Jump to content


Photo

The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


  • Please log in to reply
7806 replies to this topic

#351 Dennis Hockenbury

Dennis Hockenbury
  • Member

  • 657 posts
  • Joined: April 03

Posted 24 September 2003 - 13:24

Originally posted by Dennis David
Dennis how would you rate Lurani's or Moretti's books on Nuvolari?

Not having read the Moretti book 'When Nuvolari Raced', I cannot offer any comments on this work. I am always on the lookout for a reasonably priced copy.

Count Giovanni Lurani's book I thought was interesting as he captured the period of the Thirties quite well. As I have now read many other related titles on the subject, I question many of the "facts" presented in Lurani's book. An entertaining read none the less.

Advertisement

#352 Don Capps

Don Capps
  • Member

  • 5,933 posts
  • Joined: May 99

Posted 24 September 2003 - 14:09

As mentioned somewhere else some long time ago, the Johnny Lurani book is a great entertainment. Perhaps a bit thin on facts, but written in such a way as to really capture the essence of the impact that Nulovari had on folks.

The Moretti book is one of those books that one should have on the shelf if you have any interest in this period. I managed to find a copy not long after it was released and found it pointed me in some directions that were well worth looking into.

I do not have the de Agostini book. I just saw it the other day at Borders and will probably go back and pick it up. Just skimmimg through it made me think that if nothing else it would be a pleasant diversion to browse through now and again.

As for Christopher Hilton and his book on Nuvolari, Hilton decided to take the approach he did after mulling it over. After reading many sections of the book while it was still in draft form, I think it was an excellent approach. After being initially being contacted by Hilton, I wasn't sure really what to think. After working with him and seeing how much effort and research he put into his Nuvolari book, I completely revised my opinion of him. He was delight to work with and truly a professional in his dealings with me. He did not have to share any "credit" with anyone regarding the revision of the 1933 Tripoli Myth. That he did says volumes about Christopher Hilton.

#353 Dennis Hockenbury

Dennis Hockenbury
  • Member

  • 657 posts
  • Joined: April 03

Posted 24 September 2003 - 17:54

Originally posted by Don Capps
As for Christopher Hilton and his book on Nuvolari, Hilton decided to take the approach he did after mulling it over. After reading many sections of the book while it was still in draft form, I think it was an excellent approach.

Don, the approach taken by Hilton on his 'Nuvolari' was fine IMO. An enjoyable book.

I believe that it is important to potential buyers of the book for us to acknowledge how Hilton presents the Nivola story. Not a classic biographical form in the conventional sense. Hilton recounts the greatness of TN through accounts of selected races throughout his career. While not discounting the value of this method, indeed the corrections to the TN myth were very well done by Hilton, I stand by my assertion that the definitive biography of Tazio has yet to be published.

As Hilton himself states, perhaps the full story is impossible to write today as so little of his correspondence, contemporary accounts, etc. survives some 60 to 70 years after most of these events. Today, we can read reports, commentary, and analysis of almost everything a current F1 driver or team principal utters. It is sobering to realize how little was gathered 'in period' of these personalities, notably someone like TN who by the reckoning of most I would assume, occupies a place of greatness in the history of the sport.

Given your comments on the Moretti book, I shall redouble my efforts to obtain a copy.

#354 Anorak Man

Anorak Man
  • Member

  • 312 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 25 September 2003 - 05:18

Anyone had a sniff of Mr. Donaldson's latest?:

Fangio: The Life Behind the Legend

TERRIFIC cover!

AM

#355 Joe Fan

Joe Fan
  • Member

  • 5,591 posts
  • Joined: December 98

Posted 27 September 2003 - 10:41

Originally posted by Dennis Hockenbury
Don, the approach taken by Hilton on his 'Nuvolari' was fine IMO. An enjoyable book.

I believe that it is important to potential buyers of the book for us to acknowledge how Hilton presents the Nivola story. Not a classic biographical form in the conventional sense. Hilton recounts the greatness of TN through accounts of selected races throughout his career. While not discounting the value of this method, indeed the corrections to the TN myth were very well done by Hilton, I stand by my assertion that the definitive biography of Tazio has yet to be published.

As Hilton himself states, perhaps the full story is impossible to write today as so little of his correspondence, contemporary accounts, etc. survives some 60 to 70 years after most of these events. Today, we can read reports, commentary, and analysis of almost everything a current F1 driver or team principal utters. It is sobering to realize how little was gathered 'in period' of these personalities, notably someone like TN who by the reckoning of most I would assume, occupies a place of greatness in the history of the sport.


The problem with writing biographies is that every reader has a different expectation of what they want out of a biography. Some readers, probably unknowingly, want the author to color the story, BS them with fluff and prefer a very descriptive writing style (i.e. "the sun glistened off his forehead as he eased out of the cockpit in his sweat drenched driver suit") even when the author wasn't there at that particular moment. Some want you concentrate on the subject's professional career, the facts, and not to go much into their personal lives. Others want you to psychoanalyze the subject and to get deep inside their personality and personal lives. And sadly, some others prefer a tabloid style where you to dig up as much dirt as you can on the subject and expose all their warts to reduce them to a pathetic glob of molecular mass. Perhaps an ideal biography should have varying amounts of all the above but finding the balance that pleases everyone is impossible.

