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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#4001 Mark Godfrey

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 21:54

Phil's views on "Yankee Champion" were complicated. My perspective is better than most as I published the second edition of the book, and spoke at length to both Phil and the author William F. Nolan regarding it.

In the end, I believe Phil was rather pleased that I did the 2nd edition. His first comment to me when the book came out was that the photo selection was great. Years later he confided that he wished he had done more to promote the book. From the first time we spoke, I felt we were on good terms.

Phil's involvement and contribution to the new edition were asked for, but communications went astray. Before I agreed to publish the book I wrote to Phil at his business address (not knowing) Hill & Vaughn had just been sold -- my letter did not reach Phil and it was not returned to me. Bill Nolan telephoned the house and interviewed Alma, but could not get hold of Phil. Bill wrote new material for the book and sent it to Phil's home for his review and comments. We had no reply from Phil, and he was hard to get a hold of, as he was traveling quite a bit. Not getting a response from him we assumed he was either pleased with the material, did not want to get involved, or both. Years later Phil told me that the manuscript had been lost in his house, the mail having fallen behind a piece of furniture, not to be seen for a long time!

The second edition of the book came about because I had wanted to read of Phil Hill's career and the only book "Yankee Champion" from 1962 was out of print and silly expensive. I found a copy, read it, liked it, and thought others might also like it. I wondered why it was out of print, so I studied publishing and set up to create a new edition.

As a book designer it was especially rewarding illustrating it with the best photos I could find, and finding them was a great challenge. As an example I was hoping to include photos by Peter Coltrin. Griffith Borgeson helped by tracking down Gabriella Coltrin to "Shopping Formula 1" where she worked in Maranello. This is probably the shop Jonathan mentions where Phil signed some copies, as they stocked the book early on thanks to Gabriella. (Later GP Tours gave out copies when Phil was with them.)

In more recent years I mentioned to Phil that Jim Sitz checked the complete body text (Phil thought it had only been the new material) of the book. Phil asked me if Jim found much. I said not very much, he was surprised, but happy I had it checked. Phil also used Jim for fact checking. I mentioned this conversation to Jim, and he said something like "I don't know how Nolan could have gotten much wrong, I never saw anyone interviewed on tape as much as he interviewed Phil, he talked to him for months!." I believe Bill Nolan still has his recorded interviews with Phil.

As it turned out, Phil was involved in the dust jacket for the book, he asked Peter Hearsey to paint the 1960 Monza GP. I originally had something else in mind, but was happy to have the input. The fantastic photo from the first edition's dust jacket, and featured on the cover of Road & Track, had unfortunately been lost.

Mark

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#4002 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 22:20

Mark,

Thanks for that information. As a Phil Hill fan since childhood I'm always interested in learning more about the man.

That Road & Track cover photo made an indelible impression upon me. I still have it.

Jack

#4003 pilota

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 23:21

Originally posted by Doug Nye
Phil was many things, one of which was a very private man. He gave me a copy of 'Yankee Champion' into which we scribbled a mass of extra information and clarification. Whatever his view of that book's reprinted version, I thought it was quite good. But Phil recorded many, many hours of tape with his friend, my colleague and co-author, Steve Dawson...in which many matters he considered sensitive have been aired. If it hadn't been for Steve's relationship with Phil many of these things would have gone unsaid, and would therefore now be lost. Steve's fine and sensitive work saved them. Above all Phil was concerned that he didn't want any of his recollections and views to cause fuss while he was alive. He was NOT a controversialist nor a mischief maker.
DCN

Hi Doug
Do you have a publishing date - even approx? Also a possible price, as everyone seems to expect it to be expensive, and some of us might have to save up.
Nathan

#4004 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 00:29

My Christmas-gift-to-myself arrived today....Goodwood Revival: The First Ten Years. ...by a feller called Nye. So, after Christmas dinner I'll be in the big chair, glass of Sandeman, an Arturo Fuente don Carlos and the book.

