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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#251 ranbo38

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Posted 19 July 2003 - 06:49

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Ron Scoma
[B]


[QUOTE]With the exception of "Jaguars in Australia" I have NO books on cars or racing in that area of the world. Yet I would love to add just about any tomes to my collection, but finding what is, or was, available is not all that easy for us in the USA.[/QUOTE]

and for anyone else interested: http://www.fazazz.co.nz several new zealand books
available here as well as a few good second hand items with excell. prices? nz dollar currently about 0.57cUS mark. Being a small market there's not many but I think some of them were local releases only.

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#252 Lec CRP1

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Posted 20 July 2003 - 08:54

I got my copy of 'Piers Courage - Last Of The Gentleman Racers' yesterday morning. I've just finished writing a review of it for Amazon.co.uk, and it should be there in the next couple of days. Then we'll see if Pete Fenelon has beaten me to it or not. ;)

Anyone else read it here? And (cliche) how was it for you?

#253 petefenelon

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Posted 20 July 2003 - 12:17

Originally posted by Lec CRP1
I got my copy of 'Piers Courage - Last Of The Gentleman Racers' yesterday morning. I've just finished writing a review of it for Amazon.co.uk, and it should be there in the next couple of days. Then we'll see if Pete Fenelon has beaten me to it or not. ;)

Anyone else read it here? And (cliche) how was it for you?


I don't have a copy yet, so you've definitely beaten me to it ;)

#254 petefenelon

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 13:00

I finally treated myself to a copy of "The Certain Sound" last week. First time I've gone into three figures for a book - and by 'eck it's worth it!

Not content with being one of the best team managers ever, Wyer also writes with a wonderfully crisp and drily witty prose style and the photography is just fantastic. A great anecdote and some marvellous historical insight on every page.

This is a book that cries out to be put back in print (along with Automobile Year's gorgeous Book of Sports Car Racing).

I now kick, curse and generally debase myself every time I think of the £5 remaindered copy I passed up in favour of something about then-contemporary F1 in the early 80s :( :( :( :( :( :(

It'd be a fantastic coup for Six Two Press, Colonel.....;)


To quote from Apocalypse Now... "Sell the wife... sell the kids...." - it's that good.

#255 VAR1016

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 14:15

I am happy to report that "Full Throttle" by Sir Henry Birkin Bt was every bit as good as I had hoped.

Particularly interesting was his enormous respect for Carracciola - his descriptions of Caratsch handling the big Mercedes in the pouring rain at 120 mph are stirring indeed.

PdeRL

#256 Michael Oliver

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 17:19

Originally posted by PRD


I spent some time at Goodwood at the bookshops and it was interesting to hear Chaters trying to convince a German visitor that he couldn't buy the book and the old chap at Horton's books give the distinct impression that he had been given an exclusive preview copy as a personal favour by the author.

It does look a brilliant book and I hope that Michael hasn't lost out by missing the FoS


Yes, booksellers persuading people that they couldn't buy my Lotus 72 book was not quite what I was hoping for at the FoS but the Gods conspired against us, I'm afraid :(

Thanks for your comments about the book - it is always nice to have some feedback, especially when it is positive :D

My current 'work in progress' is a book about the Lotus wing cars but a certain J. Tipler has rather pulled the rug from under me with his Lotus 78/79 book : Any comments about whether there is room for another book on the subject in the vein of the 49/72 volumes would be much appreciated.

Cheers

Michael Oliver

#257 petefenelon

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 19:56

Originally posted by Michael Oliver


Yes, booksellers persuading people that they couldn't buy my Lotus 72 book was not quite what I was hoping for at the FoS but the Gods conspired against us, I'm afraid :(

Thanks for your comments about the book - it is always nice to have some feedback, especially when it is positive :D

My current 'work in progress' is a book about the Lotus wing cars but a certain J. Tipler has rather pulled the rug from under me with his Lotus 78/79 book : Any comments about whether there is room for another book on the subject in the vein of the 49/72 volumes would be much appreciated.

Cheers

Michael Oliver


Anyone who's got your 49 book (and intends to get the 72 one) will probably want the wing car one too. I certainly fall into that categoty (and a book on the carbon Lotuses up to the end of the marque in F1 would be good, hint hint!).

So you're probably looking at a decent-sized captive audience of people who've got the first two and want to keep up with the author, but I suspect that the 'floating voter' might go for whatever's cheapest rather than whatever has the most insight and content - and Tipler tends to put his stuff out for 20 quid or so because his books are usually fairly basic and short...

pete

#258 ensign14

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 21:08

Originally posted by petefenelon
I now kick, curse and generally debase myself every time I think of the £5 remaindered copy I passed up in favour of something about then-contemporary F1 in the early 80s :( :( :( :( :( :(

You never know...some of them may be worth a few bob in years to come.

The Wyer book is absolutely splendid, certainly (cost me £30 in 1995, BTW).

