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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#301 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 00:25

Looking good there, Joe... looking very good... and a great title!

I really wonder about this publishing business... why don't I get into it myself? Well, because I have no money, of course, but I know I could do a better job.

The whole marketing structure is unfairly weighted towards the selling end of the scale. What Levy really gains by going out and selling at the events is that he gets the retail price... or he can discount to get more sales without losing anything at all compared to what he might get through the retail chain that eats up the dollars before handing the author excrement therefrom.

A part of that market limitation is this very fact... the inflated cost of getting it to the end buyer.

I'm not sure how I will achieve it with the Matich book, but I will certainly do it. I will need to get some form of sponsorship to pay the initial printing bill, so there will be a commercial aspect to it, but the AGP book is also commercially oriented and nobody notices today.

From the printing I expect I will go to a small run of binding for a high quality release with autographs and numbers. Then the income from that will partly fund the binding of the general sale numbers. And I don't doubt that I'll go out and sell the thing from door to door as well, hawk it around Historic race meetings, at club meetings and that sort of thing.

Mind you, I will have to come up with a name as well... hmmm...

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#302 theunions

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 00:48

Originally posted by Joe Fan
My Masten Gregory biography...should be priced in the $35-$40 range, depending upon my final photo budget costs.


One of these days I'd like to pick your brain about the production end of this book venture, but for now I'd like to ask if said photo budget costs include reproduction rights - in other words, did anyone (particularly the original photographers or their estates) request/demand financial compensation in order for their works to be included?

#303 Joe Fan

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 00:57

Originally posted by Ray Bell
Looking good there, Joe... looking very good... and a great title!

I really wonder about this publishing business... why don't I get into it myself? Well, because I have no money, of course, but I know I could do a better job.

The whole marketing structure is unfairly weighted towards the selling end of the scale. What Levy really gains by going out and selling at the events is that he gets the retail price... or he can discount to get more sales without losing anything at all compared to what he might get through the retail chain that eats up the dollars before handing the author excrement therefrom.

A part of that market limitation is this very fact... the inflated cost of getting it to the end buyer.


I am still figuring out how I am going to come up with a large amount of cash for the printer. Looks like I will be taking out a loan. As a small publisher of a small market book, you are facing a tough battle. There are a lot of up front costs (pre-press costs) with the printer before anything is printed. So you really pay through the nose for small managable print runs, and if you print larger runs, you have to come up with even more cash and then figure out a way to store all the books and sell them. In order to sell a large quantity of them in a short period of time, you have to strike a deal with a book wholesaler. Negotiating favorable discount rates and terms with book wholesalers is extremely tough and almost useless for a small market book. Good luck!

#304 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 01:46

In my case, I will do the pre-press myself, and probably I will arrange every stage of printing and binding myself with people I've used for my newsletters and so on.

I plan to print the paper for a whole lot more than the 2000 number that seems so likely to be a publisher's limit. More like the 5000. I will find somewhere to store it.

As years go on I expect I will go to cheaper and cheaper binding to sell cheaper copies. But while I can I will sell it as a nice hardcover with dustjacket.

The only downside to this is that if any errors escape proofreading, they are there for all time.

#305 Joe Fan

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 03:06

Originally posted by theunions
One of these days I'd like to pick your brain about the production end of this book venture, but for now I'd like to ask if said photo budget costs include reproduction rights - in other words, did anyone (particularly the original photographers or their estates) request/demand financial compensation in order for their works to be included?


Yes, you have to pay, not for the reproduction of the photo, but for the usage itself. If the original photographer sold their collections to another party, all you have to do is give them a photo credit and the usage fee goes to the party that owns the collection.

Originally posted by Ray Bell
The only downside to this is that if any errors escape proofreading, they are there for all time.


Yes, I am finding this out, even after five people have read portions of the book. You think you have everything nit-picked and near perfect, then somebody finds an 'a" missing in a sentence or a "fourty" that should have been a "forty." Any professional copy-editor can find something wrong or not-so-perfect in any large piece of writing, even books in print. Send me an e-mail and I can hook you up with someone who does a good proofing/copy-editing job at a very reasonable rate.