Merry Christmas to all!



Jack.

#4005 jtremlett

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 10:18

Originally posted by Mark Godfrey
[B]Phil's views on "Yankee Champion" were complicated...

...Griffith Borgeson helped by tracking down Gabriella Coltrin to "Shopping Formula 1" where she worked in Maranello. This is probably the shop Jonathan mentions where Phil signed some copies, as they stocked the book early on thanks to Gabriella...

Mark,
Thank you for that fascinating insight, which explains a great deal. It was indeed "Shopping Formula 1" where Phil signed copies of the book.

Jonathan

#4006 bradbury west

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 10:50

[i]Originally posted by Mark Godfrey
.......helped by tracking down Gabriella Coltrin............ Mark [/B]

Slightly OT, but perhaps, if someone is in a position to contact her, a message of seasonal goodwill and appreciation is sent from at least one TNFer who values the 2 volumes of Pete's photos on the bookshelves here, plus the other shots in the various other books. He served a vital link to those scenes in his period, perhaps appreciated even more these days.
Roger Lund.

#4007 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 22:13

So...who got books for Christmas?

jack

#4008 fuzzi

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 09:49

Me - "Not much of an Engineer" by Sir Stanley Hooker
I've read it before but looking forward to reading it again.

#4009 Herbert

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 11:33

Does anyone know this book?

"Fearless: Open-wheel Racing on the Championship Trail 1946-82" by Gene Crucean

Synopsis
Post World-War II was a golden age for auto racing and car racing photography. This book celebrates the work of on-the-spot photographers who documented motor sports' sensational triumphs and failures through four action-packed decades. Mining a remarkable collection of rare and compelling photographs from this legendary period of open-wheel racing, author Crucean takes readers back to some of the most exciting days ever spent on the Championship Trail.Close-up and candid shots from the 1940's to the 1980's - many never before published - capture the highlights of sprint car racing, midget racing, the Indianapolis 500, and other history-making, open-wheel racing events. Featuring the drivers who made that time what it was - Rex Mays, Ted Horn, Tony and Gary Bettenhausen, Jimmy Bryan, Bill Vukovich, Parnelli Jones, Mario Andretti, Al Unser, and many others - this is a wild spin through the racing world at it's most exciting time and a compelling glimpse of auto racing history in the making."


Is it any good? I never saw it mentioned...

#4010 Tom V

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 14:23

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack

I got Mon Ami Mate and Bahamas Speed Weeks for Xmas.

#4011 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 16:07

Originally posted by Tom V
I got Mon Ami Mate and Bahamas Speed Weeks for Xmas.


Lucky you!

#4012 kdc04

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 16:44

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack


Wimpffen's Winged Sports Cars and Enduring Innovation. And I bought myself Bahamas Speed Weeks, Le Mans '55, BRM Vol 1 and Golden Boy as sort of Christmas presents (goodbye to my bonus...).

#4013 fbarrett

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 17:26

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack


Jack:

I got Simon Moore's new Alfa Romeo 8C2900 book! Spent a couple of hours enjoying a preliminary read last night.

Frank

#4014 Alan Cox

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 18:15

Some forthcomong books noted on Veloce's website:

A 'Those were the days' offering for saloon car enthusiasts....
http://www.veloce.co...oup=Motorsport

....and one for Speed Weeks' fans
http://www.veloce.co...oup=Motorsport
(pleased to see that Terry's definitive book on the Speed Weeks is still featuring on a number of TNFers Christmas lists)

An updated version of WB's Donington book
http://www.veloce.co...oup=Motorsport

An English translation of Jean François Bouzanquet's book on women drivers
http://www.veloce.co...oup=Motorsport

And Christopher Hilton's book on Toleman
http://www.veloce.co...oup=Motorsport

#4015 bradbury west

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 21:34

The Bahamas Those Were The Days book is an ideal companion to Terry's main volume, IMHO. An excellent picture book, some shots from sources familiar to TNFers. My copy arrived last week less 45%, along with Mr Ludvigsen's V16 work.
Roger Lund

#4016 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 00:43

Originally posted by fbarrett


Jack:

I got Simon Moore's new Alfa Romeo 8C2900 book! Spent a couple of hours enjoying a preliminary read last night.

