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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#1151 ensign14

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 14:33

Originally posted by green-blood
off topic I have a book on Hiroshima and one on Krakatoa to get through aswell - strangely similar outcomes from one manmade disaster and one natural disaster.

Is the Krakatoa book the Simon Winchester one? He's a very good author. His book on the history of the OED is a treat, as well as his book "Outposts" on the remnants of Empire.

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#1152 petefenelon

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 14:40

Originally posted by ensign14
Is the Krakatoa book the Simon Winchester one? He's a very good author. His book on the history of the OED is a treat, as well as his book "Outposts" on the remnants of Empire.


His OED book actually inspired me to "upgrade" from my beloved Shorter to the one-volume "Compact Edition" of the full OED. Very useful! :)

#1153 fudjones

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 16:52

Originally posted by Mallory Dan
Like Pete, I couldn't believe how bad the Starkey Lola books are. Jammed packed full of mistakes/typos/simple wrong facts, and seemingly without any chronology at all. Why is Eric B so unco-operative does anyone know ?

I'm stuck with books on Lancashire Airfields in WW2, the Alan Henry Peterson book, then onto the Lee Sharpe and Ian Botham autobiogs, so not much reading space available !


When writing the GT40 book, I had been helped enormously with info about building the first GT40s by Bob Rushbrook, Eric's Number 2, and by Laurie Bray, mechanic for the first GT40s and later Lola Works Manager. When I finished the GT40 book I wanted to do a book on the Lola T70, so naturally I went back to Lola. Eric's words to me were "I am not interested in history; only the next Lola". All the original drawings for the Lola T70 had been destroyed when they moved factories, and that included all the paperwork for sales of Lola T70's - who bought which chassis, etc. I went to the States in 1985 to search out John Mecom, who had been the importer for the early T70 spyders, but all his records had also been destroyed. I then went up to Chicago to visit Carl Haas the current importer. Would you believe that he had just moved factories and had dumped all the paperwork relating to T70 sales! His manager found me some stuff, but not enough. Starkey can only have done what I did - plough through all the magazines of the era to try to pin down who was racing which chassis, and to whom they then sold it. My list concurs with Starkey's published list, but I KNOW there are some doubtful entries - and of course, as with the GT40s, there are fakes - particularly with the first Lola Aston-Martin. I was proudly shown one being re-built, and took many photos, but was shown the door when I pointed out that they trying to shoe-horn an AM engine into a lola spyder chassis! C'est la vie !

#1154 ensign14

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 16:55

Originally posted by petefenelon


His OED book actually inspired me to "upgrade" from my beloved Shorter to the one-volume "Compact Edition" of the full OED. Very useful! :)

100 quid in a booksale for that. Absolutely invaluable. Well worth every penny. (That's tautologous, but what the heck.)

#1155 petefenelon

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 20:13

Originally posted by ensign14
100 quid in a booksale for that. Absolutely invaluable. Well worth every penny. (That's tautologous, but what the heck.)


60 on Ebay for the 2nd Edition ;)

#1156 MCS

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 20:56

Originally posted by Mallory Dan
I'm stuck with books on Lancashire Airfields in WW2, the Alan Henry Peterson book, then onto the Lee Sharpe and Ian Botham autobiogs, so not much reading space available !


Lee Sharpe, Dan?

If you want to read a great biography about a footballer, get "Garrincha" by Ruy Castro.

It puts George Best's skill and excesses into total perspective. The Brazilian winger was ten times better than Best and he probably drank ten times more. He also fathered at least fourteen children. His appetite for football drink and sex was absolutely staggering. What a book!

I've read so many dull, poorly researched biographies of racing drivers I've given up now.

But if they were as well written as "Garrincha" I'd start buying again.

Mark

#1157 Twin Window

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 21:08

Originally posted by MCS

His appetite for football drink and sex was absolutely staggering.

Blimey... I hope Tommy's autobiog can compete with that one!  ;)

#1158 MCS

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 21:12

Originally posted by Twin Window
Blimey... I hope Tommy's autobiog can compete with that one!  ;)


Stuart, I seriously doubt any biography can compete. I've never read anything quite like it :eek:

Mark

#1159 ensign14

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 21:23

Originally posted by petefenelon


60 on Ebay for the 2nd Edition ;)

Plus postage? :p

'Course, when I bought mine, there was no ebay...and I had only just started using pooters for the first time...

