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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#1601 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 21:27

Thanks Rene ,many pics? also transporter? Regards Bjørn


Any of you know : Pit & Paddock - a background to motorracing by Michael Frostick?? Hwat is it about? What the title says? Which years ? Pics? Regards Bjørn

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#1602 Vitesse2

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 21:47

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer

Any of you know : Pit & Paddock - a background to motorracing by Michael Frostick?? Hwat is it about? What the title says? Which years ? Pics? Regards Bjørn

http://forums.autosp...764#post2282764

:)

Concentrates on the early periods, with a strange final section about the Arrows team.

#1603 ensign14

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 21:55

The Frostick book is worth getting as a potboiler cos it should not be more than a tenner; in similar vein is "A Motor Racing Camera" by G N Georgano, which has lots of obscurities (Demeesters and so on) well pictured and is more or less exclusively pre-WW1.

#1604 bradbury west

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 11:27

Originally posted by ensign14
The Frostick book is worth getting as a potboiler cos it should not be more than a tenner; in similar vein is "A Motor Racing Camera" by G N Georgano, which has lots of obscurities (Demeesters and so on) well pictured and is more or less exclusively pre-WW1.


I agree with ensign14. They are worth it just for the pictures for your archive, esp. the Frostick book, with good pre war photos, incl. AU shots and a super one of David Fry in the Freikaiserwagen

The Georgano is useful for the same reasons, just to dip into , and also since there now seems to be a marked interest in pre 1920 stuff, and relevant photos are often hard to come by, other than the usual suspects/favourites.

The same applies to For Practice Only, atmospheric b/w period shots, but that generally applies to most older editions which have low monetary value IMHO. Buy them when you have the chance.

RL

#1605 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 14:24

Vitesse2 : Right under my nose? Thanks

Andre Acker : I think the "reflections" by A.Carter is GREAT , lots of pictures , never seen , many from behind the track, professional private pictures from visited top races from 58-78,most b/w.

Any of you know anything about Bollee : 1000kms Paris, Reims 63-67 and Lucky Casner??????
Just bought his book LeMans 60-69 , very good pics ,only little text in french so it didnt bother me,

Regards Bjørn

#1606 Alan Cox

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 19:14

The Outon Park book by Peter McFadyen is not due to be published until July, even though it is currently advertised. I understand from Peter that it will contain mainly unpublished work, and if his work for Autosport in the 70s and 80s is anything to go by, will be excellent.

The Porsche 917/Ford GT40 DVD is a professionally made pair of contemporary films, but I found them rather dull and uninspiring.

#1607 zakeriath

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 07:45

Just finished Christopher Hamiltons`s Memories of James Hunt. THe book comprises of various peoples recolections of James over the years.

It gives a deeper insight into his personality than the Donaldson biography and Youngs Against all odds. What supprised me was the level of his drug addiction that a quite few people mention throught the book. It most other cases you read his heart attack came as a supprise, yet having read this book it was only a case of when not if.

Its a pity because I think James was the last of a generation in many ways.

Any other reviews of this book?

#1608 Alan Cox

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 19:48

Recently received my copy of the Bahamas Speed Weeks by Terry O'Neil.

The design/layout is a little eccentric (something I've noted with other Veloce publications) but the contents include loads of pretty obscure stuff and a treasure trove of photographs.

#1609 Alan Cox

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 19:53

dretceterini, I'm sorry I missed your earlier query re the Targa book.

Yes, it includes all cars entered, with race numbers, not printed as an entry list, but as results (overall and class-by-class, together with retirements) so all cars should be listed.

#1610 Bob Brzezinski

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 20:22

Originally posted by red stick
I'm most of the way through Burt Levy's fourth and latest book in The Last Open Road series, Toly's Ghost, which is nearly 700 pages long and takes our hero, Buddy Palumbo, from late 1955 through 1961. The action focuses on Buddy's pals, Cal Carrington, as he rises through the ranks of professional sports car racing, and Hank Lyons, as he writes about Formula One and sports car racing for Car and Track magazine. The major subplot focuses on Lance Reventlow's Scarab sports cars and his attempt at F1.