I have Hilton's Nuvolari book and I must say that like it. I think this is one of his best pieces of work and one we TNFers should all applaud. Overall, I think his approach was just fine. It is extremely difficult to write about a deceased subject, especially one whose career was in one the first half of the 20th Century. And to further complicate matters, there was a language issue to deal with. Nuvolari was Italian and I am 100% positive that this hindered Hilton's research. This is where de Agostini had an obvious advantage. I think both Hilton and de Agostini's work were necessary for the facilitation of the definitive biography on Nuvolari.

#356 Geza Sury

Geza Sury
  • Member

  • 936 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 27 September 2003 - 20:19

I've just started reading John Tipler's new book about the life of Graham Hill (Graham Hill - Master of Motor Sport, ISBN 1859832792) I don't know if anyone else has this custom, but I always read the books from cover to cover, including the acknowledgements section. Here's what I've read:

Many thanks to all who assisted with the compilation of the Graham Hill story. (...) Darren Galpin helped me with the photographic query.

Congratulations Darren for your contribution to this great book :clap: :clap: :clap:

#357 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,371 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 27 September 2003 - 20:22

Originally posted by Joe Fan

I have Hilton's Nuvolari book and I must say that like it. I think this is one of his best pieces of work and one we TNFers should all applaud. Overall, I think his approach was just fine.

Yes - if you want the nuts and bolts you can go for the Moretti book for the details.

#358 E.T

E.T
  • New Member

  • 1 posts
  • Joined: July 03

Posted 30 September 2003 - 08:32

Hi
If anyone is interested in acquiring a copy of Chris Nixon's Racing the Silver Arrows...its on auction at ebay currently.
http://cgi.ebay.com/...&category=48443

*disclaimer: I have no association with the seller..just thought someone might be looking for a copy.:)


regards.

#359 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 30 September 2003 - 19:11

I just heard from Tony Adriaensens, who did the superb Alfa GTA book about 10 years ago. He said the Siata book should be completed by Jan or Feb, but it will be priced around 300 Euros. He told me it will contain somewhere around 800 photos. The intent at the moment is to print 1500 copies.

Advertisement

#360 Ruairidh

Ruairidh
  • Member

  • 1,073 posts
  • Joined: November 02

Posted 01 October 2003 - 02:23

Ok, three of the Lotus books I mentioned I ordered in an earlier post have arrived - Michael Oliver's 72 is still awaited.

Firstly the replacement copy for my disappearing Theme Lotus (I know it is not a new book, but I want to make a plea in a moment). I got a replacement copy of Doug's last version - the 1986 Second Edition. I bought the first edition in 1978 by mail order and can still remember reading it cover to cover, so it is like welcoming back an old friend. Doug, here is my plea - do the definitive Lotus history - PLEASE. Karl L has Porsche covered and, at least in my order of things, Lotus (and I'm focused on the racing cars) were so important to Motor Racing in the '60's and 70's that they deserve to be covered using a broader canvas and in way more detail than has been done today. There are some good Lotus books out there today but IMHO there is not the definitive work.

And - the reason for this shameless, inelegant and somewhat impolite plea - IMHO no-one writing today seems able to capture more of Chapman and the folks who worked for him than DCN (e.g. I haven't seen the way in which the Lotus 88 battle affected Chapman captured better than in the brief passages of Theme Lotus) and those folks and the cars they produced were the essence of Team Lotus. Drivers (even Jimmy) came and went but Team Lotus regenerated, at least until Colin's death before the final flings of the Warr-Duca years and the slow death of the 90's.

John Tipler's Lotus 78 and 79 was, if I can be honest, a disappointment. I have Tipler's two earlier Lotus "Racing Cars" books and probably should have expected less but as it was the first book on two of the my favorite Lotus F1 cars, my hopes were high. As it was I found the book's production quality to be poor value for the money, the pictures uninspired and I found very little of depth or additional information that wasn't covered in contempory reports. I thought Tipler was around JPTL at the time, but if so the insiders view didn't come through to me. It did, by accident perhaps, focus me on just how low tech and undermanned the F1 teams were in the 70s - why is it it didn't feel that way at the time? There are some good quotes from the likes of Oglivie; Waters; Rudd et al but all in all I cannot recommend. Sorry. I hate being critical of writers work, but in my defense I am one of the buying community and did pay the money to buy the book.

Happily I found Tipler's Lotus 25 & 33 book to be more worthwhile. Maybe because I know less about these cars, maybe because the production values are so much better than the 78&79 book(even though the US list price is $5.00 less!). For example the color plates are well chosen (there are no color plates in the 78 & 79 book!) and in particular I love the picture of the Team Lotus enclave in the 1963 British GP and the picture on p114 of the Lotus mechanics in Cheshunt in 1964 (it catches so well the differences in appearance, demeanour and age of the crew of Messrs. Scammell, Lazenby, Selzer, Woodley, Riley and Endruweit). But mostly the text is better and a more enjoyable and cohesive read, seemingly coming closer to capturing that simpler time and the Lotus team in the mid-60s better. it is real interesting seeing how hands on Colin was in many of the pictures.