Originally posted by MCS
If you want to read a great biography about a footballer, get "Garrincha" by Ruy Castro.

Another one on my Big Pile...

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#1160 MCS

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 21:26

Originally posted by ensign14
Another one on my Big Pile...


Read it Rob - you'll be stunned. Fantastic stuff.

#1161 petefenelon

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 21:54

Originally posted by ensign14
Plus postage? :p

'Course, when I bought mine, there was no ebay...and I had only just started using pooters for the first time...


Another one on my Big Pile...


Yep, plus postage of about a tenner, it was here in about 3 days. I think the seller lost out there. Makes up for all those people who seem to charge you two quid for a bit of secondhand cardboard ;P

#1162 green-blood

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 07:44

Is the Krakatoa book the Simon Winchester one?



yep thats the one, I really love thi type of stuff, much better than fiction, I havent read a fiction book since my leaving cert exams (A levels). He has a really easy style, explaining things in a ahuman way but still bring you along withteh tech.. "The map that changed the world" was excellant too.

#1163 ian senior

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 09:02

Originally posted by MCS


Lee Sharpe, Dan?

If you want to read a great biography about a footballer, get "Garrincha" by Ruy Castro.

It puts George Best's skill and excesses into total perspective. The Brazilian winger was ten times better than Best and he probably drank ten times more. He also fathered at least fourteen children. His appetite for football drink and sex was absolutely staggering. What a book!

I've read so many dull, poorly researched biographies of racing drivers I've given up now.

But if they were as well written as "Garrincha" I'd start buying again.

Mark


Try Frank Worthington's "One Hump Or Two", although some of it probably deserves to be taken with a pinch of salt. It also provides some material for the "Cars in Books" thread - ever heard of a "Shree-litre Capri"? And if you really want to know what life is like as a footballer at lower league level, read Garry Nelson's books ( more car material here too - not all footballers have Bentleys, Garry had a Fiat Tempra).

#1164 mark f1

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 13:21

originally posted by MCS
Stuart, I seriously doubt any biography can compete. I've never read anything quite like it


When will Warney do a bio, maybe he might come close ... :p

#1165 Twin Window

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 22:08

Originally posted by MCS

Stuart, I seriously doubt any biography can compete. I've never read anything quite like it :eek:

Trust me...  ;)

#1166 Mallory Dan

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 09:23

I've read the first Gary Nelson book, excellent. Alos the Iwan Roberts one, "All I want for Christmas", which for a Canary was a good read, tho' not the highest quality literature ever !

The Tony Cas one was also good I thought.

#1167 Mallory Dan

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 09:27

Any views on John Tennants 'Golden Age of Motor Racing', or a similar title, can't remember exactly now. Its a big thing, all photos with v little text. Pics range from the 1900s to the late 60s, all subjects. Not really to my taste, but for those interested in these eras, there are some lovely, charismatic ones. Foreword by JYS. Anyone else have it, I think it was only published in 2004.

#1168 ensign14

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 09:50

Originally posted by Mallory Dan
I've read the first Gary Nelson book, excellent. Alos the Iwan Roberts one, "All I want for Christmas", which for a Canary was a good read, tho' not the highest quality literature ever !

The Tony Cas one was also good I thought.

For football "Only A Game" by Eamon Dunphy is the best autobiog. Cascarino's is up there as well.

Best football book I know however is "Football Against The Enemy" by Simon Kuper. Any book by him or Simon Inglis are well worth a shufti. “Fever Pitch” deserves its kudos as well. “Tales From The Boot Camps” by Stevie Claridge is also worth a looksee for life at the lower end – including the Aldershot captain who had a disabled badge for his car…

A couple on Italian footy – “The Miracle Of Castel Di Sangro” by Joe McGinnis and “A Season With Verona” by Tim Parks – are very good indeed.

You can’t go wrong with books published by When Saturday Comes (a new lexicon is due out from them) – e.g. Phil Ball’s “Morbo” about Spanish footy and Uli Hesse-Lichtenberger’s “Tor” about German.

And after a publisher-enforced hiatus Mike Hammond is back with his European football annual, I have it on order.

I’ve got the Tennant book; an amazingly eclectic series of photos where Grands Prix rub shoulder to shoulder with mud-plugging. The captions though quite often miss the point, e.g. the champagne spraying “au Mans” in 1967 without mentioning that this was the first time (or close to) that this happened. One for the visual feast.

