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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#1851 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 07:40

:wave: I see Touch Wood has been reissued (Doug Nye) and can be bought from Duncan Hamilton
for @29.95 plus postage. Anyone care to say a few words about it , does it cover his whole carreer?
Regards Bjørn

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#1852 karlcars

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 10:58

Is this the place to mention that I've several new books for Christmas lists?

One is new history of the BRM V16 from Veloce. I hope it has a new slant on this incredible project. The url is http://www.veloce.co...oup=Motorsport

Then from Dalton Watson a new book on another incredible car, the 200PS Benz, better known as the Blitzen. It's at http://www.daltonwat...om/blitzen.html

Then there's a new Iconografix book on the Porsche 917.

I'd better get back to work!

#1853 ensign14

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 11:36

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
:wave: I see Touch Wood has been reissued (Doug Nye) and can be bought from Duncan Hamilton
for @29.95 plus postage. Anyone care to say a few words about it , does it cover his whole carreer?
Regards Bjørn

It's a fantastic and entertaining read, but at times you have to treat it with a pinch of salt. The story of him and Tony Rolt getting bladdered because they'd been excluded au Mans, only to have to race half-drunk, is a slight exaggeration...

And it does cover his competition car career right to 1958.

#1854 petefenelon

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 19:47

Frustration is.... getting an email from your work Goods In system saying that a parcel's arrived from Amazon when you're on the train home on Friday... and knowing it contains Peter Morgan's book on the 917, Vic Elford's autobiography, and The Lost Generation. Got the Horsman autobiography and the new Wimpffen on my wishlist, and am currently trying to find one of those cruelly-remaindered copies of Daley's The Cruel Sport.

And a very short review for a very long book: Toly's Ghost is brilliant, BS blends history and fiction a little more than in his earlier books and Buddy's rather more an observer than a participant, but by the end of the book he's... well, just go and read it. It's pure BS Levy, pure entertainment, and incredibly comfortable and entertaining to read.

#1855 Alan Cox

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 20:38

I think every racing enthusiast with an interest in a particularly golden era of motor sport should read "Touch Wood". I first read it at boarding school, when the Motoraces Book Club edition was one of three motor racing books in the school library. I think I had it out on more or less permanent loan. I had an MBC edition for years and bought one of the revised re-issues when it first came out, with a very nice personal inscription from DH himself.

As ensign says, much of it has to be taken with a pinch of salt (...don't let the facts get in the way of a good story...) and I lost count of the number of accidents he was involved in - beginning with his pram rolling down the garden steps wit the baby DH at the controls!

#1856 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 10:21

Thanks Ensign 14 and Alan, you certainly helped me decide........and I can tell you and others that DH took his Jag longnose D-type 2CPG to Le Mans 1957 towed on an open trailer behind a Land Rover !

#1857 ensign14

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 11:07

There's a review of The Lost Generation in this week's print Autosport, which says exactly what I said above and more besides.

Basically, if you don't buy this book, you're either (a) skint, (b) a non-Anglophone or © not interested in motor sport.

If motor racing were an A level, it would be a set text.

#1858 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 01:10

I am briefly back Stateside and finding out what books have arrived since my last visit. One book that I have found somewhat less than I anticipated is the one by Mark Whitelock book on the 1961/65 era when formula one had a displacement of 1.5-litres. It is focused solely on the WDC rounds, which is extremely disappointing, but probably to be expected. Oh, well....

#1859 David McKinney

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 06:01

Originally posted by bradbury west
I have received my copy of Up to Speed; The Roycroft Years in New Zealand Motor Racing, which was well reviewed in MS and Octane.

I have only had the time to dip into it at present, but it is a history of one man's racing through a long period in NZ, in a variety of cars, including a Tipo B Alfa, and a Bugatti, later Jaguar engined. It appears to cover racing in NZ from the earliest days, and details circuits and the NZ specials of yesteryear. Scott Thomson is the author.

It is a very well produced book, being substantial in weight as well as material and substance, some 390+ pages in total, with excellent photographs, representing first rate archive material covering such a wide range via one man's experiences. Milan Fistonic has supplied some of the images, perhaps he could comment on the book. Mr McKinney's views would also be salient.

It looks excellent and I look forward to reading it in full .