If you liked the earlier books, you'll like this one, although IMO this is the weakest of the series. A considerable amount of the charm of the first three books arose from looking at racing through Buddy's eyes, but this book essentially grounds him at home in New Jersey with his VW dealership and family while the story is told via phone calls from Cal and letters from Hank. This is fun for awhile but somewhat tedious about page 500--the book could use more Buddy.

Also, this book covers nearly twice as much time as the first three books combined and frankly, feels a bit like a placeholder. I'd heard or read several years ago that Levy was "planning" about six books in the series, covering racing from the early 1950s through Ford's assault on Le Mans. I'd vaguely wondered with the pace of the first three books how this would be possible, and moving forward six years in this book certainly helps. If what I vaguely recall is Levy's plan, I hope the next few books have more of Buddy's personal experiences and fewer phoned-in race wrap-ups.


I have to agree with you, Red. I have been anticipating this book for about a year now, but unlike some of the others I find that rather than staying up long into the night burning through the pages, I am content to stop after 10 or 15 each night. I am frankly growing a bit weary of so many of the "race weekend" sentences beginning with the words, "Hank said...".

I guess it's a bit disappointing because I love these books. They may not be great works of literature but since reading "The Last Open Road" I have been amazed at how well they capture the wonder that I think all racing enthusiasts must feel when they are first bitten by the bug. When Buddy gets to drive a C-type Jaguar to Elkhart Lake in the first book, I couldn't get enough, and the descriptions of his experiences there took me back to my first visit as a teenager. Unfortunately I just don't get much of that from this book. I like Burt Levy and am glad that someone is writing historically-based fiction for "us", but I think he wore himself out writing this one. His website and emails detail the struggles he went through writing and re-writing this book from the vantage points of different characters, and I can imagine how tiring it must be to start a 600+ page book "over again" and have to pore through each sentence to alter the point of view (all the while knowing that legions of fans are impatiently awaiting the already-overdue finished product).

Anyhow, I will add this one to the bookshelf knowing that all enjoyable series, whether they are films, television shows, or books, necessarily have high and low points. After covering a lot of ground, time-wise, I hope Burt recharges and takes the series on through the 1960s in high style...

#1611 Vitesse2

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 20:40

Originally posted by Alan Cox
dretceterini, I'm sorry I missed your earlier query re the Targa book.

Yes, it includes all cars entered, with race numbers, not printed as an entry list, but as results (overall and class-by-class, together with retirements) so all cars should be listed.

Does it include the Targas run to voiturette rules?

#1612 Alan Cox

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 08:47

Yes, Vitesse. it does, as well as sections on the Coppa Florio. first run in 1905 and last run, at Enna, in 1981.

#1613 red stick

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 14:37

Originally posted by Bob Brzezinski
I like Burt Levy and am glad that someone is writing historically-based fiction for "us", but I think he wore himself out writing this one. His website and emails detail the struggles he went through writing and re-writing this book from the vantage points of different characters, and I can imagine how tiring it must be to start a 600+ page book "over again" and have to pore through each sentence to alter the point of view (all the while knowing that legions of fans are impatiently awaiting the already-overdue finished product).

Anyhow, I will add this one to the bookshelf knowing that all enjoyable series, whether they are films, television shows, or books, necessarily have high and low points. After covering a lot of ground, time-wise, I hope Burt recharges and takes the series on through the 1960s in high style...


Yeah, the birthing process in this one was, to put it mildly, certainly painful as he describes it, and undoubtedly influenced the finished product. And to be fair, there's a lot more of Buddy's personal experiences in the last two hundred or so pages to remind us why we liked reading the series in the first place. (That description of the cross-country drive with the Jaguars is a classic!)

On another topic, his "apology" in the Author's Note regarding the difficulties inherent in placing fictional characters in historical situations is more interesting, to me, having finished the book. I really don't have a problem with what he's done because he does have a gift for bringing those days to life, but I wonder if I would feel differently about the process if I were a Ginther or Von Trips fan, especially given their treatment in this book.