#1169 petefenelon

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 11:30

Originally posted by Mallory Dan
Any views on John Tennants 'Golden Age of Motor Racing', or a similar title, can't remember exactly now. Its a big thing, all photos with v little text. Pics range from the 1900s to the late 60s, all subjects. Not really to my taste, but for those interested in these eras, there are some lovely, charismatic ones. Foreword by JYS. Anyone else have it, I think it was only published in 2004.



Very pretty, good production values, and often available cheaply. Haven't seen most of the pics in it before, and the emphasis is on the unusual - lots of atmosphere or behind the scenes shots rather than the usual famous racing scenes. I bought my dad the Football volume a couple of years ago and even though that's not my sport it's a very atmospheric book. Must get the cricket one, although the "golden age" there seems to be 1900-1980!

#1170 MCS

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 12:54

Originally posted by ensign14
For football "Only A Game" by Eamon Dunphy is the best autobiog. Cascarino's is up there as well.

Best football book I know however is "Football Against The Enemy" by Simon Kuper. Any book by him or Simon Inglis are well worth a shufti. “Fever Pitch” deserves its kudos as well. “Tales From The Boot Camps” by Stevie Claridge is also worth a looksee for life at the lower end – including the Aldershot captain who had a disabled badge for his car…

A couple on Italian footy – “The Miracle Of Castel Di Sangro” by Joe McGinnis and “A Season With Verona” by Tim Parks – are very good indeed.

You can’t go wrong with books published by When Saturday Comes (a new lexicon is due out from them) – e.g. Phil Ball’s “Morbo” about Spanish footy and Uli Hesse-Lichtenberger’s “Tor” about German.

And after a publisher-enforced hiatus Mike Hammond is back with his European football annual, I have it on order.

I’ve got the Tennant book; an amazingly eclectic series of photos where Grands Prix rub shoulder to shoulder with mud-plugging. The captions though quite often miss the point, e.g. the champagne spraying “au Mans” in 1967 without mentioning that this was the first time (or close to) that this happened. One for the visual feast.


Certainly concur with regard to Simon Kuper - what a pity he doesn't write about motor sport.

"A Season With Verona" is a masterpiece in my opinion, but I'm not familiar with "The Miracle of Castel Di Sangro" - I'll look out for it. Thanks :up:

#1171 petefenelon

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 10:54

I've just (belatedly - it was at the bottom of a teetering pile of to-reads) finished Eoin Young's McLaren Memories. Very charming and stylish read, no obvious howlers (although I wasn't reading it with a fine toothcomb), and a lot of personal insight into how Bruce went racing. Extremely strong on the early days of his team, with quite a bit about racing the Zerex/Jolly Green Giant, the M2 and the first Can-Am cars. Doesn't really say anything that hasn't been said already, it puts a lot of information in one place though, and as well as telling us a lot about Bruce himself has quite a bit about Jack Brabham, John Cooper, Denny Hulme and Chris Amon as supporting characters. And Bruce does come across as a modest, determined, and hugely talented "good bloke". I liked it; don't expect any huge revelations, but a lot of atmosphere and anecdote.

#1172 Dennis David

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 12:09

Funny that the conversation should reach the shores of the OED. I have the full 20 volume edition on my Christmas list as we speak.

#1173 dretceterini

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 00:08

Libreria 'dell auto is having a big sale, with some items as much as 80% off...


http://www.libreriad...ish/viewoff.asp

#1174 fudjones

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 11:12

Originally posted by Dennis David
Funny that the conversation should reach the shores of the OED. I have the full 20 volume edition on my Christmas list as we speak.


Do they now do that on a CD?

#1175 petefenelon

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 11:32

Originally posted by fudjones


Do they now do that on a CD?


Yes, £250 + VAT. The Compact edition's rrp is £275, but if you look round you can probably get it for half that new; I paid 60 + p&p for a near-mint copy - not terribly convenient to use though; the 'ordinary' 20-volume set is a snip (when you consider how much you're getting!) at £550.

#1176 Dennis David

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 12:47

To have and to hold ...

I'm clearing a shelf as we speak. ($995.00 USD)

#1177 mark f1

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 15:40

I have to ask....what is the OED?

