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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#851 PRD

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 19:30

Following a review on dsc I sent for a copy of "12 hours of Sebring 1970"

This is another labour of love like Totally Fearless- the author Harry Hurst was a photographer at Sebring and the book is the story in pictures and words of that race. He has managed to portray brilliantly the atmosphere of endurance racing and especially that particular era.For those of us whose only contact with racing at the time was through Motor Sport, then this brings it all to life most vividly.

Take a look at the website www.glorydaysofracing.com

Not expensive with the £:$ exchange rate at the minute either.

Paul

By the way , I've told Harry Hurst about TNF so he's probably lurking around here somewhere..

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#852 Twin Window

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 19:58

Just tidied up the name of the thread, chaps - nowt else!

:up:

#853 harryglorydays

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Posted 11 November 2004 - 13:19

Originally posted by Doug Nye
Has anybody seen a copy of this book on Philadelphia's Fairmount Park races? Worthwhile?
http://www.philadelp....org/akm/store/

DCN


Just saw your reference to this book while trolling through the thread. I was very involved with the revival of the Fairmount Park races (Vintage) in the mid-1990s and was surprised to find how popular motor racing was in the early part of the century. I understand that they got 400,000 spectators for one of the races, 1911 I believe.

In any case, I'll stop by the Atwater Kent musuem and pick up a copy and let you know how it is.

#854 Frank S

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 16:32

Originally posted by harryglorydays
My name is Harry Hurst and I found out about TNF from someone who bought my recently published book, "12 Hours of Sebring 1970."

...

Anyway, if you would like to see what my book looks like, go to: http://www.glorydaysofracing.com Right now, I'm working on several other books, including one on the 1970 Road Atlanta Can-Am.


I went directly to the site, submitted essential, and had the book in my San Diego, California-based hands in three days, max. Now that I have opened it I may say: Thank you, sir, for a unique and marvelously atmospheric glimpse into visual and social aspects of the goings-on in a truly memorable competition.

Inexpensive at twice the price; nothing cheap about it.

--
Frank S

cc: "The Place To Say ..."

#855 Magee

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Posted 15 November 2004 - 04:50

BOOK REVIEW by Michael Gee


Evans, Art - Race Legends of the Fabulous Fifties ISBN 0-970507321
Photo Data Research, Redondo Beach, California 2003. 133 pp.

A few years ago, Art Evans published The Fabulous Fifties, a Decade of Sports Car Racing in Southern California that became so popular it sold out quickly. Rather than reprint it he put together this new Race Legends book.
Carroll Shelby opens the book by declaring how proud he is of Evan's book. "Many of the great race drivers of the era either started in Southern California or came here to race."
Shelby mentions Phil Hill, Rodger Ward, Dan Gurney, Sam Hanks, and Parnelli Jones starting in California. Sir Jack Brabham, Briggs Cunningham, John Fitch, Sir Stirling Moss, Bobby Unser and many others (including Shelby) went there to compete. Shelby added, "…the fifties was the greatest time to be a race driver."
Fifty individuals are alphabetically profiled from Bob Akin to John von Neumann, and with the contents focusing on Southern California, there had to be several actors included. All these legends were those who Evans says, "…were important in my life." He also highlights Sir Jack Brabham, Juan Manuel Fangio, and Sir Stirling Moss all of whom were "…the most significant drivers of the fabulous fifties."
Each of the profiles provides background information and shows photos of the individual as he/she was in the 50s along with a recent full-page portrait.
In addition to the Legends' section Evans has added several short sections of background racing information.
He supplies brief information on races held on public roads early in the history of racing from 1885 in Europe to recent open-road activities in Nevada and Texas. The late Rodger Ward organized road-racing events in those states.
One page, following the Public Highways section, describes City Streets racing starting with a mention of Bridgehampton in 1915 up to the CART series in Long Beach. Evans adds that, "Most city-street venues had either been abandoned or replaced by purpose-built facilities", by the end of the 50s.
The last section, but one, provides information on several road-racing tracks starting with Watkins Glen and ending with Torrey Pines, a total of eight significant sites in the U.S. and Mexico.
Many of us in North America who were around in the 50s were influenced by events in California. News filtered out to us about the racing events in California mixed in with Hollywood films, T-shirt weather, surfing, and entertainment sites. People were so star-struck in the 50s that the most interesting visit was a tour of the neighborhood of the stars. For many, the rush was on to go there at least for a visit if not to set up roots. For example, in another recent book Evans describes Ken Miles' career after leaving England for California. Shelby left Texas for California as well.
Evans has put together a valuable personal view of people and events in his life in the Golden State. Many of those who raced in California in the 50s became the phalanx that spurred the growth of sports car racing throughout the world. Many car and engine developments blossomed there starting in the 50s and astounded the racing fraternity and pushed ahead quickly the improvements in car body design and engine power in the 60s.
This book provides a personal look by Evans that shows the unequalled contributing foundation of the post-war racing pioneers, their cars, and their determination to show the world what they could do.