#306 theunions

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 03:19

Originally posted by Joe Fan
Yes, you have to pay, not for the reproduction of the photo, but for the usage itself. If the original photographer sold their collections to another party, all you have to do is give them a photo credit and the usage fee goes to the party that owns the collection.


So what happens if 1) the photographer has long since disappeared or 2) the credit is simply unknown? Assuming the hard copy photo for such an example came from a family member, does it legally satisfy all parties for you to credit the shot to "Gregory Collection" or the like? I guess the scenario I'm trying to avoid is book publication of a shot where nobody knows whatever became of the photographer or his family, and the photo originated from a private party, and years later the photographer's descendants materialize from nowhere and want money.

#307 Joe Fan

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 04:40

Originally posted by theunions
So what happens if 1) the photographer has long since disappeared or 2) the credit is simply unknown? Assuming the hard copy photo for such an example came from a family member, does it legally satisfy all parties for you to credit the shot to "Gregory Collection" or the like? I guess the scenario I'm trying to avoid is book publication of a shot where nobody knows whatever became of the photographer or his family, and the photo originated from a private party, and years later the photographer's descendants materialize from nowhere and want money.


Legally, it is not advisable to use a photo of an unknown photographer because then you run the risk of somebody claiming it and forcing you to pay whatever usage fee they feel entitled to. And it may be more than you think is fair. However, they would have to prove it with a negative because there are always a few shots that are remarkably similar to other photographer's pictures. This happens occasionaly when two photographers snapped photos at roughly the same place and time. I have a couple of these and had to double check to be sure that they weren't somebody elses photos. I also have a few photos in my inserts that were given to me by Masten's family, where the original photographer is unknown and likely deceased. In that case, "Gregory Collection" will suffice.

#308 Joe Fan

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 04:42

Trying to get back to the original topic, has anyone purchased the Racing in Color book, with text written by Chris Nixon? I hear that there are some good photos of Masten Gregory in it.

#309 Barry Boor

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Posted 13 August 2003 - 22:06

Quite a surprise! 'Sharknose' is now remaindered; as is 'Wayward Genius' and 'Gurney's Eagles'.

I've got Sharknose but where's me cheque book........

#310 fines

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 17:37

I bought the remaindered "Gurney's Eagles" at the Ring last weekend.

The plan was to go there with four bottles of water (1.5 litres each), drink them, sweat it out on the grandstand and bring home the lost weight in books. I failed... to take into account the effect the scorching weather had on my skin! I went home early (looking like a bicycle racer! Red arms and legs, white body...), with one bottle still "uncorked" - but compensated for that fact by bringing home more than 8 kgs of books!!! http://members.atlas...ics/jumping.bmp :smoking: Posted Image

Apart from the Gurney book, I got "The Prince and I" (also remaindered), the Monkhouse M-B bible (in German), Venables "Racing 1500s", "our" David's 250F book, a "Unique Motor Books" title, a german car encyclopedia and Gary Doyle's Murphy biog.

The latter book is the one I spend most time with at the moment, and it's absolutely fabulous! :) :) :) :)

#311 petefenelon

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 19:42

Latest purchase here is the Brooklands Books ERA Gold Portfolio. Excellent value for 172 pages of reprints, including the entirety of John Lloyd's "The Story of ERA". Not exactly lavish, but follows the usual Brooklands recipe of piecing together as many contemporary and historic articles as they can fit in

As ever, b/w repro of colour pages is a bit variable, but there's a lot of information here for your money (£11.16 from Amazon!). Not at all bad for 5% of the current cost of Weguelin!

#312 Vitesse2

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 23:46

I'll look out for that one Pete!

Just acquired Ferry Porsche's autobiography (some VERY interesting bits in that!), a nice reading copy of Setright's Pirelli History of Motor Sport, a good copy of Milestones Behind the Marques (see above ^) and some mint copies of 1970s annuals: JPS 1972 and 1974 and MRY 1971 and 1974. The MRYs and the 1972 JPS annual look like they've never even been opened!

