Jump to content


Photo

The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


  • Please log in to reply
7875 replies to this topic

#951 275 GTB-4

275 GTB-4
  • Member

  • 7,134 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 14 March 2005 - 05:57

Originally posted by fines
Rennmax, please! :)


Rennmax are quicker with only one n ;)

Advertisement

#952 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 14 March 2005 - 15:38

Rennmaxes?;)

#953 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 24,452 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 14 March 2005 - 18:13

Rennmaxima? :p

#954 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,654 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 14 March 2005 - 19:51

Rennmaces.

#955 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Nostalgia Forum Moderator

  • 24,452 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 14 March 2005 - 19:58

Bloody Latin scholars :rolleyes: :p

#956 Frank S

Frank S
  • Member

  • 2,157 posts
  • Joined: September 02

Posted 22 March 2005 - 05:25

MASERATI 450S
The fastest sports racing car of the 50's
A complete racing history from 1956 to 1962
Michel Bollée and Willem Oosthoek


I am torn: shall I say what I know by now, or go on reading ... ?

A fine, beautiful book. Plenty information (I can not read for accuracy), wonderful photos, substantial lap-size presence.

Don't let the stray apostrophe on the cover dissuade you from acquiring and enjoying this one.

--
Frank S

edit: misspelling

#957 Magee

Magee
  • Member

  • 379 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 23 March 2005 - 03:48

BOOK REVIEW by Michael Gee

http://img102.exs.cx...ings11561ae.jpg foto by Art Evans of Hill chasing Shelby


Evans, Art Race Legends of the Fabulous Fifties ISBN 0-970507321
Photo Data Research, Redondo Beach, California 2003. 133 pp.

A few years ago, Art Evans published The Fabulous Fifties, a Decade of Sports Car Racing in Southern California that became so popular it sold out quickly. Rather than reprint it he put together this new Race Legends book.
Carroll Shelby opens the book by declaring how proud he is of Evan’s book. “Many of the great race drivers of the era either started in Southern California or came here to race.”
Shelby mentions Phil Hill, Rodger Ward, Dan Gurney, Sam Hanks, and Parnelli Jones starting in California. Sir Jack Brabham, Briggs Cunningham, John Fitch, Sir Stirling Moss, Bobby Unser and many others (including Shelby) went there to compete. Shelby added, “…the fifties was the greatest time to be a race driver.”
Fifty individuals are alphabetically profiled from Bob Akin to John von Neumann, and with the contents focusing on Southern California, there had to be several actors included. All these legends were those who Evans says, “…were important in my life.” He also highlights Sir Jack Brabham, Juan Manuel Fangio, and Sir Stirling Moss all of whom were “…the most significant drivers of the fabulous fifties.”

Each of the profiles provides background information and shows photos of the individual as he/she was in the 50s along with a recent full-page portrait.
Incidentally, sports car racing was active in British Columbia and in Washington State. Abbotsford airfield, in the Fraser Valley, was being used for racing starting in 1950. Also, former airfields in Washington such as Shelton, Ellensburg, Bellingham and Paine Field among others were very active. A few drivers from these areas also ventured to California back in the 50s. Pete Lovely and Jerry Grant, in this book, were two.
In addition to the Legends’ section Evans has added several short sections of background racing information.
He supplies brief information on races held on public roads early in the history of racing from 1885 in Europe to recent open-road activities in Nevada and Texas. The late Rodger Ward organized road-racing events in those states.
One page, following the Public Highways section, describes City Streets racing starting with a mention of Bridgehampton in 1915 up to the CART series in Long Beach. Evans adds that, “Most city-street venues had either been abandoned or replaced by purpose-built facilities”, by the end of the 50s.
The last section, but one, provides information on several road-racing tracks starting with Watkins Glen and ending with Torrey Pines, a total of eight significant sites in the U.S. and Mexico.
Many of us in North America who were around in the 50s were influenced by events in California. News filtered out to us about the racing events in California mixed in with Hollywood films, T-shirt weather, surfing, and entertainment sites. People were so star-struck in the 50s that the most interesting visit was a tour of the neighborhood of the stars. For many, the rush was on to go there at least for a visit if not to set up roots. For example, in another recent book Evans describes Ken Miles’ career after leaving England for California. Shelby left Texas for California as well.
Evans has put together a valuable personal view of people and events in his life in the Golden State. Many of those who raced in California in the 50s became the phalanx that spurred the growth of sports car racing throughout the world. Many car and engine developments blossomed there starting in the 50s and astounded the racing fraternity and pushed ahead quickly the improvements in car body design and engine power in the 60s.
This book provides a personal look by Evans that shows the unequalled contributing foundation of the post-war racing pioneers, their cars, and their determination to show the world what they could do.

