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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#1501 Frank S

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 19:57

Over the past fifteen years I have not read much fiction. I had hoped "The Last Open Road" would fill a void in that area. Sorry. I didn't finish it. Nothing in it grabbed me; it let me go too easily, couldn't call me back.

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#1502 MattKellett

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 00:21

I'd really like to find a good book on Grover Williams, does one exist? I'm aware of the Ryan book, is this worth reading? as I'd heard it was a little questionable. If there isn't a single book, perhaps someone could point me in the right direction for a decent article/ chapter on him.

Many thanks
Matt

#1503 green-blood

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 12:00

I can remember 2 articals in motorsport in the past 10 years, unless someone has managed to index motorsportI'm afraid I cant help any further.

#1504 D-Type

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 22:29

Originally posted by MattKellett
I'd really like to find a good book on Grover Williams, does one exist? I'm aware of the Ryan book, is this worth reading? as I'd heard it was a little questionable. If there isn't a single book, perhaps someone could point me in the right direction for a decent article/ chapter on him.

Many thanks
Matt

I don't think there is one. He was always described as "the enigmatic Grover-Williams" and makes only fleeting appearances in the fatter books on between-wars drivers. As he was French-based and never raced at Brooklands (apart from a fleeting appearance in the 1927 British GP), Shelsley Walsh, Southport, the Isle of Man etc, or set speed records, the British press never mentioned him so nobody knows much about him.
The Ryan book is 'fictionalised history' or a 'historical novel'. It's a blend of fact and fantasy in the proportions of about 70:30. It's a good read, giving a picture of a forgotten era, but you never know whether what you are reading is from the 70% or the 30%.

#1505 Doug Nye

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 16:07

I have just received through the post my copy of Mike Argetsinger's Walt Hansgen book - and have spent the past few hours scan-reading it. Mike reproduces extensive extracts from the great American's own test and racing reports - the text speaks to us with numerous voices as friends, rivals and relatives of Walt contribute sometimes lengthy and very detailed quotes - and above all this is the ultimately immensely moving story of a truly iconic American road racer.

As a piece there are aspects of the book's design and presentation which are not my personal cup of tea, but it's a terrific read - there are some very unusual and interesting photographs featured and the price seems about right too!

WELL DONE MIKE - VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED INDEED...AND A CREDIT TO WALT HANSGEN'S MEMORY.

DCN

#1506 Rob29

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 16:31

Originally posted by rudi
You can find the de Filippis book in "novita", the other one in searching under "piloti Ferrari".

Thanks rudi,finally received deFilippis book today.First atempt to order failed as they have minimum value for foreign orders. Also received Circuito Pescara 1924/39 and Formula Renault history both of which I can recomend.

#1507 Paul Medici

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 14:39

Having grown up about a hundred miles from Bridgehampton I had the opportunity to watch Walt Hansgen race on many occasions. Therefore Mike Argentsinger’s biography has special meaning for me. He describes in detail Walt’s racing career, his time with the Cunningham team, trips to England and Italy to inspect new cars, and his close friendship with other drivers such as Archie Scott Brown and Mark Donohue. The political climate among racing organizations in the late forties and fifties is carefully documented and is a fascinating story in itself.

Like great theater, the final act arrives too quickly. As I began reading Part Three, which includes Walt’s experiences with the Mecom team, the USGP, and the Indianapolis 500, I found myself wishing that the final chapter was missing and that somehow the tragedy of April 7th 1966 had never happened.

Well done Mike!
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#1508 EcosseF1

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 21:40

No dust jacket but a bargain copy of DCN's Story of Lotus (1961-71) all the same...

http://cgi.ebay.com/...1QQcmdZViewItem

#1509 chazh

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 10:34

Can I ask one of the fortunate individuals who own a copy of "Time and Two Seats" to give a brief overview of the format of the book? Is it primarily the collection of statistics, entries, results, etc, or is it heavily narrative-based? Sadly the "excerpt" on the publishers site consists of a solitary photo, which unlike the equivalent offering for "Excellence Was Expected" doesn't give a great taste of the book.

I have an abiding fascination with sports car racing and thus on the face of it, this book should be manna from heaven. All I hear is high praise of it, but very little of the nature of the beast.