Another remainder special in recent years that is getting good prices nowadays is 'Track Pass' by Geoff Goddard - £15 up to £100+.

#259 petefenelon

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 21:43

Originally posted by ensign14
You never know...some of them may be worth a few bob in years to come.

The Wyer book is absolutely splendid, certainly (cost me £30 in 1995, BTW).

Another remainder special in recent years that is getting good prices nowadays is 'Track Pass' by Geoff Goddard - £15 up to £100+.


I don't buy books as an investment - I buy them because I want to read and keep them! :)

pete

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#260 dolomite

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 21:59

Originally posted by Michael Oliver


Yes, booksellers persuading people that they couldn't buy my Lotus 72 book was not quite what I was hoping for at the FoS but the Gods conspired against us, I'm afraid :(

Thanks for your comments about the book - it is always nice to have some feedback, especially when it is positive :D

My current 'work in progress' is a book about the Lotus wing cars but a certain J. Tipler has rather pulled the rug from under me with his Lotus 78/79 book : Any comments about whether there is room for another book on the subject in the vein of the 49/72 volumes would be much appreciated.

Cheers

Michael Oliver


I'm eagerly looking forward to the 72 book, and a similar book on the wing cars would be even more fantastic, yes please! Especially if it covers the 80 and 88 as well as the 78/79.

Incidentally I was hoping to get a nice secondhand copy of the 49 book for a reasonable price from an Amazon seller the other week, but unfortunately it seems to have got lost in the post and the seller had to refund me :(

#261 ensign14

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 22:04

Originally posted by petefenelon


I don't buy books as an investment - I buy them because I want to read and keep them! :)

pete

Ditto, but if you want to read them, you have to treat them like investments - i.e. buy them when low...funny, sonmeone at the FoS was saying they knew someone who bought motor racing books as investments because it was better than the Stock Market. And seeing how some titles scream upwards in value, perhaps he's right. Sheldon vol 2 anyone?

#262 Vitesse2

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 22:16

Originally posted by ensign14
Sheldon vol 2 anyone?


70 quid from Hortons at the FoS last year :up: Bought vol 3 at the same time, same price. Could have had a vol 7 too but was already WAY over budget, and it was only 10.30 on Friday.... :

Pete: if I'd known you wanted the Wyer book, there was a good condition ex-library copy available recently for £65 at a shop near me. It's gone now though ....

#263 Ninja2

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Posted 22 July 2003 - 23:52

>Yes, booksellers persuading people that they couldn't buy my Lotus 72 book was not quite what >I was hoping for at the FoS but the Gods conspired against us, I'm afraid

>Thanks for your comments about the book - it is always nice to have some feedback, especially >when it is positive

>My current 'work in progress' is a book about the Lotus wing cars but a certain J. Tipler has rather >pulled the rug from under me with his Lotus 78/79 book Any comments about whether there is >room for another book on the subject in the vein of the 49/72 volumes would be much >appreciated.

>Cheers

>Michael Oliver

Your Lotus 49 book was one of a very select number of non-textbooks that I managed to purchase with my student loan during the first few years of my Mechanical Engineering degree. I thought that it had just the right mix of fairly technical material, but with a great story as well. I have bought many car history books since then, such as the Mclaren F1 story, and the Porsche 917 book, but none have come up to the high standard set by your own work. In particular, the quality of technical insight was marvellous in your book!

Every year I go to the FoS I check out the chassis number on the 49(s) in attendance so I can check out their histories when I go home! If the 72 book is anything like as good as the 49 one, I will definitely add it to my collection, and would be very interested in the Wing Cars book as well. I am very disappointed to read after I come home from the FoS that I could have had a preview of the 72 book!

Ciaran Branney

#264 Michael Oliver

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 10:37

Originally posted by petefenelon


Anyone who's got your 49 book (and intends to get the 72 one) will probably want the wing car one too. I certainly fall into that categoty (and a book on the carbon Lotuses up to the end of the marque in F1 would be good, hint hint!).

So you're probably looking at a decent-sized captive audience of people who've got the first two and want to keep up with the author, but I suspect that the 'floating voter' might go for whatever's cheapest rather than whatever has the most insight and content - and Tipler tends to put his stuff out for 20 quid or so because his books are usually fairly basic and short...

pete


I guess the thing that makes or breaks the viability of the project is just how big that core audience of buyers is...as you say, the floating voter will probably buy whatever is available at the time :

Not sure about writing about later Lotuses though - my interest rather dried up circa late 1982 :(

Thanks for the feedback.

Michael Oliver

#265 Michael Oliver

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 10:44

Originally posted by dolomite


I'm eagerly looking forward to the 72 book, and a similar book on the wing cars would be even more fantastic, yes please! Especially if it covers the 80 and 88 as well as the 78/79.

