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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#4501 MichaelM

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 16:54

For Formula Junior lovers;

Bernard Cowdrey is self publishing a new book on Juniors;

Formula Junior 1958-2008
A Pictorial History to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Formula Junior Racing
100+ pages
cost 15 pounds + shipping for outside England only

you can contact Ben directly at ben.cowdrey@btinternet.com


Michael

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#4502 sterling49

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 09:37

I read "Crashed and Byrned" in peace with a nice bottle of Bordeaux in a lovely gite. A great read from page one untill the end, very amusingly told as well. He could have achieved so much more. I have to admit, I knew of Tommy at the time, but knew very little about him.


I reckon Twinny should start a thread on some of the action packed events that occurred!!!! :wave:

#4503 kayemod

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 10:04

I reckon Twinny should start a thread on some of the action packed events that occurred!!!! :wave:


Couldn't agree more about Tommy's book, but I think pretty much everything that's fit to print is already in there, are you trying to get TNF taken down?


#4504 ranocchio61

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 19:31

visita il nostro sito
http://www.amicidellatargaflorio.com/

#4505 Twin Window

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 22:11

Couldn't agree more about Tommy's book, but I think pretty much everything that's fit to print is already in there...

Erm, I think not! Roughly half the material submitted didn't make the book, so there's plenty more to come - somehow, some way...  ;)

So who'd like to see an 'extended edition'?

#4506 sterling49

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 22:20

Erm, I think not! Roughly half the material submitted didn't make the book, so there's plenty more to come - somehow, some way... ;)

So who'd like to see an 'extended edition'?



Too right mate!!!! None of this clinical modern day stuff, like it was back then, warts and all mate! :up:

You should start a thread Stuart, and both you and Tommy could contribute :)

#4507 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 02:56

Just about everybody here knows more about books, motor racing history, and motor racing history books than I do, so I'd like to pose a question...

I've been reading Go Like Hell by A.J. Baime. While it couldn't be considered a scholarly work, it has been an enjoyable read....until I got to page 175 where an annotation states that Marco Andretti is Mario's third son. My question is, when you see a glaring error such as this one, do you call into question all the other facts in the book? Perhaps I over-react, but it seems like fact checking must be pretty poor for something this elementary (and easily checked) to slip through, and I read the rest of the book with less confidence in the accuracy of what I'm reading.

Jack


I leafed through that book today in Barnes and Noble. I was intrigued because my dad was involved in the development and building and racing of the Lola GT and subsequently the original (1964) Ford GTs in Slough. The book completely omits the race debut of the car at the Nurburgring, and gives an inaccurate account of the solving of the blocked carb jet on one of the cars during the Le Mans race (the book recounts that it was fixed by the Weber rep, who claimed not to have been given a pit pass). My late father recounted that the Weber rep was actually fired on the spot by Wyer when they spotted him sitting in the stands watching the race. The mechanics were far from unfamiliar with Weber carbs (as claimed in the book), and they quickly found and cleared a dead fly from the blocked jet. Okay, these are quite arcane details, but it just really put me off the book.

The book also glosses over the personality conflicts between Broadley and Lunn, as if all the problems were on one side. By all accounts Eric could be difficult, but it wasn't all one sided from what I heard...

Enjoy the book as a read, but don't treat all the "facts" as gospel.


Thanks, Nigel

Edited by Nigel Beresford, 28 July 2009 - 02:59.


#4508 fbarrett

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 03:53

I leafed through that book today in Barnes and Noble. I was intrigued because my dad was involved in the development and building and racing of the Lola GT and subsequently the original (1964) Ford GTs in Slough. The book completely omits the race debut of the car at the Nurburgring, and gives an inaccurate account of the solving of the blocked carb jet on one of the cars during the Le Mans race (the book recounts that it was fixed by the Weber rep, who claimed not to have been given a pit pass). My late father recounted that the Weber rep was actually fired on the spot by Wyer when they spotted him sitting in the stands watching the race. The mechanics were far from unfamiliar with Weber carbs (as claimed in the book), and they quickly found and cleared a dead fly from the blocked jet. Okay, these are quite arcane details, but it just really put me off the book.

The book also glosses over the personality conflicts between Broadley and Lunn, as if all the problems were on one side. By all accounts Eric could be difficult, but it wasn't all one sided from what I heard...

Enjoy the book as a read, but don't treat all the "facts" as gospel.


Thanks, Nigel


Nigel:

Your personal knowledge and insight there is invaluable. (Hint: could you write a book about the era?) There's also a real need for a Penske biography.