Frank


Wow, that's a great book.

What's your impression of Tony Dron's new 911 book?

Jack.

#4017 David Beard

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 17:31

Has any one read the Martin Hines biography? (Mr Zip karts).
If so, what comments?

#4018 Mal9444

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 19:18

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack


Not sure if this, or the dedicated thread, is the place to say something about Mike Hawthorn Golden Boy, but since this is the ‘official’ book thread I’ll post my general comments here, in case anyone might be interested.

Golden Boy is certainly an heroic work but (as Mr Spock might say and indeed Doug Nye more or less has elsewhere) it’s a motor racing book, Jim – but not as we know it.

This is not so much a book about as a shrine in book form to Mike Hawthorn. For anyone who is a Hawthorn fan it must come into the Must Have category, for with this, Mon Ami Mate and Hawthorn’s own books there surely can now be nothing left to be said, written or discovered about Britain’s first Formula 1 world champion.

The authors themselves point out that – with JMH’s driving career already so well documented – they deliberately set out to write a different sort of book, and they have. Why then is one a little disappointed? Perhaps it is because that, having assembled with obvious painstaking in-depth research all this material, all that has been done with it is publish it, wholly uncritically and certainly with no attempt to analyse or assess. There are scores of then-and-now pictures: of the semi-detached house into which Mike was born; the school he went to; of the Jet filling station that stands on the site of Leslie Hawthorn’s first garage and picture after picture of the stretch of A3 – then and now – where occurred the accident that took his life. There is even a chapter of pictures devoted to scale models (good, bad and indifferent; accurate and inaccurate) of cars that Mike drove.

Perhaps the view of the authors is that analysis or assessment is something best left to the reader – and that’s a fair point of view. It is indeed thought-provoking to read the happy recollection of Mike’s then-young cousin of how Mike came to visit and gave the youngsters joy-rides in his Jaguar demonstrating 0-60mph up the street outside their front door: the sort of thing for which they give out ASBOs these days. And for sheer disingenuous innocence it would be hard to beat the smiling Hawthorn-endorsed advertisement that was going to read ‘World Champion driver exceeded 100mph at night using only the Raydyot DL77 [driving lamps] with complete confidence’. The ad was never used: by the time it was ready for press the world champion driver in question had killed himself, racing a friend at over 100 mph on a public road. Mike Hawthorn – indeed all of us – lived in a very different world back then.

For anyone who is a not a Hawthorn fan Golden Boy will tell them little they did not already know (or could have read elsewhere) about JMH. For anyone who is a Hawthorn fan the book will doubtless be a joy to have.

I am very glad to have been given it for Christmas.

#4019 fbarrett

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 21:34

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
What's your impression of Tony Dron's new 911 book?

Jack.


Jack:

Have only skimmed it so far, but it seems like just another once-over-lightly treatment, though the driving impressions do make it more interesting. For pure technical and true engineering matters, it's hard to beat Paul Frere's The 911 Story or Karl Ludvigsen's Porsche, Excellence Was Expected, and that book doesn't seem to come close.

Frank

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#4020 Mark A

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 15:47

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack



Sports Car Racing in Camera 1960-69 - Paul Parker
Sports Car Racing in Camera 1970-79 - Paul Parker
British Touring Car Racing in Camera - Graham Robson
Aston Martin A racing History - Anthony Pritchard
Lotus Esprit-The Official Story - Jeremy Walton (when Chaters deliver it)

#4021 jumperjarier

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 19:01

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack


Shelby cars in detail
portraits(jesse alexander)
Mike Hawthorn Golden boy :love:

#4022 kayemod

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 19:14

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack


Keith Bluemels classic Ferrari 250 GTO among others, faintly worried what she must have paid for it.