Thanks in advance.

#1510 ensign14

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 10:49

Originally posted by chazh
Can I ask one of the fortunate individuals who own a copy of "Time and Two Seats" to give a brief overview of the format of the book?

It's huge, you have a narrative of the race of about a (big) page or two long on average, you then have a page or two of stats including starting numbers, drivers who did not start in a particular car, reserves, DNQers, DNAers, engine capacities &c &c. And the photo choice is wonderful as it is somewhat eclectic (KMW sitting alongside Porsche).

You also have a lengthy intro with circuit maps and appendices and indices listing things like pseudonyms and every driver who ever raced in any of the championships.

Basically, you must, must, must, must, must, must, must, must get this if you have any interest in sportscars.

#1511 petefenelon

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 11:02

Originally posted by chazh
Can I ask one of the fortunate individuals who own a copy of "Time and Two Seats" to give a brief overview of the format of the book? Is it primarily the collection of statistics, entries, results, etc, or is it heavily narrative-based? Sadly the "excerpt" on the publishers site consists of a solitary photo, which unlike the equivalent offering for "Excellence Was Expected" doesn't give a great taste of the book.

I have an abiding fascination with sports car racing and thus on the face of it, this book should be manna from heaven. All I hear is high praise of it, but very little of the nature of the beast.

Thanks in advance.


Basically I second Ensign14's description, it is the bible of sports car racing and there is nothing else quite like it out there -- think of it as a sports car version of something like a cross between the Black Books and Mike Lang's "Grand Prix!" series. The sheer volume of data, narrative and photography is almost overwhelming and it took me many pleasurable months to work my way through it all (I tended to ration myself to a year or two a week, timeslicing it with many other books). You can lose yourself in TATS for hours, or dive in to look for particular bits of information; the organisation is perfectly adequate for both and I've used it both ways.

The focus is on the World championship (in its various forms, and its replacements when it wasn't around), Le Mans, and the major American races. There is some introductory material on the broad history of sports car racing, the circuits and rules, and then it's essentially a succession of sections and chapters taking a year-by-year approach - each "era" of sports car racing is described in outline, each individual season summarised, and each race covered in painstaking detail with full entry and results lists.

He errs on the side of inclusivity, with stuff like the small-capacity-only early 60s GT races and even the occasional hillclimb rounds of the championship getting full coverage.

The race narratives are long enough to be thoroughly readable and Wimpffen writes with economy, atmosphere and a certain degree of dry wit. The connecting narratives cover the rules, politics, and economic/political background well and put the individual races in context. I'd say about 1/3 of the books are taken up with tables and the other 2/3 with text and photos. They are very handsomely produced, the photo repro isn't bad (though it's primarily a text book rather than a photographic one - Janos has shown what he can do when he gets his hands on good pictures with the sumptuous Open Roads and Front Engines).

There are some quirks, particularly that Wimpffen has his own "standardised points scheme" that he shows in parallel with the "real" ones, but that's a bonus ;)

My only minor criticism is it might've been slightly more tractable as three or even four volumes rather than two phone books - each volume is big.

#1512 chazh

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 11:57

Pete, Ensign14,

Oh dear, I really am going to have to get it aren't I. My wife will be pleased...

Thank you, both of you, for taking the time to fill me in. Time to invest in some more sturdy shelves!

#1513 VWV

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 16:32

I bought my copy of TATS last summer directly from János Wimpffen for $195 US plus $30 shipping via UPS to Canada. You can contact him at jlwmrg@earthlink.net. Since he's working with David Bull on his picture book series he may have turned his remaining stock to David Bull.

The link at Bentley Publishing states that they are sell for $295 now, when I was looking last year they were asking $235 plus shipping. Ouch

http://www.bentleypu...t.htm?code=H727

David Bull Publishing is also selling TATS but its confusing for how much, in the description it says $195 and $295. The order form also say $295. I would suggest that you contact David Bull Publishing for clarification.

http://www.bullpubli...197837_76892941

#1514 PRD

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 15:51

I bought my copy via the David Bull website paying for surface mail delivery to the UK. Had to chase it up , but Janos & David Bull between them sorted it out. It cost me £130 which I reckon is pretty :cool:

#1515 green-blood

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 19:17

hey

I bought mine not so long ago on Ebay, where I've dropped a fortune lately. Its fantastic.