Thanks to my friend Tom Warth, who founded Classic Motorbooks in the early 1960s, I recently had the opportunity to explore the warehouse at Iconografix, the book distributor in Hudson, Wisconsin, just across the river from Minneapolis. One of the books I came out with was The Ford that Beat Ferrari by John Allen and Gordon Jones, so I'll have to see if it covers this episode. I decided to pass on John Starkey's new Lola history, but it may also have interesting information, though it more likely covers just the cars, not the people.

I blew my budget in that warehouse: Vintage American Road Racing Cars, 1950-1970, by Pace and Brinker; Porsche Perspective (on the new museum, but in German, English edition coming); Four Wheels on My Basket, Charles Meisl's autobiography (pretty obscure, but as a book guy and a Porsche guy, I had to have it); The Hemi in the Barn by Tom Cotter (whose Holman-Moody book was great); Daimler-Benz in the Third Reich by Gregor; Against Death and Time by Brock Yates; If Hemingway Had Written a Racing Novel, edited by Richard Nisley; and The Crooked Mile, a look at the future of automotive transport by my friend Kevin Clemens. If any of you ever visit Minneapolis, make the short drive to Hudson and explore the place. Tom and Rick Seymour have a ton of foreign language and low-circulation books on the shelves, far more than any other U.S. importer, and I guarantee you'll find books you never knew existed. All of Tom's thousands of used books are also there, so it's a double-whammy! It's a very good thing that I don't live closer.

Frank


#4509 ERault

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 18:32

Can someone comment on the official Maserati books by Karl Ludvigsen sold at Maserati dealers ? I would be especially interested in the 150S and 200S ones. Is there anything more in them than in Orsini & Zagari and Ludvigsen's own Red Hot Rivals ?

#4510 fbarrett

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 19:05

Friends:

This is a long shot, but does anyone have a copy of the October 1950 issue of Hot Rod magazine for sale or trade? If so, please contact me off-line. Thanks.

Frank
fbarrett@aol.com

#4511 helioseism

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 01:08

New book:

Indy Cars On Short Tracks
Buzz Rose
14 Exciting Indy Car races on 5/8 mile or smaller tracks. Read the history of Southern California's ASCOT Speedways from 1910 to 1990.

* The history of Williams Grove P.A. Speedway
* The brief history of the Dayton Ohio Speedway
* Hundreds of photos and articles in a 9 x 12 high quality hard cover book
* Now available for advance purchase. Purchase one of 200 numbered limited edition copies.

$64.95 + $11 S&H
$54.95 + $11 S&H on advanced purchases by Dec. 10. Book will ship late fall or early winter.

Buzz's books are very high quality productions.

Link

#4512 Macca

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 19:39

Very dissapointing if you look for a story of the Scuderia Centro-Sud.
But if you like anecdotic short stories, you will find some in this book: Bonnier at the 1957 italian GP, the missing drivers at a Buenos Aires
GP, the Couper (?) for Enzo Ferrari, The Baghetti-Bandini fight for the italian championship and many other more or less known or
interesting.


Does it mention or give the address of Dei's house in Monza, used when he was there with his racing school?

Paul M


#4513 helioseism

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 00:55

Two new books from AutoNet Carbooks:
------------------------------------
Circuito del Mugello Volume 2
Andrea Marsili Libelli
2009
220 pages
Hardbound with jacket
Photobook, Italian
€ 69.95
Link
------------------------------------
Stille Eifel | Schneller Ring - Der Nürburgring und seine Geschichte
Michael Behrndt & Jörg-Thomas Födisch
2009
160 pages, 240 Black & White photos
Hardbound
German
€ 22.50
Link


#4514 helioseism

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 02:04

New forthcoming books on Amazon:
------------------------------------------------
Northeast American Sports Car Races 1950-1959
by Terry O'Neil
Hardcover: 432 pages
Publisher: Veloce Publishing PLC (15 May 2010)
ISBN-10: 1845842545
ISBN-13: 978-1845842543
£100.00
Link
---------------------------------------------
The Daily Mirror World Cup Rally 40: The World's Toughest Rally in Retrospect
Graham Robson
Hardcover: 208 pages
Publisher: Veloce Publishing PLC (15 Mar 2010)
ISBN-10: 1845842715
ISBN-13: 978-1845842710
£35.00
Link

#4515 rudi

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 15:57

Does it mention or give the address of Dei's house in Monza, used when he was there with his racing school?

Paul M


Nothing about the Monza location in this book but I read elswere it was via Rovani.