#313 petefenelon

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 23:46

Rejoice! Rejoice! Let joy be unbounded etc.

http://www.smokeyyunick.com

There's now a one-volume, $24.95 edition of Smokey Yunick's long, hilarious, obscene, insightful, barking mad autobiography. Loses some of the pictures, but still has all of the stories.

Look, just give the nice people your money. At $90 for the Racer's Edition it was a bargain. At $24.95 is it quite simply not something to think about - just buy it. You will not regret it.

pete

#314 mat1

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Posted 15 August 2003 - 10:15

Originally posted by Michael Oliver


Yes, it is my intention to cover the twin-chassis cars as well, so it would be a multi-Type book rather than single-Type, if you see what I mean, e.g. 77, 78, 79, 80, 86, 88 and I'd probably have to cover the 81 and 87 in there somewhere too. :


I'd buy it, Michael. The wing car and twin-chassis episode is fascinating to me.

mat1

#315 David Beard

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Posted 15 August 2003 - 11:40

Originally posted by petefenelon
There's now a one-volume, $24.95 edition of Smokey Yunick's long, hilarious, obscene, insightful, barking mad autobiography. Loses some of the pictures, but still has all of the stories.


pete [/B]



Anyone stocking it in the UK?

#316 petefenelon

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Posted 15 August 2003 - 12:13

Originally posted by Vitesse2
I'll look out for that one Pete!

Just acquired Ferry Porsche's autobiography (some VERY interesting bits in that!), a nice reading copy of Setright's Pirelli History of Motor Sport, a good copy of Milestones Behind the Marques (see above ^) and some mint copies of 1970s annuals: JPS 1972 and 1974 and MRY 1971 and 1974. The MRYs and the 1972 JPS annual look like they've never even been opened!



JPS annuals.... oh blimey.... mine when I was a nipper were generally held together with lots and lots of sellotape, they got used that much that they disintegrated - I think you can definitely tell if a copy's been well used or not ;)

I got a nice cheap 72 recently plus I've the remnants of 75 and 76... I think it stopped then?

The Setright history is.... distinctive, let's say. LJKS certainly doesn't share many opinions with other historians. (though I find his continuation of Pomeroy less dogmatic and a bit more readable than Pomeroy!)

#317 Joe Fan

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Posted 15 August 2003 - 12:58

Originally posted by petefenelon
Rejoice! Rejoice! Let joy be unbounded etc.

http://www.smokeyyunick.com

There's now a one-volume, $24.95 edition of Smokey Yunick's long, hilarious, obscene, insightful, barking mad autobiography. Loses some of the pictures, but still has all of the stories.

Look, just give the nice people your money. At $90 for the Racer's Edition it was a bargain. At $24.95 is it quite simply not something to think about - just buy it. You will not regret it.

pete


Thanks for the info. I purchased the audio book version, mainly because I am too busy to do any extensive reading right now, and I really enjoyed it. I will purchase the soft cover version to read later.

#318 dewittereus

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Posted 17 August 2003 - 09:19

Originally posted by Joe Fan
Trying to get back to the original topic, has anyone purchased the Racing in Color book, with text written by Chris Nixon? I hear that there are some good photos of Masten Gregory in it.


I bought the book this week. Beautiful book, with nice pictures showing the relaxed atmosphere of those days.
I counted 3 pictures of Masten.

#319 Joe Fan

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Posted 17 August 2003 - 20:50

Originally posted by dewittereus
I bought the book this week. Beautiful book, with nice pictures showing the relaxed atmosphere of those days.
I counted 3 pictures of Masten.


Thanks for the info!

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#320 Frank S

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Posted 20 August 2003 - 22:22

I have the latest in Art Evans' " . . . Of the Fabulous Fifties", series, "Race Legends . . . "

Art is first of all a photographer, and this volume confirms his stature as an outstanding portraitist. More than fifty drivers are profiled in text and identified by early photos, but defined by Art's photographs of the mature men behind the legends.