BTW, in terms of service from NZ, I ordered it from Steele Roberts on May 26 and it flattened the doormat( I said it was heavy) on June 5, which I reckon is top stuff, and they are nice people to deal with when I rang them.

info@steeleroberts.co.nz www.steeleroberts.co.nz

Just for all TNFers, there is a meaningful Foreword by Chris Amon

I reckon it may be one of those period gems, nicely different, but that is always a subjective view.

Roger Lund.

I have still not finished reading this book, but have to say I believe it is quite the best record of NZ racing in the period I have seen. And I say that as someone who has written two of them :lol:
Ron Roycroft kept detailed records of his racing and Scott Thomson, a family friend from the time Roycroft was first becoming established as a national figure, has had access to them.
Around this base he has woven a fascinating record of the growth of NZ racing from the earliest times. Although always written from the Roycroft viewpoint, the book takes care to place his achievements in the context of each period, with plenty of background on broader aspects of the sport in NZ.
Roycroft's father started racing in the 1920s so this period is covered as well, followed by Ron's own exploits which started when he was a teenager in the '30s and continued through early beach races, hillclimbs and speedway racing to the end of his career in the early '60s. He was the first man to race the international visitors on equal terms when he led the 1957 NZ Grand Prix in his Ferrari 375. Other famous cars he raced included an ex-works Austin 7 single-seater, a T35 Bugatti which was ultimately powered by a Jaguar engine, and the Nuvolari/German GP-winning P3 Alfa Romeo. Thomson traces the history of each one, and their development in a country as far from the centre of motor racing as it is possible to get.
The whole package is presented in a thoroughly readable form, copiously ilustrated (as Roger has said).
The subject will clearly not appeal to all, but for anyone with an interest of the way motor racing developed in New Zealand in the early postwar years, and the part played in it by the local champion of the time, Scott Thomson's opus is a must

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#1860 petefenelon

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 10:45

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
I am briefly back Stateside and finding out what books have arrived since my last visit. One book that I have found somewhat less than I anticipated is the one by Mark Whitelock book on the 1961/65 era when formula one had a displacement of 1.5-litres. It is focused solely on the WDC rounds, which is extremely disappointing, but probably to be expected. Oh, well....


I have to agree that it's a missed opportunity and rather a fragmentary, insubstantial sort of book. There is a very strong focus on works teams and the world championship, and that for me isn't the spirit of the 1.5 litre years -- given how privateer-friendly that formula was and how well BRM, Lotus, Brabham, Porsche, Ferrari and even BRP are documented elsewhere I was hoping that the net would be cast a bit wider to look at the privateers and the whole 'ecosystem' that sprung up during that formula's short life.

I was hoping for a lot from it but I didn't buy; it doesn't really contain much that can't be found out elsewhere. If you've a reasonable library I don't see much call for this book - save the pennies and spend them on Schlegelmilch's "Portraits of the Sixties" and Parker's "Formula One In Camera: 1960-69" for some glorious photos.

#1861 petefenelon

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 13:29

The dreadful Tom Rubython Senna biography has finally appeared in paperback, at £9.99. It's in the 3-for-2 in my local Borders; I'm not tempted.

Probably wise to advise all your family/friends that either (A) you've already got it (probably a white lie judging by how poorly the hardback sold!) or (B) you know just how bad it is, in an attempt to avoid being bombarded by turds for Christmas.

#1862 Vitesse2

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 14:01

Originally posted by petefenelon
The dreadful Tom Rubython Senna biography has finally appeared in paperback, at £9.99. It's in the 3-for-2 in my local Borders; I'm not tempted.

Probably wise to advise all your family/friends that either (A) you've already got it (probably a white lie judging by how poorly the hardback sold!) or (B) you know just how bad it is, in an attempt to avoid being bombarded by turds for Christmas.

Yep - it could be this year's Motor Racing's Strangest Races ... :lol:

And on that theme, may I be the first to wish everyone a heartfelt "Bah! Humbug!!"

#1863 bill moffat

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 18:01

Originally posted by ensign14
There's a review of The Lost Generation in this week's print Autosport, which says exactly what I said above and more besides.

Basically, if you don't buy this book, you're either (a) skint, (b) a non-Anglophone or © not interested in motor sport.

If motor racing were an A level, it would be a set text.