#1516 bradbury west

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 20:29

Originally posted by MattKellett
I'd really like to find a good book on Grover Williams, does one exist? If there isn't a single book, perhaps someone could point me in the right direction for a decent article/ chapter on him.

Many thanks
Matt


Try Classic and Sportscar , March 1991. There is a long article plus pictures, by Joe Saward, who always had a good interest in French drivers. Did he ever do the biog of one?

Roger Lund.

#1517 David Beard

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 16:29

Does anyone have:

In The Left Hand Seat- John Dawson-Damer - A Sporting Biography (by J Coe) ?

Any opinions? Is it worth the £49.99 Motor Books are charging in the UK?

#1518 David McKinney

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 19:02

...and, while we're at it, does it cover his collecting and racing days or is it, as the title suggests, solely about his exploits as a rally co-driver?

#1519 Terry Walker

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 10:56

I have a copy, as I was interviewed by the author for the book. I knew John briefly in the late 60s when he started rallying here in Western Australia in a Cooper S, with his then wife Rosemary driving. The book covers his rally days, but it also covers his collecting, and his collection in considerable detail.

If you knew John, and if you are interested in historic Lotus F1 cars, you shouldn't miss it.

EDIT: 49 quid? That's nearly 150 Australian dollars. :eek:

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#1520 petefenelon

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 17:58

Have been rather busy lately hence not too many posts. Fortunately a change in employment is in the offing and with an hour's train commute each way I hope to be able to get some more reading done ;)

A few short reviews of recent odds and sods:


Maserati: A Racing History by Anthony Pritchard - nicely produced book that doesn't say much new about the 250F or the well-known sports cars but has a lot of interesting stuff about the origins of the company, the 20s-40s and the twilight years. A clear and detailed narrative that sets the racing against the company's fortunes, lots of good photos, some cracking first-hand tales in an appendix, and a nice smooth writing style mean that it's a good read and a sound history of the company. Not the last word on any aspect of Maserati, but I'm unaware of any better all-round history.

Klemantaski Himself - gorgeous. Some of the most exquisite photography I've seen, in a typically elegant Palawan edition. I managed to get the 'cooking' edition for slightly under the cover price, and it's a wonderful book - a full account of an eccentric and thrilling life that reads almost as well as it looks. A luxury, sure, but a very desirable one.

ERA - The History of English Racing Automobiles by Weguelin - this had been a 'holy grail' of mine for a few years and a chunk of this year's bonus went on buying it. Worth every penny. It's long, it's written with style, it covers the history of the company, the cars and the key people in depth, it's immensely atmospheric, it's got plenty of period images of the cars, it tracks their ownership right up to the early 80s (and includes then-contemporary pictures of them in splendid colour). A truly monumental book written by someone with an obvious and consuming passion for his subject.

Case History by Norman Smith - I picked this up for a very few quid on Ebay and was aware of its status as one of the early classics of racing history - and one of the first books to actually consider individual racing cars rather than marques or models. Pom aside, it's one of the most detailed books of its era on racing, and it untangles quite a lot of history of the great marques in a readable if slightly dated style. Some very good material on pre-WW2 cars, going into quite a lot of depth.

Peter Miller's Conte Maggi's Mille Miglia has been sat on my shelves for a few months as other things have pushed it aside; I finished it last week - without it being an all-time classic it contains a lot of good photos and some crisp accounts of the race, plus maps of the course. Tells the story briskly and entertainingly, but it feels a little like it was written at too much of a distance from the race and the presentation is just a tad fussy. Still, a nice book if you can get hold of it.

#1521 David Beard

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 18:25

Originally posted by Terry Walker
I have a copy, as I was interviewed by the author for the book. I knew John briefly in the late 60s when he started rallying here in Western Australia in a Cooper S, with his then wife Rosemary driving. The book covers his rally days, but it also covers his collecting, and his collection in considerable detail.

If you knew John, and if you are interested in historic Lotus F1 cars, you shouldn't miss it.

EDIT: 49 quid? That's nearly 150 Australian dollars. :eek:


Thanks Terry. Watch out for a PM.