The black-and-white full-page portraits include Bob Bondurant, Jack Brabham, Briggs Cunningham, Juan Fangio, John Fitch, George Follmer, Dan Gurney, Jim Hall, Phil Hill, David Hobbs, Ed Hugus, Dennis Hulme, Parnelli Jones, Stirling Moss, Vasek Polak, Brian Redman, Carroll Shelby, Bobby Unser, John von Neumann, and Rodger Ward.

Short chapters about racing venues document and give flavor to the Fifties racing phenomenon, as do several pages of advertisements from contemporary magazines and programs. Introduction by Carroll Shelby.

Even though I was steeped in Southern California racing during the Fifties, I feel much closer to the men and the sport after reading this book and gazing into the eyes of the "Legends" as they are set out on these pages.

Earlier books in the series have sold out in very short order.

---------
Photo Data Research, L.L.C. Art Evans, President
800 S. Pacific Coast Hwy., Redondo Beach, CA 90277
Phone 310-540-8068, Fax 373-5988, www.fabulous-fifties.com
Memorabilia and research into sports car racing in the '50s.
Latest book: The Fabulous Fifties: $65 + $9 s&h
Autographed 8x10 photographs, autographed model race cars.
Check out the web site!
--------

Frank S

#321 Hack

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Posted 20 August 2003 - 22:48

Does anyone have current contact details of the operation offering Pomeroy Vols. 1 & 2 on CD?

The site mentioned in various threads seems out of action.
http://www.enginfoserv.com/
:confused:

#322 Vitesse2

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 00:39

This address would appear to still be current:

Engineering Information Services
63 Edendale Road
Melton Mowbray,
Leicestershire
LE13 0EW

Phone:
01664480411

#323 Hack

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 12:03

Managed to resurrect their webpage via http://web.archive.o...v.com/gpcar.htm

Their e-mail is dead and there is no answer on the phone line so I’ve sent a fax requesting info …

#324 Lec CRP1

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Posted 25 August 2003 - 15:04

After five weeks of waiting, my review of 'Piers Courage - Last Of Then Gentleman Racers' has finally appeared on Amazon (they must not like people writing more than 100 words, or being at least marginally articulate) :

http://www.amazon.co...6276271-8027853

Mine's the one dated 20th July (I'll mail a copy for anyone who doesn't want to visit Amazon for various reasons).

#325 petefenelon

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Posted 26 August 2003 - 09:51

Originally posted by Lec CRP1
After five weeks of waiting, my review of 'Piers Courage - Last Of Then Gentleman Racers' has finally appeared on Amazon (they must not like people writing more than 100 words, or being at least marginally articulate) :

http://www.amazon.co...6276271-8027853

Mine's the one dated 20th July (I'll mail a copy for anyone who doesn't want to visit Amazon for various reasons).


Book reviews can often take 6-8 weeks to appear. My review of Hillary Clinton's memoirs took about two months - then again I thought the book was a bland piece of PR fluff - might as well have been co-written with Alan Henry and Christopher Hilton ;P

pete

#326 sandy

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Posted 31 August 2003 - 12:09

It has been mentioned that there is interest in the history of Southern Hemisphere racing, I recall a comment on a recent history of the 250F, in particular.

A good starting point for Australia could be Tony Johns Motoring Books, 52 Kenmare Street, Mont Albert, 3127, Victoria. Australia. Only open on Saturdays but major reference source. Punch his name into Google and you come up with a whole host of Aust. motor racing bookshops.

The magazine of the 40's and 50's was Australian Motor Sports. If you do not give a toss about motor racing but want outstanding sports writing and hysterically funny pieces then this is hard to beat. The discussion as to whether Stan Jones stunning trailer, custom built for his new 250F, would have been on scratch at Bathurst several years prior and the on-going saga of TMWAP (The Man with......) come to mind.

The editor was Arthur Wylie, who lived near me in Cheltenham, Melbourne. I was 14 when he gave me all of his back copies and more importantly, boxes of progams, c/w Arthur's notes, on every race or event he reported on in Australia before 1956.