(Note for UK TNF'rs)

(All of Evans' books that are still in print are available from Menoshire Ltd. Unit 13, 21 Wadsworth Road, Perivale, Middlesex UB6 7LQ)

#856 dretceterini

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 02:01

New book on De Rahm coming..

http://www.libreriad...ti/FORN0166.jpg

#857 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 03:04

Can someone point me to the second BIG book thread. I have searched and cannot seem to find it here.

Thanks.

#858 Zawed

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 03:57

Originally posted by Dennis Hockenbury
Can someone point me to the second BIG book thread. I have searched and cannot seem to find it here.

Thanks.


Twin Window linked to it in his post above (#2), I have pasted link below.

http://forums.atlasf...&threadid=65757

#859 Frank S

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 06:31

Ferrari - The Sports Racing Cars - A Champion's View By Phil Hill
Dalton Watson
ISBN 1-85443-212-5

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#860 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 14:10

Thanks Zawed. I missed that the thread title had been changed.

#861 dretceterini

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 16:54

Have just gotten the new books on Carrozzeria Touring and the Villa d'Este concours. Both are excellent..

#862 petefenelon

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Posted 30 November 2004 - 00:26

Just a few words about Tony Bagnall's The Unfulfilled Dream - the history of motor racing at Aintree.

Another fairly specialist book, well-written (though it could do with proof-reading, and the prose is "serviceable" rather than scintillating - but there's an excellent selection of photos which are well-reproduced, it's readable and approachable, and Bagnall is as willing to go into the politics behind the clubbie years as he is the stories behind the big races - I would've liked to see a little more about the clubbie years as it was my introduction to racing, but the basics are all there!

Handsome, good value at 20 quid for a 200-page A4-sized hardback, and fills a much-needed gap. Every circuit needs a decent book about it and this definitely fits the bill.


Got my copy of the 2004 reissue of DCN's "Dino - The Little Ferrari" today - good value at £16.95 from Amazon, loads of good pics and incisive DCN prose, though I've done little more than a quick lunchtime skim of a few pages. Not sure if there's any new material - it's a book I read a library copy of many years ago - but it certainly makes a good addition to the Ferrari shelf - although ugh the title makes it sound like an Italian version of Thomas the Tank Engine ;)

#863 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 30 November 2004 - 01:35

Originally posted by Vitesse2
........I'd recommend you read Anthony Blight's "The French Sportscar Revolution", which covers the same period, but from the French point of view (even though it was written by an Englishman). Meticulously researched and very well written, it is not only a tour de force but also serves as a great model of how to relate racing history to the rest of the world and what was happening in politics and everyday life. I'm part-way through it at the moment and relishing every word!

After ordering this book many months ago on the kind recommendation of several TNF'ers from Amazon UK, I waited patiently for months before being notified that this title was no longer available. Which started a new search for this book that was delivered on Friday.

I would have to agree with all of the very positive comments regarding this book, as I have thoroughly enjoyed thus far the scope and range of the late Mr. Blight's final work. A true masterpiece.

My sincere thanks to all who recommended this title to me.

#864 scurrg

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Posted 30 November 2004 - 22:24

I just stumbled across this page of F1 books with brief reviews.