#1614 Rob Semmeling

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 19:47

Does anyone by any chance have the book "Sieg und Niederlage" ('Victory and defeat') by sidecar legends Deubel/Horner? Published 1965.

#1615 Bob Brzezinski

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 20:41

Originally posted by red stick


Yeah, the birthing process in this one was, to put it mildly, certainly painful as he describes it, and undoubtedly influenced the finished product. And to be fair, there's a lot more of Buddy's personal experiences in the last two hundred or so pages to remind us why we liked reading the series in the first place. (That description of the cross-country drive with the Jaguars is a classic!)


It's funny you should mention that, as I hit the "last two hundred" over the weekend and noticed the same thing. Made me feel guilty for writing a "review" of the book after having read only the first three-quarters of it. I haven't quite finished the book but so far the feeling in the final chapters is kind of like Burt could see the finish line and found some of the inspiration that the re-writes may have taken out of him.

I read the Author's Note at the outset, but haven't looked at it since. After reading your comment about it, Red, I'm interested to go home and re-read it tonight--

#1616 red stick

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 03:51

Originally posted by Bob Brzezinski
It's funny you should mention that, as I hit the "last two hundred" over the weekend and noticed the same thing. Made me feel guilty for writing a "review" of the book after having read only the first three-quarters of it.


Heck, don't feel guilty. Burt's lucky he's got dedicated readers (at least two :) who'll stick with it to see where it goes. The last two hundred pages shouldn't be the reward for making it through nearly six hundred pages--how many casual readers put the book down after three hundred pages and walked away?

I think you're right, that after all the laborious rewriting he hits his stride toward the end. Given his focus on good ole American racing, the next one should be good--Cobras, Grand Sport Corvettes, maybe even GT40s. Let's just hope Buddy gets out of the house more next time. :lol:

#1617 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 18:23

Just found info about what looks like a great book on swiss drivers :

500 pages , 1000 colour/b&W pics , CHfr. 119,-

Titel : Die Aussenseiter ( to English : the outsiders) Schweizer im internationalen Automobilrennsport 1950 bis heute.

More than 50 are described, go and look on their site with over 50 good pictures and the fist 24 pages of the book to look at.

dieaussenseiter.ch/vorschau.php

#1618 red stick

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 17:14

Has anyone seen or read Chris Economaki's recently issued memoir, Let 'Em All Go, co-written with Dave Argabright? Argabright's website makes it look pretty interesting, as the man certainly has some good stories to tell (apart from the old canard that Jim Clark was a driver, not a racer, because he couldn't pass anybody), but the speedtv.com review, while recommending it highly, is so stream of consciousness as to be practically incoherent. http://speedtv.com/a...industry/25981/

#1619 red stick

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 17:35

I've been leafing through a copy of the 2nd Edition of Michael Shoen's The Cobra-Ferrari Wars which, as he explains in his introduction, is a scanned copy of the first addition with a couple of editorial changes. I've never seen a copy of the first edition, as prices went through the roof and beyond my budget, (and given my interest in the era, I've kicked myself for years for not buying it when it came out) but for $80 this appears to be as comprehensive a telling of the tale as is possible. Some of the photos appear washed out or faded, and I don't know if this is a result of the scanning or if they looked the same in the original edition, but the book is impressive for the sheer number of pictures of the cars and drivers of the time. Well worth a look if you have any interest in the subject.

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#1620 Vitesse2

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 18:54

Originally posted by Alan Cox
Yes, Vitesse. it does, as well as sections on the Coppa Florio. first run in 1905 and last run, at Enna, in 1981.

Thanks Alan. Please check your PMs :)

#1621 Bob Brzezinski

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Posted 09 June 2006 - 16:02

Originally posted by red stick


I think you're right, that after all the laborious rewriting he hits his stride toward the end. Given his focus on good ole American racing, the next one should be good--Cobras, Grand Sport Corvettes, maybe even GT40s. Let's just hope Buddy gets out of the house more next time. :lol:


Well, I finished Toly's Ghost last night. I did enjoy the last third of the book much more than the rest. The first two-thirds were sort of detached and to me felt almost like a "capsule history of '50's motor racing", while the last couple of hundred pages or so definitely had that old "Last Open Road" feel about them. The ending was pleasantly melancholy.