#958 SEdward

SEdward
  • Member

  • 837 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 29 March 2005 - 11:27

I am looking for a biography of Lorenzo Bandini.

So far, all I have found is "Nato per correre. La vera storia di Lorenzo Bandini", from Baldini and Castoldi. A second edition was published in 1967, which is hardly surprising.

Is anyone aware of any other biographies of Bandini?

Edward

#959 Paul Medici

Paul Medici
  • Member

  • 441 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 01 April 2005 - 18:26

I will second Frank S's remarks about MASERATI 450S , and only add that there are also several very nice period color photos of the cars and their drivers included.

Well done, Michel Bollee and Willem Oosthoek!!
.
.
.
.

Advertisement

#960 green-blood

green-blood
  • Member

  • 706 posts
  • Joined: May 00

Posted 04 April 2005 - 07:48

ordered my "kings of the nurburgring" by chris nixon today... wa hoooo... come on mr postman come on..

#961 BANZAI

BANZAI
  • Member

  • 100 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 04 April 2005 - 08:04

Originally posted by SEdward
I am looking for a biography of Lorenzo Bandini.

So far, all I have found is "Nato per correre. La vera storia di Lorenzo Bandini", from Baldini and Castoldi. A second edition was published in 1967, which is hardly surprising.

Is anyone aware of any other biographies of Bandini?

Edward




Hi
The only other two that I know exist are;

ADDIO BANDINI - FRANCO LINI 1967

LORENZO BANDINI - GIACOMO SIRONI 1997

Hope this helps you out.

Rob

#962 SEdward

SEdward
  • Member

  • 837 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 04 April 2005 - 18:49

Many thanks Rob.

Edward

#963 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 04 April 2005 - 19:05

Here is what comes up on a serch on Bandini at Libreria 'Dell Automobile in Milan. The Lini book has just been re-issued..


ADDIO BANDINI
Franco Lini Luigi Costantini


ALLA DESTRA DEL DRAKE
Ed. rilegata/Hardbound ed.
Franco Gozzi

ALLA DESTRA DEL DRAKE
Edizione Speciale in pelle/Special Leatherbound Edition
Franco Gozzi


IL SOGNO ROSSO: LE GIOIE TERRIBILI DI 11 PILOTI FERRARI
Pino Casamassima


LE MOTO DA CORSA AL CIRCUITO DEL LARIO 1921/1939
S. Colombo


MEMOIRS OF ENZO FERRARI’S LIEUTENANT
Ed. rilegata/Hardbound ed.
Franco Gozzi


MEMOIRS OF ENZO FERRARI’S LIEUTENANT
Edizione Speciale in pelle/Special Leatherbound Edition
Franco Gozzi

#964 green-blood

green-blood
  • Member

  • 706 posts
  • Joined: May 00

Posted 04 April 2005 - 21:04

now that I am home and over the jubilation of spending yet another fortune on Chris Nixons scribbles ;) I've been rearranging my book shelves.

I recently bought a first edition 1976 copy of Paul Frere's 911 Story, I know the book was regularly updated, until 2002 with a 7th edition, and I know Paul Frere has a Boxster version on the way this summer but with the new 997 model 911 now on the market will ther be an 8th edition, I'd like to book-end this series, however with all due respect Mr Frere is getting on... I hope we get the chance to read his views on this latest and dynamiclaly greatest 911

anyone got the inside word from Haynes???

