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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#4251 VWV

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 16:16

stick the thread back and call it pete fenelon memorial book thread

Excellent idea, a fitting tribute. I really miss his witt and his book reviews.

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#4252 Twin Window

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 16:21

Agreed.

Once a couple of things have been sorted this will happen.

As has been said, a fitting tribute.

:up:

#4253 CNE

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 17:52

Originally posted by Twin Window
Agreed.

Once a couple of things have been sorted this will happen.

As has been said, a fitting tribute.

:up:

Cheers TW.

Full marks though to ivandjj for suggesting the tribute heading.

#4254 fbarrett

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 18:17

Great Idea! Thanks for implementing it so quickly.

Frank

#4255 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 18:36

This is wonderful! A very fitting tribute to Pete. I am sure he would had something to say about it.... but probably not printable. I am delighted to see this happen.

#4256 fines

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 19:00

At one time, Pete had exactly every tenth post in this thread - like, 365 out of 3,650 or something, so this is nothing more than long overdue!! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

#4257 MattKellett

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 19:08

What a wonderful and simple gesture that means so much :)

Bravo!

Matt

#4258 MCS

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 20:51

What a great idea to dedicate this to Pete :up:

quote:Originally posted by FLB ...This week, I've received Stephen Dorril's book on Oswald Mosely. I bought it on Pete Fenelon's posthumous advice...

quote:Originally posted by MCS ...It never ceases to amaze me how often I come across Pete's reviews. God bless him. I've just bought a book by Jonathan Meades, as recommended by Pete.

#4259 sterling49

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 21:06

Originally posted by MCS
What a great idea to dedicate this to Pete :up:

quote:Originally posted by FLB ...This week, I've received Stephen Dorril's book on Oswald Mosely. I bought it on Pete Fenelon's posthumous advice...

quote:Originally posted by MCS ...It never ceases to amaze me how often I come across Pete's reviews. God bless him. I've just bought a book by Jonathan Meades, as recommended by Pete.



I read Pete's reviews often on Amazon, they are an invaluable guide when I am browsing, he really "owned" this thread, a fitting tribute.

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#4260 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 21:58

Originally posted by Twin Window
Agreed.

Once a couple of things have been sorted this will happen.

As has been said, a fitting tribute.

:up:


Thank you, Stuart and Ivan! :clap:

Jack.

#4261 rdrcr

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 23:40

A class act -

:up: :up: :up:

#4262 David Birchall

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 23:42

Aah, that's much better! :up:

#4263 Dennis Hockenbury

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 23:47

Thanks Stuart and ivandjj. I cannot think of a more fitting tribute to Pete. :up:

#4264 bigears

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 08:17

This is a stunning tribute as it is very much his place to know about books. :up:

#4265 ensign14

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 09:10

Yes, terrific idea, thank you both.

#4266 kayemod

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 09:19

Originally posted by Dennis Hockenbury
Thanks Stuart and ivandjj. I cannot think of a more fitting tribute to Pete. :up:


Yes, but rather amusing that it took TW's somewhat misguided spring cleaning to prod us into coming up with this excellent idea.

#4267 green-blood

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 10:30

Do you know what, I think this is one of the classiest things I have ever seen on the internet.

A fine and fitting tribute to Pete.

#4268 Kingsleyrob

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 10:51

Is someone going to let Pete's nearest and dearest know? One of my fellow North West England TNFers has a direct link I am sure.

From the little I know, I am sure they would be proud to learn of this tribute.

A good idea ivandjj :clap:

Rob :wave:

#4269 David Beard

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 12:42

Originally posted by Kingsleyrob
Is someone going to let Pete's nearest and dearest know?
Rob :wave:


Done :up:

#4270 ivandjj

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 13:03

same as for many others, petes reviews here and at amazon helped me a lot in choosing how to spend racing book money. never thanked him for that while he was still here. but i guess that such positive reaction to this idea is also because pete was decent human. it was ment like a memorial to complete package, not just to his knowledge.