I certainly hope the next book delves into the Cobra-Ferrari wars and the GT40 effort. Perhaps Cal Carrington will find his way onto the Shelby American squad. When it became apparent that Toly's Ghost was going to mix Lance Reventlow into the story I hoped that Phil Remington would feature in some way, shape, or form. I had the pleasure of introducing Rem to Burt Levy at Road America a few years back, and Burt was so pleased to meet him he presented him with signed copies of all of his books. Unfortunately I think Rem was only mentioned once in Toly's Ghost. Maybe he will get some dialogue in the next book. Aside from being a world-class fabricator, he is a character and all-around good guy, and he seems to have been involved in just about every aspect of American Road Racing, from RAI to Shelby to AAR.

Red Stick, Mike Shoen's book is a great one. I was a starving student when the original was published and I think I donated blood a few extra times in order to afford a copy, which I've perused a million times since then. I'm glad to hear it's been re-issued as it's a book that deserves to be readily available.

#1622 petefenelon

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Posted 10 June 2006 - 20:21

Originally posted by petefenelon
Started reading Michael Argetsinger's Hansgen biography last night - very reasonably priced at 30 quid, nice smooth writing style, lots of new information, although the ultra-short chapters do make it a bit choppy. Will post more details when I've finished it but so far - an important document about the development of road-racing in the USA and an entertaining read.


Finished this this week -- a very well-written book that seamlessly merges Hansgen's own story with the rise of sports car racing in America, leaving you with a much broader appreciation of both. It's obvious that Michael is deeply, deeply knowledgeable about his subject matter, and it's a very personal book in many respects. Very approachable, almost conversational in tone but still carrying a significant amount of historical weight. If 50s/60s sports car racing is at all your thing you need this one.

Couple of other recent reads:

Leslie Thurston's TWR Jaguar Prototype Racers is concise, slightly dry, but thorough and very well illustrated (LOTS of good colour pics) with good development and race history of the cars. Not going to convert anyone into a fan of the Cat (but a lot for those of us who do like Jaguars), and not up to Andrew Whyte's standard, but does take the Jaguar competition history on to the end of the GpC/IMSA years. At its best discussing the V6s, XJR-14 and XJR-15 and the racing XJ220s, cars which haven't really been properly documented yet. I would think modellers would love this one for the sheer depth of detail on the different variants!

In the "oldies but goodies", Ebay threw up a cheap copy of Albert Bochroch's "American Automobile Racing: An Illustrated History". Particularly strong on pre-WW2 racing, with some very atmospheric B&W and a lot of incisive text, though it does tend to jump around in time a little. I think with slightly better organisation this could've been a classic; as it is, it's informative, comprehensive and useful but ever so slightly too bitty to be the definitive text.

(Sorry I've not been maintaining my usual productivity here - have recently changed jobs and it's a much longer commute and my net access at work is fairly patchy - once things have settled down I hope to be back up to speed!)

#1623 red stick

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Posted 10 June 2006 - 23:42

Originally posted by Bob Brzezinski
I certainly hope the next book delves into the Cobra-Ferrari wars and the GT40 effort. Perhaps Cal Carrington will find his way onto the Shelby American squad. When it became apparent that Toly's Ghost was going to mix Lance Reventlow into the story I hoped that Phil Remington would feature in some way, shape, or form. I had the pleasure of introducing Rem to Burt Levy at Road America a few years back, and Burt was so pleased to meet him he presented him with signed copies of all of his books. Unfortunately I think Rem was only mentioned once in Toly's Ghost. Maybe he will get some dialogue in the next book. Aside from being a world-class fabricator, he is a character and all-around good guy, and he seems to have been involved in just about every aspect of American Road Racing, from RAI to Shelby to AAR.


