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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#4701 Tuboscocca

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 21:32

Surprised to see that, I've just looked on Abe myself, and there's only that Italian place advertising again. no-one else. I thought that Abe was international, I've bought several books from US sellers, so do you get a different version from the one we see? I can only guess where you might be as in common with many other TNFs, your profile is completely blank...



Bluemel Pourret GTO Italian version (identical to the English- content wise) at
http://www.libreriad...asp?IDBook=1923
Very few left ,still 46 Euros ,and they deliver worldwide!!!
Michael

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#4702 fbarrett

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 23:17

Friends:

New limited-edition Porsche book:

Posted Image

Describes Porsche's first race cars, the final 11 Gmuend Coupes, three of which were entered for Le Mans in 1951; one won its class. Others ran in the Liege-Rome-Liege Rally, and three came to the US. Phil Carney writes for the 356 Registry, and Jacques Mertens owns a Gmuend Coupe. The book is hardbound, 98 pages, 9-1/2x8 inches, with great original photos of the cars being built and in action plus individual chassis histories of each car.

Limited to 400 copies, $74.95 plus shipping. US and Australian sales via www.toadhallbook.com, or 303/237-0911; European and Japanese readers, please contact Jacques directly at jacques-mertens@skynet.be.

Frank

#4703 Pete Stowe

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 16:17

The latest newsletter for the NZ Festival of Motor Racing Celebrating Bruce McLaren, November 2009 issue,
includes the following details on a new book about Bruce:

New Book –‘Bruce McLaren- A Celebration of a Kiwi Icon’
In conjunction with the ‘NZ Festival of Motor Racing celebrating Bruce McLaren’, the Festival has
commissioned a new book ‘Bruce McLaren-A Celebration of a Kiwi Icon’. The 80-page book will
be on sale at the Festival. The book is a composition of memories, stories and photographs about
Bruce contributed by his immediate family and many guests including Sir Stirling Moss, Sir Jack
Brabham, Sir Jackie Stewart and Dan Gurney. Articles and stories by Phil Kerr, Eoin Young, Michael
Clark, Howden Ganley, Wal Wilmott, Ken Smith and many others complete a fine tribute to Bruce.
Watch for details about the book on the Festival website www.nzfmr.co.nz. Secure an advance copy
online, or purchase your book at the Festival and have it signed by members of the McLaren family,
former Cooper and McLaren team mechanics, drivers, and friends. All profits from this book will be
donated to the Bruce McLaren Trust.


#4704 David McKinney

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 16:49

...but there's no suggestion it will be available before the Festival (end of January 2010)

#4705 Eric Dunsdon

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 16:41

A biography on Jacky Ickx, that one has been long overdue. I think his career was versatile and succesful enough to deserve one. Years ago Veloce publishing announced that Johnny Tipler was working on one, but I think that it will never materialise.


Jean Behra
Luigi Fagioli
Achille Varzi
Harry Schell
Ken Wharton

To name just five!.

#4706 Giraffe

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 09:59

For info, I've been chasing up Brian Redman for years trying to encourage him to complete his planned book, and these are this year's responses for the record:

14th Jan: Well, it's an on-going saga!
We have 1,600 photographs! Not much else!
Hope to have it ready for Christmas!


15th Jan: Yes, Michael Keyser - Speed Merchants - is doing work with me on the book. I just need to find time to
get some serious writing done!


10th Sept: The book is coming along quite well......we have over 1,800 photographs!


17th Nov: Hi Tony, working on the book as we speak! Don't know when it will be ready.......not later than
July I think and maybe before.

All the best, Brian


Brian Redman


Fingers crossed for 2010! :cat:

Edited by Giraffe, 05 December 2009 - 09:59.


#4707 D-Type

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 17:55

Today's charity shop finds: Can-Am by Peter Lyons (2004) and Racing Mechanic, Ermanno Cuoghi. Mechanic to a world champion by Jeremy Walton (1980) for £1 each.
Doesa anyone know if either is any good? I think I've read a favourable review of the Can-Am one but the other is a total unknown.