#4271 david stinson

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 15:23

Originally posted by fbarrett


David:

So far I have only the German-language edition and will reserve judgement until the English version arrives here in the U.S., which should be in about a month, I'm told. Whatever, the 908 was an amazing success for Porsche, a car well worth a good book.

Frank
Toad Hall Motorbooks
www.toadhallbook.com


Thanks Frank. I am hoping that it does the 908 justice. It would be nice to see a book on the 906 as well.

#4272 proviz

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 15:51

Jürgen Barth has done a book about the 906. I'm sure you can google it.

#4273 David Beard

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 18:45

From Pete's sister Leanne and girlfriend Emma...

That is a really lovely gesture! Please give my regards to the forum members- that is a lovely way for Pete's name to be remembered! I took great comfort reading the many messages of condolence on there last year

Thank you for letting me know!

Leanne :)


Thanks for letting me know David, I haven't been on TNF for a while but I can hear him chuckle about that as I type!

Regards
Emma



#4274 david stinson

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 00:49

Originally posted by proviz
Jürgen Barth has done a book about the 906. I'm sure you can google it.


Yes, unfortunately, German text only, I think? I'm barely unilingual, I'm afraid.

#4275 ERault

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 17:27

It depends what you are after : the Barth / Trispel is not a narrative book. It is a thorough chassis history of all the 906s, with hundred of photos and complete race results, from Anderstorp to Westwood. My german skills are very limited, and yet I love it.

Also warmly recommended on the subject is Jerry Pantis' The Porsche 904, 906 and 910 in the Americas.

#4276 Doug Nye

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 22:09

This is a move of sheer genius - and so perfectly fitting in Pete Fenelon's memory. Well done - well done...

DCN

#4277 Jan Holmskov

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 14:06

Franco Scaglione Designer is a new 96 page softcover book in A4 format published by the Libreria Automotoclub Storico Italiano, Torino. The text is in italian.

Lorenzo Ramaciotti has written a 2 page foreword and Guiliano Silli has written approx 10 pages on the life of Franco Scaglione. From his education and the start of his career as automotive designer to the sad involvement in the Frank Reisner projects (which left Scaglione without money for his retirement).

The book is illustrated with color and b/w photos of most of his designs and it also has a number of design sketches from the early fifties.

A nice tribute to a great designer who did such exiting cars as the Alfa Romeo BATs and 33 Stradale.

#4278 retriever

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 11:48

I read somewhere last year that a book commemorating 50 years of Lola was in the offing but nothing materialised. My research revealed that it was supposedly coming from the same publisher who was going to going to publish a book by the British Ferrari employee Nigel Stepney involved in the Mclaren/Ferrari scandal a couple of years ago - that never materialised either!

Has there ever been a really decent book published on the Lola marque and Eric Broadley. I possess one of the Starkey books but was put off buying any more due to the poor image reproduction / poor quality pictures used.

#4279 kayemod

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:32

Originally posted by retriever


Has there ever been a really decent book published on the Lola marque and Eric Broadley. I possess one of the Starkey books but was put off buying any more due to the poor image reproduction / poor quality pictures used.


No there hasn't, and the main reason seems to be Eric Broadley's blunt refusal to co-operate with all who have come up with the idea so far. My fairly distant memories of working with the man aren't particularly fond, and others who knew him seem to feel much the same, but judging by a recent 'Lunch with...' feature in Motor Sport, he does appear to have mellowed somewhat in recent years, so maybe there's still a faint hope of a good book on Lola, particularly the early years. There must be a competent writer somewhere, both brave enough to take this on, and who EB could rub along with, at least for long enough to complete the work...

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#4280 David McKinney

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 13:05

I'd rather see a good Lola book without Mr Broadley's input than no Lola book at all :)

#4281 tonyb

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 13:39

Originally posted by Doug Nye
This is a move of sheer genius - and so perfectly fitting in Pete Fenelon's memory. Well done - well done...
DCN

Agreed.

But there's one problem this will not solve and that's the growing size of this fantastic thread! I personally find it a nightmare to get round sometimes - and it doesn't help when people don't quote anything at all from the person they are replying to so you have to navigate back to work out what they are on about. This happened when I spotted Doug's reply above and a number of others and had to wander about trying to find the instigating post (well it was my 6nth Birthday a few days back and I know I'm getting slower...).