#1522 green-blood

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 08:24

yeah well Pete, thanks for the reviews, I'd have had Klemantaski read myuself if it wasnt for you are your Ebay snipping :lol:

been busy myself though, have ERA on the way, Pomeroy I + II (plus LJKS) and teh mrs gave me a son and heir last week... so loads of late nights to read :D


edit - oh and Conway's Bugatti book. FANTASTIC.

#1523 Allen Brown

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 08:56

Originally posted by green-blood
... and teh mrs gave me a son and heir last week...

Congratulations!

#1524 petefenelon

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:27

Originally posted by green-blood

edit - oh and Conway's Bugatti book. FANTASTIC.


A lovely read that - not just a book about cars and racing, but about fine engineering generally, fine art and design, and a phenomenally talented family. It's fantastic dip-into reading, too, with bits about all kinds of things that interest me from aero engines to high-speed trains.

#1525 David McKinney

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 12:29

Which of Conway's many Bugatti books are we talking about here?

#1526 petefenelon

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 13:04

Originally posted by David McKinney
Which of Conway's many Bugatti books are we talking about here?


I was thinking of "Bugatti: Le Pur-Sang Des Automobiles", 5th ed, early 90s - covers all the cars, a fair bit of the racing history, and a lot of the company and the family's other endeavours.

#1527 KJJ

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 14:35

Apropos of nothing at all.....Hugh Conway was married to the pre-war racer Eva Gordon-Simpson.

#1528 green-blood

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 20:02

this one


Posted Image

I've been avoiding buying this looking for something that covered all he bases...this does, silly me.

#1529 Antoine Pilette

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 23:29

I saw on eBay "The Story of ERA" 1934-35, 1936 first edition, for $49.
Is it worth this amount?
(The cover is signed by my grand-father Andre and I bet it might be one of his books when he was a teenager.)

#1530 ian senior

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 07:29

Originally posted by Antoine Pilette
I saw on eBay "The Story of ERA" 1934-35, 1936 first edition, for $49.
Is it worth this amount?
(The cover is signed by my grand-father Andre and I bet it might be one of his books when he was a teenager.)


I don't know what it's worth but the fact that it's signed by Andre means it needs to go to a good home - yours. Buy it.

#1531 green-blood

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 07:52

hey

I keep finding in reviews of books references to certain awards, Karl L won something for his V12 book and I have just been looking at a Can-Am book that one a "bronze medal".

Does anyone have an idea where it woudl be possible o find a list of these award winners over the years??

#1532 philippe charuest

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 17:17

Originally posted by green-blood
this one


Posted Image

I've been avoiding buying this looking for something that covered all he bases...this does, silly me.

if youre interest is bugatti in "racing " not the grand-tourisme and limousines, theres the "bugatti a racing history" by David Venables , all Venables books are very well done

#1533 MattKellett

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 03:43

I've just received the David Bull Publishing catalogue in the mail today, good news is that the Vic Elford autobiography will be available on May 31st, another book that also looks quite interesting is Grand Prix! rare images of the first 100 years, due June 1st.

I'm also looking forward to the copy of Cobra Ferrari Wars which I recently purchased, thank god they came out with a second edition! $85 compared to $800!

It's not often that I read a book in one session, but I recently enjoyed Thunder In The Park by Tom Wheatcroft, well worth the reasonable cost and I would recommend it to everyone who wants an enjoyable afternoon, I'm sure I was smiling the whole time I was reading it!

Matt

#1534 red stick

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 10:44

Originally posted by MattKellett
I'm also looking forward to the copy of Cobra Ferrari Wars which I recently purchased, thank god they came out with a second edition! $85 compared to $800!


Is that the original publisher or a new outfit? Let us know what you think of the second edition--that's even a discount off of the original price, which IIRC was always around $100.

#1535 Mark Ballard

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 11:52

Originally posted by red stick


Is that the original publisher or a new outfit? Let us know what you think of the second edition--that's even a discount off of the original price, which IIRC was always around $100.