Incidentally I was hoping to get a nice secondhand copy of the 49 book for a reasonable price from an Amazon seller the other week, but unfortunately it seems to have got lost in the post and the seller had to refund me :(


Yes, it is my intention to cover the twin-chassis cars as well, so it would be a multi-Type book rather than single-Type, if you see what I mean, e.g. 77, 78, 79, 80, 86, 88 and I'd probably have to cover the 81 and 87 in there somewhere too. :

Re the 49 book: funnily enough I was browing on abebooks.com yesterday and there was someone in the UK (Gloucester, I think) who had a Gold Leaf edition (the standard one) for £40, so might be worth a try. I'd supply you one myself, but I only have two copies of my own!

Cheers

Michael Oliver

#266 Michael Oliver

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 14:51

Originally posted by Ninja2
Your Lotus 49 book was one of a very select number of non-textbooks that I managed to purchase with my student loan during the first few years of my Mechanical Engineering degree. I thought that it had just the right mix of fairly technical material, but with a great story as well. I have bought many car history books since then, such as the Mclaren F1 story, and the Porsche 917 book, but none have come up to the high standard set by your own work. In particular, the quality of technical insight was marvellous in your book!

Every year I go to the FoS I check out the chassis number on the 49(s) in attendance so I can check out their histories when I go home! If the 72 book is anything like as good as the 49 one, I will definitely add it to my collection, and would be very interested in the Wing Cars book as well. I am very disappointed to read after I come home from the FoS that I could have had a preview of the 72 book!

Ciaran Branney


Thanks for your comments and I feel very honoured that you saw fit to spend some of your student loan on my 49 book :blush: I'm not a particularly technical person but maybe that helps when trying to explain technical things in plain English ;) Sorry you missed a sneak preview at Goodwood but the finished article should be available in the next couple of weeks - hope it lives up to expectations!

Cheers

Michael Oliver

#267 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 15:09

Michael, I am looking forward to your forthcoming Lotus 72 book, as I very much enjoyed your Lotus 49 work. I'm glad to hear that it will be available in the next few weeks.

While most preferred the 72 in the famous JPS black and gold livery, I always thought the car looked fantastic in the red and gold of the Rindt era. I liked the black and gold look on 'Black Beauty'.

I finished "Bernie's Game" about a month ago, and found it to be a very interesting book, particularly in context of understanding more how F1 has arrived at the state we find it in today. This is very true in light of the GWPC and Silverstone events of late.

There is a very good review of this work by Mike Lawrence on Pitpass.com, and I agree with his assessment of this book. His review is far better than anything that I can write.

Lawrence Review of "Bernie's Game"

#268 schildkrte

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 16:58

I was initially very interested in "Bernie's Game" but discouraged by the apprehension that it would likely be another "Piranha Club" by Timothy Collings.
The latter too promised much but delivered very little in terms of original material.

#269 PRD

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 17:20

I'll certainly buy Michael's Lotus 72 book, but my interest in Lotus faded somewhat after that. I really do not like cigarette advertising on racing cars and bought the BRG version of the Lotus 49 book to avoid it.

Having said that, Lotus painted an Elise in GLTL colours and it looked really cool...

Regards

Paul

#270 petefenelon

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 17:22

Originally posted by schildkröte
I was initially very interested in "Bernie's Game" but discouraged by the apprehension that it would likely be another "Piranha Club" by Timothy Collings.
The latter too promised much but delivered very little in terms of original material.


It's far, far better than the Collings book. Most of what Collings put in his book could've been pieced together from the news pages of the racing comics - it's not a bad potted history of F1 politics, but it contains a few too many errors and a bit too little insight to be truly useful or fascinating. It was a couple of mornings' reading when I was on holiday, a nice time-filler but nothing spectacular.

The stuff in the Lovell book is near-incendiary in places. The bits about Bernie's pre-Brabham career in and out of the sport raise as many questions as they answer; the middle part of the book is a couple of cracking racing stories - Bernie's years at Brabham and his rise within FOCA tying in with the FISA/FOCA war... the second half is eye-opening about his business deals after he took effective commercial control of F1.

From a racing point of view there's lots of interesting stuff that didn't crop up in Alan Henry's Brabham book or Mike Lawrence's Ron Tauranac one turn up here - how after using Colin Seeley to shaft Ron, Bernie subsequently shafted Colin Seeley...

The FIASCO years are documented more thoroughly than I've ever seen before, with a lot more insight into how things might have turned out (those of you who read my posts know that the "alternative history" of racing fascinates me almost as much as the real one...) and who was doing what to whom....

The meat of the book's really an account of how Bernie went from millionaire to billionaire through his control of F1, and isn't really a racing story at all -- it's a business story. A lot of CEOs and CFOs and accountants and politicians whizz through the pages at a rate of knots, and as Dr Lawrence says it pays to read slowly and carefully to keep track of the deals. Pure gearheads might find the second half of the book dull; anyone with a broader interest should find it gripping.