I didn't know that F1 was so popular with born again christians.

Formula One bookstore

#865 m.tanney

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Posted 01 December 2004 - 00:24

  Has anyone read the new book called Vintage American Road Racing Cars, 1950-1970, by Harold Price? If so, what did you think of it?

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#866 petefenelon

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Posted 01 December 2004 - 10:32

Looks interesting....


Stuart, could you merge this thread with the other books thread please?;)

#867 petefenelon

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Posted 01 December 2004 - 10:41

Originally posted by scurrg
I just stumbled across this page of F1 books with brief reviews.

I didn't know that F1 was so popular with born again christians.

Formula One bookstore


The owner of that site used to be a regular here (under the name Anorak Man). Some of his rants (particularly against the prices of Palawan Press books) were splenetic, ill-judged and spectacularly tactless!

#868 Mallory Dan

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Posted 01 December 2004 - 10:53

"Motor Racing at Brands Hatch in the Seventies". Anyone got it or seen it ? Is it worth getting ? Written by some one called Parker apparently.

#869 richardspringett

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Posted 01 December 2004 - 14:22

I have just spent a most enjoyable evening reading most of 'AUTODELTA' by Gianni Chizzola. Anew book. This is the first 'history' I've ever read... but for those who have an interest in Alfa Romeo and particularly TZ1's this is fascinating stuff. Probably not enough for the number buffs it is an incredible story of the rise and fall of a great marque - it creates wonderfully the times and personalities of the 60's.

No book shops in the UK were aware but the ever helpful - 6 days Fedex delivery E38 book and E25.5 airmail to Japan - Libreria Dell Automobile in Milan came up trumps.

#870 Frank de Jong

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 20:02

I've just finished reading "The British Saloon Car Championship (1958-1972) highlihjting the triple-winning era of the Bevan & McGovern Imp" by Martyn Morgan Jones.
It's a little difficult to judge. It is certainly not the definitive BTCC story - it tells a little about the early years, but the 1970-1972 period is all about the Imp and little else. The Imp story is most interesting, however, and Martyn deserves credit for that.
It has some errors, a few a little painful.
But there are not many books around about Touring Car Racing, so I welcome each single attempt. You'll notice my name in the "Acknowledgements" section - a first for me :blush: The second one is coming up, by the way.
So if you're interested in the little Imp, this is a nice book; if you're interested in Touring Car racing, get "Ford in touring car racing" and "Unbeatable BMW" to get some sort of picture.
ISBN 1-870519-62-0 , £ 40 for the hardbound edition.

#871 Frank S

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 20:31

Originally posted by m.tanney
  Has anyone read the new book called Vintage American Road Racing Cars, 1950-1970, by Harold Price? If so, what did you think of it?

Posted Image


I have this book. Pace and Brinkler collected photographs and information on many, if not all, of the worthwhile "American" road racing cars of my favorite era. I have not read it for accuracy, but the trove of familiar and not-so-familiar photos brought smiles and tears. I feel much richer now.

Contributors include TNF regular Tam McPartland, Alan Kuhn, Fred Puhn (whose story about the cars he designed and built is a reflection of dedication and enterprise common at the time), and others who may not frequent TNF, but are often enough subjects here.

For me, a lucky guy who saw in contemporary real life many of the machines depicted and described in the book, it is a must-have; for others less fortunate, a chance to peek at (and a little into) one of the germinal (is that really a word?) episodes in motor sport.


--
Frank ess

Public Address announcer: "I hear you had a little accident at the north end ... "
Ken Miles, who had just rolled and destroyed J. von Neumann's newest Porsche Spyder, incurring the wrath of Eleanor: "Yes, I seem to have bent a wheel ... "

#872 petefenelon

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 23:19

Originally posted by Frank de Jong

So if you're interested in the little Imp, this is a nice book; if you're interested in Touring Car racing, get "Ford in touring car racing" and "Unbeatable BMW" to get some sort of picture.
ISBN 1-870519-62-0 , £ 40 for the hardbound edition.