Whew. Sorry for the self-indulgent ramble and pleas. And again I'm sorry to be negative about any book but I was so disappointed with the Lotus 78 & 79 book. Michael Oliver, if you are still thinking of doing a book on the wing cars then (based on your 49 book) I'd be one of the first to buy it.


Ciao

#361 Michael Oliver

Michael Oliver
  • Member

  • 882 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 01 October 2003 - 12:33

Originally posted by Ruairidh
Michael Oliver, if you are still thinking of doing a book on the wing cars then (based on your 49 book) I'd be one of the first to buy it.


Ciao


Sadly, looking less likely now because of the Tipler book and even more frustrating given your comments about it not meeting your expectations :(

Anyhow, you haven't read the 72 book yet - you might change your mind :lol:

Michael

#362 neville mackay

neville mackay
  • Member

  • 127 posts
  • Joined: April 03

Posted 04 October 2003 - 18:53

I personally hope very much that Michael Oliver - or perhaps to be more accurate, his publishers- might be persuaded to move onto the Lotus 78 for their next book. There is simply no comparison between the beautifully written and researched masterpieces that Michael has produced on the 49 and 72 and the throwaway work of Tipler - which tells us little new, is dry as dust and looks as if most of its source material has come from a pile of old Autosports.

Incidentally, I was interested to read that Michael moved to Coterie Press for his 72 book because he felt they could do a better job presentationally than Veloce did on the 49. I personally thought the 49 book was a very nice production - nice glossy paper, clear photgraphic reproduction, and small enough to read on the loo! Although the 72 book is an entirely diferent proposition design-wise, I can't help feeling that Coterie have tried a little too hard to get a trendy designer look without getting it quite right. And, of course, its far too big to read in the privacy of the privvy!

All of which is nit picking - Michael, thank you for two excellent books that are both in my all time top 10 motor racing books (and my collection, as my wife never ceases to remind me, now runs into several hundred!)

Neville Mackay

#363 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,371 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 04 October 2003 - 19:27

Originally posted by neville mackay
There is simply no comparison between the beautifully written and researched masterpieces that Michael has produced on the 49 and 72 and the throwaway work of Tipler - which tells us little new, is dry as dust and looks as if most of its source material has come from a pile of old Autosports.

On t'other hand, those who do not have the Autosports will welcome the Tipler book, I assume? - I'm still relying on Theme Lotus...

#364 Michael Oliver

Michael Oliver
  • Member

  • 882 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 06 October 2003 - 10:27

Originally posted by neville mackay
I personally hope very much that Michael Oliver - or perhaps to be more accurate, his publishers- might be persuaded to move onto the Lotus 78 for their next book. There is simply no comparison between the beautifully written and researched masterpieces that Michael has produced on the 49 and 72 and the throwaway work of Tipler - which tells us little new, is dry as dust and looks as if most of its source material has come from a pile of old Autosports.

Incidentally, I was interested to read that Michael moved to Coterie Press for his 72 book because he felt they could do a better job presentationally than Veloce did on the 49. I personally thought the 49 book was a very nice production - nice glossy paper, clear photgraphic reproduction, and small enough to read on the loo! Although the 72 book is an entirely diferent proposition design-wise, I can't help feeling that Coterie have tried a little too hard to get a trendy designer look without getting it quite right. And, of course, its far too big to read in the privacy of the privvy!

All of which is nit picking - Michael, thank you for two excellent books that are both in my all time top 10 motor racing books (and my collection, as my wife never ceases to remind me, now runs into several hundred!)

Neville Mackay


Hi Neville

Thanks for your feedback re the 78 book and your comments about the 72 one! On reflection, I think perhaps a size similar to that of the Andrew Ferguson Indy Lotus book (e.g. a bit bigger than the 49 one but smaller than the 72) would probably be the optimum.

The reason Coterie went with the size that they did is that to date, the size of their books has always been the same, e.g. what you and I might call a coffee table book. The choice of size was something, regrettably, beyond my control :rolleyes:

As you quite rightly say, weighing in at a hefty 2.5kg, the 72 book is not something you'd read in the loo (and that's a shame, as some of my best reading is done there ;) ) although you can still use it for a handy bicep workout :lol: Maybe we should have got Classic Team Lotus to design a carbon-fibre book-stand for us to avoid arm-ache...

Cheers

Michael

#365 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,371 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 07 October 2003 - 07:58

Piers Courage by Adam Cooper.

Wow, this is some read. The title is almost misleading, at times it reads more of a history of the Pinner Road Posse, although without the full SP on the childhood of Charlie Crichton-Stuart et al.