Sure, Lovell's not a racing expert and once in a while gets some of the technicalities wrong, but this is the kind of book that could only have been written by an "outsider" who didn't necessarily have the preconceptions that a racing journalist would've had.

#271 dolomite

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 17:38

Originally posted by Michael Oliver


Yes, it is my intention to cover the twin-chassis cars as well, so it would be a multi-Type book rather than single-Type, if you see what I mean, e.g. 77, 78, 79, 80, 86, 88 and I'd probably have to cover the 81 and 87 in there somewhere too. :

Re the 49 book: funnily enough I was browing on abebooks.com yesterday and there was someone in the UK (Gloucester, I think) who had a Gold Leaf edition (the standard one) for £40, so might be worth a try. I'd supply you one myself, but I only have two copies of my own!

Cheers

Michael Oliver


Thanks Michael, I've ordered that one now.

Can't wait for the next book already. Of course I've no objection to the 81 and 87 also being included. I was present at Silverstone in 1981, and witnessed at first hand the frantic activity in the Lotus garage after the first practice day as 88s were hurriedly cobbled back into 87s overnight....

#272 Michael Oliver

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 19:54

Originally posted by Dennis Hockenbury
Michael, I am looking forward to your forthcoming Lotus 72 book, as I very much enjoyed your Lotus 49 work. I'm glad to hear that it will be available in the next few weeks.

While most preferred the 72 in the famous JPS black and gold livery, I always thought the car looked fantastic in the red and gold of the Rindt era. I liked the black and gold look on 'Black Beauty'.


Dennis,

I agree with you about 'Black Beauty', it was just right on the 79s...however, I too liked the Gold Leaf livery - there was something very crisp and clean about the red and white with the gold lining. Then again, I thought the Walker car looked good in 1970 - until they stuck those horrific mirrors on stalks on the side :down: - and I also liked the Lucky Strike livery run by Dave Charlton. I've tried to include a few shots of 72s in other 'non-JPS' colours too, such as the Gunston cars and the Embassy car run by Eddie Keizan in 1974, which was a very spectacular blue with gold trim. I don't think a 72 ran in any other colours but I'm sure if it did, someone here will put me right ;)

Michael Oliver

#273 Michael Oliver

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Posted 23 July 2003 - 20:17

Originally posted by dolomite


Thanks Michael, I've ordered that one now.

Can't wait for the next book already. Of course I've no objection to the 81 and 87 also being included. I was present at Silverstone in 1981, and witnessed at first hand the frantic activity in the Lotus garage after the first practice day as 88s were hurriedly cobbled back into 87s overnight....


Glad to be of assistance ;)

Yes the two Types are inter-mingled really, arent' they - difficult to mention one without the other!

Michael

#274 Frank S

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Posted 24 July 2003 - 05:58

I have received Wolfgang Klopfer's FORMULA A and FORMULA 5000 in America Race by Race, from www.amazon.de (ISBN 3-8330-0846-6). Very well put together, with cogent summaries of the competitions and enlightening views from some of the principals.

Thank you for the opportunity, Wolfgang. I was reminded of the exciting action and pleasurable sensations those hybrids contributed to racing during my choice as a 'glory era", mid-60s to mid-70s.


Frank S

#275 Geza Sury

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Posted 24 July 2003 - 06:43

Originally posted by ensign14
Another remainder special in recent years that is getting good prices nowadays is 'Track Pass' by Geoff Goddard - £15 up to £100+.

I'm just considering the purchase of this book. As the subtitled says, "A Photographer's View of Motor Racing 1950-1980". I already have the two huge Schlegelmilch books. (Grand Prix Fascination F1 and Portraits of 60s) Why is the Goddard book so special? Does it contain more text (written by DCN of course) than the Könemann books?

#276 petefenelon

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Posted 24 July 2003 - 09:15

Originally posted by Geza Sury

I'm just considering the purchase of this book. As the subtitled says, "A Photographer's View of Motor Racing 1950-1980". I already have the two huge Schlegelmilch books. (Grand Prix Fascination F1 and Portraits of 60s) Why is the Goddard book so special? Does it contain more text (written by DCN of course) than the Könemann books?


The main reason the Goddard book is a must is the 50s photography - the later pics are also very good, but they're of an era that's pretty well-documented. There is a lot of fascinating stuff in the earlier pics.

There's also Goddard/DCN "Classic Racing Cars: The Post-War Front Engined GP Cars" which covers the 50s in rather more depth.

You might also consider getting hold of Nigel Snowdon's "Formula One Through The Lens" which is 60s-90s if Geoff's photography appeals. Copies seem to be around for 25 pounds or so these days.

pete

#277 David Beard

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Posted 24 July 2003 - 09:27

Originally posted by petefenelon


You might also consider getting hold of Nigel Snowdon's "Formula One Through The Lens" which is 60s-90s if Geoff's photography appeals. Copies seem to be around for 25 pounds or so these days.

pete


I'm sure I got mine free with a MotorSport subscription. I feel quite pleased with it now. :)

#278 Don Capps

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 00:48

Bernie's Game, by Terry Lovell doesn't seem to be available on the Western side of the Atlantic. Having read what Mike Lawrence has had to say about it, it seems like a book that I wouldn't mind reading. I think that the business side of racing is so poorly covered as to be a glaring omission in the coverage of the activity. I think that this has been the case for some years now on both sides of the Atlantic and on the Pacific rim and elsewhere to boot.