#965 JohnS

JohnS
  • Member

  • 295 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 12 April 2005 - 19:41

Does anyone have this new book about Monza? Worth buying?

http://www.collector...k/shop/889.html

Thanks

John

#966 Magee

Magee
  • Member

  • 379 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 13 April 2005 - 19:20

Book Review by Michael Gee


Racing with Mercedes, by John Fitch
ISBN 0-9705073-6-4.128 pp., $29.95, Photo Data Research, Redondo Beach, Calif., 2005.

Here’s another exciting book from Art Evans who continues with his 1950s series of motor sports history. Don Klein, editor-in-chief of the magazine “Mercedes Momentum” assists John Fitch with this manuscript. Also, Mercedes-Benz Archives provides many of the striking photographs in this interesting work.
During the early 50s, Fitch was in action both with Briggs Cunningham racing efforts and Alfred Neubaurer’s Mercedes-Benz efforts on tracks in the UK, Europe, US, and Mexico.
Included in the “Introduction” are comments by Juan Fangio (printed in a previous book) recognizing Fitch as a true sportsman and gentleman. Fangio was a witness to Fitch’s driving achievements back in the 50s. Both drove for Mercedes-Benz along with Stirling Moss, Karl Kling, Hermann Lang, Olivier Gendebien, Desmond Titterington, and others.
Fitch opens with his recollections of his first competitive ride in a 356 Porsche coupe at the demanding 14-mile circuit Nurburgring (also new to him). This leads to several practice laps in the new Mercedes 300 SL at the same circuit. The writing is detailed and complete making a very exciting opening chapter.
The results in Germany lead to a 300 SL driving opportunity in the Carrera Panamericana in Mexico. Fitch continues his narrative detailing compelling race-by-race details of this definite torture test.
In 1955, Fitch is busy again with Mercedes on the Mille Miglia circuit in a 300SL. Here he meets a few famous drivers and writers working as navigators. He also covers this with extremely interesting inside details
In the next chapter, Fitch describes events at Le Mans in 1955. In this part he adds a postscript to the tragic events there and the emotions of the drivers who “…were not the principal players – the tragedy was.” . Later he doubles with Moss in a 300 SLR in Northern Ireland in September 1955.
In the last quarter of 1955, Mercedes achieves three world titles and then retires from motor racing. Fitch has a whirlwind year, one which he occasionally reflects on trying to accept the fact that he took in so much in such a short time.
The book contains a chapter devoted to the 300SLR – the star of 1955. Fitch describes it as the “most successful racing sports car ever.” And the photo on p. 89 reveals a 50s car that would not look out of place today.
The amazing thing about Fitch is that he is still involved in motor sports at 88. He’s been active driving a 300 SL at Bonneville Flats chasing a land-speed record. He’s due for another run this year.
John Fitch’s lifetime has been a study of fighting the odds, but also, later in his life, developing automobile safety devices. . He’s been a risk-taker, but now he’s active in reducing risks for others. But he’s also not giving up on motor sport.

http://www.racesafet...ss/mm_2002.html

#967 Keir

Keir
  • Member

  • 5,226 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 20 April 2005 - 16:16

As you may or may not know, I have become a "Motoring Book" merchant.

The books can not be had cheaply but are in mint condition.

Autocourse 79
Autocourse 82
Autocourse, The History of the GP Car - 66 to 85
The Grand Prix Carpetbaggers
Behind the Scenes - Louis Stanley

More to come !!

Keir

kjdtrk@hotmail.com

#968 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 26 April 2005 - 15:24

Bob Norton's 4CDs full of scans of the Californian tabloid "Motoracing" arrived today - for anyone interested in American racing in the 50s/60s, or sports cars and sports car racing in general, this is a goldmine. There's going to be a lot to read and look at in them and the scans are good enough to print off and read offline.

A real labour of love, and at a very reasonable price. Excellent stuff indeed - a fuller review will no doubt follow. *ALMOST* makes me want to try to get the rights to 'Competition Car';)

#969 Twin Window

Twin Window
  • Nostalgia Host

  • 6,611 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted 26 April 2005 - 23:36

Originally posted by petefenelon

*ALMOST* makes me want to try to get the rights to 'Competition Car';)

:up:

A great publication; I treasure mine.