Yeah, given the number of people involved in the Scarab effort who went on to later glory in other programs I was kind of looking for Remington too. Then, I think looking through the Shoen book, I discovered that Shelby was based in the old Scarab building and I thought, ah ha, maybe the next will revolve somewhat around old Carroll, since the chicken farmer has figured in this and prior Levy books. Doesn't much matter I guess--it will probably be three to four years before the next volume. :(

Am thoroughly enjoying the Shoen book.

#1624 Frank S

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 01:19

Good interview with Phil Remington in VINTAGE RACECAR for July. Also an article on the mighty Crowfoot Holden Special; Questor GP; Ronnie Peterson; Golden Gate Park races.

--
Frank S

#1625 Bob Brzezinski

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 01:24

Originally posted by red stick


Then, I think looking through the Shoen book, I discovered that Shelby was based in the old Scarab building and I thought, ah ha, maybe the next will revolve somewhat around old Carroll, since the chicken farmer has figured in this and prior Levy books. Doesn't much matter I guess--it will probably be three to four years before the next volume. :(



Yes, the old story is that Phil Remington "went with the building" when Shelby took it over from Reventlow. Not quite true, but historically colorful.

Totally off-track, but talking about Phil and RAI reminds me of a story he tells about when Von Dutch would pinstripe the Scarabs...he would apparently come by the shop at the end of the work day, when the RAI employees were gone home. Phil says that they would leave a twelve-pack of beer out for him. When they would punch in the next morning there would be twelve empties in the garbage can and a beautifully pinstriped race car. Wish I could work that well under those, er, conditions...

Given Shelby's prominence in the era that Levy is about to delve into, I can't see how the story won't heavily involve him.

The Argetsinger book is a very, very nice read. For some reason Walt Hansgen seems to get lost in the mists of time for a lot of people, amazing considering his utter dominance at tracks like Bridgehampton and his ability to excel in equipment as varied as GT40s and Lister-Jags...

#1626 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 06:44

Can any of you give me sone hints on the book THE MINTEX MAN?? Bjørn

#1627 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 07:17

I think M.Bollee has been involved in faboulos books , allthough I dont speak French the latest I bought was Le Mans 60-69 , great pics!!
Any one for some extra info on his Camoradi, Reims and Paris 1000 books??? Bjørn

#1628 bradbury west

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 16:49

Mintex Man is a very good pictorial archive, with reasonable captions, reflecting the fifties and early sixties. IMHO it is well produced as a low volume work, essentially, I believe a labour of love by Guy Loveridge, and the photographs, 90 pages, are excellent, especially as they are in colour and feature many paddock shots. Not expensive, and I like it a lot.

Michel Bollee's "Lucky" Camoradi book is a fine work. IMHO. A4 landscape format with many excellent photos, incl some from Ted Walker, and not just the usual ones. I like the ones from the 4 Hour race at Pescara and the 3 Heures d'Auvergne. It has a very sound narrative, in French, and has chapters on Maserati France and Colonel Simone, and a nice section on the 151 as well. I like it.


Roger Lund.

#1629 bradbury west

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 17:14

I have received my copy of Up to Speed; The Roycroft Years in New Zealand Motor Racing, which was well reviewed in MS and Octane.

I have only had the time to dip into it at present, but it is a history of one man's racing through a long period in NZ, in a variety of cars, including a Tipo B Alfa, and a Bugatti, later Jaguar engined. It appears to cover racing in NZ from the earliest days, and details circuits and the NZ specials of yesteryear. Scott Thomson is the author.

It is a very well produced book, being substantial in weight as well as material and substance, some 390+ pages in total, with excellent photographs, representing first rate archive material covering such a wide range via one man's experiences. Milan Fistonic has supplied some of the images, perhaps he could comment on the book. Mr McKinney's views would also be salient.

It looks excellent and I look forward to reading it in full .

BTW, in terms of service from NZ, I ordered it from Steele Roberts on May 26 and it flattened the doormat( I said it was heavy) on June 5, which I reckon is top stuff, and they are nice people to deal with when I rang them.

info@steeleroberts.co.nz www.steeleroberts.co.nz

Just for all TNFers, there is a meaningful Foreword by Chris Amon

I reckon it may be one of those period gems, nicely different, but that is always a subjective view.