Then again, perhaps my interests in "the sport of motor racing" have changed over the years....

#279 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 02:01

Don, I purchased my copy of 'Bernie's Game' from Amazon.co.uk several months ago. You can buy this book there for £12.59. As a fellow American, you will have also noticed the difficulty in finding many titles here in the U.S. for a reasonable price.

Although the commercial side of F1 is not to the taste of many here, I feel it is important to understand how the sport has evolved from that perspective in order to have a well-balanced view of the sport. Many of the issues in present day F1 have to be understood through the prism of the commercial considerations of Ecclestone and his associates.

I'm not saying that I like the current state of affairs, to the contrary in fact. But it is important to understand the context of today's headlines.

I did not post my review of this book, as I felt that Mike Lawrence provided a fair and balanced overview of the work. I would also endorse Pete Fenelon's post as well. Very well written Pete, I can tell that you enjoyed the book from the passion shown in your words.

Having been very disappointed in 'Piranha Club', I was quite pleased with the very well presented story by Terry Lovell of a most difficult subject.

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#280 Don Capps

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 03:28

Formula A and Formula 5000 in America: Race by Race By Wolfgang Klopfer is supposed to be out soon, with a special color version available from "Island" himself.

#281 Frank S

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 03:36

Originally posted by Frank S
I have received Wolfgang Klopfer's FORMULA A and FORMULA 5000 in America Race by Race, from www.amazon.de (ISBN 3-8330-0846-6). Very well put together, with cogent summaries of the competitions and enlightening views from some of the principals.

Thank you for the opportunity, Wolfgang. I was reminded of the exciting action and pleasurable sensations those hybrids contributed to racing during my choice as a 'glory era", mid-60s to mid-70s.


Frank S


I take it all back.

#282 petefenelon

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 09:21

Originally posted by Don Capps
Bernie's Game, by Terry Lovell doesn't seem to be available on the Western side of the Atlantic. Having read what Mike Lawrence has had to say about it, it seems like a book that I wouldn't mind reading. I think that the business side of racing is so poorly covered as to be a glaring omission in the coverage of the activity. I think that this has been the case for some years now on both sides of the Atlantic and on the Pacific rim and elsewhere to boot.

Then again, perhaps my interests in "the sport of motor racing" have changed over the years....


Amazon.co.uk are doing it for twelve pounds - shouldn't be more than a few pounds to ship to the USA...

#283 Geza Sury

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 09:52

Originally posted by petefenelon
The main reason the Goddard book is a must is the 50s photography - the later pics are also very good, but they're of an era that's pretty well-documented. There is a lot of fascinating stuff in the earlier pics.

There's also Goddard/DCN "Classic Racing Cars: The Post-War Front Engined GP Cars" which covers the 50s in rather more depth.

You might also consider getting hold of Nigel Snowdon's "Formula One Through The Lens" which is 60s-90s if Geoff's photography appeals. Copies seem to be around for 25 pounds or so these days.

Thanks, Pete. I guess I will go for the "Classic Racing Cars: The Post-War Front-Engined GP Cars" book first which can be acquired for cover price from Mill House Books. It would supplement my Könemann books pretty well. "Formula One Through The Lens" for the sale price of 9.99 pounds from MH is very appealing as well...

#284 Don Capps

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 13:20

Originally posted by petefenelon
Amazon.co.uk are doing it for twelve pounds - shouldn't be more than a few pounds to ship to the USA...


Done deal -- ordered it last night.

#285 dolomite

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 13:35

Foiled again! :(

The following order has been cancelled because the item is unavailable. There are many possibilities as to why the bookseller marked the book(s) unavailable:

- It may have been previously sold and not yet removed from our database.
- The book was sold to a walk-in customer in the bookseller's store
- There may have been a previous hold on the book
- The book was misplaced but the bookseller did not realize it was missing until they tried to locate it

Bookseller: Paperbackshop.co.uk
Author: "OLIVER", "MICHAEL"
Title: "LOTUS 49 GOLD LEAF ED"
Bookseller Book No.: "1901295516"
Price: US$ 63.90



#286 Jim Thurman

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Posted 28 July 2003 - 00:36

Originally posted by Frank S
Vitesse2

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cds of journals would be marvellous, but the sheer amount of work (and cost) involved are staggering.
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Just today I got Bob Norton's PDFs-on-4-CDROMs of Gus Vignolle's complete Motor Racing, V1 No1 through V9 No3, 1953-1964. Bob can tell you what it took to complete such a project, and what it takes to deliver a product.