Edited by D-Type, 05 December 2009 - 17:56.


#4708 Vitesse2

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 18:18

You've got a couple of real bargains there, Duncan! I have the Lyons book - for which I paid £8 (ex-public library, loaned out just twice before being withdrawn!). Probably the best on the subject.

The Cuoghi book's not really my era, but the cheapest on ABE is twenty quid! It's had favourable mentions here before IIRC.

Charity shops round your way are obviously not all that clued up!

#4709 RA Historian

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 20:03

Duncan, I echo Bob. Get 'em both!

I have not seen the Cuoghi book, but the Pete Lyons book on the Can Am is THE book on that fabled series. Absolutely a must.
Tom

#4710 kayemod

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 20:13

I think I've read a favourable review of the Can-Am one but the other is a total unknown.


I can pretty much guarantee that there's never been an unfavourable review of that Pete Lyons classic.

#4711 ensign14

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 20:56

The Cuoghi book is perhaps the best place for the lowdown on the Scirocco. For that alone it's worth the entrance...

#4712 Giraffe

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 09:34

With Borders going into administration, there are quite alot of motoring/motorsport books being sold off in the UK. Can anyone tell me if Eoin Young's book on Bruce McLaren is worth buying in the firesale?

#4713 PRD

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:20

With Borders going into administration, there are quite alot of motoring/motorsport books being sold off in the UK. Can anyone tell me if Eoin Young's book on Bruce McLaren is worth buying in the firesale?


Depends on how cheap you can get it for- £5 at the very most I'd say

#4714 Giraffe

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:25

Depends on how cheap you can get it for- £5 at the very most I'd say


Er, so it's that good?!?! :well:



#4715 kayemod

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:27

Depends on how cheap you can get it for- £5 at the very most I'd say


It it's anything like Young's book on Denny Hulme, £5 is far too much.

My local Borders is having a closing down sale, but as far as I know it's just 20% off previously listed prices, which still makes them a lot more expensive than Amazon. Also, Amazon's books haven't been thumbed.


#4716 Giraffe

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:45

It it's anything like Young's book on Denny Hulme, £5 is far too much.

My local Borders is having a closing down sale, but as far as I know it's just 20% off previously listed prices, which still makes them a lot more expensive than Amazon. Also, Amazon's books haven't been thumbed.

Thanks for that. Both books are nicely presented and I've been tempted to purchase them, but I won't bother now. :wave:


#4717 kayemod

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 12:21

...Amazon's books haven't been thumbed.


Or coughed into.

I had a flu jab last Tuesday, when I turned up my GP had put me down for both of them, so one in each arm. One arm, I suspect the swine flu one, was pretty painful for a few days, so I'm a bit more conscious than usual about catching something unpleasant from the great unwashed. I'm hoping of course that no Amazon employee was so fascinated that he had a lengthy peruse through the copy of Sir Stirling's latest that I received from them a few days ago. I was in a bookshop a few weeks ago, and saw one browser sneeze into a book she had open in front of her, doubtless spattering the pages with mucus DNA. She looked around guiltily and put it back on the shelf. That experience, together with that Government information ad of those people in the lift have made me slightly paranoid about these things.


#4718 Alan Cox

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 18:58

With Borders going into administration,

Can't say I was surprised when I heard this. I'm amazed that they kept going for so long when, in these days of discounts/special offers, their stock always seemed to be a full cover price and if they ever sold a DVD at their prices I'd be amazed. Outside the internet, Waterstones always seemed to be a much better bet to me. It doesn't sound like a "firesale" with 20% off is much of a deal.

#4719 ensign14

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 19:22

The book trade is a bit mad anyway, it seems to rely on product placement. But it's crazy, you have entire city centres now with precisely one major bookseller present when only a few years ago there would have been competition - Dillons, Ottakars, Waterstones, Borders. The MMC seemed to allow each to be swallowed up. Maybe they foresaw the Amazon threat...