Roger Lund.

#1630 continental

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 20:12

Tony Adriaensens, of 'Corsa Research' fame, will present his newest tome 'Weekend Heroes' on Pebble Beach in August. Earlier this year, Tony was so kind to show me some of the pictures that he will be using for the book. Lovers of the 50's and 60's American racing scene, will be very well served. The early colourpics are stunning and I think that anyone interested in the subject should preorder a copy, as I did. I also think that anyone interested in wonderful Italian cars should buy his labour of love 'Ottovu', which deserves to be a sellout. I'm not involved in any of these projects, but I am of the opinion that authors, that tackle subjects that are not mainstream and do it as well and with such passion as Tony does, need supporters.

Regards,
Mick

#1631 David McKinney

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 20:50

Originally posted by bradbury west
Mr McKinney's views would also be salient.

I haven't seen it yet :cry:

#1632 TooTall

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 00:34

Tony Adriaensens, of 'Corsa Research' fame, will present his newest tome 'Weekend Heroes' on Pebble Beach in August. Earlier this year, Tony was so kind to show me some of the pictures that he will be using for the book. Lovers of the 50's and 60's American racing scene, will be very well served. The early colourpics are stunning and I think that anyone interested in the subject should preorder a copy, as I did. I also think that anyone interested in wonderful Italian cars should buy his labour of love 'Ottovu', which deserves to be a sellout. I'm not involved in any of these projects, but I am of the opinion that authors, that tackle subjects that are not mainstream and do it as well and with such passion as Tony does, need supporters.



How can I order these books in the US?

#1633 dretceterini

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 03:43

Originally posted by TooTall


How can I order these books in the US?


Tony's e-mail is: corsa@pandora.be

Say hi for me.... Stu Schaller

#1634 bpratt

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 04:50

Has anybody on this forum seen any of these books:
http://www.tempus-pu...isbn=0752438700
Just wondering if it's a vanity press or are the books of reasonably good quality. (Not to say that a vanity press can't produce something of quality.)

#1635 petefenelon

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 09:19

Originally posted by bpratt
Has anybody on this forum seen any of these books:
http://www.tempus-pu...isbn=0752438700
Just wondering if it's a vanity press or are the books of reasonably good quality. (Not to say that a vanity press can't produce something of quality.)


I've seen this book on Renault in F1 and... well, I don't own a copy. It's colourful and quite pretty but rather nsubstantial in terms of content. Quite nicely printed and bound though.

#1636 Alan Cox

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 15:44

Tempus most certainly aren't 'vanity' publishers. They publish an excellent and wide range of titles, their forte being titles on local history topics but also covering motoring subjects as, I believe, one of the owners is a motoring enthusiast.

Generally softbacks, at realistic prices.

#1637 Vitesse2

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 21:35

Originally posted by Alan Cox
Tempus most certainly aren't 'vanity' publishers. They publish an excellent and wide range of titles, their forte being titles on local history topics but also covering motoring subjects as, I believe, one of the owners is a motoring enthusiast.

Generally softbacks, at realistic prices.

Well, not a vanity press, but close to. Their local history titles tend to be VERY local, so the compilers (they're usually photo collections) don't get much more out of it than seeing their names in print. I doubt they ever pay out much in royalties.

Tempus was founded and is still owned by Alan Sutton, who sold his very similar and eponymous press to Haynes and then managed to regain hold of the academic history side of his old company: that's where the real money is - sell ten copies of a £60 monograph and you're in profit!

The Renault book is very pretty, but lightweight. Much like their title on Morgan at Le Mans ....

#1638 petefenelon

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 22:03

I enjoyed Morgan At Le Mans - didn't notice it was one of theirs! It was a very good insight into modern sports car racing, particularly the sheer amount of effort needed just to get to the races, and the politics behind the racing. Also a rather sobering assessment of Pushy Dad Power.