I obviously have an interest in the thread, being an author, and did find early on that it didn't seem to make sense talking about the JMH book in the middle of this long thread when there was so much interest last year. So, with some trepidation being a relative newbie, I announced I was starting a new thread in TNF for it and that I did. I never did see any adverse comments and it seemed to work well (for me anyway) and all the replies were in an easily assimilated single area with little confusion.

Having devised three forums from scratch in the past 10 years (Jag-lovers was the main public one) there is another solution - I should add that there is nothing whatsoever wrong with the format of Atlas F1 Board - the vBulletin software is really good and a treat to use. What I personally would do is start a new Forum where each book gets its own thread! You could call it the 'Pete Fenelon Memorial Book Forum ' or whatever suits those that make such decisions.

The big problem would be what to do with the existing thread that has some 4200+ posts - ideally break it down into new threads within the new forum but this would take an awfully long time for someone - assuming the software has the facility in the first place.

Okay well it's just an idea and I'll go take a nap now....

#4282 retriever

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 13:50

So I presume the answer is no regarding my enquiry of a decent Lola book - as regarding Mr Broadley I know very little of his temperment apart what I read about his involvement in the early days of the Ford GT project.

Please do remember there are many of us who visit and view the Nostalgia Forum who have neither worked or competed in Motor Sport and therefore have no direct knowledge or experience regarding individuals, events or circumstances so cryptic comments enhance little that what we seek.

#4283 RA Historian

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 14:14

Originally posted by retriever
I read somewhere last year that a book commemorating 50 years of Lola was in the offing but nothing materialised. My research revealed that it was supposedly coming from the same publisher who was going to going to publish a book by the British Ferrari employee Nigel Stepney involved in the Mclaren/Ferrari scandal a couple of years ago - that never materialised either!

Lorie Coffey, who put out that wonderful book on Elio DeAngelis and is a poster on TNF, was well into the process of a Lola 50 Years book, but it has apparently bogged down due to a lack of cooperation and support.....

Pity.

Tom

#4284 kayemod

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 18:37

Originally posted by retriever


Please do remember there are many of us who visit and view the Nostalgia Forum who have neither worked or competed in Motor Sport and therefore have no direct knowledge or experience regarding individuals, events or circumstances so cryptic comments enhance little that what we seek.


I hope that wasn't aimed in my direction. If you use the 'Search BB' feature, you'll find many references to Eric Broadley, including some on his lack of interest in documenting the history of the company he founded, it's not exactly 'insider information'. I've met and worked with probably fewer than 1% of the names that crop up on TNF, but I value hugely, constant personal insights on the other 99%+ from the many others on this forum who know much more than I do, that's one of the features that makes TNF such a rich source of information, and such a special place. An additional problem for me, is something that my Mother oft repeated to me as a child, "If you can't say something nice about a person, it's better to say nothing at all", probably even more so when they are still around. Apologies if that comes across as a 'cryptic comment' in the case of Eric Broadley.

#4285 Option1

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 19:41

Originally posted by Dennis Hockenbury
Thanks Stuart and ivandjj. I cannot think of a more fitting tribute to Pete. :up:

Agreed! :up: :up:

Neil

#4286 retriever

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 11:31

Further to my seeking information regarding books on Lola and Kayemod's entry on the subject, I was actually referring to a one-liner posted by another. However, I do take on board the content of his response. My mother also advised me in a similar manner!

Regarding my enquiry for a in-depth Lola book I do hope that those who have picked up their pens only to put them down again do go on to finish the task, even if it is an uphill one - with ten cars entered for the 2009 Le Mans (sorry Mr Richards) and therefore occupying nearly 20% of the available grid - the marque really deserves similar recognition of its status in print form.