While I was away, overseas on Army service, some years later, it was all thrown out.

The rivalry between Stan Jones and Reg Hunt, both Melbourne motor dealers and both 250F owners and drivers would be worth research. Us schoolboys of the time favoured one or the other and Stan was my hero. He looked like a racing driver should look. Their big showdown was the 1956 Melbourne Grand Prix, when Stirling and Jean Behra turned up with the works team.

Very discomforting for us local lads to see Stirling and Jean half asleep as they toured around while Stan and Reg gritted away, arms flailing, hard into it, yet markedly falling back at every lap.

#327 petefenelon

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Posted 04 September 2003 - 10:32

Originally posted by sandy

The magazine of the 40's and 50's was Australian Motor Sports. If you do not give a toss about motor racing but want outstanding sports writing and hysterically funny pieces then this is hard to beat. The discussion as to whether Stan Jones stunning trailer, custom built for his new 250F, would have been on scratch at Bathurst several years prior and the on-going saga of TMWAP (The Man with......) come to mind.


Splendid posting, thanks for the atmosphere!

It's a pity that racing magazines have lost that 'community' feel these days - then again, we've rediscovered them online with things like Atlas and Dailysportscar (which I heartily recommend to those of you who like racing with the wheels decently covered!) so it's not too bad these days ;)

#328 petefenelon

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Posted 04 September 2003 - 16:16

Just got my new edition of Peter Higham's International Motor Racing Guide.

For those who haven't seen the first edition, it's an attempt to be a one-volume historical and statistical reference to most major forms of racing and to the major national racing scenes across the world. It is not a substitute for Sheldon, or Wimpffen, or Steve Small on GP drivers, or even our own Jimmy Piget's sterling efforts - it's an attempt to pack as many general racing facts and figures into one relatively handy volume as possible - in which it succeeded admirably and indeed still does.

Based on 10 minutes looking at the new edition:

Layout's slightly less fussy than the first version, so looking things up in the Drivers section is a little easier on the eye! (There are less grey stripes and blobs now!)

It's been updated to the end of the 2002 season.

FIA GT, NASCAR and the IRL are added, as are lots more national circuits and championships. Non-championship F1 race winners are added (but not the Aurora series!)

My main criticism is that ALMS/ELMS and (ack, spit) GrandAm don't get individual race coverage and just get a summary listing of champions -- not even race winners -- whereas the rather piddling FIA sports car championship gets race by race listings.

It appears to be printed on something akin to shiny bog-roll, unlike the nice heavy paper of the first edition; then again it would be a rather chunky book if it was on thick paper - it's nearly 900 pages now.

I got my copy through Amazon at a good discount - the RRP of £35.99 is pretty dear given that the original was under 20 quid. But it's still a lot of bits per buck, and an impressive achievement.

It's not the last word on anything, but it probably contains 95% of the information 95% of racing fans are likely to want, and is a good first point of reference for most simple 'who won what where and when' questions.

pete

#329 Joe Fan

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 00:21

Originally posted by petefenelon
Just got my new edition of Peter Higham's International Motor Racing Guide.


A must buy for the serious race fan or historian. This is always a good book to bring with you on a plane trip or wherever because no matter how boring the situation you find yourself in, you can be entertained for hours just thumbing through this book.

#330 Geza Sury

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 06:39

Originally posted by petefenelon
I got my copy through Amazon at a good discount - the RRP of £35.99 is pretty dear given that the original was under 20 quid. But it's still a lot of bits per buck, and an impressive achievement.

Amazon offers a 30% discount on most of the books and free shipping within the UK. Unfortunately outside UK and Western Europe, they charge massive shipping costs, much higher than the actual ones. I wrote an E-mail to the customer support to do something about it to but to no avail.

#331 petefenelon

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 08:53

Originally posted by Joe Fan


A must buy for the serious race fan or historian. This is always a good book to bring with you on a plane trip or wherever because no matter how boring the situation you find yourself in, you can be entertained for hours just thumbing through this book.