#970 Bud Byrnes

Bud Byrnes
  • New Member

  • 14 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 28 April 2005 - 18:26

I just did a quick search on the web (Amazon, Abebooks, Motorbooks) and could not find "The Pirhana Club". Would you please post the publisher and ISBN number?

#971 MichaelM

MichaelM
  • Member

  • 57 posts
  • Joined: April 05

Posted 28 April 2005 - 19:36

Look under "The Piranha Club".

ISBN: 1852279079

#972 David Birchall

David Birchall
  • Member

  • 3,006 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 29 April 2005 - 00:22

I very seldom post on this thread but I find myself in need of money!!

I need to sell my copy of "The Immortal 2.9" by Simon Moore. How does one go about selling a book for (Hopefully) top money? :eek:

ps I need the money to put into my Aston DB2....
David B

#973 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 29 April 2005 - 09:38

Originally posted by David Birchall
I very seldom post on this thread but I find myself in need of money!!

I need to sell my copy of "The Immortal 2.9" by Simon Moore. How does one go about selling a book for (Hopefully) top money? :eek:

ps I need the money to put into my Aston DB2....
David B


For that particular book there will be no shortage of buyers.... I would suggest phoning around some of the "usual suspects" dealers (Collectors' Carbooks, Chaters, Motor Books etc.) to see if they're interested in taking it off your hands; I'd also consider eBay, where there is a small but spirited market in top-end automotive books.

As a data point, Collector's Carbooks have a signed copy for £695 at the moment. Ouch.
(although I believe the last few copies of the book were sold retail for about 1/3 off the normal price).

#974 dmj

dmj
  • Member

  • 1,957 posts
  • Joined: August 01

Posted 30 April 2005 - 13:29

Bought some books recently and would like to offer a view, as there were not much comments.

Lorie Coffey & Jan Moller: "Didier - Dreams and nightmares"
Inside this is stated that reason for much of French people that knew Pironi to refuse talking about him nowadays lays in French custom of not saying anything negative about deceased persons... and they supposedly have nothing good to say about him. If I'd stick with that rule I'd never post a comment on this book... but then I'm not French.

Book is obviously a labour of love but that's about anything positive one can say about it. Scarcely any new data, not enough research put into it, some factual mistakes, people disappearing from particular stories without any word on explanation what happened next... For example, well known wedding that took place shortly before Imola 1982. is mentioned but not a single word is in book about further destiny of Catherine, Didier's wife! Later affairs and girlfriends are mentioned but not a single word more about his wife or ex-wife! Racing details are also lacking deeper analysis, even major points like that fateful race are going on it too light way - for example, there is comment that recently is discovered that "Slow" pit signal is shown for the first time when Pironi was in lead, without stating the source for that thesis (and shouldn't that one be crucial if one writes a book with intention of defying Pironi from critics accumulated in last 20+ years?)

My suggestion: avoid it.

Bob Gates: "Vukovich"
I'm hooked. Even if I still didn't get to Indy part, just the details of Vuky's childhood and midget racing are already worth purchasing and reading the whole book. I didn't read much racing biographies so far but this one is olready best by the long margin. Stunning piece of work, highly recommended.

#975 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,654 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 30 April 2005 - 19:41

Originally posted by petefenelon

As a data point, Collector's Carbooks have a signed copy for £695 at the moment. Ouch.
(although I believe the last few copies of the book were sold retail for about 1/3 off the normal price).

2.9 or 2.3?