#4516 fbarrett

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 21:33

Friends:

Just found a copy of Les 24 Heures du Mans by Roger Labric, with Geo Ham illustrations, at a local antiquarian book fair for a very reasonable price. The book is number 851 of 1,000 copies. Thankfully, all of the illustrations are present, and the book is in good condition for its age (1949), but one signature has pages that were never cut apart at the top. Is this normal?

Frank

#4517 Vitesse2

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 23:34

Friends:

Just found a copy of Les 24 Heures du Mans by Roger Labric, with Geo Ham illustrations, at a local antiquarian book fair for a very reasonable price. The book is number 851 of 1,000 copies. Thankfully, all of the illustrations are present, and the book is in good condition for its age (1949), but one signature has pages that were never cut apart at the top. Is this normal?

Frank

Well, there's a copy on ABE at the moment which has "many pages uncut at the head", so not unique :) Given the date and the limited number of copies, I doubt they were machine cut - perhaps the guy who bound them tried to make every one different?

ps - how reasonable was "reasonable"? Copies of this are rarer than rocking horse droppings!

Edited by Vitesse2, 02 August 2009 - 23:36.


#4518 kayemod

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 09:04

ps - how reasonable was "reasonable"? Copies of this are rarer than rocking horse droppings!


Ah, the arcane language of the secondhand book dealer! I think their descriptions are fairly specific among the book dealing brotherhood themselves, but sometimes a bit of a mystery to their customers, especially those who aren't regular 'pre-owned' book buyers. My own experience has been that books described as 'very good', 'mint' or 'fine' have often been slightly better than I expected, whereas those listed as merely 'good' or 'reasonable' have sometimes been a bit of a disappointment. You have to make allowances of course if the book is really rare, or something you've been looking for for ages, but the ones I'd never touch are those described as 'a good reading copy', and in most cases 'an ex-library copy'. On the specific question on uncut pages, I'd say this is quite common with older limited run works, as Vitesse says everything was done by hand back then, not by machines, and it's not necessarily a turn-off, but I buy books to read not collect, and I cut neatly through any uncut pages, probably devaluing them slightly in the process.


#4519 Vitesse2

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:39

Ah, the arcane language of the secondhand book dealer! I think their descriptions are fairly specific among the book dealing brotherhood themselves, but sometimes a bit of a mystery to their customers, especially those who aren't regular 'pre-owned' book buyers. My own experience has been that books described as 'very good', 'mint' or 'fine' have often been slightly better than I expected, whereas those listed as merely 'good' or 'reasonable' have sometimes been a bit of a disappointment. You have to make allowances of course if the book is really rare, or something you've been looking for for ages, but the ones I'd never touch are those described as 'a good reading copy', and in most cases 'an ex-library copy'. On the specific question on uncut pages, I'd say this is quite common with older limited run works, as Vitesse says everything was done by hand back then, not by machines, and it's not necessarily a turn-off, but I buy books to read not collect, and I cut neatly through any uncut pages, probably devaluing them slightly in the process.

I was really referring to the price - the cheapest copy on ABE at present, in apparently worse condition, is offered at just under £365! The most expensive? £585!!! :eek:

I wouldn't automatically dismiss "good reading copies" or "ex-library". More academic or arcane books tend to have had a reasonably easy life in libraries: I just purchased some 30s history books from a dealer in Lincoln and they're in a condition I'd describe as at least "good". They actually took the trouble to email me about one which, when they collated my order, was found to have some old mould stains on the front board which weren't in the description. It was described as "ex-library", so I wasn't expecting perfection - especially for £1.25 for a 1200-page book. When it arrived, it was in far better nick than I'd anticipated: binding tight, no foxing of the paper. In fact, disregarding the library stamps and ticket pocket, I would have described it as "good to very good" - even more so considering it's 70 years old!

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#4520 fbarrett

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 15:00

Friends:

Thanks for the information.

Frank

#4521 MichaelM

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 16:14

With regards to the ragged edge on some books;
I have some books that have neatly cut top (even with gilt) and bottom edges
yet they have the ragged edge so it didn't have anything to do with hand vrs machine work.
I've been told that a new book would come this way and as you read it, you'd
slice through the pages. Think of it as a bookmark. Obviously a bit time intensive, meant
for the more wealthy and seen mainly on upper end books of the time.

Also, on the Les 24 Heures du Mans by Roger Labric, the original cover was a rather
flimsy paper/ cardboard and I've been told that it was meant to be rebound by the
eventual purchaser (perhaps to match the rest of their leather bound collections?).


Michael

#4522 ensign14

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 17:47

The tendency in French books until the middle of the 20th century was to have cheap white softback covers as the owner would be expected to get them properly bound.

#4523 Vitesse2

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 20:55

The tendency in French books until the middle of the 20th century was to have cheap white softback covers as the owner would be expected to get them properly bound.