#4287 bradbury west

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 13:24

For those who delighted in his book Emotions Ferrari,and for everyone else, Maurice Louche advises that a new, not revised, version of his Age of the Tour de France Automobile 1899-1986 is due to be issued at the end of the year. The first 448 page version is long since out of print and the new one will be 552 pages, incl 48 colour, and will have 988 new photographs. The book will also give entry lists and results.
Current stock on site; http://editionsmauricelouche.com/
usual disclaimers
Roger Lund

#4288 Ted Walker

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 07:55

There is a Lola book in the pipeline. I think its due out later this year. Its being funded by Lola Cars.And being written by Ed McDonough.

#4289 B Squared

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:05

In regards to a question of availability for "Mark Donohue: Technical Excellence at Speed", authored by Michael Argetsinger - this new work will be available for full distribution beginning April 25 both at Watkins Glen in conjunction with the Mark Donohue Tribute and through David Bull www.bullpublishing.com as well as through book stores. In Europe distribution is through Haynes. An announcement can be expected in early April for the full details. Again, thank you all for the interest.

Brian Brown

#4290 philippe charuest

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 15:00

Originally posted by Ted Walker
There is a Lola book in the pipeline. I think its due out later this year. Its being funded by Lola Cars.And being written by Ed McDonough.

yeeeaahh ,just hope that it wont be a 150usd/euro book with unnecessary "value add collectors "luxury stuff" who seem to be so trendy now,you know leather cover numbered edition and so on, a good well done and complete book with a good iconography at affordable price would be just perfect

#4291 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 11:25

Philip Collins, a leader writer with The Times, wrote a marvellous piece in the Weekend section a couple of weeks back, dealing with the joys and tribulations of organising one’s own library. It was called 'File under G for God', which referenced what he saw as the biggest quandary of all – where to file the Bible? Thinking of my LP and CD collections, filed in alphabetical order by artist name and then chronologically within artist, I think there’s a case for filing it under V for Various Artists, but then I don’t have a Bible so it’s not my problem.

But then my mind moved on to my motor racing books and how I file them. You may not want to know, and this is necessarily going to be a long post, so move on if you wish … but for the rest of you, grab a glass of your favourite and read on!

Top left come all the reference works and generic histories, the most well-thumbed of which are Mike Lang’s four 'Grand Prix!' volumes for Haynes (which cover 1950 – 1984) and Peter Higham’s 'The International Motor Racing Guide' (David Bull Publishing, 2003).

Then comes a section on specific races (by which I mean British GPs generally, not the 1968 one at Brands Hatch, good though it was), which stretch from Lord Montagu’s 'The Gordon Bennett Races' (Cassell, 1963) to DCN’s 'The United States Grand Prix and Grand Prize Races 1908 – 1977' (Batsford, 1978). For the sheer quality of research, writing, images and race result tables, and general look and feel of a beautiful book, my favourite is Pino Fondi’s 'Targo Florio: 20th Century Epic' (Giorgio Nada Editore, 2006).

After a few generic books on favourite circuits – check out S. S. Collins and Gavin D. Ireland’s 'Autodrome: The lost race circuits of Europe' (Veloce, 2005) – comes a section of specific circuits, from Tony Bagnall’s 'The Unfulfilled Dream: The Story of Motor Racing at Aintree' (tfm Publishing, 2004) to Simon Taylor’s 'The Shelsley Walsh Story' (Haynes, 2005).

Then come the drivers. Among the ‘greatest’ selections and books on more than one driver, my favourite has to be David Tremayne’s 'The Lost Generation: The Brilliant but Tragic Lives of Rising British F1 Stars Roger Williamson, Tony Brise and Tom Pryce' (Haynes, 2006). The autobiographies and biographies literally stretch from A to Z, starting with Eoin Young’s 'Forza Amon: A Biography of Chris Amon' (Haynes, 2003) and finishing with Alex Zanardi’s 'My Story' (Haynes, 2004). Picking a favourite is hellish, but I’ll plump for Adam Cooper’s superb 'Piers Courage: Last of the Gentlemen Racers' (Haynes, 2003).

On to constructors' biographies, ranging from 'The Autobiography of W. O. Bentley' (Hutchinson, 1958) to Virginia Williams’ 'A Different Kind of Life' (Doubleday, 1991). Top honours go to Richard Williams’ diligently researched and beautifully written 'Enzo Ferrari' (Yellow Jersey, 2001).