Adam Cooper has a very easy style and manages to transmit a huge amount of new information without overburdening the mind or losing the reader.

The layout of the book is decent as well - carefully chosen pics breaking up the text, useful in this 3 minute culture; and by having larger than usual pages the spine is not overburdened with the heavy paper.

I find it encouraging that a book such as this could be written and published. Imagine if someone were to write a book on a contemporary equivalent in GP status - perhaps Andrea de Cesaris? Doubt whether it would go down so well. But then again they had personalities in the 60s.

There are a number of anecdotes as well, such as the time when a bunch of drivers were arrested in Italy, the cops asked the first one his name and place of birth, and when he said he was "Prophet, David, from Hong Kong" they thought he was taking the mick and arrested them all...

Adam Oliver spoke to a large number of people - Sally Curzon, Loti Irwin, Jonathan Williams et al - and it shows as their comments breathe life into the story. There was also a privately published autobiog of Piers on which Adam relied as well.

This is a fine book, please buy it and encourage the publishers to do more. Cooper is working on one about Denny Hulme and that would be a fascinating story - he has only been 'biogged' in relation to Jack Brabham and Bruce McLaren, really.

#366 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 08 October 2003 - 11:26

A few bargains (at the moment!) that TNFers might find interesting on Ebay:

I can't afford this - Phil Hil signed copy of Klementaski & Ferrari:
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=29763

For anyone who's chasing a copy of Wyer's The Certain Sound:
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=30134
Currently at 77 quid with 5 days to run..
No connection with the seller, but it's such a sought-after book that I thought I'd bring it to the collective attention of the forum!


Chris Mason's Uphill Racers - a wonderful early-90s history of British hillclimbing, currently 24.99 with no bidders and 4 days to go:
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=30134
Austen May's history of hillclimbing too:
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=30134
(I've bought a few books from this seller in the past, he's an excellent chap to deal with)

Roebuck's Mario Andretti: World Champion
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=30134
Nice little book with some good quotes and pictures.

DCN's Autocourse history of McLaren, for a fiver! - lots of good stuff for your money!
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=30134

Cheap paperback of the Mays/Roberts BRM history - interesting to compare/contrast to DCN's!
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...&category=30134




#367 neville mackay

neville mackay
  • Member

  • 127 posts
  • Joined: April 03

Posted 09 October 2003 - 18:32

I would simply endorse Ensign14's glowing review of the Piers Courage book. A truly brilliant production and one of the best of recent biographies - a sort of "mon Ami Mate" of the 60's. I'm delighted that Adam Cooper is writing another one and can't wait to read it!

#368 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 09 October 2003 - 22:43

Just got my latest 'care parcel';) from Amazon containing Michael Oliver's Lotus 72 tome and Adam Cooper's Piers Courage book. Looks like I'm going to be doing a lot of reading!

I was very pleasantly surprised by just how much there appears to be in the Cooper book - he is one of the few good journos left on Autosport and this really does look to be a masterpiece, with a good selection of illustrations and the few snippets I've read look to be compelling - plenty of quotes from people who knew Piers well. Looks to be an excellent winter read.

I've read Michael's 49 book cover-to-cover twice already and skimmed it for facts on many more occasions - so I had high expectations of the 72 book which it's already surpassed after just an hour or so looking at it! You're right Michael, it's too big to read on the lav, in fact it's gigantic and that much book for forty quid these days is something of a bargain. Coterie have done a very nice design job on it, the 49 book was a bit cramped as far as layout's concerned but this manages to combine coffee-table appeal and good readable layout very well. I decided to look at the South Africa chapter first on the basis that it was the bit I knew least about - taught me loads about the South African scene and had some very intriguing potos, especially the 72 fitted with that odd airbox that looks like it came off Hesketh's old March 731! Looks good, reads well, and set to become a firm favourite, I was one of the generation of schoolkds who grew up lusting after the 72 and there's a lot to drool over in there!

I'll give fuller reports on both of these at some point - have to get them out of the way before Excellence Was Expected thuds onto my desk - it's been dispatched and is on its way - but it looks like both are well-placed to become classics.

#369 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,060 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 10 October 2003 - 01:25

For the impoverished, Asda have a small format paperback version of Tim Hill's "Formula 1 - Unseen Archives" at £2.79. I only had a quick look through - it seems to have a lot of the same photos (and incorrest captions) as the original hardback. If you don't have the hardback get this. At £2.79 it's an affordable way of playing "Spot the incorrect caption"

In all seriousness, despite the few engagingly wrong captions, either book is good value. Particularly pictures of Villeneuve (snr) cornering in controlled terminal oversteeer mode.

#370 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 13 October 2003 - 10:55

My copy of Porsche: Hernia Was Expected arrived today. That's a big set of books, Karl!

pete

#371 Ruairidh

Ruairidh
  • Member

  • 1,073 posts
  • Joined: November 02

Posted 15 October 2003 - 02:29

My copy of Michael Oliver's "Lotus 72 - Formula One Icon" arrived today. Those who read my ramble on some recent Lotus books and earlier musings re: books on Colin Chapman may have surmised correctly that (a) I am a pain in the a** Lotus devotee and (b) if anything was published anywhere in the 1970s about Lotus F1 cars I think I've seen it and will bitch incessantly if it is simply regurgitated.