#4023 bradbury west

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 22:06

In Borders the other day I had a good opportunity to look through the LAT picture book on Jim Clark. Very much in line with Peter Darley's superb book, but smaller, but with top shots of JC. Recommended
Roger Lund

#4024 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 04:09

Originally posted by kayemod


Keith Bluemels classic Ferrari 250 GTO among others, faintly worried what she must have paid for it.


I have this book. I wish the ownership information could be updated, perhaps even including details about restoration/preservation and historic racing history.

Jack.

#4025 Mallory Dan

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 14:55

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

jack


Nothing racing related I'm afraid - Jon Gaunt's book, a history of the Carry On films, latest Viz annual, Good Beer Guide, Andrew Flintoff book, and a 1986 Airline Colours book...

#4026 green-blood

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 15:11

great service from Paul skilliter again allowed me to add the Hawthorn book to my collection... although not leather this time, sorry Paul, times are hard...

I did get the Top Gear book from my mother in law (as expected) to go with my lovely grandad sweater from my father in law (as expected), I doubt it will ever be opened!!! (or the book)

50euro voucher to spend in waterstones tomorrow... I wonder how ripped off I will be!!

#4027 red stick

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 17:56

Originally posted by Mark A
Sports Car Racing in Camera 1960-69 - Paul Parker
Sports Car Racing in Camera 1970-79 - Paul Parker
British Touring Car Racing in Camera - Graham Robson
Aston Martin A racing History - Anthony Pritchard
Lotus Esprit-The Official Story - Jeremy Walton (when Chaters deliver it)


I enjoy Parker's books and have recommended them. How is the Pritchard book? I've only seen this online, not in person, and while interested in the subject, I am a little concerned that it was published in close proximity to his book on Porsche sports racing cars -- either he's very good, in which case more power to him, or just prolific, in which case the content tends to suffer.

#4028 lil'chris

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 22:34

New Xmas additions to my library

Golden Boy
The 2 volume Cahier set
Ronnie Peterson - A photographic portrait
Crash and Byrned
2009 Good Beer guide

#4029 KoenDW

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 10:26

A lot of Alfa reading to do:
I found ' The Immortal 2.9' and 'The Legendary 2.3' under the tree.
Both are superb.

Koen

#4030 Mark A

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 16:57

Originally posted by red stick


I enjoy Parker's books and have recommended them. How is the Pritchard book? I've only seen this online, not in person, and while interested in the subject, I am a little concerned that it was published in close proximity to his book on Porsche sports racing cars -- either he's very good, in which case more power to him, or just prolific, in which case the content tends to suffer.


Only glanced at it so far, been a few discussions on it previously which was why I added it to my Christmas list.

#4031 red stick

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 18:10

Originally posted by Mark A
Only glanced at it so far, been a few discussions on it previously which was why I added it to my Christmas list.


Thanks. And while we're almost on the topic, and it's another subject I'm interested in, any reviews of Pritchard's recent book on the Porsche sports racing cars? Birthday's coming up...

#4032 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 20:04

If the topic is Porsche , I would say the Porsche 1953 Racing Cars to1975 by Brian Long is a fine book ,272 pages , lots of pics , b/w & colour , story and good captions.

#4033 bradbury west

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 21:56

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
If the topic is Porsche , I would say the Porsche 1953 Racing Cars to1975 by Brian Long is a fine book ,272 pages , lots of pics , b/w & colour , story and good captions.

Fully agreed, and at Veloce's discounted price.
Roger Lund.

#4034 fines

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 11:38

A few recent additions to my shelf:

Racing the Heartland - A History of MVARA by Ken Paulsen.