Indeed - I'd forgotten that! Which would explain the uncut top edges, as a craft bookbinder would have to trim them, perhaps before gilding or colouring, when attaching the endpapers and boards.

The technical name for the "uncut" look on the fore-edge is deckle-edging. Many US publishers used to produce books in that style, especially before about 1980, but the rise of co-editions, whereby publishers saved money by printing for several different markets at the same time killed it off. Only America used deckle-edging and British and other customers viewed it with suspicion, thinking that the publisher hadn't finished the books off properly. In Britain it generally died out before WW2 - I have a few deckle-edged British books, but they're all from the 20s and 30s.

And of course, the original primary function of paper-knives wasn't to open letters .... ;)

Edited by Vitesse2, 03 August 2009 - 20:55.


#4524 Option1

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 00:30

Not sure all that's entirely true Richard. I have bought a number of deckle-edged books here in Nth America - they're all written post 1980 (more like 2000 on) and tend to be from the cheaper end of the market.

Neil

#4525 Tuboscocca

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 09:08

Hello,

sorry for entering something totally different.

I'm looking for a title (now for years):

Benito Quadraroli’s ‘Circuito di Senigallia-Annali’ , it deals with the races held in Senigallia (year by year)

Privately published by a Italian Petrol company in 1988 ,printrun approx 1000. nearly 300 pages

Does any one know this book. The usual search (web) and specialists in Italy didn't succeed!!

Any help is highly appreciated

Michael



#4526 marlondylan

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 21:54

Hello,

sorry for entering something totally different.

I'm looking for a title (now for years):

Benito Quadraroli’s ‘Circuito di Senigallia-Annali’ , it deals with the races held in Senigallia (year by year)

Privately published by a Italian Petrol company in 1988 ,printrun approx 1000. nearly 300 pages

Does any one know this book. The usual search (web) and specialists in Italy didn't succeed!!

Any help is highly appreciated

Michael


Try Libreria Autodromo at Monza (monza@libreria-autodromo.it). I bought a copy last year at the Rétromobile at the stand of La Libreria dell'Automobile which came from this address.


#4527 Tuboscocca

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Posted 07 August 2009 - 06:08

Thanks Lesley , I tried them already for years, but they always told me that they don't have the title.
Tried again!!
Michael

#4528 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 08 August 2009 - 10:39

Especially since TNF-ers helped me out on numerous occasions over the last three years, I’d like to bring to your attention my biography of Amherst Villiers, ‘The Man Who Supercharged Bond’, which is about to hit the stands.

The first couple of chapters focus on family – his father’s surreal political career, his mother’s insistence on marrying for love rather than money, his correspondence with second cousin Winston Churchill – and school, particularly the valuable lessons learned in the workshops at Oundle, where he first met Raymond Mays.

Chapter 3 is where the cars start. After introducing Cambridge and the general Brooklands / hill-climb / sprint / beach racing domestic motor sport scene, I focus on the developments Amherst made to May’s first car, the Speed Model Hillman named Quicksilver.

Chapter 4 is devoted to the pair’s brace of Brescia Bugattis, Cordon Rouge and Cordon Bleu, and is followed by a chapter on Amherst’s first, unsuccessful forays into supercharging with Mays’s AC and Humphrey Cook’s TT Vauxhall, which comes back into the story a little later.

Next comes Bluebird, with big thanks to Steve Holter for filtering through all the claims, counter claims and silence to decipher why Amherst walked off the project just before Campbell raised the world land speed record to 174.88mph at Pendine.

Chapter 7 focuses on the R-R Phantom I Amherst supercharged for Jack Kruse, with the blower and the little engine which drove it fitted neatly within a cabinet on the running board – and no, the engine wasn’t from an Austin Seven, Amherst really did design and build one from scratch.

Chapter 8 is where Amherst’s partnership with Mays is renewed and Cook’s Vauxhall reappears, first as the Vauxhall Villiers and then the Villiers Supercharge, and is still competitive at Shelsley Walsh more than a decade after making its debut in the 1922 Tourist Trophy.

No surprises that the biggest chapter is devoted to the Blower Bentley, though Amherst only spent a matter of months on the project. His involvement, and the enigma of why such an unsuccessful racing car went on to enjoy such a high profile, did take some explaining!

Chapter 10 covers his efforts as a businessman, straddling supercharging for road cars and civil aviation, including his aero-engine and his bid to break the world land-plane (as opposed to sea-plane) record, and then comes Amherst’s war – his time with the ATA, the U-boat attack on the Queen Elizabeth as he sailed for America, and the six-engine, double-decker, trans-Atlantic passenger plane he designed in Canada.