Both reasonable books, but both structurally rather flawed.

The "Ford In Touring Car Racing" book is well-illustrated and very good value, but there isn't enough text in it - it's quite "bitty" and doesn't really show how all the different programmes and independent efforts fitted together against the overall background of tintop racing. What's there is good, but there should be more. It feels cramped. I think there are two good books in this one - book 1 covering the dawn of time to the end of the Capri era, book 2 covering the Sierra and Mondeo.

"Unbeatable BMW" suffers from updateitis - it reads very much like a book that's been retypeset and had new chapters added without any real thought to integrating new material into the text. Again, what's there is excellent, but some stories get cut off at the end of the first edition and abandoned halfway... (particularly the last few years of F2 and the BMW vs Honda battle...)

For general BTCC fans there's a very nice DVD called "Tales from the Tarmac" that covers the Super Touring era and the first couple of seasons of the new formula. It'd be nice to have a prequel covering Group A - the Cossies were always great to watch even if the repmobiles ended up a lot quicker than them over the whole lap ;)

I think there is scope for a really good Saloon Car/BTCC book, it'd probably even get a good mainstream readership in the UK...

pete

#873 Ren de Boer

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 14:23

Originally posted by Frank de Jong
But there are not many books around about Touring Car Racing, so I welcome each single attempt.


Originally posted by petefenelon
I think there is scope for a really good Saloon Car/BTCC book, it'd probably even get a good mainstream readership in the UK...


It is a matter I have been thinking about so many times, and discussed it with the likes of Fabio Ravaioli (Touring car World), Charles Bradley (Autosport), Jonathan Gill (former press officer of the BTCC) and Thomas Voigt (German Tourenwagen Story). But would something like that be commercially viable? The BTCC Yearbook hasn't been published since 1999 and the only regular updates on international touring car racing can be found in Autocourse or in the German Tourenwagen Story.

Ideal would be something like Janos Wimpffen's two-volume sports car bible, perhaps not with that much detail, but definitely with overviews of every year and every major championship, race winners and the like.

But I am afraid that this will remain a dream forever...

#874 petefenelon

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 21:23

Originally posted by René de Boer




It is a matter I have been thinking about so many times, and discussed it with the likes of Fabio Ravaioli (Touring car World), Charles Bradley (Autosport), Jonathan Gill (former press officer of the BTCC) and Thomas Voigt (German Tourenwagen Story). But would something like that be commercially viable? The BTCC Yearbook hasn't been published since 1999 and the only regular updates on international touring car racing can be found in Autocourse or in the German Tourenwagen Story.

Ideal would be something like Janos Wimpffen's two-volume sports car bible, perhaps not with that much detail, but definitely with overviews of every year and every major championship, race winners and the like.

But I am afraid that this will remain a dream forever...


That would be the ideal, but I don't think the market would bear it - I don't think there are many people with the depth or breadth of interest in tourers that some of us have in sports cars; by its nature national touring car racing is fairly ephemeral and few outside their own countries are interested in international series, perhaps the DTM and BTCC apart. But there are lot of casual fans -- for instance, I think the British market would take a 200-300 page illustrated book for 20-30 quid majoring on "incidents" and "characters" in the BTCC and a year by year rundown of the Championship since the mid-80s.... yes, a potboiler to some extent but it'd be a highly entertaining one with the right writer and enough interviews with the main protagonists.

#875 Frank de Jong

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 10:22

The lack of books or other sources on touring car races - at first I concentrated on the ETCC, but it is amazing that there is no history of the BTCC either on the net or in a book - is the main reason why I made my site. At least it's a backbone for further research - and of course I would cooperate with any attempt for any book, just as I tried to help Martyn Jones and Francesco Panarotto (who has written a book about the racing history of the Fiat 128, a personal favourite I might add).

#876 petefenelon

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Posted 20 December 2004 - 11:39

Another cheapie, but excellent value - picked up a copy of the Tom Burnside (pics) Denise McCluggage (words) "American Racing". Yet another Konemann classic - gorgeous B&W photos (action, pit&paddock and "off duty" shots all included) from a range of US sports car races from the early 50s to late 60s. Everything from MG TFs in SCCA through to the early years of the Can-Am, in fact.