Spotted a few minor mistakes. Consistent use of "on the sight of" for when one circuit was built on the site of another; IRL described as using 3.5l engines from the start rather than 4.0l... The circuit map of Aintree uses the 'other' set of names for corners and straights (I think the names that were only used for the first couple of meetings?). But if that's all I could find in several hours' browsing last night...;)

The F2 and sports car results are still the most fun - spent a fair chunk of last night just browsing old F2 results and trying to remember obscure drivers!

#332 Geza Sury

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Posted 06 September 2003 - 08:36

I've just finished Timothy Collings' new bio on Eddie Jordan. To be honest, I'm releived to have done so. The book was a deep disappointment. The author tries to show the human side of Eddie, but he tells the same thing with different words many-many times. It's pretty boring to say the least. The other problem with the book is that there are only few facts in it, no concrete dates or events, just vague recollections of various people. For example, I would have really liked to learn something about Jordan's test in a Formula One car, AFAIK a McLaren. There's only a single sentence about it, but it doesn't reveal anything! You don't get to know properly Eddie's racing carrier either. Just sentences, like "He was pretty good", but nothing about his successes or failures. The book is more than 300 pages long, but the essence of it could have been written on 50. I'm seriously considering to sell it on Ebay.

I already started reading Gerald Donaldson's book about the life of Gilles Villeneuve. What a difference...

#333 petefenelon

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Posted 06 September 2003 - 11:48

Originally posted by Geza Sury
I've just finished Timothy Collings' new bio on Eddie Jordan. To be honest, I'm releived to have done so. The book was a deep disappointment.


Thanks for the warning - I didn't have a good feeling about that after The Piranha Club which felt a bit like reading something by a kid jumping up and down outside the window trying to work out what the grown-ups inside were doing....

If you want real deals'n'scams stuff, then Terry Lovell's Bernie's Game or any of Mike Lawrence's books but particularly Four Guys and a Telephone - I found out more about how racing works from Mike's books than I ever did from spectating or reading the news about it ;)

pete

#334 dretceterini

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Posted 06 September 2003 - 19:38

I remember a mention of a new Pegaso book that was coming but haven't heard anything further. Anyone know anything about this?

#335 Geza Sury

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 14:57

Originally posted by petefenelon
Thanks for the warning - I didn't have a good feeling about that after The Piranha Club which felt a bit like reading something by a kid jumping up and down outside the window trying to work out what the grown-ups inside were doing....

:lol: :lol: :up:

The only really interesing feature of the Jordan book is that Collings tells you what exactly have happened on that particular Friday night at Monza in 1991, when Flavio Bratore and Tom Walkinshaw signed a certain M. Schumacher to race in their team instead of Jordan's.

#336 edmcd

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 10:52

I was told by some Forum members at the Revival meeting at Goodwood last weekend that mention of my Vanwall book and Ferrari 156 book had been made on the Forum and that Doug Nye has been giving them publicity which I could not have afforded to buy, so thank you for that.

If anyone is interested, please see Peter Egan's 2 page article in the Sept. Road and Track and the review of the Sharknose book. For information, I did reference Nye's Dino book, but he misses the point entirely as I set out to write something about the people as well as the machines in the 1961-62 seasons, and hence interviewed most of the people involved.

The Vanwall book is somewhat similar, and involves those who were there in the period. I have used material from other works, appropriately referenced, which is not a universal custom these days. The intent is that the Vanwall book will be out this November, having been delayed by me being slow in putting it together.

I am bemused by Doug Nye's using this Forum to refer to me as a "geezer" rather than speaking to me directly which he has had the opportunity to do. I also do not see why he should think he is the last word on the subject. Where I quote the Jenkinson/Posthumous book, I do it from the source. In any event, Mr. Nye has never responded in the past to enquiries, and the cost of using the photo archives he has access to is well beyond the means of this publisher. However, the Vanwall book will contain many photos never seen before.