Next up comes rocketry, spanning a ship-to-ship missile based on the V-2, Presidency of the American Rocket Society, the gyroscope which helped win his company the contract for Polaris, a brief spell at Livermore, and a role with Boeing’s Lunar Systems Group.

Chapter 13 covers his art – studying under Annigoni in Florence, the paintings of Graham Hill and 007 writer Ian Fleming which were displayed at London’s National Portrait Gallery, meeting Pope John Paul II…

Chapter 14, on BRM, leaned heavily, obviously, on DCN’s work, but he was even good enough to ‘Dugg’ my initial draft, so thank you Mr Nye.

Next up comes the reason for the book’s title – Amherst’s great friendship with Ian Fleming. Through the first three Bond novels, 007 drives a Blower and in ‘Moonraker’, uses it in arguably English literature’s greatest car chase, pursuing Hugo Drax in a Mercedes 300S (plus a cameo appearance from a straight-eight Alfa). I also explain Amherst’s involvement in Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang, and why, in the movie ‘Casino Royale’, the PA to Judi Dench’s ‘M’ was called Villiers.

The final chapters cover California (working at Douglas on how best to go Mars, and in his garage on restoring a Blower), the wilderness years after his second wife died, the extraordinary 2-stroke turbo he was working on for Embassy-Hill when Graham was killed (thanks again to Mr Holter), and a wretched dispute with Rolls-Royce which only someone with Amherst’s unique blend of engineering talent, creativity, hubris and lack of acumen could have taken all the way to the High Court – aged 90!

Apologies for banging on at such length, but Amherst did have a bewildering array of skills and a most eventful 91 years, and I have found it an absolute privilege to record his life for posterity. Even more information is at www.themanwhosuperchargedbond.com

The book is published by Haynes (lovely people who were very gentle with a first-time author) and Lord Montagu kindly provided the foreword. I believe Chater’s, Motor Books and Horton’s will all be stocking it.

Do let me know what you make of it!

Rgds

Paul

Edited by P0wderf1nger, 18 August 2009 - 22:28.


#4529 Tuboscocca

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Posted 08 August 2009 - 16:20

Hello,
just found this: Chaparral The Texas roadrunner,
Japanese book ,english text, great photographs...
At http://www.e-sales.n...o...3&cat=14419
Autonetcarbooks of Netherlands..

They have very few!! 89 Euros.
At abe I saw at least 200+ to 350 Euros..
NO commercial interest, only the joy of finding such books

Michael

#4530 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 08 August 2009 - 17:55

Paul,

Thanks for letting us know. I look forward to the book. Will it be distributed in the US?

Jack.

#4531 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 08 August 2009 - 20:25

Paul,

Thanks for letting us know. I look forward to the book. Will it be distributed in the US?

Jack.


Thanks Jack.
It will indeed be distributed in the US, by Motor Books International. They have it on their web site at http://www.motorbook...tails_42256.ncm, though they're saying it has a December rather than September publication date. I'll ask Haynes about this on Monday and report back.
Rgds
Paul

#4532 helioseism

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Posted 08 August 2009 - 21:18

New book on Amazon US:

Bluebird CN7: The Inside Story of Donald Campbell's Last Land Speed Record Car (Hardcover)
by Donald Stevens (Author)
# Hardcover: 128 pages
# Publisher: Veloce Publishing PLC (March 15, 2010)
# ISBN-10: 1845842804
# ISBN-13: 978-1845842802

Link

#4533 PRD

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 18:52

New book from Coterie press:
1965- Jim Clark & Team Lotus - The UK Races
by William Taylor

The latest release from Coterie Publishing is an in-depth photo essay of the cars and drivers competing in a complete season of British motorsport. Detailing every major class and formula, saloons and single-seaters, it sees the legendary drivers such as Stewart, Hill, Gurney, Brabham, Surtees and McLaren competing hard against the formitable talent of Team Lotus and works supported drivers Jimmy Clark, Mike Spence, Jack Sears, Sir John Whitmore, Pedro Rodriguez, Brian Hart, Peter Revson and Ray Parsons.

Copiously illustrated with nearly 200 hitherto unseen photographs from the Peter Darley Archive, the book not only captures the unique atmosphere of the time but also lists the race results for every class in which Jim Clark competed and records the thrills and spills as they unfolded for Colin Chapman's record breaking Team Lotus in 1965.

With new contributions from Jack Sears, Sally Swart (Stokes), Bob Dance and David Hobbs, '1965: Jim Clark & Team Lotus - The UK Races' is not just an invaluable record of Jimmy's early life and times but also a uniquely colorful depiction of an important period in British motor racing history. One which like many other Coterie publications is sure to become a coveted collectors item.