Doesn't attempt to tell a unified story; instead it presents photo essays on individual races (out of chronological order).

The pics are generally excellent, well-selected and have room to breathe, the small amount of text is entertaining, and all in all this is a very atmospheric and evocative book. I got my copy for fifteen quid, which I'd say makes it very good value.

#877 harryglorydays

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Posted 20 December 2004 - 13:26

Originally posted by petefenelon
Another cheapie, but excellent value - picked up a copy of the Tom Burnside (pics) Denise McCluggage (words) "American Racing". Yet another Konemann classic - gorgeous B&W photos (action, pit&paddock and "off duty" shots all included) from a range of US sports car races from the early 50s to late 60s. Everything from MG TFs in SCCA through to the early years of the Can-Am, in fact.


Let me second that recommendation. In MHO, Tom Burnside was one of the best "photojournalists" to ever shoot a race - certainly here in the States. Tom shot for both Life and Sports Illustrated and has captured some haunting photos of the golden era of the 50s and early 60s American road racing. McCluggage, of course, was one of the few women racers who could hold her own against the very best males of the era - and she's a great writer to boot. She founded Competition Press, the weekly racing newspaper "bible" that later became Autoweek. (And you guys complain about what's happened to MotorSport!)

Sample photos and ordering info is available at: www.tomburnside.com. If you order directly from him, the books come autographed. With the dollar devaluation, the book is a bargain.

#878 KJJ

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Posted 22 December 2004 - 17:08

Just received my copy of Graham Gauld's "Scottish Motor Racing and Drivers" ISBN no. 0-9549167-0-0. OK it costs £40 but it's pretty much essential for anyone interested in Scottish Motor Sport and Scottish drivers, and oh yes there've been one or two of those!

#879 Vitesse2

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Posted 31 December 2004 - 00:01

Having just received a copy today (bought very cheap from German eBay and still shrinkwrapped!), I'll third that! It's worth pointing out that the title and subtitle are somewhat misleading, since it not only includes the US sports car races you'd expect but also some excellent coverage of events elsewhere - Nassau, Cuba, Venezuela, Puerto Rico - with quite a number of excellent off-track shots of European drivers and several pages on the 1959 US GP, including pictures of both Rodger Ward's Kurtis and Bob Said's Connaught.

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#880 Barry Lake

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Posted 31 December 2004 - 05:47

Originally posted by m.tanney
  Has anyone read the new book called Vintage American Road Racing Cars, 1950-1970, by Harold Price? If so, what did you think of it?


I just received this book last night, so obviously I haven't read it. But I did browse through it, page by page.

It isn't quite what I expected. I thought it would be about the more prominent cars, as depicted on the cover, with lots of big pics. Instead, I found it is an encyclopedia of most, if not all, US-built racing sports cars - far more of them than I ever expected.

First impression was that the pics are too small, then realised this is because the book covers so many cars that even this weighty tome is struggling to fit it all in. I was surprised to find that Horst Kwech had built a number of cars under the name Ausca (also used in Australia by Paul England), then disappointed that the Woodill Wildfire is listed as "Woodhill" and there is no photo. Such a famous car, too, having won the one-off Canada to Mexico road race through the USA, driven by Tony Curtis, in 1953! :lol:

One can only assume that such a labour of love (it represents a mind-boggling degree of research over many years) would contain far more information than one ever expected to find, but also surely must have its share of slip-ups.

Overall, it gives me the impression that it will delight anyone who has an interest in US-built sports racing cars, particularly the more rare and unusual models - like the one that created downforce by hydraulically lifting, from the rear, almost the entire body of the car for corners, then lowered it again for the straights.

I got it at a bargain price - already reduced, then a further 30% off at Motorbooks.com during that company's pre-Christmas bargain sale - ultimately less than half the original price.

#881 BruceTC

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 07:18

Just finished the George Begg book on Bruce McLaren. I bought it via the Bruce McLaren trust in NZ as figured that it would take a long time to appear on a bopokshelf here in Perth. Great read - very interesting and some terrific insights into racing car development and manufacture in the 60s and 70s.