But I also liked what I'd seen here about Michael Oliver's concern for his books and understated pride and I'd decided even if I didn't like what I saw I'd keep mum.

No Fricking way do I keep quiet. I've spent the last five hours nose deep in this book and it is fricking marvellous. It is simply superb. It is f***ing brilliant.

I'd never seen the Giugiaro sketch for the Lotus 76 airbox - and yes the second gen 77 airbox does look a lot like it. I'd never seen JYS's humorous retort to the invoice for dry-cleaning Emmo's clothes after the '73 Monaco slowing down collision - things were more fun back then! There was a recent thread here about the accident en route to the '72 Italian GP, well Michael gives the full story on page 107. We recently debated Henton - and whether he fulfilled his potential. Well Michael catches the why Lotus hired him (god JPTL were in the wilderness in '75) - the "biggest bag of s***" quote and also the "silly buggar" reaction of the Team before Henton's career with JPTL ended at the same time the 72's did. For heavens sake there is even a picture of page 1 of the Worldwide Racing Limited letter agreement with Alex Soler-Roig - he was to do 10 races!!! (I'm a lawyer - humor me, I may have died and gone to heaven here - but I'm happy - I love insights into the business side of F1 in the 70s). Photos of examples of Teams notes and notebooks - cor! There is a lot of other fresh stuff and I ain't even really started reading this yet.

I LOVE the production values - there are a lot of pictures that are fresh to me (as Pete mentions the book is really strong on SA) and I'm pleased to see more shots of the Rob Walker 72 but the Thomas Rohracher shot of the wingless 72 as Jochen braked for Parabolica on his last lap choked me up. Fantastic.

And the size works for me - I also liked William Turner's two Lotus books - all the more space for pictures and text. You just need to have a bidet next to your loo to rest the darn thing on :blush:

I didn't buy the expensive one - blame Karl for that ;) (my Excellence has yet to arrive :| )- but Michael, if you can get someone to publish your book on the Lotus wing-cars (my favorites)- I will be first in line to buy the limited edition version.

All I can say is if you like 1970s Motor Racing - this is a total must have.

Michael, Thank You.

#372 Michael Oliver

Michael Oliver
  • Member

  • 882 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 15 October 2003 - 15:51

Originally posted by Ruairidh
My copy of Michael Oliver's "Lotus 72 - Formula One Icon" arrived today. Those who read my ramble on some recent Lotus books and earlier musings re: books on Colin Chapman may have surmised correctly that (a) I am a pain in the a** Lotus devotee and (b) if anything was published anywhere in the 1970s about Lotus F1 cars I think I've seen it and will bitch incessantly if it is simply regurgitated.

But I also liked what I'd seen here about Michael Oliver's concern for his books and understated pride and I'd decided even if I didn't like what I saw I'd keep mum.

No Fricking way do I keep quiet. I've spent the last five hours nose deep in this book and it is fricking marvellous. It is simply superb. It is f***ing brilliant.

I'd never seen the Giugiaro sketch for the Lotus 76 airbox - and yes the second gen 77 airbox does look a lot like it. I'd never seen JYS's humorous retort to the invoice for dry-cleaning Emmo's clothes after the '73 Monaco slowing down collision - things were more fun back then! There was a recent thread here about the accident en route to the '72 Italian GP, well Michael gives the full story on page 107. We recently debated Henton - and whether he fulfilled his potential. Well Michael catches the why Lotus hired him (god JPTL were in the wilderness in '75) - the "biggest bag of s***" quote and also the "silly buggar" reaction of the Team before Henton's career with JPTL ended at the same time the 72's did. For heavens sake there is even a picture of page 1 of the Worldwide Racing Limited letter agreement with Alex Soler-Roig - he was to do 10 races!!! (I'm a lawyer - humor me, I may have died and gone to heaven here - but I'm happy - I love insights into the business side of F1 in the 70s). Photos of examples of Teams notes and notebooks - cor! There is a lot of other fresh stuff and I ain't even really started reading this yet.

I LOVE the production values - there are a lot of pictures that are fresh to me (as Pete mentions the book is really strong on SA) and I'm pleased to see more shots of the Rob Walker 72 but the Thomas Rohracher shot of the wingless 72 as Jochen braked for Parabolica on his last lap choked me up. Fantastic.

And the size works for me - I also liked William Turner's two Lotus books - all the more space for pictures and text. You just need to have a bidet next to your loo to rest the darn thing on :blush:

I didn't buy the expensive one - blame Karl for that ;) (my Excellence has yet to arrive :| )- but Michael, if you can get someone to publish your book on the Lotus wing-cars (my favorites)- I will be first in line to buy the limited edition version.

All I can say is if you like 1970s Motor Racing - this is a total must have.

Michael, Thank You.