Next up are the racing cars and teams. Starting with dear old Beatrice Canning Brown’s 'Austin Seven Competition History: The Cars and Those Who Drove Them 1922 – 1939' (Twincam, 2006) and ending with DCN’s 'Racers: The Inside Story of Williams Grand Prix Engineering' (Barker, 1982), DCN dominates this section of my shelves and, influenced by my love of Team Lotus and the fact that Colin Chapman signed my copy, I plump for his 'Theme Lotus' (MRP, 1978) as my favourite car / team book.

Next up is a short, thus-far disappointing section on F1 business and politics, though I do look forward to reading Terry Lovell’s 'Bernie’s Game' (Metro, 2003) once I have more time.

The next section, on mechanics, is shorter than it should be and, up against the famous Alf Francis book and Jo Ramirez’s marvellous 'Memoirs of a Racing Man' (Haynes, 2005), my favourite may surprise you. It’s Elizabeth Nagle’s 'The Other Bentley Boys' (Harrap, 1964). It would be more accurate to call her the book’s editor than its author, as 90% of the text is quotes from the men who built the cars and maintained them at the circuits, but it deserves to be in any serious motor racing library, as a rare celebration of the men without whom the cars would reach neither the track nor the chequered flag.

A slightly bigger section on writers and broadcasters stretches from John Bolster’s 'Motoring is my Business' (Autosport, 1958) to Eoin Young’s 'It Still Beats Working' (Transport Bookman, 2003). Top dog here has to be 'Jenks: A Passion for Motor Sport' (MRP, 1997).

Then we’re off into a section on safety, again not large, but all four items in it, from Michael Henderson’s 'Motor Racing in Safety: The Human Factors' (PSL, 1968) via Sid Watkins’ pair of books to Stephen Olvey’s 'Rapid Response' (Haynes, 2006), have an important tale to tell. Some of us may think motor racing is too safe today, but manifestly that wasn’t always the case, and it needs to be remembered.

Then it’s off into art, cigarette cards and photography. Favourite art titles include Sallon’s 'Motor Racing Drivers Past and Present' (Shell-Mex and BP, 1956) – hard to get nowadays, as so many of the spiral-bound copies have been torn up so that individual cartoons could be framed and displayed – and Peter Garnier’s 'The Art of Gordon Crosby' (Hamlyn, 1978). Michael Cooper and Paul Parker’s beautiful tome 'Sixties Motor Racing' (Palawan Press, 2000) is my favourite photography book.

Finally come the land speed record books, with loads by or on various Campbells, and two by the ultimate right hand man, Leo Villa. If I could keep only one land speed record book, I would choose something by another TNF-er, Steve Holter’s Leap Into Legend: Donald Campbell and The Complete Story of the World Speed Records (Sigma Press, 2002), because of its insights into the Campbells pers et fils and as an excellent reference book into the history of land speed record making generally.

Then the library strays off via road cars, car manufacturers and Bonhams auction catalogues in the direction of cricket and cycling, and it’s time to stop before I bore you all.

But I leave you with this question. Why do the spines of books published by British publishers read from top to bottom, while the spines of books published by Continental publishers read from bottom to top?

Rgds

Paul

#4292 john winfield

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 12:31

Great stuff, Paul!

Tilting my head sideways, and reading the spine of your post from bottom to top, that's an interesting last point. Almost all of my french books read bottom to top, the exception being one very dull one by Valery Giscard d'Estaing who, presumably, was making a plea for Anglo/French entente. The motor sport content of this book is disappointing by the way.
Nearly all my english motor sport books are top to bottom, although I notice that a Batsford series from the early 1960s is bottom to top (It was bound in Denmark - perhaps those cheeky Danes were having a giggle). I have an English book on Hull with the spine French style, but that's Hull for you.

Apparently, it's just a matter of national convention. Most European countries, except for Britain and, sometimes, Germany went one way, most other countries the other. I think South American books are top to bottom aren't they?