Available late August.
208 pages / 197 B&W photos.

$49.95 plus shipping
Link



Coterie are taking orders via their website for UK delivery next month

http://www.coteriepr.../CP_Home_01.php

#4534 helioseism

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 20:55

New book:

Full Throttle – Images of Australian Speedway 1970-2009
Price: $Aus 74.95
ISBN: 9780980524826
Author: Tony Loxley
No. pages: 275
Dimension: 290x215mm
Hard Bound, Colour ill
Available mid September

Link

#4535 helioseism

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 23:17

Two new Porsche books:

-----------------------------------------------
Porsche 917 x 17: The Cars and Drivers in Studio
$149.95
by Jeffrey R. Zwart
AVAILABLE LATE AUGUST 2009.

Forty years after its 1969 debut, racing fans still regard the Porsche 917 with awe as one the greatest sports cars ever built. In Porsche 917 X 17: The Cars and Drivers in Studio, renowned automotive photographer and director Jeff Zwart follows up his award-winning book, Porsche Rennsport, with exquisitely rendered images of 17 of the most beautiful and historic 917s. Highlights include the first Porsche to win Le Mans overall, the 917K shared by Richard Attwood and Hans Hermann; the Gulf-Wyer 917K shared by Pedro Rodríguez and Jackie Oliver in 1971; and the notorious “Pink Pig”—a 917/20 that was raced just once by Willi Kauhsen in 1971.

Using dramatic angles and controlled lighting, Zwart provides a fresh perspective on these iconic cars. He reveals each 917’s distinctive characteristics and patina, and shows artful technical details from inside the cockpit, chassis, and engine compartments. These photographs are accompanied by engaging portraits and vivid recollections from 15 Porsche drivers—including Derek Bell, Vic Elford, Brian Redman, and Hurley Haywood—who look back on the anticipation, fear, and excitement they felt driving the 917.

With its heavy matte art paper, spot varnish, metallic silver ink, and cloth-covered slipcase, the book’s high-quality production is as lavish as Zwart’s photography. Of all the recently published 917 books this one stands alone in offering Porschephiles an all-new take on the cars and drivers.

While the memory of many successful racing cars fades with time, that of the 917 has endured, passing not just into Porsche history but motorsport folklore itself. Amazing when you consider it raced for just five short seasons 40 years ago. The word “legend” is overused generally and in racing circles particularly, but if any car can be said to be worthy of it, the 917 surely is.

—Derek Bell


Link

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The Porsche Book
The Complete History of Types and Models
BY JURGEN BARTH & GUSTAV BUSING

$299.95 PLUS SHIPPING
Hardcover / 3 Volumes / Slipcase / 2,012 b&w and color photos

DUE LATE AUGUST 2009

Written by Porsche insider and Le Mans-winner Jürgen Barth with co-author Gustav Büsing, The Porsche Book: The Complete History of Types and Models, is a massive, three-volume set, and is the ultimate technical history of all Porsche cars and designs, from the most famous sports cars to the most obscure prototypes. Originally published in 1977, this is the first English-language edition of The Porsche Book in 25 years. Complete descriptions of each model's specifications, from 1948 through the present day are complemented by details of upgrades and major options.

In addition to background histories on individual cars technical developments there is also fascinating history on the company itself, including Ferdinand Porsche's early design work in the period leading up to his formation of the company; leadership under his son, Ferry; and biographies of all seven men who have led Porsche A.G.

The first volume of The Porsche Book covers Porsche's 356 and 911, with all their production racing variants. Volume 2 addresses Porsche's mid- and front-engine cars (such as the 914, 924, and 944, as well as the contemporary Boxster, Cayenne, and Cayman) and also offers a complete list of more than 1,300 Porsche type numbers and related design projects ranging from engines and transmissions to tanks and outboard motors. Finally, Volume 3 comprises all of the company s pure-bred race cars, from the first Glöckler Porsches of the early 1950s through the RS Spyder. Each volume is handsomely designed, packed with rare photographs, and includes all recent models with new facts and illustrations.

The Porsche Book total more than 1,500 pages and are presented in a slipcase that graphically depicts the cockpit of a 356. Many of the more than 2,000 photographs are historic period images appearing in print for the first time. There are also scores of other illustrations (including design sketches and technical drawings), as well as comprehensive tables featuring chassis numbers, engine numbers, specifications, and performance figures.

This definitive account of Porsche's cars and design projects tells the whole story behind the cars from this legendary marque, and is an essential resource for all Porsche enthusiasts, especially those who are restoring, racing, or collecting vintage Porsches.