It seems to be scanned copy by the original author. see the explanation below on his website
http://www.thecobraf...om/1180490.html

#1536 red stick

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 13:29

Thanks. That really does explain it all. :up:

#1537 MattKellett

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 15:19

Originally posted by Mark Ballard


It seems to be scanned copy by the original author. see the explanation below on his website
http://www.thecobraf...om/1180490.html


Mark, thanks for the link, I purchased my copy through Amazon and thought I had found a great price at $85. I bidded for a copy on ebay at $75, I was outbid fairly quickly and right now the bidding is up to $150!! So it always pays to do research for the best deal.

I will report back when I have the copy in my hand.

Matt

#1538 PRD

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 17:26

Originally posted by MattKellett
I've just received the David Bull Publishing catalogue in the mail today, good news is that the Vic Elford autobiography will be available on May 31st, another book that also looks quite interesting is Grand Prix! rare images of the first 100 years, due June 1st.


Matt


As mentioned in another thread, you will be able to buy a copy from Vic Elford himself

http://www.vicelford...storebooks.html

Vic's wife Anita runs the site and will happily arrange for Vic to dedicate a copy

Paul

#1539 red stick

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 01:42

Originally posted by MattKellett
. . . I purchased my copy through Amazon and thought I had found a great price at $85. I bidded for a copy on ebay at $75, I was outbid fairly quickly and right now the bidding is up to $150!! So it always pays to do research for the best deal.


The price through Amazon is still the best price. I was unable to buy a copy today from thecobraferrariwars.com at the then-listed price of $75, and tonight the website lists the prices as $100 US and $125 Canadian. So I went to Amazon before the prices go up there too.

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#1540 MattKellett

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 03:12

Originally posted by red stick


The price through Amazon is still the best price. I was unable to buy a copy today from thecobraferrariwars.com at the then-listed price of $75, and tonight the website lists the prices as $100 US and $125 Canadian. So I went to Amazon before the prices go up there too.


I just received an email from the seller at Amazon stating that the book would be a week late due to a delay at the bindery? I'm guessing they're binding once a certain amount of orders come in. Still better waiting an extra week than paying $150 on ebay.

Matt

#1541 Alan Cox

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 21:00

Interesting to see how much is asked for books about Cobras, i.e. the Cobra-Ferrari Wars, where 1st editions seem to be priced around $800, while the Stauffer/Brock/Friedman Daytona Coupe tome has only one copy available that I can find at $1250.

Good job I bought them when they came out! Do people really pay these prices?

#1542 Vitesse2

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 22:08

Originally posted by Alan Cox
Interesting to see how much is asked for books about Cobras, i.e. the Cobra-Ferrari Wars, where 1st editions seem to be priced around $800, while the Stauffer/Brock/Friedman Daytona Coupe tome has only one copy available that I can find at $1250.

Good job I bought them when they came out! Do people really pay these prices?

I think some are daft enough to. But they're buying to invest rather than use and/or enjoy.

As an example, I've had my eye open for a copy of TASO Mathieson's "Pictorial Survey of Racing Cars", published by MRP in 1963. For about two years the only one on the net was with Roger Godden, who was asking £80 for it, which I considered excessive for what it was, especially as I'd be quite happy with an ex-library reading copy so long as it's complete.

Godden's now sold his, but suddenly there are another six copies on ABEbooks! The cheapest is - surprise, surprise! - £80 and they go up as far as £135 (at Collectors Car Books of course! :lol: ) That's not buying for pleasure, that's for investment.

So, has anyone got a reading copy they don't want?;)

#1543 red stick

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 00:05

Originally posted by Alan Cox
Interesting to see how much is asked for books about Cobras, i.e. the Cobra-Ferrari Wars, where 1st editions seem to be priced around $800, while the Stauffer/Brock/Friedman Daytona Coupe tome has only one copy available that I can find at $1250.

Good job I bought them when they came out! Do people really pay these prices?



Let's hear it for second editions! I've been stalking a copy of The Cobra-Ferrari Wars for years and am happy to pay $85 after years of seeing them, and not buying them, in the $400+ range. Likewise when the second edition of The Ford that Beat Ferrari came out last year I was glad to finally buy one for a "reasonable" price. A copy of the Stauffer, et al, book sold on eBay for $1250 a few months ago, which evidently has set the price for that volume in the eyes of remaining sellers/speculators. The most interesting thing I noticed in my shopping yesterday, aside from CFW raising their prices $25, evidently due to demand, is that Thursday evening on Amazon TE Warth, the famous or infamous (depending on your worldview :)) automotive bookseller would part with a first edition of The Cobra-Ferrari Wars for $800. Yesterday, same place, same book, same source, $600.