Tell me about it! :rolleyes: This is what has kept me busy this year. I've been scanning (and in some cases, re-scanning) issues of a Western U.S. racing paper which covers primarily short track racing. This was only possible thanks to the kind loan from a long time columnist from said paper.

I'm sure many would find many flaws with my scans, and I'll freely admit they are far from perfect...but at least I did it. Time constraints (having to get them back to the person who loaned them) left me to concentrate on doing them quick and dirty, but my main concern was that the text was legible. And in dealing with newspapers from 1964...that can get a bit tricky.

Thanks to Michael T. Lynch pointing out Bob Norton's project, I was able to get in contact with him, and Bob gave me a lot of tips that I can use to improve the presentation...but that is for when I can find the time to do so. I greatly appreciate folks like Bob undetaking projects like this.

This paper is still in publication and I hope to clean up these scans and make a presentation in hopes of getting them more interested in preserving their publication for research purposes. And, I still need to scan my collection of issues...but :eek: I need some time to recover! (and get to my other projects).

If I am able to pass these along to other historians/researchers, they are more than welcome to cuss my decisions and question the scans much in the same manner I cussed trying to line up crooked pages and deal with frays and tears...but, damn it...I'm the one who actually did the project in the first place :D

I'm discovering some great items in these issues. For example when Marshall Sargent (mentioned in other threads on TNF) went to the Southern U.S. to compete in some races, who subbed for him in his weekly Super Modified ride at San Jose Speedway?...Dick Atkins.


Jim Thurman

#287 petefenelon

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Posted 01 August 2003 - 16:09

A few brief brief reviews of recent reads.

David McKinney's Maserati 250F book - a very thorough piece of work, particularly when it comes to untangling the histories of the cars in the front-line and beyond. Some very interesting photos. I think this is a book that needed a little more space to breathe - although highly readable I was left wanting more background to round out the detail, particularly about the things that aren't well documented elsewhere (some of the Down Under characters in particular, although I'm generally getting more and more interested in racing in the Southern Hemisphere these days). An excellent book, particularly at the price (it's really well-produced) and combined with DSJ's little Donington Monomarque on the 250F really tells you everything you'd ever need to know.

Paul Sheldon, Milestones Behind the Marques. Where do I get my complete set of Black Books? - a marvellously dense little book that distils history down to its raw ingredients and serves them up with the elegance of a sushi bento. Not much here in the way of anecdote or reminiscence, but a lot of facts about some important cars.


Koen Vergeer, Formula One Fanatic. Not very good at all. Amateur in both the factual and perjorative senses of the word, I think, and basically just a piece of subjective "why I am a racing fan" rambling. Roger Williamson's death plays far too big a part in this book. I freely admit to not finishing this. It went back to the shop as a "duplicated present".

Maurice Hamilton, Ken Tyrrell: The Authorised Biography. Knowing how reluctant Ken was to have a biography done I was reluctant to read this and didn't buy a copy for a long time, but it is a splendid book. Warm, dignified and human, as befits its subject; told with a lot of insight into Chopper's character and the team he founded. There is just a little too much JYS and not quite enough Ken Tyrrell in this, if you're being ultra-critical, but on the whole it is excellent and a fine tribute to a fine man.

A little outside my normal reading matter, Michael Scott's The 500cc World Champions: Kings of the Road Race is a nice little one-volume intro to the history of the old top class of bike racing seen through the focus of its champions. Good illustrations, a focus on people rather than technology, crisp storytelling and for the non-expert like me an illuminating book that reveals a lot about people I've heard of but don't know much about. Another very nice book at the price.

John Tipler's Graham Hill: Master of Motorsport is, typically of Tipler, cheap, interestingly illustrated and fact-dense without being particularly engaging. There's no real insight into Hill the man, but it's a useful reminder of how long and broad Graham's career was. Workmanlike and useful for the pictures, but Graham's own words were much more fun!

Sadly Murray Walker's Unless I'm Very Much Mistaken wasn't anywhere near as good as I hoped it'd be. It was still highly enjoyable, but I was hoping for more - much more - from someone who's been around the sport for so long. I was also hoping for more about his fascinating early life and his early commentary work, and less of his rather diffuse good-natured enthusiasm for modern F1. Charming, witty, and quite evocative, but I think dear old Murray doesn't want to leave a bad word in print about anyone, so it's rather bland really as it describes his career on Grand Prix and with ITV - a book that, like many, gets less interesting the nearer it gets to the present. Some very moving bits about James Hunt. A nice light read, certainly, and it's in paperback in Amazon's three for 12 quid offer at the moment.


I see there's yet another new edition of Cosworth: The Search For Power coming out this month, but I guess there can't be much new in it - Jaguar in F1 and the CART one-make formula, hardly inspirational...?