#976 Magee

Magee
  • Member

  • 379 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 06 May 2005 - 16:40

BOOK REVIEW by Michael Gee


Pebble Beach Remembered by Art Evans, Photo Data Research, Redondo Beach, California, 2005, ISBN 0-9705073-5-6, 240 pp, $34.95

This book, classified as a “scrapbook” by Art Evans follows in line with his series of books of sports car racing in the 1950s in California – Race Legends of the Fabulous Fifties, Ken Miles and Torrey Pines Remembered. “Its (Pebble Beach Remembered) forte is the reproduction of original documents and archival photographs,” says Evans.
The sports car races started in November 1950 through the auspices of the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) and with permission of The Del Monte Properties Company extending up to 1956. In 1957 the race switched to Laguna Seca for reasons outlined in the “Aftermath” section.
The “scrapbook” format is very complete. In addition to photos, driver details, race and Concours results, magazine articles, news articles, interviews, driver recollections, and much more.
The variety of cars is a notable feature. British cars dominated the field in number and results during the early years. Later came the Porsches, Alfa Romeo’s and Corvette’s. MG TC and TD’s dominated the small-bore races, and Jaguars XK120 and 140’s dominated the big bore classes in 1950. By 1957, Porsche 1600’s, Ferrari’s, Aston Martin’s and Maserati’s contributed to faster races.
Drivers came mostly from California, and others from Texas (Hall and Shelby), Kansas (Gregory), Washington (Lovely), at the beginning of their racing careers. In fact, along the Pacific Coast many drivers were also attracted to Pebble Beach from Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. At least seven drivers from Vancouver, BC raced there. These drivers, in turn, took their experiences and stories back to their race clubs promoting the growth of sports car racing in their hometowns. A conduit was built up during the early 50s that left a legacy of international racing in the USA, Canada, and Mexico.
Most important to note, in the history of motor sport, were the drivers who graduated from Pebble Beach and other tracks then described as “European Style Racing” sites. Also, in that style of racing, developed Formula 3 competition provided with their own races including 500 cc open-wheelers – Cooper, (Britain), Effyh (Sweden), Kieft (Ireland), Trimax, Enfield, and Ariel (USA). In 1953 there was a 11-car field.
Art Evans has produced a very valuable resource, in this book, for his readers to be transported back to the 50s to understand the “European racing” phenomenon back then and the obvious differences to traditional tracks.
As part of his presentation, Evans has included valuable interviews of drivers active at that time – John Von Neumann, Phil Hill, Bill Pollack, Cy Yedar, Riddelle Gregory, Pete Lovely, and Carroll Shelby.
Al Coppel said it all in his article of the race at Pebble Beach in 1950, “What does the future hold? Great racing, of course. But far more than that. The continuance of a tradition, the thrill of a race that is now – and will probably always – the Big Race in America”
Finally, with this book, Art Evans takes us as close as possible to participants and events in the 1950s in California at Pebble Beach. His book is a valuable resource of the evolution, through the 50s, of. “European Style Racing”.

#977 Pils1989

Pils1989
  • Member

  • 1,111 posts
  • Joined: December 02

Posted 06 May 2005 - 20:01

Hi,

Could someone advice me about a book on Jaguar cars which could suit a thirteen year old kid for his birthday please?

Thank you:)

#978 Ivan

Ivan
  • Member

  • 6,646 posts
  • Joined: March 99

Posted 06 May 2005 - 21:41

have you looked in the Atlas bookstore?

#979 Pils1989

Pils1989
  • Member

  • 1,111 posts
  • Joined: December 02

Posted 06 May 2005 - 23:34

Yes and elsewhere too but I would need to check the books in person to know if one of them suits a kid and also I don't have any books specialized on Jaguar :
Maybe a book with more pictures than text :confused:

Advertisement

#980 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 07 May 2005 - 03:24

Originally posted by Pils1989
Yes and elsewhere too but I would need to check the books in person to know if one of them suits a kid and also I don't have any books specialized on Jaguar :
Maybe a book with more pictures than text :confused:


Pils1989

My advice would be to take care not to underestimate the intelligence of a 13 year old kid. I began collecting motoring books when I was 12 years old and I knew a good book from a "dud" even then. To receive what I call "picture books" as a present was always a disappointment - yet these are the big sellers to well-intentioned relatives buying birthday and Christmas presents.

Better, I believe, to get him started on the right foot with a well-researched book.

If you were in Australia, I could direct you to www.pitstop.net.au which is The Pitstop Bookshop in Perth, Western Australia, and know they would give you good advice and deliver the book promptly. The owner of the business, an Englishman, recently revealed he was a spectator - as a kid - at the 1955 Tourist Trophy at Dundrod.