I have some concern that Nye sparks a question of plagiarism and there is an implication that material has been 'cut and pasted'. One of my concerns about this Forum is that members feel free to throw ideas around with no fear of the consequences, so I don't spend much time here as the valuable in-put is down-graded by the ego-tripping. Some of you, however, are pretty discerning, so I leave you to read and judge.

Ed McDonough

#337 Seppi_0_917PA

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 14:40

I too was disturbed by that section of this thread; it's tone is out-of-character for this forum. And puzzling since all prior comments regarding Sharknose on this forum were favorable.

#338 dretceterini

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Posted 11 September 2003 - 15:26

I know of very few books that couldn't be substantially better than they are, so enough of this na na na na na na na nonsense please!

#339 Seppi_0_917PA

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Posted 17 September 2003 - 16:10

Joel Finn's "Ferrari Testa Rossa V-12" from 1979 is being reissued by MBI.

Soft Bound; 256 pages, 10w x 10h
ISBN: 0760317356
Catalog Id: 136436
Due Date: Sep 15, 2003

Any chance his Maserati Birdcage book will be reissued?

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#340 WGD706

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Posted 17 September 2003 - 21:28

There are 2 books out on Tazio Nuvolari. First is by Christopher Hilton, 256 pages with 40 b/w pictures for $39.95.
Second is by Cesare De Agostini, subtitled: The Legend Lives Again, 200 pages and 200 b/w photos, some of them previously unpublished, for $44.95.
Anyone read either one? Would one complement the other or is one more preferable over the other in terms of content. Hilton's is only 56 pages more and has 160 LESS photos, so I would have to assume that De Agostini's book would be a better bargain.
Warren

#341 Ruairidh

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Posted 18 September 2003 - 22:20

Originally posted by Michael Oliver




My current 'work in progress' is a book about the Lotus wing cars but a certain J. Tipler has rather pulled the rug from under me with his Lotus 78/79 book : Any comments about whether there is room for another book on the subject in the vein of the 49/72 volumes would be much appreciated.


YES YES YES YES YES YES (please)

.......and I've ordered both Tipler's 78/79 and your 72 today from Amazon (and managed to find a copy of that man Nye's last Theme Lotus to replace my lost copies - I reckon DCN puts a spell on his books so they disappear) so, fingers crossed, today has been a good day :clap: :clap: :clap:

#342 Doug Nye

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Posted 19 September 2003 - 08:38

Originally posted by Ruairidh
I reckon DCN puts a spell on his books so they disappear)


That's called pulping - when the buggers don't sell... ;)

#343 Vitesse2

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Posted 19 September 2003 - 09:51

Originally posted by WGD706
There are 2 books out on Tazio Nuvolari. First is by Christopher Hilton, 256 pages with 40 b/w pictures for $39.95.
Second is by Cesare De Agostini, subtitled: The Legend Lives Again, 200 pages and 200 b/w photos, some of them previously unpublished, for $44.95.
Anyone read either one? Would one complement the other or is one more preferable over the other in terms of content. Hilton's is only 56 pages more and has 160 LESS photos, so I would have to assume that De Agostini's book would be a better bargain.
Warren


I haven't bought either yet. Reviews of the De Agostini title have been good, praising the pictures especially - I had browse through it at Goodwood and was very impressed by them. Brief reviews of the Hilton book have been good, but the only extended one I've seen, by David Venables in "The Automobile", was (shall we say) luke-warm, saying it didn't really get under the skin of the man. What baffled me, though, was that Venables made no mention in his review of the Tripoli affair: this makes me wonder whether he is actually writing something on Nuvolari and/or 30s GP racing himself - it's odd that he did the first two 1920s-1930s "Racing History" titles on Alfa and Bugatti, while the Maserati one was done by Pritchard.

#344 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 20 September 2003 - 00:08

I also have the Nuvolari/Hilton book enroute at present. I've been looking forward to reading it.

I received a few books in the post earlier this week, one of which is "Auto Union GP Race & Record Cars" by Vann. I haven't had the chance to read it yet, but the predominantly color photography is stunning.