Er, what can I say other than...thank you :blush: and glad you liked it :D

Cheers

Michael

PS - the money is in the post :lol:

#373 Don Capps

Don Capps
  • Member

  • 5,933 posts
  • Joined: May 99

Posted 15 October 2003 - 16:17

I have just ordered the latest Dick Wallen book, the one on the Seventies. When I get the funding lined up the next ones are Karl's Porsche set and Michael's 72 book. Right now they are my "Priority" purchases. However, the rest of the items on the list do get their moments if my eye catches one of them at Borders or wherever.....

#374 Bernd

Bernd
  • Member

  • 3,307 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 16 October 2003 - 00:01

Anyone have Dymocks new Clark book Racing Legend?

I've have it coming and if it is nothing but an update of the original work I'll be very displeased.

#375 Joe Fan

Joe Fan
  • Member

  • 5,591 posts
  • Joined: December 98

Posted 16 October 2003 - 00:43

Originally posted by Bernd
Anyone have Dymocks new Clark book Racing Legend?

I've have it coming and if it is nothing but an update of the original work I'll be very displeased.


I think it has the same written content but with added photos.

#376 Bernd

Bernd
  • Member

  • 3,307 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 16 October 2003 - 06:22

:mad:

Goddamnit!

#377 marat

marat
  • Member

  • 311 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 16 October 2003 - 19:36

According to La Vie de l'Auto, the long awaited book "Nicha" , from Adelino Dinis is now available.
I hope the book is better than the two pages in LVA telling the story of Mario Cabral, packed with
errors.

#378 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 16 October 2003 - 21:24

First thoughts on Excellence was Expected.....

Wow.

Does for Porsche what Quicksilver Century did for Mercedes, Benz and Mercedes-Benz, but covers road cars as well as competition vehicles, so needs about three times the space. There doesn't seem to be a wasted page in it, either, with loads of unfamiliar photos, details of every Porsche project you can think of and a lot you can't, and Karl's typically crisp and incisive prose backed with lots of quotes from the Porsche folks involved.

There's only really Doug with BRM in the same league for in-depth warts-and-all portrayals of a marque - Karl's stuff lacks a bit of the joie de vivre that you find in Doug's books but if anything he piles even more detail in.

As with most of the books joining the to-read pile I read a couple of semi-random chapters - in this case the two Indy programmes (one of which is available as a PDF on Bentley's site as a taster) to get a feel for the quality - mightily impressed, Karl isn't afraid to say when things went pear-shaped.

I suspect I might find some of the 80s/early 90s 911 development a bit dull - the era when it was the posermobile par excellence and special models seemed to come along to fleece the nouveau-riche of their bonuses on a regular basis - but pretty much everything else looks to be fascinating!

You'll need to allocate a good few evenings for this set. And you'll need a lot of space for it, it's big and handsome and heavy.

#379 Geza Sury

Geza Sury
  • Member

  • 936 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 17 October 2003 - 15:02

My copy of Doug's 'Cooper Cars' has arrived today. I thought it would look like that, but it's looks like this. It was published by Motorbooks International so it seems I have ordered the American edition whereas I intended to purchase the European one which had appeared this August. It looks impressive nevertheless! Is there any difference between the second, third, fourth, fifth and the American editions? My copy was printed in 2003 and labelled as 'New Edition' but is it the newest? Perhaps Doug knows the answer ;)

Advertisement

#380 Geza Sury

Geza Sury
  • Member

  • 936 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 17 October 2003 - 15:35

In the meantime I tracked down the respective ISBN numbers of the American and the (fifth) European edition. They are perfectly the same (0760317097)! It looks like there are two books from different publishers with the same ISBN in existence. :confused:

#381 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,363 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 17 October 2003 - 16:43

Originally posted by Geza Sury
Perhaps Doug knows the answer ;)


Geza - so sorry - I am afraid I do not know the answer in any detail. The edition with the Michael Turner painting on the front cover emerged as a complete surprise to me, and in fact caused considerable embarrassment because of that. John Cooper underwrote the edition which first included an additional chapter on the racing Mini-Cooper saloons which I couldn't raise the interest to produce so I asked Mike Lawrence to do it for me, and he consequently researched and wrote the chapter which appears in these later editions, and I simply subbed it to suit.

I must confess I have had no input into this latest edition other than to cash the (modest) cheque.