#288 m.tanney

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Posted 03 August 2003 - 20:16

  I haven't seen this one yet, but I'm sure that it will be of interest to many of you:

  Formula A and Formula 5000 in America: Race by Race
  by Wolfgang Klopfer
  published by the author (Books on Demand?)
  121 pages of text

  The bulk of the text (100 pages) is a year-by-year, race-by-race account of American F5000 from 1968-1976. The last ten pages are brief (one or two page) "as told by" articles on topics such as the Sid Taylor team, the Haas/Hall team (as told by Brian Redman), and the Eagle 735-765 cars.
  There are two editions. A black and white one, which is 25 Euros, and one with 18 colour photos for 45 Euros. Air mail shipping is included in the price. Payment in Euros, or via Paypal using the email address below.
  The book is available from the author:

    Wolfgang Klopfer
    Lessingstrasse 13
    04600 Altenberg
    Germany

email address: faracer_99@yahoo.com

  Nice fellow. Responds to inquiries. If you email him, he will send jpg images of the covers and table of contents.

#289 m.tanney

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Posted 03 August 2003 - 21:53

  Here is another book I have not seen yet, but am really looking forward to reading:

  Offy, America's Greatest Racing Engine
  by Kenneth E. Walton
  490 pages
  softbound $74.95 ; hardbound 99.95
  $7.50 shipping and handling
  available from the author
  c/o Roadster Works
  25911 East Outer Belt Road
  Greenwood, MO
  64034 - 8951

  Writing on Yahoo's American Racing History Group, Gordon White judged that Walton's work is a good complement to his own 1996 book. Whereas White's book dealt with the background of the engine and the personalities involved, Walton's is more of a technical history, "though he has considerable background too".
  In the works for well over a decade, it should be quite an informative volume.

#290 m.tanney

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Posted 04 August 2003 - 01:28

  Seventies Championship Revolution
  by Dick Wallen
  published by Dick Wallen
  240 pages, over 500 colour photos
  Hardbound $75 ; Deluxe edition &100
  Shipping: U.S. $10; Canada $12; Elsewhere $45 air, $20 surface
  Can be ordered by phone at 623-566-5578 or FAX at 623-566-5580
  Due mid-September

  The follow-up to Wallen's books on '50s and '60s championship racing. At only 240 pages, it's less than half as long as its predecessors (unless there's a typo in the brochure). It's also $50 dollars cheaper. I'd pay more or trade the colour photos for more text, but with Bob Schilling doing most of the writing I'm sure that it will be very informative.

#291 m.tanney

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Posted 04 August 2003 - 02:59

  Here are some other forthcoming titles, on a variety of automobile racing subjects:

  Non-championship F1 races

  The Daytona 24 Hours
    Though published in the US, this isn't listed on Amazon.com yet, but likely will be soon.

  Sports car racing in western Canada.
    Much less expensive at Amazon.ca than the others. It's $5 off for new customers,
  and another $10 off with the discount code CANADATELUSM.


  American dirt track racing.
    Having seen some of the author's magnificent photo collection, and knowing how         knowledgeable he is, I'm really looking forward to this one. A description can be found at the publisher's website .

  Early AAA races in Philadelphia.


  And, for those with diverse tastes, a couple of new books by two of my favourite motorsports writers: David Tremayne and Kevin Desmond. The latter's book deals with the later exploits of Sir Henry Segrave and Kaye Don.

#292 Ron Scoma

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Posted 04 August 2003 - 05:27

Originally posted by m.tanney
The latter's book deals with the later exploits of Sir Henry Segrave and Kaye Don.


And it's about time for the Kaye Don book.

Now, what about Dudley Froy, Chris Staniland, Baron d'Erlanger, and Whitney Straight ?


Ron Scoma
you know your views are left of centre when you see a sign that says "Free firewood" and you want to know who he is and what's he in for.

#293 Darren Galpin

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Posted 04 August 2003 - 07:19

Pete - the Murray Walker book is available in the UK at Tesco's or Asda for £3.73, so is presumably available from www.tesco.co.uk for those who want one shipped.

#294 Michael Oliver

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 10:22

Originally posted by dolomite
Foiled again! :(


Sorry to hear that, Dolomite. If I hear of any copies around, I'll let you know. The only place I believe there are copies are with Veloce's Australian distributor - I think last time I checked they had something like 8 left! Guess there might be some possibilities there if an Oz TNFer was coming your way on business or something ;) You could get their contact details from Veloce (www.veloce.co.uk). Don't know if this helps...