The Mississippi Valley Auto Racing Association was a Big Car/Sprint Car sanctioning body for roughly two decades after WW2, really third or even fourth division stuff as the only "name drivers" to have come up through this organisation have been Jerry Blundy, Ken Rubright and Al Ketter (and it can be argued that the latter did more for MVARA than vice versa). Still, it is a very interesting subject, as this was bread and butter stuff for many county fairs and their patrons in the Midwest, and some other big names did an MVARA race or two during their formative years (e.g. Don Branson, Johnny Rutherford or even Bobby Unser!).

The author did a good job of unearthing an amazing amount of information, though much of it (list of main event winners, final point standings, rosters of drivers and officials) remains incomplete and a bit patchy. There are many pictures, not always fully captioned, and of rather poor quality in many cases, but given the obscurity of the subject, that was quite expected. One would have wished for some more info on some of the more interesting car/engine combinations, but the book was clearly never intended to be a technical appraisal. On the plus side, there are a goodly number of period newspaper clippings in facsimile, mostly race ads though, but also race reports and some programme pages.

Good effort! :up:

#4035 fines

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 12:05

Damn Few Died In Bed - Memories Of A Life In American Automobile Racing 1930-1975 by Andy Dunlop with Tom Saal.

This one has been on my wish list for quite some time, but I never got around to ordering it, and in fact it had already slipped a bit in the ranking of my most wanted items for reasons which I can't really explain - perhaps it's the rather gory title? But DON'T let that put you off, as the book appears to be all that I hoped it would be, and promises to be even more! So far, I haven't had time for much more than the odd casual browse through it in a quiet moment, but each time I found it extremely hard to put down!

Andy Dunlop had been around racing's "small and BIG time" for almost half a century and, as Tom Saal remarks in his foreword, he had an absolutely amazing recall when interviewed about it in the late nineties! There's so much stuff about the independent Big Car "scene" in the thirties, racing with organisations like CSRA and IMCA in the forties, and then AAA from the fifties onwards, it's enough to consider it an essential read already, but for a racing car nut like me, the icing on the cake is his "nuts and bolts" approach to racing and its history, as that is what racing is all about in the final reckoning.

Lots of period photography, and a few statistics to round out the picture - Get it!

#4036 fines

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 12:42

Brick by Brick - The story of auto racing pioneer Joie Ray by Patrick Sullivan.

Joie Ray raced Big Cars in the forties and fifties, Stock Cars after that, but he never really "made it" in either category, so why was he a "racing pioneer"? Well, for one thing he was "black"... an Afro-American, as they say these days. That's already enough to make for an interesting background to a simple racer's biography, but this book is something more than that. It is packed with bibliographical notes, so you can see the author's made an effort, and by running down the list of these notes you can already tell its broad approach to the subject. This book is not only about racing, but about society in general, and about Kentucky and the Southern Midwest in particular.

Mind you, I haven't read the book cover to cover so far, but I think I can already form a valid opinion, and it looks to be miles apart from the rather fanciful Charlie Wiggins bio "For Gold and Glory". For instance, Ray was under no illusions why he didn't make it to Indy - not because of the colour of his skin, but because he didn't get the right breaks at the right time, like any white racing driver who didn't make it either, and he's not afraid to say so, even if it makes his story less of a "seller". Added to all that, the book also contains a lot of info about another Midwestern Big Car sanctioning body (MDTRA), so it really concludes the circle with my other recent purchases mentioned above.

200 pages, pocket size, many photographs - recommended!

#4037 fines

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 13:05

A Pictorial View From The Bear Shops At Indianapolis by Richard Iverson.

The Bear Manufacturing Co. was "famous" as the company that did the "official" wheel alignment and balancing at the IMS for over sixty years, and also other services such as body and frame straightening, brake and steering diagnostics etc. This book doesn't contain many words, only pictures with captions, about 200 in all, ranging from the thirties to the seventies. I expected to find rare pictures of rare cars, together with some of the better known cars "unclothed" - and it's exactly what I got! A few miscellaneous titbits as well as indexes of drivers and cars round out the picture, and the accuracy of the captions appears to be "waterproof".