Mark

#1178 Dennis David

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 16:12

The ultimate authority on the usage and meaning of English words and phrases, unparalleled in its accuracy and comprehensiveness, the Oxford English Dictionary is the supreme reference work for anyone who loves the language. Now, this greatest of all dictionaries appears in a new Second Edition--the first up-to-date coverage of words and meanings in one alphabetical sequence since the original dictionary was published in 1928.

The result of an enormously ambitious, on-going project to computerize the dictionary, the Second Edition integrates the original OED with the four volumes of the Supplement. Published between 1972 and 1986, this Supplement was produced to bring the Dictionary up to date, to extend its coverage to the language of the mid-20th century, and to reflect the ever-broadening international century, and to reflect the ever-broadening international nature of the English. In addition to merging the original OED and the Supplement, which greatly enhances the convenience of using the Dictionary, the Second Edition includes some 5,000 new words and meanings--from perestroika to yuppification--which have entered the language quite recently. It has also been completely redesigned and reset to enhance its legibility: the typeface is more open, the headwords stand out more clearly, and the paper used is brighter, with greater opacity. Still another new feature is the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet to represent pronunciation, replacing the system devised by Sir James Murray, the first editor of the OED. By employing what is now the universally accepted standard guide to pronunciation, the Second Edition greatly extends the usefulness of this vital feature.

The key feature of the OED, of course, remains intact: its unique historical focus. Accompanying each definition is a chronologically arranged group of quotations that illustrate the evolution of meaning from the word's first recorded usage and show the contexts in which it can be used. The quotations are drawn from a huge variety of sources--literary, scholarly, technical, popular--and represent authors as disparate as Geoffrey Chaucer and Erica Jong, William Shakespeare and Raymond Chandler, Charles Darwin and John Le Carre. In all, nearly 2.5 million quotations--illustrating over a half-million words--can be found in the OED. Other features distinguishing the entries in the dictionary are the most authoritative definitions, detailed information on pronunciation, variant spellings throughout each word's history, extensive treatment of etymology, and details of area of usage and of any regional characteristics (including geographical origins). A dictionary like no other in the world, the OED has been described as "among the wonders of the world of scholarship." With the publication of the Second Edition, that statement is today more apt than it ever has been. Also available online at: www.oed.com

20 Volume Set Second Edition Edited by John Simpson and Edmund Weiner
22,000 pages Mar 1989

#1179 mark f1

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Posted 12 October 2005 - 06:19

Thanks Dennis,

Yeah I've got one of those too, a dictionary..... :p

Mark

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#1180 JohnS

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 20:34

Originally posted by Mallory Dan
The Tony Cas one was also good I thought.


The Cascarino book is fantastic, just gripping. It was ghosted by Paul Kimmage, who also wrote the best cycling book ever, Rough Ride.

John

#1181 David Beard

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 07:04

Originally posted by JohnS


The Cascarino book is fantastic, just gripping.
John


A good book on football? Oxymoron, surely?

#1182 Scribe06

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 13:15

Originally posted by David Beard
A good book on football? Oxymoron, surely?


Dunno, I always thought that Run to Daylight! by Howell Cosell and Instant Replay by Jerry Kramer were two pretty darn good books on football, the former giving us the all-time Vince Lombardi quote in context.

#1183 ensign14

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 13:54

Vincenzo Lombardi? The Sampdoria midfielder?

#1184 Scribe06

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 14:07

Originally posted by ensign14
Vincenzo Lombardi? The Sampdoria midfielder?


Nope, Vince Lombardi, as in one of the greatest coaches in professional football.....

#1185 ensign14

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 14:42

Is this the imitation game where they don't actually use the foot? The one invented by Harvard cos they couldn't understand the offside law?

There is an interesting response to David, actually. Football is not exactly gifted when it comes to literature of a high standard (you're looking at the likes of Inglis, Kuper and Glanville) - but when it comes to passionate writing, something that gives the atmosphere, it is a LOT better than motor racing. Perhaps because the fan experience is central to footy. But there are very few motor racing books that really get to the heart of the motor racing experience. In the way that Nick Hornby and Eduardo Galeano can for football.

#1186 Rob29

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 17:55

Why the ***** are we discussing footbal in TNF-please move to Paddock Club.

#1187 JohnS

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 21:40

I picked up a copy of "Porsche Prototype Era 1964-73 in Photographs" today. Same format as last year's "Ferrari Prototype Era" and just as good. Loads of wonderful photos, many unfamiliar to me.