Everyone in the place is a motoring enthusiast in some way or other. Between them, they cover the whole spectrum. Even the young lady who wraps the parcels for postage has an early Mustang.

Here, from their web site, are some possibilities. I can't say I know all of these books, but the summaries on this site are usually a very good guide.

http://www.pitstop.n...13PUM&PLU=12455

http://www.pitstop.n...13PUM&PLU=12536

http://www.pitstop.n...13PUM&PLU=15324

http://www.pitstop.n...13PUM&PLU=15231

http://www.pitstop.n...S13PUM&PLU=9639

Since you are in the US, I would suggest checking what The Pitstop Bookshop has to say on its web site, as above, then shop around in the US at motorbooks.com, amazon.com etc.

#981 Ivan

Ivan
  • Member

  • 6,646 posts
  • Joined: March 99

Posted 07 May 2005 - 04:44

try this
motorsport collector

and this
amazon uk

I get a lot of my books from here

#982 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 07 May 2005 - 08:05

Does anyone of you know the book "USAC Sprint Car History 1956-1980" by Carl Hungness? What's in it, is it "only" a general historic write-up or does it contain specific information about cars and races? Good pictures?

#983 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 07 May 2005 - 08:19

"Kurtis-Kraft Midget Geneology Companion Edition, An Illustrated History" by Bill Montgomery

Anyone heard of this book? Anyone own it or "Kurtis-Kraft Midget–A Genealogy of Speed"? I know Don Capps has the second (older) one, and he praised it when new, but I'm somehow reluctant to spend 80+ bucks on the two of them without knowing either. Is it somehow viable to buy only the newer one, or do I need to have both because it's a "companion edition" rather than an "update"?

#984 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,118 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 07 May 2005 - 12:39

Originally posted by Pils1989
Hi,

Could someone advice me about a book on Jaguar cars which could suit a thirteen year old kid for his birthday please?

Thank you:)

It really depend on how interested the youngster is.

For example I have Jaguar, the Sporting Heritage by Paul Skilleter, Virgin Publishing, 2000 ISBN 1 85227 889 7. It covers the whole spectrum of Jaguars from the SS sidecars to the Formula 1 cars. A fair amount of text, which is readable and accurate plus lots of pictures.
A keen youngster would love it but a vaguely interested one you are trying to get interested would spend an hour looking at the pictures and consign it to the top of the wardrobe or under the bed - wherever the dust gathers thickest.

There are loads of Jaguar books out there ranging from lightweight pot boilers to TNF-level of detail etc. As you say, you really have to look at a book to judge it.

#985 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 07 May 2005 - 13:39

Originally posted by fines
"Kurtis-Kraft Midget Geneology Companion Edition, An Illustrated History" by Bill Montgomery

Anyone heard of this book? Anyone own it or "Kurtis-Kraft Midget–A Genealogy of Speed"? I know Don Capps has the second (older) one, and he praised it when new, but I'm somehow reluctant to spend 80+ bucks on the two of them without knowing either. Is it somehow viable to buy only the newer one, or do I need to have both because it's a "companion edition" rather than an "update"?



Michael

I have "Kurtis-Kraft Midget–A Genealogy of Speed" and, if you are interested in the history of these cars (ALL midget cars, no sprint cars etc) I think it is a "must have".

Montgomery has made a serious attempt at recording all the cars by chassis numbers, then tracing their histories from the first owner onwards. Having said that, the text is brief and short on dates, but does try to mention all the known owners of each car and also there are from one to three photos of most of the cars, showing them in various colour schemes and with different drivers.

On the one hand you would be impressed and pleased. On the other hand - knowing something of your passion and thirst for detail - you will be left wanting for more. Considering how difficult midget racing would be to research compared to the bigger cars, I think he has done a great job.

I don't have the Companion Edition yet - but I definitely will buy it. As I understand it, this second book has been inspired by all the additional information stirred up by the original. I also understand (though am not 100 per cent sure) that it definitely is an addendum, not an "updated, second edition". I believe you need both books

As I said, if midget cars are now included in your "need to know" list, then you have to have these books.