Essential for any serious Indy Car researcher!

#4038 fines

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 14:29

Langhorne! - No Man's Land by Spencer Riggs.

By far the most ambitious, and the most eagerly anticipated book I have purchased in a long time! A tome, really, of more than 500 pages, and twice as many pictures - heavy, impressive!! It has everything the heart can desire, a section of colour photographs (and some fairly old ones, too!) and statistics, indexes, an exhaustive collection of programme covers, before and after stories, many sidelights on personalities and oddities, programme and newspaper article facsimiles, even cartoons - you name it!

Langhorne Speedway shouldn't really need an introduction, but for those unaware of its cult status, it was THE iconic dirt track of US racing for almost half a century. Riggs endeavours to recount its story on a race-by-race basis, and he doesn't leave anything out: Big Cars/Sprint Cars, Champ Cars/Indy Cars, Midgets, Stock Cars, Modifieds in all shapes and sizes, yes, even Sports Cars of the SCCA, and more than a dozen Motorcycle meets, it's all there, with lots of detail and background! Especially impressive is his account of the early days, when the track was built and operated under the auspices of the NMRA (National Motor Racing Association), as it's by far the most comprehensive account of the activities of this somewhat obscure sanctioning body I have ever found in one place - A+ for effort!!!

Having spent many hours already with the book over the better part of two weeks that I have it now, the only reason why I haven't posted about it earlier is because I'm still trying to determine whether the few gripes I have about it are major ones or not. There is, for instance, the rather anecdotal tone in which the articles are written, and while it's not really bad, it still does raise an eyebrow or two in places, such as when Riggs obviously repeats the "colour" of ancient newspaper articles, with driver's wifes begging their hubbies not to race on the eve of that fatal accident, or some wisecracking "voices from the crowd" - a tad more critical distance from one's sources would've certainly appealed to this reader, for one! :

There are also some failed photo captions, which is perhaps inevitable, but still annoying because the author doesn't shy away from leaving others somewhat vague - a bit more caution, or better editing (Jonathan Stein) could have helped that. Then, there are the factual errors - it's quite difficult to be specific about the amount, seeing on how much of the info isn't really found anywhere else, but one gets quite suspicious when there are obvious ones, like having the date for one race off by a whole month, and repeating the error several times - this is especially poignant when juxtaposed with the author's seemingly constant remarks about "most records" ignoring such-and-such race, "but thorough research revealed that...", or words to that effect.

There's also the case of one 1929 race, for which "many records have the date (...) as May 12, a Tuesday, [when it] was actually held on Saturday May 16." - every historian should be able to find out (without "thorough research"!), that the May 12 in question was actually a Sunday, and since the race in question was variously reported in the Monday (May 13) papers, there goes another assertion... :| Finally, there's the case of the two racing drivers by the same name, where "there has been a measure of confusion over the Mackenzie cousins, George W. (...) and George D." [my emphasis], to which Riggs then goes on to contribute GREATLY with his subsequent article! :(

Time for a resumé: warts and all, there's no doubt that this is one of the major contributions to the Historical Record of American Automobile Racing, and as such it is quite indispensable to the serious historian, as well as attractive to the more casual fan. The many pictures alone are a gold mine, and will keep this particular poster happy for many more hours to come! Much of the narrative is distilled from unique sources, such as official records that have survived in the hands of ardent collectors and former race officials, so it is nothing one can easily dismiss as "just another book". For me, it is clearly the book of the year, perhaps even the decade!

If you have any interest in US racing, don't hesitate - buy it!

#4039 Chocmonster

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 22:01

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
So...who got books for Christmas?

I got Andy Priaulx: The Autobiography of the Three-time World Touring Car Champion - should keep me amused on the plane over to Daytona later this month. :)

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#4040 jumperjarier

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 15:25

[QUOTE]Originally posted by fines
[b]Langhorne! - No Man's Land by Spencer Riggs.