Published by David Bull.

John

#1188 philippe charuest

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Posted 16 October 2005 - 21:19

Originally posted by Rob29
Why the ***** are we discussing footbal in TNF-please move to Paddock Club.

ya those ball sport are a kind of polution ,it look there no way to escape from it ;)

#1189 green-blood

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 09:39

I dont normally deal with Amazon, I know they are cheaper than the specialist motoring book stores, but I like the idea of keeping these specialists in business, in anycase I was looking to purchase "Autodrome: the lost circuits of europe" and was scouting about when teh discussion up above got around to this book on Garrincha. Anyway, I could only find it on Amazon, so 2 birds and one stone and all that.

So package arrives to workplace today, 4 days over estimated delivery date, in a burst packaging, with thank God the expensive (and on initial inspection interesting and beautifully photographed) Autodrome still present but slightly damaged, but no Garrincha book, and worse still no delivery docket - so my book is gone and my credit card details are in the public domain - so that looks like card cancelation time. I'm tryingto complain to Amazon who are apparently not contactable by email in anyway. This is gonns be an intersting fight.

Lesson - stay well clear of Amazon.

right on a happier note, I've got a bit of cash just for me, and I'm gonna buy Mr Nye's first 2 BRM volumes, any advice on best store, are matching numbers still available. Similar question regarding Karl L's "Porsche - Excellance was expected"

#1190 Lec CRP1

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 10:24

Of course, for balance purposes I have to post this - but I've ordered dozens of things (books, DVDs, videos, software, digital cameras etc. etc.) from Amazon and have never had a problem with them. In eight years of ordering stuff online I've only ever had one 'issue' with a vendor - (when I was sent a different item from what I ordered, returned it, and never received the original item I ordered).

I'd much rather deal with a computerised ordering and payment processing system than a human-based one. I know which is more likely to be dishonest :)

#1191 green-blood

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 10:31

Hi
Fior balance, perhaps I wasn't very balance earlier, but I have an excuse!!!

I've used them previously and never really had a problem, I do feel guilty as I know the affect they have had on the specialist. My biggest gripe is the impossibility of making a complaint in this situation. we'll see.

#1192 Mark Ballard

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 13:03

You can e-mail Amazon, they just don't advertise their email too obviously. On this page
http://www.amazon.co...8991166-9418250

just above the line "I ordered the wrong thing and want to return it" is a link to send them an email

I have dealt which their customer service dept (usually about books that are "late" and they have been very helpful)

Mark

#1193 green-blood

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 13:08

thanks Mark, I finally found that one myself, I am pleased to say a second copy of the missing book is being sent in the post as componsation. Kudos for amazon.

Now here's the question, should I buy Doug Nyes BRM 1+2 from Amazon and save some cash??

#1194 Lec CRP1

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 14:16

Originally posted by green-blood
thanks Mark, I finally found that one myself, I am pleased to say a second copy of the missing book is being sent in the post as componsation. Kudos for amazon.

Now here's the question, should I buy Doug Nyes BRM 1+2 from Amazon and save some cash??


Dunno. How much will you save? I remember I saved 9 quid on the Piers Courage book and 5 quid on the Christopher Hilton Le Mans '55 book.

As the fictional grasshopper says, always let your conscience be your guide :smoking:

Incidentally, Amazon have the cover of the David Tremayne 'Lost Generation' book up now.

#1195 philippe charuest

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 17:14

Originally posted by green-blood
Hi
Fior balance, perhaps I wasn't very balance earlier, but I have an excuse!!!

I've used them previously and never really had a problem, I do feel guilty as I know the affect they have had on the specialist. My biggest gripe is the impossibility of making a complaint in this situation. we'll see.

sure you can complain, i bought a lot of thing from amazon.com and amazon.ca and had a problem only one time cause it was third party seller and even there amazon made no problem and gave me a credit . the morale is dont buy from third party seller only directly from amazon. about buying from specialized dealer like chaters or millhouse they are ok but they are more expensive . and i guess if you live in england the shipping is at a reasonable price but otherwise its a killer

#1196 Zawed

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 23:45

Originally posted by Mark Ballard
I have dealt which their customer service dept (usually about books that are "late" and they have been very helpful)

Mark


Yeah, ditto here. I only ever had one problem with Amazon, which was a missing order, notified them and they promptly dispatched replacements. Even on Amazon marketplace which I use a lot, I have again only had one problem, and that was a hardback book which had been ordered and turned out to be a paperback. Sorted that one out no hassles.