'Cooper Cars' is not as pin-perfectly correct as it could - and should - be but it's still my personal favourite amongst all the books with which I've been associated. Even the villains in that story are attractive and amusing characters and I loved every minute of compiling it all, and of trying to recapture the character of Charlie Cooper - and of (for example) his gardener who, when upset by the old man, would feed his horse oats to make it sparky in the hope it might unseat CNC.... I always felt that showed a bit of form... :p

DCN

#382 Pils1989

Pils1989
  • Member

  • 1,111 posts
  • Joined: December 02

Posted 17 October 2003 - 22:33

Met today Christophe A. Gaascht (author of Willy Mairesse book) at the Brussels Retromobil, he is starting a new project on the Equipe Nationale Belge and he's aiming to publish it for 2005. I will try to contribute to it with some pictures asap I can afford a new scanner.
Also talked to Sébastien Dulac, Automobile Historique editor. They stopped the english booklet because it cost them too much but they are thinking about publishing a full english version of the magazine next year. :up:
Brought back home:
"Lotus 72, Formula one icon" :up: :up:
"Lotus Elise, the official story" by J. Walton :up:
and "Tuning the A-Series engines" by D. Vizard :smoking:

#383 marat

marat
  • Member

  • 311 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 18 October 2003 - 06:30

Also back from Brussels, did not buy any of the books I had on list but came back with
"Mille Miglia Identikit".

#384 Geza Sury

Geza Sury
  • Member

  • 936 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 18 October 2003 - 07:21

Originally posted by Doug Nye
Geza - so sorry - I am afraid I do not know the answer in any detail. The edition with the Michael Turner painting on the front cover emerged as a complete surprise to me, and in fact caused considerable embarrassment because of that. John Cooper underwrote the edition which first included an additional chapter on the racing Mini-Cooper saloons which I couldn't raise the interest to produce so I asked Mike Lawrence to do it for me, and he consequently researched and wrote the chapter which appears in these later editions, and I simply subbed it to suit.

I must confess I have had no input into this latest edition other than to cash the (modest) cheque.

'Cooper Cars' is not as pin-perfectly correct as it could - and should - be but it's still my personal favourite amongst all the books with which I've been associated. Even the villains in that story are attractive and amusing characters and I loved every minute of compiling it all, and of trying to recapture the character of Charlie Cooper - and of (for example) his gardener who, when upset by the old man, would feed his horse oats to make it sparky in the hope it might unseat CNC.... I always felt that showed a bit of form... :p

DCN

Thank You Doug :up: It seems this new edition is pretty much the same as the older ones, except for the first of course. I'm very much looking forward to reading 'Cooper Cars', but I'm going to finish the Graham Hill bio first.

#385 2F-001

2F-001
  • Member

  • 2,284 posts
  • Joined: November 01

Posted 19 October 2003 - 18:59

Today, I saw the Robert Edwards "Stirling Moss: the authorised biography'' (hardback) selling for under 13 UKP (originally 30). Is it worth having? It made a bit of a splash when it first appeared, so a bit surprised to see it on offer so soon...

#386 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,857 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 19 October 2003 - 19:03

Tony, I'd grab it at that price. The pictures alone are worth it.

#387 2F-001

2F-001
  • Member

  • 2,284 posts
  • Joined: November 01

Posted 19 October 2003 - 19:44

Will do, then! Thanks Barry. I have nothing on Moss in my 'library' anyway...

(It was in Chaters at Brands Hatch, so presumably it'll be the same in their shop or mail order if anyone else is after a copy. Went to the Formula Ford Festival at Brands - the most disappointing one I can recall, really. The Caterham racing stole the show! As it often does! Up the Sevens! Gary was racing his Nike as well but I didn't get a chance to speak with him.)

#388 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 19 October 2003 - 21:18

Supposedly coming soon...I hope this doesn't take as long to come out as does many other things from Nada...

The Legendary Targa Florio (UNDER PREPARATION) :::
Author/s: Pino Fondi and Gianni Cancellieri
ISBN: 88-7911-270-8
Publishing date: 2003
Price €: 0.00


Size: 24.5 x 31,5 cms - Pages: 308 - Pictures: 400 in b/w and colour - Hardbound with jacket - Text: English

Many years ago, the legend of the Targa Florio became one of the most emotive and prestigious expressions in world motor racing. The joy of this celebrated road race, second only to the mythical Mille Miglia, began in 1906 at the dawn of motoring civilisation and it evolved over the years, hand-in-hand with the ever growing popularity of the car itself. The narrow and tortuous roads of the Madonie mountains were testimony to the feats of Fiat, Bugatti, Alfa Romeo, Maserati, Lancia, Ferrari and Porsche: manufacturers who alternated year after year at the top of the final classification of one of the toughest races in history, a race rich in allure and an ever present peril. In May 1977, after 71 glorious years, the Targa Florio ceased to exist, because that last edition of the race was ravaged by several serious accidents. And that is how, like the Mille Miglia 20 years before it, another heroic phase of road racing was lost forever, the reconstruction of that epic race now left to the historians and the nostalgic.

#389 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 19 October 2003 - 21:22

Another one that is a must have for me...

Stanguellini (UNDER PREPARATION) :::
Author/s: Luigi Orsini
ISBN: 88-7911-306-2
Publishing date: 2003
Price €: 68.00


Size: 24.3 x 27 - Pagine: 352 - Foto: approx 500 b/w and in colour - Hardbound with jacket - Text: English

A thorough and complete survey of Stanguellini, the man, and his cars. The numerous black & white photographs alone tell a compelling story of this Fiat dealer turned race-car manufacturer. While Stanguellini is primarily known in the USA for its Formula Juniors, the book provides an in-depth look at the wide variety of cars produced and run under the Stanguellini name. A must have for the etceterini fans.