Cheers

Michael

#295 Geza Sury

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 18:37

Originally posted by m.tanney
  Here are some other forthcoming titles, on a variety of automobile racing subjects:

  Non-championship F1 races

That's the book I'm very much looking forward to! Unfortunately it will cover only the 1966 to 1983 period. I wonder if it would feature the South African championship and the Aurora series :confused:

#296 Henri Greuter

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 08:00

m.tanney wrote:

Here is another book I have not seen yet, but am really looking forward to reading:

Offy, America's Greatest Racing Engine
by Kenneth E. Walton
490 pages
softbound $74.95 ; hardbound 99.95
$7.50 shipping and handling
available from the author
c/o Roadster Works
25911 East Outer Belt Road
Greenwood, MO
64034 - 8951

Writing on Yahoo's American Racing History Group, Gordon White judged that Walton's work is a good complement to his own 1996 book. Whereas White's book dealt with the background of the engine and the personalities involved, Walton's is more of a technical history, "though he has considerable background too".
In the works for well over a decade, it should be quite an informative volume.


====

I've got my copy of that one, a softcover.
Must read it thorougly yet but had a first glance.
If you're into details and technology about the Offy, this is the one you need.
Man what a blockbuster.....

Henri Greuter

#297 petefenelon

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 13:10

Just read Serge Bellu's Blue Blood, which I found a cheap secondhand copy of the other day. It's basically a mostly-pictorial history of French-built GP cars from the beginning to the late 70s

Verdict: Very nice pictures, particularly of pre-WW2 cars; text is skimpy and translated indifferently, and by god it's chauvinistic!!! (and all the more entertaining for it).

Worth your money for the pics and the little snippets on the obscure cars.

#298 Joe Fan

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 22:11

Originally posted by cabianca
The market for almost all motorsports books is from 2000 to 5000 copies unless its about Fangio, Senna or perhaps, Moss. Serious historical subjects just don't sell and the previously mentioned "front-end" cost of publishing makes making a buck, pound or yen very tough. Levy's 30,000 sales figure was partially achieved by Bert himself who shamelessly sets up shop at several different venues during any motorsport weekend he attends. I don't think most authors would undertake the travel expense that Bert does to be where potential buyers are. I know I wouldn't.

Warning: It's going to get worse before it gets better. The best stuff is going to continue come out in expensive small print runs until print on demand is perfected.


:wave: I can testify to you all now, that everything Cabianca said is spot on. The rule of thumb for publishing is that you should price your book at 5 times your total production costs, which also should include some front-end marketing costs. This only realistic for books with large print runs. With my Masten Gregory biography, I am not going to be able to price the book anywhere near 5 times my production costs or else the book would be so ridicously high that, I would price it completely out of the market. This is the norm for small market motorbooks that are research-intensive and/or photo intensive.

Burt Levy's 30,000 sold figure for the Last Open Road is extraordinary. Burt deserves a lot of credit for his writing ability and creating his niche in the book market, but he is also a great self-promoter who works very hard selling his books. I hope that I can sell 3,000 copies of my Masten Gregory biography but most book wholesalers want ridiculous discount percentages and terms that it would defeat the purpose in trying to expand sales through most of them with a small market book.

My Masten Gregory biography should be ready in February, and although it is probably not realistic at this point, I am trying very hard to get the book ready for Christmas. The ISBN number will be 0-9744043-0-6 and should be priced in the $35-$40 range, depending upon my final photo budget costs. You can view what my front cover should look like at: www.geocities.com/mastoidfan/bookinfo.html

Overall, I am pleased with how the written portion of book turned out as I have had many compliments from those who have read various parts of the book. Even my copy editors, who aren't car people or racing fans, like it and they want to buy a copy of the book when it becomes available. So I guess my effort was worthwhile.

Sorry for my absence from the forum lately. I have been very busy. Got to get back to working on the photo inserts, cross checking my index and agonizing over trival stuff like whether I should use an em dash or a colon in certain places.

#299 Barry Boor

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 22:59

I have not been following this thread so I must apologise here if I am repeating what has been said before.

Anyway, even if I am, I would like to say a word or two (or several) to commend Chris Nixon's 'Sports Car Heaven' book to everyone.

If you are keen on 1950s sports car racing, this book is a MUST. The photography, much of it in colour, is superb. But what really appeals to me is the number of times I find myself saying "Really! I didn't know that!" If a book can hit me with lots of little anecdote/stories etc that I had not heard of or read before, I LOVE IT!

As an e,g, - I didn't realise that Masten Gregory shared a Ferrari in the 1957 Nurburgring !000 K's with a guy he had never met before and in fact, when he started the race, he hadn't even spoken to the guy. I love just this sort of information.

BUY IT!

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#300 Joe Fan

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 23:58

Originally posted by Barry Boor
As an e,g, - I didn't realise that Masten Gregory shared a Ferrari in the 1957 Nurburgring !000 K's with a guy he had never met before and in fact, when he started the race, he hadn't even spoken to the guy. I love just this sort of information.

BUY IT!


This is in my book. The driver was Italian Olinto Morolli, who had never seen the 'Ring before. This prompted one of several heated arguments between Masten and Enzo Ferrari. Masten was pretty pissed with Enzo for not lining him up with one of the top Ferrari drivers for this event. I think Morolli lost several positions on the circuit before he was called into the pits and replaced with Masten.