My copy is in the post to me courtesy of eBay.

I was down in Cardiff at the weekend, not one of the bookshops in the capital city of Tom Pryce's home country could help me with a copy. A specialised sports bookshop upset me just a bit with their retort of "Tom who?" when I described the book.

I still bought a copy of JPR Williams' autobiography from them, although perhaps I should have applied sanctions...

#1864 petefenelon

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 08:19

The Lost Generation is one of the finest books ever written on racing. It's been obvious for a long time that Tremayne was the man to write this; his depth of knowledge, his contacts throughout the British racing scene and his elegant writing style have combined to make one of the relatively few classic biographies in the sport's literature.

I remember the deaths of all three drivers; Roger died in the first season that I remember taking much note of motor racing; Tony and Tom's deaths came when I was a very young but easily upset fan of the sport. Coming to the book I knew a fair bit about the careers of these drivers, but not so much about them as people; Roger tended to be characterised as the working class boy made good, Tom as the quiet Welsh farm boy and Tony as the brash rich kid.

Tremayne revives them, turns them into three-dimensional, complex figures; makes them feel like they're still around. Much of the book consists of interviews with other drivers, friends, family, team members; racing history for me is at its most readable when it is oral history, folk history if you like; as well as the words of the drivers themselves Tremayne has collected interviews with many of those who are no longer with us and has spoken to almost all of the key people in the lives of the three drivers.

The structure of the book is rather similar to Chris Nixon's Mon Ami Mate, comparing and contrasting the lives and careers of the drivers, setting them against the background of what was going on elsewhere in racing; it's a fine tribute to Tremayne that his book bears comparison with Nixon's.

Although beautifully written, it's not all easy reading. The account of Roger's death at Zandvoort is, without being gratuitously horrific, one of the most harrowing things I've ever read on our sport, and the accompanying photographs make it clear just how awful the accident was. (I normally have issues with books that include photos of fatal accidents; but it's clear that Tremayne is not using them here for sensational purposes; he's showing how easily things could've turned out differently had the circuit organisation been better). Similarly, the account of Tom's accident is crisp, precise, detached... and painful to read.

Roger emerges from the book as possibly the most engaging character; there's an obvious passsion for life and for his sport. There's a slight subtext that sticking with Tom Wheatcroft in F1 might not have been the right thing for him to do but it seems that for Roger who you went racing with and how you did it was vitally important, and he was always one to remember people who'd helped him on the way up.

Tom comes across as far more than the shy Welsh farm boy; he comes across as an intelligent, modest and yet utterly committed racer, a man with very close family ties, a very private and perhaps rather more sophisticated man than he's usually painted. And I think he comes across as probably the "boy most likely to" in this book; there's a very real sense for me that even through '75-6 had he been in the right team he would've been a Championship contender.

Tony is perhaps the most complex of the three characters; relative to Roger and Tom his start in the sport was somewhat easier; his commercially-aware approach to the sport was somewhat ahead of its time with only a relative few drivers before him having appreciated the value of publicity; the 'arrogance' that many perceived in him now looks more like a modern awareness of the importance of getting his name into people's heads.

Pretty much everything about this book is magnificent; it captures the joys and terrors of the sport beautifully; it's immensely moving; it's written with genuine grace and insight; and the selection of illustrations is appropriate, evocative and wide-ranging, with as much attention given to the drivers' early careers as to their time in F1.

I hope I've conveyed just how good this book is; it has been a long time coming and it is well worth the wait.

#1865 ian senior

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 11:29

I think it's going to be a fearsomely difficult book to read, for me at any rate. Three drivers whose careers I followed closely from their early days, three men who weren't much older than me at the time and who were in a way like glamourous elder brothers, guys whose backgrounds weren't too unlike my own - neither filthy rich nor "shoebox in t'middle of t'road" poor ...

I might steel myself to read it, but it will be an emotional experience I'm sure.

#1866 Mallory Dan

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 11:47

Don't spoil it for the rest of us, chaps !!!

#1867 Lec CRP1

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 17:17

I got my copy of 'The Lost Generation' a few weeks back. I can say it's one of the best books I've every bought (and I have hundreds, as I've found this week packing the things in boxes for an upcoming house move), almost up there with 'Trilobite' by Richard Fortey and 'Revolution In The Head' by Ian MacDonald. It certainly seems to have gone down well - it's Amazon's top seller in the Formula One category. I hope it gets a paperback reprint, so those who doubt it's worth £30 (or £19.80 at Amazon) can be persuaded.

If, like me, you only know Williamson, Brise and Pryce as historical figures who only turn up on motor racing web forums as tragic figures to anguish over while viewing video footage of their deaths, 'Lost Generation' gives you an excellent sense what they were like as people, and how those who still remember them regard their memory. There was nothing the slightest bit tragic about Roger, Tony and Tom, except of course the final few minutes of their lives.

#1868 bill moffat

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 08:43

"Lost Generation" arrived on my door step in time for my arrival home yesterday evening. By midnight I'd turned the final page.

Believe the hype. Right up there with "Mon Ami Mate", "Archie & the Listers" and whatever else tickles your fancy.

Buy it !

#1869 David Beard

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 17:09

Originally posted by ian senior
I think it's going to be a fearsomely difficult book to read, for me at any rate.


I find the idea of actually buying it difficult, for the same reason.

#1870 MCS

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 20:01

Originally posted by David Beard
I find the idea of actually buying it difficult, for the same reason.


I deleted my earlier post because I thought I was being silly.

It's here now and I haven't opened it yet. I'm trying to think when it would be best to read it.

Give me strength.

#1871 Twin Window

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 22:56

If I know my mate DJT at all - and we've been pals for twenty-five years now, so I should - you will not find this book at all depressing. Distressing in parts, I have no doubt - that's sadly unavoidable - but depressing? No.

Without having even seen it (let alone read it) I am confident that David will have painted an overall positive picture of these three young lives, in spite their ulitimately tragic endings.

Perhaps it's worth mentioning that these three blokes were heros of the young Master Tremayne; something which may have been overlooked. If Pedro Rodriguez (as an example) had been your hero as a youth, would you write a depressing account of his life and career as a consequence of the way he died? Of course you wouldn't!

From the very moment he told me he was doing it I've known that this book will be my personal, all-time, number one...

#1872 Twin Window

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 07:38

A message from David Tremayne, specifically written to you guys here on TNF...

"To all those kind enough to post their comments regarding The Lost Generation, may I say thank you. Petefenelon, in particular, I think has it absolutely spot-on, as far as what I was hoping to achieve.

I have never put so much emotion into a book, not even the Donald Campbell biography or Racers Apart. This one came from the only place it could, from the heart. Some of you mention that you would find it difficult to buy or to read; I understand exactly what you mean. It was without question the hardest book to write, for me. And yet it was also cathartic, and I hope with everything I have that the families and loved ones understand the sentiments behind it and feel it has done the right thing by Roger, Tony and Tom. I think the Introduction says everything I felt about the book, and the subjects, and why I wanted to portray them the way I did.

I said to Mark Hughes last weekend, re his review in Autosport, that I felt humbled, and partway through had to remind myself it was about something I had actually done.

I feel the same reading your feedback. That, and previous comments, are deeply appreciated and make such projects totally worthwhile.

Thanks.

David Tremayne"




#1873 petefenelon

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 22:29

Originally posted by David Beard


I find the idea of actually buying it difficult, for the same reason.


David, Ian.... it is tough in parts, but 90, 95% of it is a celebration of just how damn good Roger, Tom and Tony were, and of how vibrant the British racing scene was in the early seventies. The drivers feel more alive to me through DJT's book than most of the modern crop of non-entities do now. Nothing will bring them back; but this book does more than you could imagine to show just how much they achieved in their short lives and how much they are missed.



They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England's foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

#1874 m.tanney

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 20:17

Originally posted by helioseism
According to Mill House Books, publication of the following titles has been CANCELLED :(

..... Dan Gurney - All American Racer


  I spoke to someone at David Bull a couple of weeks ago. She told me that Gordon Kirby's book on Dan Gurney is not dead. The manuscript is finished and just recently went to the man himself. Gurney will go through it, make his suggestions, corrections, additions, etc. David Bull hopes to publish it late next year.

Mike

#1875 Vitesse2

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 22:23

Originally posted by petefenelon


David, Ian.... it is tough in parts, but 90, 95% of it is a celebration of just how damn good Roger, Tom and Tony were, and of how vibrant the British racing scene was in the early seventies. The drivers feel more alive to me through DJT's book than most of the modern crop of non-entities do now. Nothing will bring them back; but this book does more than you could imagine to show just how much they achieved in their short lives and how much they are missed.


Aye, well - if only ....

#1876 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 01:41

Based upon the many positive comments here on "The Lost Generation" I am looking forward to having this available (soon I trust) here in U.S. This indeed sounds like a great read.

I have just plowed through the first three B.S. Levy novels and am currently reading Toly's Ghost and rarely have I enjoyed reading a motoring title(s) more. A highly enjoyable read for we Yanks.

#1877 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 06:49

:wave: Will someone please say a few words about : Sportscar Heaven,DBR1 vs Testa Rossa? by Chris Nixon ? Does the book cover 1957?

#1878 Barry Boor

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 07:40

Yes, it does.

It is a first class tome. It has the usual excellent Chris Nixon prose and many, many wonderful photographs.

#1879 petefenelon

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 08:11

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
:wave: Will someone please say a few words about : Sportscar Heaven,DBR1 vs Testa Rossa? by Chris Nixon ? Does the book cover 1957?


It's one of the smaller landscape-format and heavily illustrated books Chris did for Transport Bookman. As Barry said it's very well-written and illustrated, highly atmospheric, and nicely presented. It covers some great cars, drivers and races, although there's some overlap with 'Racing the David Brown Aston Martins' and 'Mon Ami Mate' - it's inevitable that some of the research was shared.

Anything by Chris is worth owning,

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#1880 Maldwyn

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 11:48

Originally posted by Dennis Hockenbury
Based upon the many positive comments here on "The Lost Generation" I am looking forward to having this available (soon I trust) here in U.S. This indeed sounds like a great read.

My copy has just arrived and is alongside me as I type. Having read the comments here, and having had a brief glance at the book (I really should be working!), I just know how my evening will pass later today :)

#1881 Frank S

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 01:50

I've just received Mike O'Leary's
RODGER WARD
SUPERSTAR OF AMERICAN RACING'S GOLDEN AGE

Photos are well-chosen and reproduced, the text clear and illuminating.

One of the true racers' racers is brought into focus. Read this and move
Rodger Ward up on your list of the best and most versatile ever.

--
Frank S

#1882 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 09:43

Thanks to Pete and Barry , that I must have ! Any comments on "The Cobra -Ferrari Wars"?

PS I Just got my new "Touch Wood" , looks like a good winterread!

#1883 Doug Nye

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 18:53

'Lost Generation' is indeed excellent, having just acquired my copy. I agree with Pete that the only problem is that as one begins to read it, one already knows the outcome....

Very good piece of work, however. Highly recommended. As, incidentally, is Vic Elford's book and John Horsman's though I feel that both could have been more detailed...both should have much more to relate.

But absolutely the most impressive read for me over the past few weeks (birthday you see) has been on a completely different topic - for any so inclined I absolutely recommend 'Barefoot Soldier' - the story of Johnson Beharry VC. An extraordinary story, extraordinarily well told.

DCN

#1884 ensign14

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 20:18

And a fitting time to read that...

#1885 Barry Boor

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 23:07

Just as a matter of interest, does Duncan Hamilton say much about this....

Posted Image

...which is a model of the car he raced at Le Mans in 1951?

#1886 Twin Window

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 23:19

Originally posted by Doug Nye

'Lost Generation' is indeed excellent, having just acquired my copy. I agree with Pete that the only problem is that as one begins to read it, one already knows the outcome....

Sadly, that's somewhat unavoidable...

#1887 red stick

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 16:36

Originally posted by m.tanney
I spoke to someone at David Bull a couple of weeks ago. She told me that Gordon Kirby's book on Dan Gurney is not dead. The manuscript is finished and just recently went to the man himself. Gurney will go through it, make his suggestions, corrections, additions, etc. David Bull hopes to publish it late next year.

Mike


:up:

#1888 red stick

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 16:41

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
Any comments on "The Cobra -Ferrari Wars"?


I have the recently released second edition, a scan of the first with a few editiorial updates, and am very pleased with it. I'll leave others on the forum more familiar with the time to comment on its accuracy in all matters, but it's a serious effort; full of photos and produced with a great deal of cooperation from the parties involved. It's clearly a labor of love from the author and remains the best treatment of the subject.

#1889 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 17:49

Any comments on "The Cobra -Ferrari Wars"?


Other than the fact that it is an excellent book?

I gladly shelled out the money for it ages ago when it appeared, when $100 was real money for a book, the sort of outlay that made you think long and hard about such a purchase.

Note how the book is laid out, each picture being exactly where it is needed, versus where it would be cheaper/easier to place it.

It immediately struck me as the sort of book a person after my heart would produce.

Desert Island book material.

#1890 Doug Nye

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 18:32

Great book - absolutely agreed - but the one thing which irritates me is the way the title seems to have misled an entire generation into believing that through the mid-60s there was such a concept as the Cobra-Ferrari War. It's complete cobblers. The FORD-FERRARI WAR was The Issue of 1964-66ish - the Cobra part of that was a minor sub-division to everybody except Carroll Shelby, his people and their close-focused supporters. When the TV documentary was made using the same title as the book the producers became very grumpy and foot-shuffling when this same fact was pointed out to them. It kind of screwed-up a particular editorial stance - but it was the perfectly supportable editorial focus of that book which has screwed-up the real history - of the FORD-FERRARI WAR.

And I still rate the book v. highly.

DCN

#1891 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 18:32

Thanks , there should be a second edition to have , so I am thinking a bit about it.!

#1892 Frank S

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 18:50

Here was my take on the Ford-Ferrari thing

Click in the upper left-hand corner of the small photo.

--
Frank S

#1893 red stick

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 19:01

Originally posted by Frank S
Here was my take on the Ford-Ferrari thing
--
Frank S


:p

#1894 Alan Cox

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 23:33

Bjorn, I note the attached copy of The Cobra-Ferrari Wars being offered on Abebooks site - It says it's still in publisher's shrink-wrap

2. The Cobra-Ferrari Wars 1963-1965 (ISBN: 0962509302)
Shoen, Michael L.; Frere, Paul; Bondurant, Bob
Bookseller: Dharma Books
(Reno, NV, U.S.A.) Price: £ 40.48 ($75.00)
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Quantity: 1 Shipping within U.S.A.:
£ 2.10
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Book Description: Michael L Shoen, Vancouver, Washington, U.S.A., 1990. Hard Cover. Book Condition: As New. Dust Jacket Condition: As New. Sealed in original publisher's shrinkwrap. Includes orignal shipping box. Second Edition. Bookseller Inventory # TH40126

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#1895 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 14:47

Thanks Cox , I have my hesitation buying it from the US , its not cheap , but sounds great ,I also found Shoen home page which tell a lot. I guess I have to ask for the postage before.............

#1896 Barry Boor

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 17:11

Thanks Cox



...or even, Alan!

#1897 dewittereus

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 17:52

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
[, I have my hesitation buying it from the US , its not cheap , but sounds great ,I also found Shoen home page which tell a lot. I guess I have to ask for the postage before............. [/B]


Not cheap???? It's CHEAP, have a look at the other Abebooks sellers offering this book: plenty of opportunities to pay more for this great book. I paid much more for my 1st edition copy, bought from a London based carbookseller, but it was worth the money.

BTW as to your hesitation to buy from the US: most American booksellers, like their European colleagues pack their books very carefully and are handling their transactions smoothly

Hope this helps.

Regards
Dick
Holland

#1898 Alan Cox

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 23:00

Agreed, Dick. I have had some excellent service from US booksellers who use the Abebooks website. Prompt delivery and very well packaged, and generally I do not feel that I have been overcharged for postage - the books have always been cheaper than from an English dealer offering the same title, even when postage has been added.

#1899 Mark Ballard

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 13:13

Hi,
Whilst looking on ebay, I saw what appears to be a new book on Austin 7s and their racing history. Does anyone know anything about it as it doesn't appear to be listed on any of the usual booksellers websites ?

Thank you


As an aside, as Alan, I have also had no problems from any books I have bought from the US, Australia or South Africa through Abebooks.com

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#1900 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 17:04

:wave: I am not thinking any more, neither hesitating nor asking for the postage : I ORDERED IT !

Thanks guys!