As for "USAC Sprint Car History 1956-1980" by Carl Hungness, I do also have this book, but can't get to it at the moment (too many other books between me and it, and no room to shuffle them). So I am going from memory. The way I remember it is that it is more of an overall story. I don't remember any detailed results (though I could be wrong) and, as for photos, my memory is saying that those that are there are good, but probably not enough cars would be covered to satisfy your desires.

My guess is that you probably could get by without this one, although I also suspect it would contribute to some extent to your search.

If I can get to it before anyone else replies with better information, I will have another look at it.

#986 Pils1989

Pils1989
  • Member

  • 1,111 posts
  • Joined: December 02

Posted 07 May 2005 - 13:43

Thank you for the advices!
I've ordered Jaguar, the Sporting Heritage :up:

#987 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 07 May 2005 - 19:25

Originally posted by D-Type
It really depend on how interested the youngster is.

For example I have Jaguar, the Sporting Heritage by Paul Skilleter, Virgin Publishing, 2000 ISBN 1 85227 889 7. It covers the whole spectrum of Jaguars from the SS sidecars to the Formula 1 cars. A fair amount of text, which is readable and accurate plus lots of pictures.
A keen youngster would love it but a vaguely interested one you are trying to get interested would spend an hour looking at the pictures and consign it to the top of the wardrobe or under the bed - wherever the dust gathers thickest.

There are loads of Jaguar books out there ranging from lightweight pot boilers to TNF-level of detail etc. As you say, you really have to look at a book to judge it.


The Skilleter book is very handsome, I find it a bit lightweight (being a devoted worshipper at the shrine of Andrew Whyte) but I've seen copies for a tenner in remaindered/outlet bookshops - at that price it's very good value.

For something with a bit more meat but less glitz I'd recommend Paul Parker's "Jaguar At Le Mans" - a good and clear explanation of the Cat's long and successful career at La Sarthe. Well-priced and readable.

#988 Jim Thurman

Jim Thurman
  • Member

  • 4,187 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 07 May 2005 - 20:12

Originally posted by fines
Does anyone of you know the book "USAC Sprint Car History 1956-1980" by Carl Hungness? What's in it, is it "only" a general historic write-up or does it contain specific information about cars and races? Good pictures?


My brother managed to find a used copy for me about 11-12 years ago, during the time it was out of print.

Not extremely detailed, but broken down year by year with a re-cap for each season (quite short for earlier seasons :), point standings - both driver and owner (and Midwest and East prior to being combined in 1960), and table of race winners by date (with car number and name), followed by a section of many b&w pictures from that respective season. The pictures feature many action shots, posed of drivers sitting in their cars and driver head shots. Many of the fatal accidents from the era are pictured, for anyone that has issues with that aspect (the beginning or middle of the incident - not the aftermath, I don't want to make it seem as if they are terribly graphic, as they are not).

The season re-cap text covers how the points championship played out, but not a lot on tech end (other than the arrival and emergence of the Chevrolet engine) with occasional forays into peripheral matters. Much more space spent on the seasons from the 60's and 70's.

Overall, I've found it very useful, even more so when considering the lack of material on USAC Sprint Cars.

#989 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 08 May 2005 - 09:14

Jim

Obviously the Hungness book is more informative than I had remembered. The thought did keep going through my mind that Hungness is more of a serious historian than the "belt it out and grab the money" school.

Looks like fines is about to do his bit for boosting the US economy.

#990 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 08 May 2005 - 12:56

Thanks Barry and Jim for your detailed info.

Actually, I was hoping to find something useful on Sprint Cars since that's a terrain I would dearly love to explore more thoroughly. Midgets are certainly an interesting subject, but I feel this is such a big field I'd surely get lost at this stage, and anyway Sprints come first in my hierarchy! :D

Having said that, I still feel like skipping the Hungness book and go for at least one of the Montgomery deals. Reading your observations, I now think I remember browsing the Hungness book at the Trips library, and finding it interesting, but rather not vital. I will check on my next visit, and if it's there I don't think I'll need to buy it.