Hi fines, do you know were i can obtain this book from
i,m not sure any of the usual book dealers in the uk will be stocking it
thanks
jumperjarier

#4041 David Beard

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 16:12

Originally posted by Chocmonster

I got Andy Priaulx: The Autobiography of the Three-time World Touring Car Champion - should keep me amused on the plane over to Daytona later this month. :)


I hope his hill climbing career gets its fair share of space. How many hillclimbers have made that transition so successfully? (Cue SteveW)

#4042 fines

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 16:49

[QUOTE]Originally posted by jumperjarier
[QUOTE]Originally posted by fines
[b]Langhorne! - No Man's Land by Spencer Riggs.

Hi fines, do you know were i can obtain this book from
i,m not sure any of the usual book dealers in the uk will be stocking it
thanks
jumperjarier
[/QUOTE]
Not sure if or where you can order it in Britain (or the rest of Europe, for that matter), but it shouldn't be a problem to find a dealer overseas. I got mine from Coastal 181 in Massachusetts, a web search should provide plenty of other shops. Let me know if you have problems locating one!

EDIT: Well, I surfed around a bit and it seems the book is already sold out! :eek: However, Coastal announces a "Second printing available mid-January 2009"!

#4043 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 21:46

One of the books that has been sitting on my shelf and used for reference now and then , came up for a read this X-mas. 350+ pages , lots of info , great story , lots of pictures b/w and colour not only on Cobras , but also its competitors. A great work with lots of research , and I just happen to know that some are still available ,a must have in my opinion , by Michael L .Shoen , The Cobra-Ferrari Wars 1963-65 , 2nd edition at :
www.thecobraferrariwars.com

#4044 MichaelM

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 17:16

Interesting forthcoming book spotted at Motorbooks UK:

Life of Spice: The autobiography of Gordon Spice
Publication March 2009
Author: Gordon Spice, Jeremy Walton
ISBN: 9781844255689
22.50 pounds


Michael

#4045 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 02:47

Does anyone have any new information about when The Brothers Rodriguez will be available in English?

Jack

#4046 pilota

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 16:47

Originally posted by Jack-the-Lad
Does anyone have any new information about when The Brothers Rodriguez will be available in English? Jack

Hi Jack
Latest news is that the book will be presented at the Amelia Island Concours D'élégance (13-15 March).
Nathan

#4047 Jerry Entin

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 16:55

Jack: I have seen Paul Medici's copy of the Brothers Rodriguez book, I can tell you that you won't be dissapointed with it. It is very good.

#4048 philippe charuest

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 17:43

does someone already have the new book on rolt and bira

#4049 Adam F

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 18:11

Originally posted by philippe charuest
does someone already have the new book on rolt and bira


Yes, I have it.

A strange book.
There is very little reason to link Rolt and Bira in a book.
The book subtitle calls them "The Forgotten Stars", but I am not sure that this epithet applies to either driver.
Overall there is very little new material on Bira. If, however, the reader has never read any of the books by Chula or Bira they may well learn something. As far as Tony Rolt is concerned, the author has benefited from being able to interview him and his family. There is therefore much more that has not been published before.

The author has a strange habit of peppering the text with chassis numbers at every opportunity, which can make the text very indigestible. There is also a fair peppering of recent photos of cars at current meetings such as the Goodwood Revival.

My overall reaction is that the book is not worth its £30 price.

#4050 RA Historian

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 19:07

Originally posted by Adam F
There is also a fair peppering of recent photos of cars at current meetings such as the Goodwood Revival.

Tht seems to be a trap that a number of recent books have suffered. I think that most readers would want to see period photos of the car(s) in question, not some pictures of a dandied up version being driven at a modern track by a dude with a full face helmet. I can understand using modern photos if there are no period photos available, but when there are, who wants to see a picture of the car at a modern vanity (thanks again to Col Capps for that marvelous term) car race?
Tom