Link

#4536 green-blood

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 08:39

The Porsche Book
The Complete History of Types and Models
BY JURGEN BARTH & GUSTAV BUSING

$299.95 PLUS SHIPPING
Hardcover / 3 Volumes / Slipcase / 2,012 b&w and color photos

DUE LATE AUGUST 2009

Written by Porsche insider and Le Mans-winner Jürgen Barth with co-author Gustav Büsing, The Porsche Book: The Complete History of Types and Models, is a massive, three-volume set, and is the ultimate technical history of all Porsche cars and designs, from the most famous sports cars to the most obscure prototypes. Originally published in ...

...behind the cars from this legendary marque, and is an essential resource for all Porsche enthusiasts, especially those who are restoring, racing, or collecting vintage Porsches.

Link



whats the point of that, hasn't Karl L already created that definitive 3 volume slip cased opus.. in these recessionary times (trust me if its bad where you are welcome to Ireland) I've cut back on my book spending hugely, really only buying on occassion... I cant see why I'd double up here.

#4537 fbarrett

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 15:31

whats the point of that, hasn't Karl L already created that definitive 3 volume slip cased opus.. in these recessionary times (trust me if its bad where you are welcome to Ireland) I've cut back on my book spending hugely, really only buying on occassion... I cant see why I'd double up here.


Green-blood:

This new book (a major expansion of the 1980s book) is different from Karl's in that it's not so much a chronological historical narrative as it is a list of Porsche types, concentrating on individual models. It's more of a reference book in its approach, so it complements Excellence Was Expected well.

Frank

Edited by fbarrett, 18 August 2009 - 15:32.


#4538 David M. Woodhouse

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 18:37

Browsing the vendor area at Monterey, I saw some very nice items at what seem to be reasonable prices. Best deal was probably a pristine copy of Pete Brock's Daytona Cobra Coupes book that a friend picked up for less than half the Ebay prices, also an (ex-lib but all there with nice dj) Golden Age of the American Racing Car - $15. A perfect Weguelin ERA in slipcase for $350 would have tempted me if I did not already have it (and Romulus was there but didn't run). In contrast, the vendor at Pebble Beach's Retroauto had all the right volumes, but at what I consider inflated prices. Keep looking - bargains are out there.

Woody

#4539 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 22:21

Thanks Jack.
It will indeed be distributed in the US, by Motor Books International. They have it on their web site at http://www.motorbook...tails_42256.ncm, though they're saying it has a December rather than September publication date. I'll ask Haynes about this on Monday and report back.
Rgds
Paul

Jack
Haynes tell me that the US publication date for my Amherst Villiers biography is November. Apparently, US publication of books printed in the UK is scheduled a couple of months after UK launch to allow for shipment to N America and despatch to book sellers.
I've also sent you a PM.
Rgds
Paul

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#4540 green-blood

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 07:53

This new book (a major expansion of the 1980s book) is different from Karl's in that it's not so much a chronological historical narrative as it is a list of Porsche types, concentrating on individual models. It's more of a reference book in its approach, so it complements Excellence Was Expected well.

Frank ere.



cheers, it doesnt sound like that from the publishers ntoes, thanks for the info

Edited by green-blood, 19 August 2009 - 07:54.


#4541 ensign14

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 19:57

Bit of an article about Haynes manuals on the BBC website.

#4542 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 20:44

Bit of an article about Haynes manuals on the BBC website.

Wonderful article! The programme will be broadcast on BBC Radio 4 tomorrow, Friday 21 August at 1100 BST, and will be available as a podcast for the following seven days from http://www.bbc.co.uk...rammes/b00m4470.
Rgds
Paul


#4543 tonyb

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 06:30

Here is some info from Paul Skilleter of P J Publishing on two books that are underway from him:

"It's been rather a long time coming, but the book on Lister cars is now well under way and disasters aside, will be published by November this year (2009). Essentially a picture book, it will tell the story of Brian Lister and the cars he built, primarily through the photo archives of Ted Walker (Ferret Fotographics). Ted has been acquiring motor racing negatives for the past 30+ years (almost but not quite as long as I've known him!), many of which have never been printed before, and we have agreed to collaborate on series of high quality books to show-case them.

"The Lister book is the first, and Ted's photographs will be augmented with pictures from my own collection and from Brian Lister himself, who is helping with the project. The book will be the same format as Golden Boy (which has now been reprinted and will be available at the Revival), but those suffering from muscular disorders will be relieved to learn that it will have rather less pages, probably 260 rather than the 460+ of Golden Boy.