So, what automobile racing book should be reprinted next?

#1544 petefenelon

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 11:24

Originally posted by red stick



So, what automobile racing book should be reprinted next?


Top of my own list at the moment would be The French Sports Car Revolution and Georges Roesch and the Invincible Talbot.

#1545 Ray Bell

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 11:32

Originally posted by red stick
.....So, what automobile racing book should be reprinted next?


Not racing, strictly... rallying, but more adventure, but a must-read anyway... A Boot Full Of Right Arms!

I'll be back with some words about the Walt Hansgen book some time soon... my copy has arrived and it looks like absolutely fantastic reading.

#1546 Vitesse2

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 11:46

Originally posted by petefenelon


Top of my own list at the moment would be The French Sports Car Revolution and Georges Roesch and the Invincible Talbot.

I think the former's unlikely as Haynes had to reduce them to half price to clear (which is when I got mine!) And I may be imagining it, but I thought I'd seen something (in C&SC?) about the Talbot book being reprinted with some revisions by Blight's son? (But see your PMs Pete)

#1547 harryglorydays

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 13:25

Just finished Mike Argetsinger's book on Walt Hansgen and would highly recommend it to anyone interested in the early development of sportscar racing after WWII. Mike uses an interesting technique to intertwine Walt's career to the rise of professional racing here in the States and the emergence of American teams (Cunningham) in the international front. I had certainly heard of Walt, but knew very little of him since my interest in the sport began at about the same time as his career tragically ended.

While the book paints a very good portrait of Hansgen, it is the "behind the scenes" tales of the battles between the AAA, SCCA, Nascar, and the track promoters that are the real story here. Being part of the family responsible for the success of Watkins Glen, Argetsinger provides some important information on the politics and personalities that fought over the "amateur vs. professional" debate that characterized the sport in the 1950s.

The book is long (400+ pages) but is broken up into over 100 short chapters so it reads very quickly. The research combines both contemporary race reportage with first-person rcollections. I found it to be a most enjoyable and informative read. If you want to learn more about the man who helped define American road-racing, get this book.

I believe it's aleady been mentioned, but here is the link to buy:

http://www.bullpublishing.com/

#1548 Ray Bell

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 01:43

Yes, Harry, it's interesting the way Mike has broken it up into such short chapters, some only a page and a half (even less!) long...

It will certainly help with referencing points later on, but it also makes it very comfortable to read about topics which might not be so comfortable. It won't labour on you, if you know what I mean.

Mike's quotes come from many sources. I know he travelled across to the West Coast to talk to Phil Hill among others, he got very close to Walt's family, he got access to letters and reports Walt wrote and doesn't get too shy about sheeting problems to the feet of individuals who made errors from time to time.

That last part is a bit un-Mike. One of the things that TNF does to upset him is getting into character assassinations and muck-raking. Mike would rather ignore the bad and laud the good in people to a very large extent, but he seems to pull few punches in the book at all.

I'm not all that well advanced with my reading yet... but what I have seen is good indeed. I'm glad you were able to get a picture of the times before you became interested, because that's exactly what I expect it will do for me and others.

#1549 wdm

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 10:35

Just came upon the reference to Jo Bonnier's "Fort, Fortare, Fortast" in the Cesare Perdisa thread... I've never heard of it before: I presume it's an autobiography?

Is it any good? ... and has it ever been translated into English?

Ta,
Willie

#1550 petefenelon

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 10:54

Originally posted by Vitesse2

I think the former's unlikely as Haynes had to reduce them to half price to clear (which is when I got mine!) And I may be imagining it, but I thought I'd seen something (in C&SC?) about the Talbot book being reprinted with some revisions by Blight's son? (But see your PMs Pete)


Just because something got remaindered then doesn't mean it's not immensely desirable now - I saw a £5 copy of The Certain Sound on the remainders table in the basement of Blackler's department store in Liverpool in about '84... But I didn't buy it... :( - ended up paying about 25 times that nearly two decades later... :(