#1639 continental

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 19:10

Haynes will publish a new book by Jesse Alexander in August. It's called 'Porsche Moments' and will cost GBP 45.00. :)

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#1640 Mark Godfrey

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 23:08

Southern California Automotive Book Event
Irwindale Speedway, 7am to 1pm.
Sunday, June 25, 2006

The SoCal Chapter of the Society of Automotive Historians will present its 24th annual Literature Faire & Exchange. The event features vendors of automotive literature -- many out-of-print books, as well as hard to find new racing books, magazines, programs, posters, photographs, drawings and artwork. Located in Irwindale at 13300 Live Oak Ave, the Speedway is 18 miles east of downtown Los Angeles at the SE intersection of the 210 and 605 freeways.

I will be surrounded by fine titles at booth #63. Bill Pollack will inscribe copies of his book "Red Wheels and White Sidewalls" and Willem Oosthoek will be on hand to sign his Maserati books. Signed copies of "Barney Oldfield" and "Phil Hill: Yankee Champion" by William F. Nolan will be available.

Mark Godfrey, Brown Fox Books

#1641 Magee

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 20:44

Any comments out there about the book "Racing Cars" (from 1900 to the present day) by John Tipler.?
ISBN 1-84509-250-3
Is Tipler well known in the motorsport community?

#1642 Vitesse2

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 21:25

Originally posted by Magee
Any comments out there about the book "Racing Cars" (from 1900 to the present day) by John Tipler.?
ISBN 1-84509-250-3
Is Tipler well known in the motorsport community?

Cut 'n' paste job, that one.

He does produce the occasional gem, but most of his work tends towards the populist.

Possibly best-known for his Graham Hill biography, which I'd describe as no more than adequate.

#1643 FLB

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 00:24

For those of you interested in late-1960s French motorsports and Formula France in particular, there is a new book (in French) that has just been published about the involvement of Elf at the time:

http://www.editions-...nds-rouges.html

#1644 petefenelon

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 19:24

Originally posted by Magee
Any comments out there about the book "Racing Cars" (from 1900 to the present day) by John Tipler.?
ISBN 1-84509-250-3
Is Tipler well known in the motorsport community?


Tipler's a sort of second-division Lotus fan - most of his books are related to Lotus (Graham Hill, a nicely produced but not too interesting Ronnie biography, a couple of slim volumes on Lotus competition cars, and histories of the 25/33 and 78/79. The facts tend to be there but there's no real spark to his books.

#1645 petefenelon

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 21:37

It's about time Stefan Johansson did an autobiography; not only has he done pretty much everything in racing, on the strength of
this brilliant rant about Le Mans 2006 it'd be one of the alltime great driver books.

#1646 RTH

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:45

Stirling Moss Scrapbook 1961
SM with Philip Porter
Porter Press 01584 781588 www.stirlingmoss.com hardback £34.95
Autoexpress reviewer raves about it today on and off track exploits in newspaper cuttings pictures magazine pieces and interviews over just one year.
Anyone seen it ?

#1647 PRD

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 18:49

Those interested in the circuit at Reims might like this

http://www.amazon.fr...5Fencoding=UTF8

which cost me £27 from Amazon France. Lots of good pictures and reproduction of Geo Ham posters .

Written in french, but anyone with O level can get the gist

#1648 PRD

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 18:52

Originally posted by RTH
Stirling Moss Scrapbook 1961
SM with Philip Porter
Porter Press 01584 781588 www.stirlingmoss.com hardback £34.95
Autoexpress reviewer raves about it today on and off track exploits in newspaper cuttings pictures magazine pieces and interviews over just one year.
Anyone seen it ?


I've got the 1955 scrapbook which was brought out last year. Quirky,but fun. I don't know whether I'd go for the 1961 book though, so obviously I'm not totally convinced

#1649 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 20:36

:wave: RTH , I have the Moss 61 scrap book!
PRD : Any transporters or paddock photos in the Reims book?

Regards Bjørn

#1650 PRD

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 16:36

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer

PRD : Any transporters or paddock photos in the Reims book?

Regards Bjørn [/B]


There are a few paddock photos, but more track and pits photos in the book. The only transporter I can see is Jack Brabham's in the background of one picture.