"Secondly, looking ahead to September 2010, I have just signed a contract with David Abecassis to publish the biography of his father George which he is writing. This is going to be absolutely fascinating, as David is well-placed to tell the story of this race-car constructor and amateur driver who launched a number of notable drivers on their careers - Stirling Moss, Peter Collins and Lance Macklin amongst them. George had a successful racing career pre-war, gained a DFC while serving in Bomber Command during the war, continued motor racing after hostilities ended, and collaborated with his business partner John Heath on the HWM F2 cars, then built the HWM-Jaguars.

"All this is being recorded by David in some detail with the help of family archives and those who knew George, and we are allocating a large budget so that we can produce the very best images of George and his cars taken by the very best photographers of the day, Louis Klemantaski, Guy Griffiths and Geoff Goddard amongst them. And, the book is going to be very affordable - publication will be September 2010."

Anyone wanting more details of either of the above via e-mail when available, please contact Paul on jagworld1 (at) aol.com.

#4544 terry mcgrath

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 16:43

A book on EBAY that may be of interest to readers item number 380150288369

"THE JAGUAR XK IN AUSTRALIA" by John Elmgreen and Terry McGrath, foreword by Frank Gardner, LIMITED & NUMBERED First (and only!) Edition 1985, hard cover with gold print to spine and front as well as dust wrapper, 373 pages, very well illustrated in b&w, 10" x 13 1/2" and weighs almost 2 3/4 kg or 6 lb!

Chapters are:-
THE XK ENTHUSIAST IN AUSTRALIA
THE IMPORT AND SALE OF THE JAGUAR XK IN AUSTRALIA
THE AUSTRALIAN XK HISTORIES
C TYPES, D TYPES AND OTHER SPORTS RACERS
AUSTRALIAN XK'S IN COMPETITION
XK'S IN NEW ZEALAND AND ASIA
PRODUCTION STATISTICS
CONTEMPORARY ARTICLES
INDEXES AND MISCELLANEOUS

One of the rarer Jaguar titles which covers each and every XK 120, XK140, XK150, C, D type car as well as cars based on XK components known to have ever been in Australia..


#4545 RA Historian

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 17:45

"It's been rather a long time coming, but the book on Lister cars is now well under way and disasters aside, will be published by November this year (2009). Essentially a picture book, it will tell the story of Brian Lister and the cars he built, primarily through the photo archives of Ted Walker (Ferret Fotographics). Ted has been acquiring motor racing negatives for the past 30+ years (almost but not quite as long as I've known him!), many of which have never been printed before, and we have agreed to collaborate on series of high quality books to show-case them.

"The Lister book is the first, and Ted's photographs will be augmented with pictures from my own collection and from Brian Lister himself, who is helping with the project.

Do I take it that the focus will be on UK racing and that there will be little or nothing on US Lister racing?
Tom

#4546 tonyb

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 19:26

Do I take it that the focus will be on UK racing and that there will be little or nothing on US Lister racing?
Tom

That was the intention, due to keeping the book a sensible size and because
Ted Walker's archives are mainly UK/European based. But Paul has recently
been in touch with Mike Silverman (thanks to Mike Stephenson), so he is
thinking of expanding the book to include US material. Whatever, it will stress
the great importance to Jaguar and the British car industry generally of
the success of the Cunningham effort with the Listers.


#4547 sterling49

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 14:59

I have just bagged a bargain, a copy of Mario Andretti, World Champion for the sum of £3.00 in a local antique bookshop, should be a good read, I watched Mario and Ronnie in the summer of '78 :up:

#4548 green-blood

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 09:22

Well its my Birhtday today - I'm stilla tiddler in here though !!

Kids wandered in at some god awful hour with gifts... a nice autumn sweater was an inauspicious start, but The Goodwood Revival 10 year book was a nice suprise, not sure its 50% race by race coverage is ever going to be read, does anyone really care who wins an historic race!!! Anyhow the first half looks like great reading. Also delivered by the baby of the terrible threesome was Karl L's Red Hot RIvals, now this is getting a boost to the top of my pile.. although my eldest just thinks all red sports/f1 cars are "Fewarris", so maybe it'll do for bedtime reading with her!!!!

Edited by green-blood, 25 August 2009 - 15:07.


#4549 red stick

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 21:17

Burt Levy's latest Last Open Road novel delayed to next March. Maybe.

http://www.lastopenr...newsletter.html

#4550 fbarrett

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 19:07

Burt Levy's latest Last Open Road novel delayed to next March. Maybe.

http://www.lastopenr...newsletter.html


Maybe they've decided to edit this one...

Frank