OT: Barry, I know you're still waiting on something - I haven't forgotten. I know I'm testing your patience, but the day will come... :blush:;)

#991 Keir

Keir
  • Member

  • 5,226 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 09 May 2005 - 16:13

The McLaren History by Doug Nye can be had for a mere $35 American from,

Keir's Motoring Books

Details at

kjdtrk@hotmail.com

#992 simonlewisbooks

simonlewisbooks
  • Member

  • 2,118 posts
  • Joined: January 02

Posted 10 May 2005 - 09:06

Originally posted by fines
[B] Actually, I was hoping to find something useful on Sprint Cars [B]

Fines,
have you seen STAND ON THE GAS by Joe Scalzo? Sprint car history up to mid 70s by a man who knew all the greats of the era, Jan Opperman, Don Branson, the Bettenhausens etc etc.
Rather lurid with a lot of accident photos and such but a real eye opener to anyone from this side of the Atlantic not really used to the full fury of this kind of racing. A very interesting read. Well recommended. Sadly I don't have one in stock right now but they are about.

Simon Lewis
Transport Books
www.simonlewis.com
Purveyors of Motor Sport Books and Photos since 1985

#993 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 11 May 2005 - 15:40

My copy of Anthony Pritchard's new book on sports-racing cars arrived today. It's pretty much as I expected - a series of short, well-illustrated profiles of sports-racers through history, with nothing Earth-shattering in either words or (well-chosen) pictures. A sensibly-priced book with a lot to look at and a moderate amount to read. It's far from being the last word on any of these cars, but it's nice to see the history of the sports-racer gathered together in one manageable volume - I can't think of any other book that tries to duplicate what Pritchard is doing. Didn't spot any obvious bloopers in a quick flick through it at lunchtime. Will report back with more detail later, although initial impressions are that this is obviously a good general "reading" book rather than heavy-duty reference material a la TATS.;)


EDIT: I've had a more extensive flick - admirably pithy prose, some very nice cutaways, but a couple of (subjective) flaws with the selection of cars. No Audi R8 (although the Bentley cousin gets in), and no Peugeot 905 or Jag XJR14 as an example of the "3.5l" Group C years. Yet the Lola GT gets in there in its own right whereas most of us I think would regard it as little more than a prequel to the GT40....



#994 Twin Window

Twin Window
  • Nostalgia Host

  • 6,611 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted 11 May 2005 - 23:16

I've just proof-read the forthcoming Formula 1 in Camera 1980-89 to be published by Haynes, featuring Rainer Schlegelmilch photography and words by (former Autosport editor) Quentin Spurring.

For those who regard the 1980s as one of their favourite eras, this will be a must-have publication. It follows on from the 1970s edition, written by Paul Parker.

#995 theunions

theunions
  • Member

  • 638 posts
  • Joined: October 02

Posted 12 May 2005 - 05:55

Janet Guthrie has apparently finally found a publisher for her long-shelved autobiography and will be signing copies throughout Indy later this month. Not sure of the actual release date though.

#996 Keir

Keir
  • Member

  • 5,226 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 12 May 2005 - 17:43

I have two of Nye's books gathering dust. Won't someone take them off my hands for a mere bit of compensation ??

#997 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,118 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 12 May 2005 - 22:32

Keir, please don't hijack this thread for a series of advertisments.

#998 Twin Window

Twin Window
  • Nostalgia Host

  • 6,611 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted 13 May 2005 - 06:43

Duncan's right, Keir - try an ad in the 'For sale & want' forum. :up:

#999 Keir

Keir
  • Member

  • 5,226 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 13 May 2005 - 14:48

Twinny,
Been there, done that !

No hijacking on my part, just talking about books .

Advertisement

#1000 FLB

FLB
  • Member

  • 1,930 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 16 May 2005 - 22:36

Just found on Trackforum (I searched on TNF and found no mention of it) :

http://www.indianare...s.com/index.asp

It's a link to the author of INDY: Racing Before the 500, a book about the races held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1909 and 1910. From the website, it seems a very well-researched book. The author describes his methodology on his website (and acknowledges there is such a thing as methodology in racing history), so this does not seem to be a book reporting research done by others, but is new reasearch itself :up: