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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#2351 green-blood

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 13:31

ahh...I'll watch out for your name in future, we can maybe come to an agreement rather than ramp up the price....

I saw it a few days ago and set an alarm to go check, I bid once at 42.50, so you were VERY VERY close!!!

sorry man....

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#2352 ensign14

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 13:43

Originally posted by Vitesse2
I already have the Heel edition in German, but it's a smaller format and the picture reproduction's rather poor.

Not a great feet. :)

#2353 Vitesse2

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 14:00

Originally posted by green-blood
ahh...I'll watch out for your name in future, we can maybe come to an agreement rather than ramp up the price....

I saw it a few days ago and set an alarm to go check, I bid once at 42.50, so you were VERY VERY close!!!

sorry man....

No problem. All's fair in love, war and eBay!

Originally posted by ensign14
Not a great feet. :)

***groan***

#2354 green-blood

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 14:50

that joke is TOE bad to be repeated

#2355 ensign14

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 15:25

You nailed it.

#2356 bradbury west

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 21:33

Bernard Cahier; Double Volume book. see previous posts.
Chaters now advise June delivery.

RL

#2357 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 22:44

I'm told by the publisher that it will ship next month in the US.

Jack

#2358 h4887

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 17:16

Does anyone know of a book on the life of Dr Frederick Lanchester?

#2359 Allan Lupton

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 17:43

Originally posted by h4887
Does anyone know of a book on the life of Dr Frederick Lanchester?


The Lancester Legacy, Vol. 1 by Chris Clark (1995) contains a great deal about Dr. Fred as well as his two brothers as well as the cars and other matters.
The Life of an Engineer by P.W. Kingsford (1960ish) is just about Dr. Fred.

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#2360 PRD

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 16:31

http://cgi.ebay.co.u...58418&rd=1&rd=1

See how much this copy of Autocourse went for :eek:

#2361 Rob29

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 17:25

Originally posted by PRD
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...58418&rd=1&rd=1

See how much this copy of Autocourse went for :eek:

Interesting-I have 59,60(2 parts)61,62,63,72 & 76. Any idea how much these might fetch?

#2362 ensign14

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 17:27

I'll give you a fiver for 'em. :)

#2363 Vitesse2

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 18:05

Looking on ABEbooks, it appears that's a rare one. Only copy for sale is a fairly ropy one at TE Warth for US$1000 or about £530. There are a few 1963s available, but no 1965s at all.

Although there's a bookseller in Preston advertising a complete set (1951-2006), plus some duplicates and DCN's Autocourse History of the GP Car 1966-91 thrown in. All for a mere £7500!!! Actually quite a bargain if you've got seven and a half grand to spare :rolleyes:

#2364 David Beard

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 20:09

Originally posted by Vitesse2

Although there's a bookseller in Preston advertising a complete set (1951-2006), plus some duplicates and DCN's Autocourse History of the GP Car 1966-91 thrown in. All for a mere £7500!!! Actually quite a bargain if you've got seven and a half grand to spare :rolleyes:


A book seller in Preston who has even heard of such things? More detail please....Preston is 7 miles down the road :eek:

#2365 Vitesse2

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 20:20

Check your PMs, David :)

#2366 RA Historian

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 23:06

Originally posted by PRD
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...58418&rd=1&rd=1

See how much this copy of Autocourse went for :eek:

VERY interesting! I have the '61 book, autographed by Phil Hill, and every one from 1967 to present. Have filled in the gaps from 56 through 66 with Automobile Year. I better not let my wife see any numbers as she, an e bay junkie, may just sell them out from under me!
Tom

#2367 HistoricMustang

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 22:44

Coming in May 2007.

Rex White and Anne B. Jones.

I understand Rex's first book "Gold Thunder" is now enjoying a "third" printing.

And, mine is autographed! :clap:

PM if interested in autographed copies of either book. I will refer you to a contact.

Henry

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#2368 Magee

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 18:50

WESTWOOD (Everyone's Favourite Racing Circuit)
By Tom Johnston
Granville Island Publishing, Vancouver, Canada
ISBN – 1-894694-49-X (paper back)
ISBN – 1-894694-50-3 (bound)

Review by Michael Gee

In 2004, Tom Johnston released Sports Car Road Racing in Western Canada, ISBN 1-894694-19-8 also printed by Granville Island Publishing. A short quote in the 389-page book from author Johnston appears, "Westwood was a fabulous, much-loved track….The history of the Westwood track could be a book all by itself – in fact I'll have to write it" (p.28) He has put into this new book his respect for Westwood and its personnel, racing or supporting the track, for over 30 years. Johnston first raced his Lola at Westwood in 1967. He went on to design open wheelers for Formula Atlantic competition starting at Westwood in 1974. Johnston was inducted into The Canadian Motor Sport Hall of Fame for his contribution to motor sport in Canada.

Among the number of race tracks back in the 1950's, Westwood was unique. It was the first purpose-built road racing circuit in Canada. Johnston, knowing the importance of positive interaction, introduces his history of Westwood by mentioning the human element, "It was a people place – built, owned and operated by racers themselves." He is describing the Sports Car Club of British Columbia.

The author, with his experience, builds his book by starting with the preparation, the track itself, and energy needed by the debenture holders. Local drivers were asked, "We must have green stuff – lots of it…Stop Smoking! Stop drinking! Take the bus! But buy debentures!" Following that was the chore of combining participants from Western Canada and the states of Washington and Oregon. A very unique international club was formed to link race tracks north and south. As well as racing at airfields in the US, drivers in Canada made treks as far as Pebble Beach, California, to compete, starting in the early 50s. Prior to Westwood, the Abbotsford airport was used by the future debenture owners. They were a determined group.

It's fair to say that thousands of drivers made their way to Westwood to compete in club racing, Trans-Am, NASCAR, Formula Ford and Atlantic and others.. Professional drivers from A to V -- Andretti to Villeneuve -- competed there along with visitors such as Moss, Miles, Gendebien, Rodger Ward and others. The list is long. One important part of this book is the list of races held and the winners' names. Helping to support the track and the activities were the sponsors –Texaco, Pepsi, Player's, Semperit, Pennzoil, local newspapers and radio stations and many car dealers to name a few. The strong local fan support was a key factor in the track's venture. However, the end came in 1990 due to pressure from developers of a different kind.

This book has approximately 155 various photos (colour and black & white) of track supporters at work and race cars battling each other on the track. There are also 300 mug shots of faces of Westwood ending the book. Between the covers there is a very interesting display of people and their sport with several anecdotes. This book captures the many elements of the sport in a very personal tone along with many surprises. Johnston leads the reader through the life of Westwood and explains his memories as a very committed supporter and a strong voice for the sport.

#2369 Neil Smith

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 19:34

Hi

this should be a candidate for racing book of 2007:

http://www.motorspor.../EagleBook.html

can't wait...

Neil

#2370 Pils1989

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 02:02

Originally posted by bluelite


Where did you buy the book about the Brussels GP, Antoine?

I also would like to buy the "Grand Prix Saboteurs" book by Joe Saward, but I do not have VISA/Mastercard... I hope I can find that book somewhere. Maybe in Roadrunner in Hasselt (Belgium that is) or else I have to go to England.


Got the book from the author but I'm sure it's available at Autoworld, Brussels

#2371 Flathead

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 13:50

Originally posted by David McKinney
OK, OK
Anyone who wants the NZ Buckler book, try emailing yknot@ledanet.com.au
If that fails (as it did in my case) PM me
(The alternative logistics are too complicated to spell out here)


Now available via www.bucklercars.com

#2372 David McKinney

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 16:45

Originally posted by Flathead
Now available via www.bucklercars.com

But no more easily than when I tried back whenever

#2373 Flathead

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 18:19

David, the email address you quote is now obselete.

It is not like buying a book from a bookshop as each one is copied to order by the author. If anyone contacts me direct with their email address I will ask the author, Kelvin Brown to email them personally.

Or if they prefer, they can do it via the buckler website, which may take longer, by emailing the webmaster simon @ bucklercars. com (remove spaces to use).

#2374 David McKinney

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 18:59

From memory, Flathead, my email to Simon (back then) led to another email in Australia which didn't work, then contact with Malcolm Buckler, and finally direct with Kelvin Brown

#2375 Flathead

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 19:04

A case of no gain without pain David. Anyway hope you got the book in the end and were pleased with it. Mine was a bound edition but I think most are in a loose binder? It has quite a lot more NZ cars in than just Bucklers.

#2376 Andrew Stevens

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 01:34

I just went seaching around for a copy of Fusi's "Alfa Romeo - All Cars From 1910" around various sources for a customer of ours and came across Mill House Book's website saying that they had closed down...which seems a shame. Hopefully not another specialist victim of the Amazon plague!

#2377 jtremlett

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 12:18

If anyone is still waiting for their copy of Winged Sportscars & Enduring Innovation from Amazon.co.uk, they might like to note that Amazon have two separate listings for this book. One shows as not yet published (the one I had originally ordered against) and the other as in stock. Both at the same price. I switched my order from the one to the other and got a despatch note back the same day after having waited for some considerable time since my original order and had two abortive attempts to query it with Amazon.

Jonathan

#2378 Andrew Stevens

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 23:24

Of course you could have bought a copy from one of the specialist motoring booksellers and had it some time ago by now. The book even made it to Australia by mid November last year :)

#2379 Peter Darley

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 09:02

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Peter Darley
[B]

Can now bring you all up to date.
The book will be launched at the Club Lotus Meet at Donington on March 17/18. There will be a limited stock of books available for sale, with the main batch being in the shops for April.

The book was launched as above, and all copies are now sold out. There will, however, be a sample copy on the Classic Team Lotus stand at Stoneleigh, and they will also be taking orders. I will be on and off the stand on Saturday.

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#2380 David Birchall

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 19:38

Originally posted by Doug Nye
Re Vera Atkins - I really must recommend the biography on this remarkable Rumanian-born lady who served within SOE while effectively 'an enemy alien'. The book is by Sarah Helm and is entitled 'A Life in Secrets' - ISBN: 038550845X. I found it a simply stunning work, packed with insight, atmosphere, researching zeal and a level of detail which in many places is very difficult to stomach. It details her hunt to verify the fates of her missing agents at the end of World War 2. Much of the story frankly left me boiling to thump a Hun (1939-45 vintage)...the back of my neck actually goes hot and my stomach muscles tighten as I write this, recalling Helm's forensic account of what really went on in the Avenue Foch interrogation cells, in Natzweiler, Sachsenhausen - and in the women's camp at Buchenwald...

Lest we forget, indeed.

DCN


As a result of this post I bought this book (Which is excellent and very deeply researched) and am mid way through it. My main response is anger at the stupidity, intransigence, lack of planning and follow through exibited by the upper class twits who ran SOE!
One example: Agents who were trained as radio operators were given two identifying pass words; one was real and one was phony. The idea being, obviously, that if captured and forced to transmit by the Nazis they would transmit the phony pass word thus advising the British that the transmission was being made under duress. Repeatedly the officer receiving these transmissions at SOE would transmit back "You silly person, you have sent the phoney pass word, send the real one"!! The result of course being that the person in captivity was tortured until they gave the real pass word. Another example: An SOE agent was believed to have been captured but was still transmitting. Arrangements were made to speak with him directly by radio and a plane flew to France with an SOE officer on board who knew the agent. He talked with the agent on the radio and reported by that the person he spoke with had a gutteral, German accent. The heads of SOE decided that it must have been radio interference and continued to send important information and explosives to the agent!

Signed, Seething in Canada

#2381 hipperson

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 08:29

Jim Clark:Life at Team Lotus by Peter Darley. Got my copy at Donington a week ago......what a cracking book !
A must for everyone on this forum. 250 photographs, not just of Clark but all the great Lotus personalities from that period.
Lots of Peter Arundel....incidentally he has recently foregone the sunny climes of Florida and is living with the 'carrot crunchers' in Norfolk. Not in the best of health though.
Jackie Oliver features a lot in the book and coincidentally he is speaking to us at the FORC meeting in Suffolk tomorrow night. Ticket only sell out.

#2382 Paul Rochdale

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 09:18

NOWHERE TO HIDE - THE STORY OF ROYALE RACING CARS by Paul Lawrence (ISBN 0-9530052-9-1) (£3.99 on special offer from MotorBooks)

I was first attracted to this book by the excellent illustration on the cover, by Andrew Kitson, a painted collection of the various Royale model, as well as the bargain price. I wish I could have liked the book more. It started off well with the story of Bob King firstly, then Alan Cornock who took over the company when King became 'unwell'. For many years, Royale was on a roll gaining a lot of successes on the track but with a buying public that demanded new models each year, even if the existing car was perfectly competitive. Designers such as Rory Byrne and Pat Symonds brought out various Formula Ford and FF 2000 models with the RP 26 being their most successful. Everything seemed to falter with Bob Marston-designed RP34M, a ground effect FF2000 car which flopped and was scrapped after only one race. Fickle customers went elsewhere. Royale had fingers in a great many classes and seemed stretched. Much of the manufacturing was sub-contracted out and they were really assemblers. Alan Cornock eventually cried enough and became bankrupt. The company was sold on at least twice but they were always playing catch-up against the other manufacturers. Various fabricators and designers let them down, and it all came to a sorry end. For me, I found it confusing trying to remember the various model numbers especially when with an altered piece of GRP and radiators moved a bit, a 'new' model was created. The writing became a bit of a 'list', still it was interesting to see the way racing car manufacturers were run back then.

#2383 petefenelon

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 15:50

Originally posted by Paul Rochdale
For me, I found it confusing trying to remember the various model numbers especially when with an altered piece of GRP and radiators moved a bit, a 'new' model was created. The writing became a bit of a 'list', still it was interesting to see the way racing car manufacturers were run back then.


Does it explain the Argo JM16/Royale RP39/RP40 confusion in IMSA Lights properly? Michael Cotton's Directory of World Sports Cars (or whatever it was called!) tries to explain it but left me feeling even more befuddled than I was before because he does it in two places each telling a different 60% of the story ;)

#2384 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 21:10

Re: Joe Saward's The Grand Prix Saboteurs

I made it a point to read this book, finishing it Sunday evening. Overall, it meshed with what I had gathered from some research that I did in conjunction with work for my mentoring professor at the time, who happened to be a former OSS Jedburgh type -- something that he had never mentioned prior to this little research effort. I was both really fascinated and appalled by what happened to the SOE, OSS, and French resistance fighters who seemed to be truly up against the odds.

I was a bit amused to read that Benoist racked up 19,500 flying hours by 1919 -- that is a huge number of hours at any time, but even then relatively few cracked the 1,000+ hour barrier. I could see where he could have 1,950 hours with no problem, but.... My only other quibble was that the 1925 world championship's first round was at Indianapolis and not Spa.

I thought that the good Mr. Saward caught the essence of the racing scene from this period. I hope some read it and realize just how interesting this period truly was, regardless of where you were in the racing world.

Otherwise, an increasingly depressing book as the wound steadily towards its end. That there were those involved who left and then returned to the field of action is to perform a really remarkable act of courage. Which only made the realization of the near-complete lack of recognition that these brave men and women recognition very irritating and quite depressing. I somehow never realized that so few received anything in recognition of their courage and sacrifices -- I had not realized that the only GCs awarded were to the three women mentioned. That was a shocker. That, plus the utter stupidity of the SOE REMFs was enough to make one seethe.....

At any rate, it was definitely a "good read." I would recommend that you put it on your reading lists.

#2385 David Birchall

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 03:13

Continuing this thread (pun intended) on the British SOE and it's problems, I would suggest reading "The Sisters: The Saga of the Mitford Family" by Mary S. Lovell.

Why mention such a book in this forum? Well, one of the sisters concerned, Diana, was the mother of Max Mosley having left her first husband, heir to the Guiness fortune, to marry Oswald Mosley. Does Max Mosley sound familiar? I know this was covered in a thread a couple of years ago but this book has come out since then.

Diana was friendly with Hitler, he was a guest at her wedding to Mosley in Joseph Goebbels house, but Diana's sister Unity was even closer to Hitler and possibly his lover. Since she was a niece of Winston Churchill it was not unusual for her to dine one night with Churchill and the following with Hitler.

An excellent read that provides great insight into the British aristocracy pre-war.

#2386 Mallory Dan

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 12:45

Originally posted by Paul Rochdale
NOWHERE TO HIDE - THE STORY OF ROYALE RACING CARS by Paul Lawrence (ISBN 0-9530052-9-1) (£3.99 on special offer from MotorBooks)

I was first attracted to this book by the excellent illustration on the cover, by Andrew Kitson, a painted collection of the various Royale model, as well as the bargain price. I wish I could have liked the book more. It started off well with the story of Bob King firstly, then Alan Cornock who took over the company when King became 'unwell'. For many years, Royale was on a roll gaining a lot of successes on the track but with a buying public that demanded new models each year, even if the existing car was perfectly competitive. Designers such as Rory Byrne and Pat Symonds brought out various Formula Ford and FF 2000 models with the RP 26 being their most successful. Everything seemed to falter with Bob Marston-designed RP34M, a ground effect FF2000 car which flopped and was scrapped after only one race. Fickle customers went elsewhere. Royale had fingers in a great many classes and seemed stretched. Much of the manufacturing was sub-contracted out and they were really assemblers. Alan Cornock eventually cried enough and became bankrupt. The company was sold on at least twice but they were always playing catch-up against the other manufacturers. Various fabricators and designers let them down, and it all came to a sorry end. For me, I found it confusing trying to remember the various model numbers especially when with an altered piece of GRP and radiators moved a bit, a 'new' model was created. The writing became a bit of a 'list', still it was interesting to see the way racing car manufacturers were run back then.


Sorry Paul, I don't agree, I think its a brilliant book for what it is. Perhaps because I always had a soft spot for Royale over the VDs, or maybe its the memories it brings back of the 70s/80s days. I think its a well told story, with many great characters quoted within, and is one of very few books I know that concentrates on the whole subject of British Club Racing. It also has a superb appendix of the cars sold, even down to the chassis numbers (which I realise is not to everyone's taste!).

I have only one criticism, its that the last few years of Royale, from 1983-88 or so, are crammed in at the back.

#2387 Paul Rochdale

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 08:27

Well Dan, 'brilliant' is a strong word. I read it cover to cover in two evenings and found it 'OK', but it was marked down at £3.99 in the Reduced Books section at Motorbooks, so nothing lost. If you found that 'brilliant', how did you find 'Cooper Cars' or 'The Lost Generation' or 'Colin Chapman Lotus Engineering'?;)

#2388 bradbury west

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 08:50

Originally posted by Paul Rochdale
Well , how did you find 'Colin Chapman Lotus Engineering'?;)


Not seen that mentioned for a long time, Paul. Hugh Haskell did a very good job in that book, IMHO, with a different approach.

Roger Lund

#2389 Paul Rochdale

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 17:32

An absolute cracker, as were the other two mentioned. My sort of books.

#2390 Barry Boor

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 17:41

A really strange thing happened yesterday.

I noticed the Glory of Goodwood book being offered on Ebay. The starting bid was £0.99p. I decided to have a look at Amazon to see if I could find out its true worth. I was gobsmacked to see that Amazon were offering 6 of them, ranging from £114 to £170. (At this moment it is 5 copies, £113 to £169).

The thing is, the Ebay version ended yesterday afternoon and sold for £7.51, with only 2 bids.

Did I get it? I wanted it, but an elderly neighbour dropped in at about 2.30 and by the time he left I had missed it... :mad:

So, how come this book is so expensive on Amazon, yet sold so cheaply on Ebay? Amazon must be having a laugh asking those prices, or is there something else going on here?

#2391 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 18:38

I don't know....is this book out of print now? There's only one copy at www.abebooks.com It's in Germany at $116.00. I'm glad I got my copy a few years ago.

Jack

#2392 rudi

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 18:54

Librairie du Palmier sell it for 58,70 Euro.
And there are two on the french Amazon at more than 100 Euro.

#2393 philippe charuest

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 19:25

Originally posted by Barry Boor
A really strange thing happened yesterday.

I noticed the Glory of Goodwood book being offered on Ebay. The starting bid was £0.99p. I decided to have a look at Amazon to see if I could find out its true worth. I was gobsmacked to see that Amazon were offering 6 of them, ranging from £114 to £170. (At this moment it is 5 copies, £113 to £169).

The thing is, the Ebay version ended yesterday afternoon and sold for £7.51, with only 2 bids.

Did I get it? I wanted it, but an elderly neighbour dropped in at about 2.30 and by the time he left I had missed it... :mad:

So, how come this book is so expensive on Amazon, yet sold so cheaply on Ebay? Amazon must be having a laugh asking those prices, or is there something else going on here?

never ever buy anything used or from a third party true Amazon they are a bunch of crook ,the third party i mean not Amazon they are great for new book . but that kind of good deal like you mention in your post , i do some every week true ebay , but if you want a specific book at a decent price , not the the ridiculously good deal but the decent price theres always ABEbook

#2394 Roger Clark

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 20:48

In the WB column of the latest Motor Sport, he refers to The Strasbourg Sunbeams by Neville S Webb. A postal address in Australia is given. Does anybody know anything about this book?

WB says: "Webb sorts out the confused past and present of the four cars built for the 1922 French Grand Prix - and the 1.5-litre Sunbeam racing engine..." which has left me a little confused. A Sydney bookseller, http://www.autobookw...exd.asp?ID=7176 also refers to 1.5-litre engines.

#2395 sterling49

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 20:19

I have just finished "Racing In The Rain", a very interesting account of John Horsman's years with JW Automotive. I must say that my favourite chapters were those on the GT40's and the 917's.......it's a pity I didn't take the book last week to F.O.R.C. so that I could have got Jackie Oliver to sign it..........oh well, next time!

#2396 dretceterini

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 20:41

Just got a copy of the Bucciali book at a reduced price, and it is a fantastic read..

Now, if I could only find a copy of Adriaensen's Fiat 8V book at a similar price reduction...the public price is over $500 with post costs...

#2397 Mark Godfrey

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 21:40

Often the books listed on Amazon Marketplace, ABE, and other sources are priced according to those already listed, as opposed to a truer value. The value of a book in a given part of the world may be greater than in others, also the fees taken by the listing source can be a factor in the price asked.

Some people like the ease and familiarity of dealing with Amazon, including the Marketplace listings. I purchase and sell some books via Amazon Marketplace (as well as Ebay, and online shopping cart). A few smaller publishers sell their titles via Amazon Marketplace as the cost is less than selling direct to Amazon.

Amazon Marketplace certainly can be higher priced than other sources. If you want a good buy, look at all the sources you can. As mentioned via ABE is one copy of The Glory of Goodwood listed at US$116. Amazon Marketplace (US) lists four copies from US$102 to 126.

Low start price, no minimum and few bidders may well result in a good deal on Ebay -- or just a more realistic price -- another copy of this book sold recently on eBay for GBP12. But check any online pricing available, as it is not uncommon for bidders on eBay to exceed these.

#2398 Allan Lupton

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 07:21

Amazon is a funny outfit: I found that Amazon Germany had Halwart Schrader's Deutsche Autos 1885-1920 at a sensible price, so went through every step (which included the system recognising me as a customer with my correct details) until it told me it could not send the book to my address (which is in the UK, a member of the EU, etc. etc!)
Amazon UK said that it was a matter for Amazon DE but that outfit never came up with a rational explanation.
I bought one from an eBay shop in Germany which had no problem sending it to me.

#2399 Mallory Dan

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 13:24

Originally posted by Paul Rochdale
Well Dan, 'brilliant' is a strong word. I read it cover to cover in two evenings and found it 'OK', but it was marked down at £3.99 in the Reduced Books section at Motorbooks, so nothing lost. If you found that 'brilliant', how did you find 'Cooper Cars' or 'The Lost Generation' or 'Colin Chapman Lotus Engineering'?;)


Paul, I stand by that word I'm afraid. Following the mentions on here, I've just picked it up again, and I still reckon its great. Most of the stuff in it, albeit pretty mundane and 'low-key' I guess, is all new to me. I've got TLG, and its an excellent read, but I have to say, it didn't tell me much that i didn't already know.

Plus the Royale book, covering British Club/National Racing of the late 60s to early 80s period, pretty much exactly covers the time I became obsessed with that subject.

Each to his own ...!!

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#2400 PRD

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 14:20

Originally posted by Allan Lupton
Amazon is a funny outfit: I found that Amazon Germany had Halwart Schrader's Deutsche Autos 1885-1920 at a sensible price, so went through every step (which included the system recognising me as a customer with my correct details) until it told me it could not send the book to my address (which is in the UK, a member of the EU, etc. etc!)
Amazon UK said that it was a matter for Amazon DE but that outfit never came up with a rational explanation.
I bought one from an eBay shop in Germany which had no problem sending it to me.


I live in the UK and have bought from Amazon in the US, France and Germany with no problem