Having decided to print spines one way or the other, I like the subsequent justification. The British claim that top to bottom allows the spine to be read on a shelf as you move logically across left to right. The French argue that bottom to top is better as the head tilts more easily to the left (!) AND that if the book has been placed face down on a table, at least the spine remains legible. Love it.

As regards motor sport library lay out, I just like grouping series together and then, at random, putting small books on small shelves and big ones on big shelves. I don't know where anything is and it's a delight when I find something years later that I forgot I ever owned.

John

#4293 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 12:55

Originally posted by john winfield
The British claim that top to bottom allows the spine to be read on a shelf as you move logically across left to right. The French argue that bottom to top is better as the head tilts more easily to the left (!) AND that if the book has been placed face down on a table, at least the spine remains legible. Love it.

Do you think there is any correlation between which side of the road a nation drives on, and whether the spines of their books read up or down?

And might Gordon, Barack, Nicolas and Angela be carving a little time out from G20 to reach an accord on book spines?

I think we should be told!

#4294 David McKinney

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 14:57

I'm sure the which-way-up thing is based on books being placed flat
If you put an English/American one face-up on the table, you can read the title on the spine
With French ones you have to stand on your head (or place the book face-down)

#4295 kayemod

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 15:23

Powderfinger's dedication is admirable. I'm not going to say anything even mildly rude, I wouldn't suggest for example that he should get out a bit more, and I'm not for one moment implying that his fastidious book arranging could have any effect on his love life, but a woman friend once told me that when she went to a man's place and saw that his CDs were arranged in alphabetical order, she couldn't drop him fast enough. So what do I do, I hear some of you asking? Well quite simply, I arrange my books so that they look pleasing to the eye, attractive colour and size contrasts, big books together where shelves are more widely spaced, and so on. They aren't arranged by subject or author, but I have a pretty good idea where everything resides, and in any case, classification is far from easy. Take the Mike Lawrence work Colin Chapman - Flawed Genius as an example. Should it go in the Lotus section, every good motor racing library must have one of those, under Chapman, or possibly with other biographies ?

#4296 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 15:54

It's simple, kayemod. Lawrence's book is in the section on constructors' biographies, between Jabby Crombac's 'Colin Chapman: The Man and His Cars' and Dennis Ortenburger's 'Flying on Four Wheels: Frank Costin and His Car Designs'

And my love life's fine, thank you.

#4297 kayemod

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 16:10

Originally posted by P0wderf1nger
It's simple, kayemod. Lawrence's book is in the section on constructors' biographies, between Jabby Crombac's 'Colin Chapman: The Man and His Cars' and Dennis Ortenburger's 'Flying on Four Wheels: Frank Costin and His Car Designs'

And my love life's fine, thank you.


Well, I certainly can't argue with that.

#4298 kayemod

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 18:04

I've just been to see where my own copy of Colin Capman - Flawed Genius resides. Currently, it's between Chris Nixon's book Rosemeyer, and a work on the history of Clyde Puffers, so red and silver, green and yellow, and blue and white. Very tasteful.

#4299 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 18:23

Originally posted by kayemod
I've just been to see where my own copy of Colin Capman - Flawed Genius resides. Currently, it's between Chris Nixon's book Rosemeyer, and a work on the history of Clyde Puffers, so red and silver, green and yellow, and blue and white. Very tasteful.

Is that Clyde Puffers, the notorious bank-robbing partner of Bonnie Parker, or the small steamboats which provide a vital supply link around the west coast of Scotland?

Either way, I'm sorry, even if your book shelves are pretty to behold, and even if you were getting more rumpy-pumpy than me - and I agree, let's not argue about that! - that's just anarchy. How do you find anything? :drunk:

Rgds

Paul

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#4300 kayemod

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 18:31

Originally posted by P0wderf1nger

Is that Clyde Puffers, the notorious bank-robbing partner of Bonnie Parker, or the small steamboats which provide a vital supply link around the west coast of Scotland?



Paul


The latter. My bookshelves even have a Clyde Puffer section, or at least they would have if their covers were more colour co-ordinated. I know where everything is, I can lay my hands on any book at all, given time.