Great stuff about the Can-Am racing cars and how, with a lot of work, dedicated and hard working people, McLaren turned from an also ran in 1966 to class leader for 67 and beyond. Recommend it to any one interested in this period and in McLarens.

#882 Twin Window

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 10:56

I had a quick flick through Mike Cotton's Blue & Orange a couple of days ago, and was disappointed with the pictorial quality. :|

#883 Fred Gallagher

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Posted 08 January 2005 - 05:57

I bought "Blue & Orange" at the same time as "Vintage American Road Racing Cars" thinking I would love the first and flick through the second. Not so; was still flicking at 02.00 on December 25th!

Fred

#884 glyn parham

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Posted 08 January 2005 - 10:33

Frank.
The British Touring Car Championship book is really a biography of George Bevan and his triple success in the championship from 1970 to 1972.
Apparently Martin Morgan Jones is an Imp and Bevan fan and was given access to Georges' records as well many interviews with Doris and Peter Bevan to create this biography.
The title is used (I suspect) to help sell the book as it will have very little interest to the majority of motorsport fans, although I liked what I think was the working title of "Bevan & McGovern".
Quite agree that a two volume history of the BTCC would be great, but publishers like to know the bottom line is worthwhile for them, so I will just have to carrying on dreaming.
Glyn

#885 Catalina Park

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Posted 08 January 2005 - 13:37

Legends of Speed by Bill Woods (Brabham to Webber, Beechey to Brock)
The Story of Australia's great race drivers.

This book is rubbish!

Here is one of his better mistakes...

As written by Bill Woods
He even drove in the budding CART championship, which was in its infancy after the famous split with the Sprintcar Control Council of Australia (SCCA)



#886 Frank de Jong

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Posted 08 January 2005 - 14:51

Originally posted by glyn parham
Frank.
The British Touring Car Championship book is really a biography of George Bevan and his triple success in the championship from 1970 to 1972.
Apparently Martin Morgan Jones is an Imp and Bevan fan and was given access to Georges' records as well many interviews with Doris and Peter Bevan to create this biography.
The title is used (I suspect) to help sell the book as it will have very little interest to the majority of motorsport fans, although I liked what I think was the working title of "Bevan & McGovern".
Quite agree that a two volume history of the BTCC would be great, but publishers like to know the bottom line is worthwhile for them, so I will just have to carrying on dreaming.
Glyn


I'm aware of that, Glyn. It's just the idea you get when you see the book - it has a picture of an Imp AND a picture of an Escort TC on the cover - and that one is even on top. I understand a book must be sold, but now you may disappoint BTCC fans a little.
That said, the story on the Imp and Bevan is quite allright.

#887 dretceterini

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Posted 08 January 2005 - 17:24

Originally posted by Dennis David
Actually I have been reading a book called Sixpense House and it mentioned a study done in the 20's that estimated only 1 in 500 Americans are avid readers. This figure could well be even lower today. Now for the really scary fact 50% of American households did not purchase a single book last year!

If this figure is true then I bought books for 500 families last year!



You must have won the lottery to afford 500 books and be very lucky to have time to read that much! My wife and I buy a lot of books and magazines, but nowhere near that amount.

#888 subh

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 12:57

I can’t see any mention of Alex Zanardi’s autobiography.

#889 Dennis David

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 06:02

When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.

Desiderius Erasmus

#890 glyn parham

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 19:15

Frank.

Sorry if my post sounded a bit brusque, it was not meant to be anything more than a little bit of background as to why the book was written and given its title, which I agree is very misleading.

You will be pleased to know that the Bevan family are very pleased with the result and feel that it is a fitting memorial to George and his work.

Glyn

#891 billthekat

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 19:36

When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.

Desiderius Erasmus


Words some of us truly live by....