I had to wince a bit however at the section on the Donington Autowelo/Sokol, obviously not described as such in this book. One of the many benefits to my, albeit limited participation on TNF is in knowing the results of such superb detective work shared by so many of you.

Some interesting background on how the AU's found in Russia came to the West. A section on the restorations by C&G was well done.

On another topic, I was also perplexed by the post of Ed McDonough regarding the 156 Sharknose book, as I enjoyed his book very much. In fact I am using it as a primary refrerence to the 1/12 scale model that I am slowly building of this now non-existing masterpiece of F1 history.

#345 Mischa Bijenhof

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Posted 22 September 2003 - 21:50

For all the Dutch-speaking members of TNF: “Dwars door de Tarzanbocht”, by fellow TNF-member Hans van der Klis, has been released this week. A wonderful work that contains extensive biographies of all eleven Dutch drivers that ever started in a Grand Prix. It is rather unique in a sense that it gives credit to long forgotten men such as Jan Flinterman and Dries van der Lof as much as it does to more recent and better-known drivers like Jan Lammers, Jos Verstappen and perhaps Netherlands finest, Carel Godin the Beaufort. The little-reported efforts of Flinterman and Van der Lof are charming as well as they are heroic. “This Brazilian was so small I had to drive with my feet against the steering wheel”, Flinterman recalled later about his shared drive with Chico Landi in the Brazilian’s Maserati. “It was impossible to drive and the seat couldn’t be adjusted, but anyway, I took it to the finish.” If you are able to read Dutch, and if you’re curious just exactly what happened that marked the end of a possibly brilliant career that should have been Roelof Wunderinks, how De Beaufort managed to campaign his aging Porsche for years on end or what made Huub Rothengatter decide to call it quits, go ahead and buy it! Just being a little patriotic here…

Title: Dwars door de Tarzanbocht
Author: Hans van der Klis
ISBN: 90 204 0327 3

#346 Barry Boor

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Posted 22 September 2003 - 22:15

Here is one Englishman who would buy that book like a shot were it ever to be translated into my language.

#347 ensign14

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Posted 23 September 2003 - 06:18

Originally posted by Vitesse2
Brief reviews of the Hilton book have been good, but the only extended one I've seen, by David Venables in "The Automobile", was (shall we say) luke-warm, saying it didn't really get under the skin of the man.

I think this is right - it is not really a biography of Nuvolari, more a seriez of in-depth reports on some individual races. You glimpse something of Nivola through these.

Not bothering with the de Agostini book, seems to be mainly pictures, there are pics of TN everywhere anyway.

Mischa - what DID happen to Roelof Wunderink? :p

#348 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 23 September 2003 - 12:51

Originally posted by ensign14
I think this is right - it is not really a biography of Nuvolari, more a series of in-depth reports on some individual races. You glimpse something of Nivola through these.

Not bothering with the de Agostini book, seems to be mainly pictures, there are pics of TN everywhere anyway.

I fully agree ensign, having received the Nuvolari book on Saturday, I have now had the opportunity to read the first half of this new title.

Although I cannot count myself as a Christopher Hilton fan, this book is much better than his very average driver bios. Having said that, the book is not really a biography, at least in my sense of the term, and I agree with your post that this rather smallish book captures various moments in the life of Nivola, and through this Hilton writes a narrative of his life.

To be honest, this is not what I was expecting to receive, but the result is acceptable. It seems that the definitive biography on Nuvolari is yet to be published.

For those who are interested in this book, I recommend the review by Mark Glendenning as he captures my feelings on the book quite accurately.

"Nuvolari" Review

I did not purchase the de Agostini book either as I have a wonderful copy of 'Tazio Nuvolari' by Franco Zagari which is an excellent photographic history of TN.

#349 marat

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Posted 23 September 2003 - 17:44

Mischa, thanks for the information, I hope to find the book next month at "Brussels Retro...".

#350 Dennis David

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Posted 23 September 2003 - 21:09

Dennis how would you rate Lurani's or Moretti's books on Nuvolari?