#1197 petefenelon

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 00:14

Jo Ramirez - Memoirs of a Racing Man

I read this pretty much in one sitting, which is something that normally happens only with books that are either very short or very good. Jo's autobiography is 340 pages, so draw your own conclusions ;)

Put simply, it's the best non-driver autobiography since Tony Rudd's, and for those whose interest in F1 remains current it may be even better. Jo describes his entire career in racing from his Mexican upbringing and early days as an unpaid gofer in Italy, with no work permit and no money, through to his retirement as McLaren's team coordinator. In between are fascinating insights into the Rodriguez brothers, Ferrari, Maserati, the Ford GT40, AAR, Tyrrell, Fittipaldi, Shadow, ATS, Theodore, and many more. There are great insights into all of the teams, with some very interesting background to the Arrows/Shadow split and the strange circumstances at ATS....

Although immensely entertaining and hugely readable, this isn't a book that pulls punches. Jo isn't afraid to say exactly what he thought - fans of Emerson Fittipaldi will find the section on jo's time there uncomfortable reading, in particular, and the portrait he paints of Ron Dennis is very complex - there's a clear mix of vast admiration for what Ron's achieved and genuine anger and perhaps pity about the lack of grace with which he can behave.

There's a lot of insight into the characters of drivers and engineers he's worked with - quite trenchant in some cases. It's clear that Jo's all time favourites were the Rodriguez brothers, particularly Riccardo, and Dan Gurney; he was no great fan of Lauda the man, recognised Prost and Senna as deeply flawed geniuses (and managed to remain on good terms with both, although it's difficult to hide the fact that he has perhaps more admiration for Senna than any other modern driver), and had a lot of time for Berger, Hakkinen and Coulthard. I would imagine Michael Andretti and Nigel Mansell don't figure strongly on the Ramirez Christmas card list.

What Jo tells, in a compelling, readable and often humorous style, is essentially the story of how Formula 1 has changed from a small-scale sport fought out by small bands of enthusiasts to a war fought between huge egos and huger corporations, and how as the stakes increased the human element started to disappear from the sport.

There are a very few minor mistakes - down at the level of minor typos on some names - but that doesn't spoil the enjoyment at all.

Unconditionally recommended. It's been well worth the wait.

#1198 green-blood

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 08:32

great review, will have to bump this up the list a bit

#1199 David Beard

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 18:20

Originally posted by petefenelon
Jo Ramirez - Memoirs of a Racing Man

I read this pretty much in one sitting, which is something that normally happens only with books that are either very short or very good. Jo's autobiography is 340 pages, so draw your own conclusions ;)................etc


Unconditionally recommended. It's been well worth the wait.


Thanks for that Pete. Excellent review as usual.
Just got my wife to read it....hope she got the hint.....

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#1200 KJJ

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 19:42

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With the first edition of “All Arms and Elbows” selling for £60 or so and with the 1994 Transport Bookman edition also increasing in price, I suppose that there is a market for a new third edition of what has become for many a motor racing classic.

Mercian Manuals have produced some interesting reprints of late and “All Arms and Elbows” is the latest addition to their catalogue. A fairly large and heavy book, 23cmx27cmx2cm, it consists of three parts, photographs of Innes in competition, a facsimile printing of the first edition including all the photographs, and a collection of photographs of Innes mainly from the decade or so before his death in 1993.

The book starts off with an unsigned biographical note “Who was Innes Ireland” which is not dissimilar to the biography on my Innes website, it does contain a few errors however, Innes certainly did not drive for three years alongside Stirling Moss in BRP and I am not aware that he was ever an editor at Motor Sport. This factual but rather clumsily written biography is followed by a one page appreciation of Innes by his widow Jean Ireland.

There are 13 pages of competition photographs, three of which are in colour, followed by a page detailing Innes’s World Championship Formula One record. What a shame that the rather lovely Targa Florio shot shows Masten Gregory and not the subject of the book. The 12 pages of family colour photographs at the end of the book are charming enough.

If money is not a consideration I would advise any new reader of “All Arms and Elbows” to get hold of a copy of the first edition. This new edition is much better than the second edition, however, and at under £30, will place in the hands of the reader a book that has itself become part of the history of motor sport.