and the same goes for the pictures, which are plentiful and mostly of excellent quality. The weirdo racers in these "backwater events" range from early rear-engined sprints, over dirt track roadsters, "stretched" Midgets and homebuilt jalopies-turned-sprint-cars to a propane-propelled Big Car (!), with a sprinkling of former Indy Cars earning their "pension" in the minor leagues - absolutely amazing! If your taste is for the weird and whacky, this one's for you - if you just want to read up where many of America's future greats got their start, you'll like it, too. I can't wait to order volume two!

Edited by Michael Ferner, 15 December 2011 - 22:44.


#6226 Alan Cox

Alan Cox
  • Member

  • 7,666 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 17 December 2011 - 17:23

Does anyone have any observations to make about this new title: '100 Years of the British Automobile Racing Club' by Gareth Rogers? If so, is it worth considering?
Posted Image

#6227 Tom V

Tom V
  • New Member

  • 26 posts
  • Joined: May 08

Posted 17 December 2011 - 17:57

See post #6187...

Edited by Tom V, 17 December 2011 - 17:58.


#6228 Alan Cox

Alan Cox
  • Member

  • 7,666 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 18 December 2011 - 10:59

Thank you Tom. How did I miss that? Sounds like one to avoid.

#6229 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,045 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 18 December 2011 - 17:39

Post 6187 merely asks if anyone has read the book, just as you did, Alan. The next two posts give speculative opinions about it based on the publisher's blurb. I'm waiting for someone who has actually read the book (or at least looked at) to give their opinion.



#6230 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 20 December 2011 - 22:37

Amon,McLaren books plus DVD...

http://www.hamptondo.....mp; Books.htm

Some (in Europe) rarer titles..

NO commercial interest....

'Pathfinder' Michael

#6231 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 3,539 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 22 December 2011 - 19:47

BOAC 500 and 1000 ,1967-72 book (soon)

Editions Palmier announces two new titles..

On the BOAC 500/1000 races

http://www.editions-...s,fr,4,p156.cfm

And an (updated version) of Bollée's 12 Heures du Reims:

http://www.editions-...s,fr,4,p144.cfm

Both seem to be available within a month.

Best regards

Michael


Thanks for this, Michael. I am particularly keen on the Reims book, but the BOAC 500/1000KM book sounds interesting. I still look at the grid line-up for the 1967 race in awe!


#6232 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 22 December 2011 - 22:27

Thanks for this, Michael. I am particularly keen on the Reims book, but the BOAC 500/1000KM book sounds interesting. I still look at the grid line-up for the 1967 race in awe!



MCS --no problem!!

In the meantime both books are availble--I talked to them today.

http://www.editions-...r.com/index.cfm

Especially C.Naviaux (Brands Hatch book author) is very accurate (at least in his other publications).

Bollée's Reims book should be a second edition (with new photos???)??

Merry Christmas and lots of GOOD books from Santa

Michael

#6233 Bjorn Kjer

Bjorn Kjer
  • Member

  • 3,623 posts
  • Joined: February 06

Posted 23 December 2011 - 07:05

The Reims book is incl. the 50's with many new pictures , mine is on the way......I also ordered the revamped Paris 1000kms/Monthlery book both by Michel Bollee.

#6234 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,054 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 23 December 2011 - 08:06

They're unsung heroes on the quiet, Palmier. They produce a lot of niche stuff that's always worth a dekko.

#6235 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 23 December 2011 - 10:22

They're unsung heroes on the quiet, Palmier. They produce a lot of niche stuff that's always worth a dekko.



Ensign , nicely said!!

And the founder even participated on the first Paris -Dakar!!!(Made a nice book on it!!)

regards Michael

#6236 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 1,388 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 25 December 2011 - 00:49

Another Christmas and no Inside Track......

:well:

But, tell us what books you received (or gave yourself!) for Christmas.

Jack.

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 25 December 2011 - 05:43.


#6237 Ralf Pickel

Ralf Pickel
  • Member

  • 491 posts
  • Joined: December 05

Posted 25 December 2011 - 08:44

Amilcar by Gilles Fournier (wanted that for a long time) and Real Racers, both from my girlfriend.
ELVA from myself ! :)

Ralf

#6238 longhorn

longhorn
  • Member

  • 173 posts
  • Joined: July 09

Posted 25 December 2011 - 13:27

Ford versus Ferrari by Pritchard, Memoirs of Enzo Ferrari's Lieutenant by Gozzi, Piers Courage by Cooper (hardback) & Lotus Competition Cars by Ptitchard. All either from my wife or my mother, clearly both of them well read. And I have a birthday tomorrow.....

Edited by longhorn, 25 December 2011 - 13:27.


#6239 LittleChris

LittleChris
  • Member

  • 2,164 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 25 December 2011 - 18:29

DCN's Racers 1948 -68
BRM - A Mechanics Tale - Richard Salmon
Croz - Larrikin Biker - Graeme Crosby
Ballington Unkorked - Kork Ballington

Advertisement

#6240 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,045 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 26 December 2011 - 15:55

Colin Chapman - Inside the Innovator - Karl Ludvigsen

#6241 RA Historian

RA Historian
  • Member

  • 3,417 posts
  • Joined: October 06

Posted 26 December 2011 - 18:50

Two.

Sports Car Racing in Camera, 1950-1959 by Paul Parker. Discussed here before and all I can add at this time is that it should be a fabulous read.

The Midwest Motorsport Legend, Meadowdale Raceways by Philip A. Aleo. Where to begin? First of all, Aleo is a local writer of local history, and apparently has no background in racing. It shows, as the book is a mish-mash of this and that about Meadowdale. Just one example of the lack of racing knowledge: a photo showing the paddock after the wooden pits had been torn down is captioned that "the paddocks (sic) have been removed". Oh my. While the book covers the people who built it and the construction of the track in reasonable detail, it falls flat on any reporting of races at the track. It simply does not, with only one race having a results box, and that reprinted from elsewhere. Granted, I do not believe the author set out to write the definitive race history, but some history would have been appreciated.

The book itself cries out for editing. It jumps about rather disconcertingly, with races scattered throughout without much attention to chronology. Several items are mentioned two or three times, in almost the same words, repeating previous points unnecessarily. Occasionally a topic is given a few pages for no apparent reason, as it is off topic to the book's supposed mission, or features something having to do with, one suspects, a friend of the author's. It occasionally strays onto a tangent which is really not necessary for the history of the track. For example, there is a short chapter on Lance Reventlow; fine and dandy, but Lance only raced at the track once whereas regulars such as Augie Pabst, Harry Heuer, Ernie Erickson, and Bill Wuesthoff are barely mentioned.

The book itself is largely a photo book. Some have been published before, while others are new. However, on several occasions photos are presented with no captions at all, leaving one to wonder just what the point is.

The early races are mentioned several times, as is the last big event, the 1968 Trans Am. However, arguably the biggest race ever run at the track, the August, 1964, USRRC is all but ignored.

The book is riddled with errors. After several pages I had to go back and keep track. I counted 53 factual errors in the text, not counting errors in quotes and reprinted articles. Several are whoppers. On no less than six occasions the author tells us that Meadowdale's main straight, which was somewhere under 4000 feet in length, is "the longest in the world" (sic). Apparently he never heard of Mulsanne. Speaking of Le Mans, he also tells us that Bruce McLaren won Le Mans twice. Then there is poor Jim Place. The author captions a photo of Bill Kimberly's Ferrari 500 TR as being Jim Place, and then informs us that Place was killed in "November, 1960" at Elkhart Lake. This should come as news to Place, who is not only still alive, but still racing, even as he pushes 80 years of age. The author regularly throws out absurd attendance figures, up to 151,000 in some instances. While he likely was simply repeating what he read in promoter's exaggerated releases, he should not have unquestioningly printed them.

The author does not understand the various levels of racing, as he calls several small time Midwest Council club races "SCCA Nationals". A number of photos have incorrect identifications, such as captioning the Scarab of Jerry Hansen as Alan Connell in a Cooper Monaco. Does not even have the engine in the same end.

At some point in his writing, he must have received a box of exclamation points as a gift, as in a couple chapters he throws them around like confetti, while they are absent from the majority of the book.

At the end of the book he tries to list every driver who raced at Meadowdale with the year of their participation. An impossible task, one that should not have been attempted. With all the levels of road racing, from pro to the lowest club, plus several stock car series, drag races, and motorcycle races, this is just out of the question. As it is, a quick scan through this shows many errors in spelling, years, and drivers repeated unnecessarily. I cut him some slack here as I did not count any of these in the 53 errors mentioned above.

In summation, the Meadowdale book is interesting as a photo book, but next to useless as history. Meadowdale has a very interesting history, and some day it should be written. But this is not it. Aleo took a stab at presenting the track as a piece of local history, but as a record of the track itself he should have called in a co-author who could have presented the racing history.

Upon reflection, this book is actually more of a scrap book than an attempt to tell the track's history.

Edited by RA Historian, 27 December 2011 - 14:10.


#6242 fbarrett

fbarrett
  • Member

  • 1,000 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 26 December 2011 - 23:55

The Lost Generation by David Tremayne: a good, well-detailed history of the too brief lives of the talented Roger Williamson, Tom Pryce, and Tony Brise. The reader must focus to keep each of the three individuals straight in his mind. Am only about 50 pages into it so far, so more thoughts later. Good period photos, too. Got a special wholesale discount on it from Motorbooks International (aka Quayside), so it's probably the least expensive Christmas book I've ever given myself. If it weren't already on the shelf here, the top book on my Christmas hinting list would have been Elva by Janos Wimpffen, along with Porsche by Mailander, created by Karl Ludvigsen.

Frank

#6243 longhorn

longhorn
  • Member

  • 173 posts
  • Joined: July 09

Posted 27 December 2011 - 09:09

And for my birthday I received Colin Chapman by Ludvigsen, Ferrari Prototypen by Henry & the Senna DVD. I also have some money to spend in the sales.

#6244 BRMfan

BRMfan
  • New Member

  • 28 posts
  • Joined: January 06

Posted 27 December 2011 - 16:05

for Christmas I received Peter Warr's book about his years with Lotus it is an excellent read especially about his drivers not flattering about Mansell!

#6245 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,054 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 27 December 2011 - 16:27

I got a rock.

#6246 PRD

PRD
  • Member

  • 319 posts
  • Joined: October 02

Posted 27 December 2011 - 16:53

For Christmas I received the Senna DVD, the "Solitude" picture book and "Never Stop Challenging" about Mazda's sport car team and its eventual Le Mans victory in 1991

#6247 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,045 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 27 December 2011 - 18:46

I got a rock.

Was it inscribed?

#6248 Arjan de Roos

Arjan de Roos
  • Member

  • 2,086 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 28 December 2011 - 11:20

I got Giorgio Piola's 1999 and 2000 from my wife and Floyd's Clymer "Carrera Panamericana 1950" from my girl friend.

#6249 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 7,169 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 28 December 2011 - 11:23

Was it inscribed?



Ensign lives in Birmingham, it probably came through a window.

#6250 Tuboscocca

Tuboscocca
  • Member

  • 996 posts
  • Joined: February 08

Posted 28 December 2011 - 11:44

I got Giorgio Piola's 1999 and 2000 from my wife and Floyd's Clymer "Carrera Panamericana 1950" from my girl friend.



Arjan, the books are not the interesting thing here--but the 'givers'.??

Regards Michael