#892 Ruairidh

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 22:14

Just finished Graham Gauld's excellent "Ecurie Ecosse" - just want to recommend that if this period has any interest to you - and this book is not on your shelves, I'd drop a line to Graham and ask if he has any left. It really is that good :clap:

#893 Rob Ryder

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 22:15

I am not sure where to post this? The 'place to say....' thread or the 'Book News' sticky? :confused:
To hell with it, I'll post it to both :p

As a Christmas gift I received a copy of 'Motor Racing at Brands Hatch in the Seventies' by Chas Parker. If you like the 'Personal Photos from the Paddock/Track' threads you will love this book.

It is a collection of Parker's personal photos taken between 1970 and 1979, covering every type of 4 wheeled motor sport from Brands (including caravan racing :eek: ). Photo captions and short recollections of the race meetings he visited are the only text content, so do not expect an education. It is 96 pages (8.5in x 7.5in) of pure nostalgia! I think it is a snip at £12.99, so if you would like a break from the heavy research and hard reading pick up a copy of this book and lose yourself for an hour or two in your memories :)

'Motor Racing at Brands Hatch in the Seventies'
Chas Parker
Veloce Publishing
ISBN 1-904788-06-8

#894 Rob Ryder

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 22:16

I am not sure where to post this? The 'place to say....' thread or the 'Book News' sticky? :confused:
To hell with it, I'll post it to both :p

As a Christmas gift I received a copy of 'Motor Racing at Brands Hatch in the Seventies' by Chas Parker. If you like the 'Personal Photos from the Paddock/Track' threads you will love this book.

It is a collection of Parker's personal photos taken between 1970 and 1979, covering every type of 4 wheeled motor sport from Brands (including caravan racing :eek: ). Photo captions and short recollections of the race meetings he visited are the only text content, so do not expect an education. It is 96 pages (8.5in x 7.5in) of pure nostalgia! I think it is a snip at £12.99, so if you would like a break from the heavy research and hard reading pick up a copy of this book and lose yourself for an hour or two in your memories :)

'Motor Racing at Brands Hatch in the Seventies'
Chas Parker
Veloce Publishing
ISBN 1-904788-06-8

Edit: Amazon are currently selling this book at 30% discount!

#895 Bob Brzezinski

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 22:24

I'm not quite as earnest as David, but when I stop to think about the car books (and magazines) I buy it gets a bit embarrassing.

I have been lucky to have acquired several nice books lately, including "Maserati Birdcage to Supercage", "Blue and Orange", the "Vintage American Road Racing Specials" book, Phil Hill's new book, and "Bridgehampton: From the Streets to the Bridge." I have the Sebring 1970 book on order and am looking forward to receiving it.

The Maserati book is really wonderful, one of the best books I've seen in a while. I was rather disappointed in "Blue and Orange," probably because I have "That Certain Sound" and it seems to me like much of the book is a retelling of that. Wyer's book is certainly quoted liberally. I was also initially disappointed in the road racing specials book, until I too started considering the astounding number of cars it covers, at which point I started to appreciate it for what it is. The subject really deserves a multi-volume, Janos Wimpffen-type work, complete with loads of large-scale photos.

In looking through Hill's book, it seemed to me that I had read the text before, and I subsequently discovered the book is an anthology of Salon articles Hill has written for Road & Track over the years. That was a little disappointing to me, only because I was under the impression that the book was new ground when I ordered it. Hill is certainly a worthy author, and it's good that his articles can all be found in one place with some great photography; I was just expecting new insight.

The Bridgehampton book looks tremendous. I have not had much opportunity to do more than thumb through it, but it appears to be a classic in the making. I love the "then and now" photos, as well as the pictures of the track being laid out and constructed.

The Tom Burnside book mentioned above has some wonderful photos. I think my favorite is a shot of an awards ceremony featuring, among others, Fon de Portago and his sometime-girlfriend, B-movie actress Linda Christian. She looks positively radiant and to me the whole photo has a mystical air to it.