#390 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 20 October 2003 - 16:59

A few bits and bobs....

A couple of racing books spotted in a remaindered shop in Leeds -

Koen Vergeer's "Formula One Fanatic" in hardback for 2.99
Louis Stanley's "Strictly Off The Record" in hardback for 3.99

Plenty of copies of both left - unfortunately they're two books I disliked!


In the 'ordinary' bookshops I spotted a new Alan Henry: "Power Brokers: The Inside Track on the Controllers of Formula 1". Big pictures of Max and Bernie on the cover, large sans-serif type with a lot of spacing, and looked to cover pretty much the same ground as Terry Lovell did in Bernie's Game or Timothy Collings did in The Piranha Club. A quick flick through revealed lots of acronyms and large numbers of dollar signs. I'm not the world's greatest Alan Henry fan (he's OK writing about cars and the engineering side) so I think I'll probably give this one a miss unless it really does contain anything incendiary.

#391 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 20 October 2003 - 17:00

Originally posted by 2F-001
Today, I saw the Robert Edwards "Stirling Moss: the authorised biography'' (hardback) selling for under 13 UKP (originally 30). Is it worth having? It made a bit of a splash when it first appeared, so a bit surprised to see it on offer so soon...


Yes - buy it - that's cheaper than the paperback (14.95 IIRC). A handsome book with a lot to read in it.

Robert Edwards did tell me that a reprint of Archie and the Listers was a possibility a while back....

#392 m.tanney

m.tanney
  • Member

  • 341 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 28 October 2003 - 02:37

Originally posted by Don Capps
I have just ordered the latest Dick Wallen book, the one on the Seventies.

Don,

  I am a great admirer of Dick Wallen's other books on AAA/USAC racing, but I've been told (by someone whose judgement I rate highly) that the latest one is a bit of a disappointment. I'd be very interested to know your opinion.

Mike

#393 theunions

theunions
  • Member

  • 638 posts
  • Joined: October 02

Posted 29 October 2003 - 19:54

Originally posted by m.tanney
  I am a great admirer of Dick Wallen's other books on AAA/USAC racing, but I've been told (by someone whose judgement I rate highly) that the latest one is a bit of a disappointment.


How so?

Because of page count vs. cover price relative to the previous titles?

#394 m.tanney

m.tanney
  • Member

  • 341 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 30 October 2003 - 00:40

  Yes.
  When I got the brochure and read that the new book was to be 240 pages, I honestly thought it was a typo. Fabulous Fifties was 576 pages long. Roar From the Sixties was 600 pages. That's a reduction of around 60%. I couldn't help but wonder what had been left out - especially as the new book includes the Silver Crown races (an unnecessary addition, IMO, as there's already a good history of that series). I finally got up the nerve to post the question on a couple of forums that deal with American racing history. I received only one response, a personal email, to which I referred in the post above. I suspect that we are all so grateful to Dick Wallen and Bob Schilling for the remarkable work they've done, that no one wants to say anything critical (myself included).
  I suppose that if anyone else published a 240 page book on USAC racing in the '70s, I'd buy it without hesitation. There aren't any other histories of the period. The other two books had everything I could ask from a racing history: well written text, tons of information, great stats (thanks, Phil!), excellent photos. With those books, Wallen and Schilling raised the bar. Did they clear it this time?

  Mike

P.S. I know that the new book costs about 40% less than the others. I thought they were worth every penny. I expected - and would have been happy - to pay the same for the book on the '70s, a period for which I have great affection.

#395 PRD

PRD
  • Member

  • 320 posts
  • Joined: October 02

Posted 01 November 2003 - 19:29

Has anyone read Eoin Young's Forza Amon book yet? The book review on Amazon was most unflattering.

regards

Paul

#396 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,363 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 01 November 2003 - 20:31

Forgive me for being thick but after reading the above I just clicked onto Amazon and while I can find Eoin's book listed I can't find any such review. If someone has really rubbished a book by him I would be most surprised.... :confused:

DCN

#397 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,371 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 01 November 2003 - 20:46

Here. Apparently the dastardly Eoin dared to quote from correspondence and magazines rather than make it all up.

#398 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 01 November 2003 - 20:56

Originally posted by ensign14
Here. Apparently the dastardly Eoin dared to quote from correspondence and magazines rather than make it all up.


Poor sods. They're probably so used to reading Christopher Hilton quickies with no quotes or interviews or original source documents in them :(

(Puzzler - why's Hilton so lousy at writing modern stuff, when his books on the Donington GPs and Nuvolari have both been excellent?)

#399 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,363 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 01 November 2003 - 20:57

Oh dear..... :rolleyes:

Advertisement

#400 Frank S

Frank S
  • Member

  • 2,157 posts
  • Joined: September 02

Posted 01 November 2003 - 22:17

You know that any persona can post a review on Amazon. A worst enemy could torch an honored edifice without having entered the lobby.