Denise McCluggage published a collection of essays about racing- and car-related subjects a few years back called "By Brooks too Broad for Leaping." Her insight into the personalities of such racing luminaries as Briggs Cunningham, Masten Gregory, Sir Stirling Moss, the Rodriguez brothers, Steve McQueen, Carroll Shelby, Taffy von Trips, etc. is intriguing. The book is a small, softcover work that I bought several copies of for friends. I wish I had bought more as an investment: http://store.motolit...brooktoobr.html

Vintage Motorsport magazine has also published a compilation of a series of ten or so articles it ran in the early 90's on road racing specials. The articles were by some accomplished authors such as Pete Lyons and the late Dean Batchelor. The original issues containing these articles are hard to come by, but they can all be found in one place now: http://vintagemotors...cific=453054468

The coverage is less encyclopedic than the "American Road Racing Specials" book, but it is liberally laced with photos and the writing is very good.

Sorry if this post talks about books already fully discussed. I have not had the time to go through every page on this topic--

Bob

#896 D-Type

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 23:46

I've just bought Safari Rally - the first 40 years by Roger Barnard. Although published in 1992, this pristine copy was on the shelf in my local Waterstones. Either it's been reprinted or they've finally cleared the back of the stockroom!

I grew up in Kenya where Easter meant listening to the radio broadcasts every couple of hours and updating my chart of time lost, and going into Safari HQ in Nairobi to check the retirements. Then later 'helping out' at a control (washing race numbers and lights and windscreen if they'd let me). And with fellow members of the Vespa Club piloting competitors to the parque ferme or to scrutineering (it kept us out of trouble and we were part of the scene). So I obviously enjoyed the book.

The book is written by a former official and competitor and has the ring of authenticity about it. As far as I can see it is accurate. It triggered a lot of memories and told me some things I didn't know.

At £14.99 worth a reading if you have any interest in Rallies.


Edit: Typos

#897 Rob Ryder

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 11:41

'Motor Racing at Brands Hatch in the Seventies'
Chas Parker
Veloce Publishing
ISBN 1-904788-06-8

Amazon are currently selling this book at 30% discount!

#898 Joe Fan

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 21:09

Add 12 Hours of Sebring by Harry Hurst to the list.

:up: I got the book this week and I am very happy to add it in my collection. It is gorgeous and a real bargain for a hardback book at $25. Great pics of the cars and drivers in that race with a spot varnish applied to them that really brings them out. Some great quotes from high profile types like Mario Andretti, Dan Gurney and Brian Redman. A Masten Gregory anecdote which I did not know about, foreword by Mario Andretti and a complete race result table. And if you are a Steve McQueen fan--you'll like the pics of him in this book. A friend of mine, Joe Egle, ordered the book after he saw the book rewiew in Road & Track and he really likes it too. So TNF faithful, help Harry out by purchasing a book via his website at: http://www.glorydaysofracing.com/

P.S. I would also like to see book in this format for a few more great races. I've got a few in mind.

#899 Darren Galpin

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 08:29

Not a book, but a DVD sold as part of a series in newsagents in Brazil. Entitled "Racing Through Time", it is in English with optional Portuguese subtitles - I have number 3, which covers Fangio and Clark. The Fangio program features coverage from the Rio de Janeiro GP at Gavea, which was quite impressive. The Clark program featured an interview with Graham Gauld. Looks like it might been a series of programs which went out on ESPN? Whatever, well worth the £5 or so cost!

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#900 petefenelon

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 10:48

If anyone is in London -- Foyles have a sale on and there are some racing bargains there (mixed in with physical sciences and other transport stuff on the first floor, some distance from the "regular price" car books).

There are a few Autocourses and Automobile Years left, as well as the big pile of "modern" Mille Miglia yearbooks that they've been trying to shift for years, and quite a lot of books on American racing - at half price I picked up Bobby Rahal - The Graceful Champion, the Ludvigsen Library picture book on Chaparrals (definitely worth it for the pics), Tony Sakkis' nicely-written but desperately-in-need-of-proofreading Indy Racing Legends and a curious but entertaining compilation of short historical articles called Race Car Flashback - A Celebration of America's Affair with Auto Racing. There was still quite a lot of decent stuff left much of which I already had - a couple of copies of DCN/Geoff Goddard's "Track Pass" were probably the highlights.