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#4720 kayemod

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 19:27

I was in the local Bournemouth Borders this afternoon, a less pleasant experience than it usually is. Their closing-down sale started last Monday, and there didn't seem to be very much left, not much worth having at any rate, all the good stuff had either been sold or shipped off to a warehouse somewhere, probably to be sold elsewhere at full price. Books were being advertised at up to 50% off, but only 20% off on what there was left of the better stuff. I didn't join the scrums, I suspect that a fair amount of the stock had been brought in specially, it didn't look like their normal stuff, strange works by unknown authors. All this didn't seem to put off most people though, the place was so crammed I could hardly move, the queue to pay stretched almost to the back of the shop, it must have taken at least half an hour to make it to the tills. A sad and undignified end to what was once quite a good bookshop, though I must confess that I only ever took advantage of their 3 for the price of 2 fiction offers, never bought much else there, so maybe as a long time Amazon and Abe customer, I'm really a part of their problems. How can any town centre bookshop survive these days with the competition they face from the Internet?

#4721 bradbury west

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 19:44

It is hard to see how anyone makes a living what with rent prices, business rates, the horrendous liabilities of obligatory red-tape, plus the inevitable employment legislation etc, without the copetition of on-line retailers. It also requires the idle shoppers to get off their backsides. But if you want a range of specific low-volume, specialist titles, they cannot supply.
Roger Lund

#4722 Vitesse2

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 23:18

The book trade is a bit mad anyway, it seems to rely on product placement. But it's crazy, you have entire city centres now with precisely one major bookseller present when only a few years ago there would have been competition - Dillons, Ottakars, Waterstones, Borders. The MMC seemed to allow each to be swallowed up. Maybe they foresaw the Amazon threat...

Actually, the MMC were the root cause of it, when they bowed to pressure from Dillons and abolished the Net Book Agreement. Amazon wouldn't be the force they are today if the NBA was still around. There would be a lot more small chains operating in larger towns and plenty of independents too.

Fittingly - in my view - Dillons were the first big casualty. Served 'em right.

The Borders business model was never going to work in the UK - I'm surprised they lasted as long as they did: I suspect the better Books Etc branches were holding the whole thing together, but once their credit insurance was withdrawn they were doomed ....

#4723 R Peck

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 23:46

Bought the following at Borders last month, just before the closing down sales :-

At 50% off stock clearance :

Analysing Formula 1
Dream Garages

At 70% off stock clearance :

Jaguar E Type : The Complete Story

At present, the discount on the remaining motoring books is running at 30%



#4724 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 00:41

I don't know what the Borders "experience" is like in the UK, but here in the US I rarely go there. I frankly resent a bunch of freeloaders sitting around reading books and magazines for nothing...soiling, tearing, and otherwise diminishing the same product the proprietors expect me to pay full retail to take home.

Amazon, on the other hand, is an amazingly positive experience from almost any perspective. I have purchased scores of products from Amazon. I had only one unfortunate experience and Amazon rectified it immediately. Amazon deserves to flourish, Borders does not.

As I say, my comments apply to the US Borders operation.

Jack

#4725 Giraffe

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 08:57

I think that High Street booksellers are trying to commit Hari-Kari. I attempted to order Derek Lawson's new F5000 book in a city centre branch of WH Smith and was quoted £40. I proceeded to order it from the WH Smith website, price £26 delivered. However, for convenience I could have had it delivered to the same or any other convenient branch of WH Smith for collection for the same price, £26. Hello................. :drunk:

#4726 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 13:52

I think that High Street booksellers are trying to commit Hari-Kari. I attempted to order Derek Lawson's new F5000 book in a city centre branch of WH Smith and was quoted £40. I proceeded to order it from the WH Smith website, price £26 delivered. However, for convenience I could have had it delivered to the same or any other convenient branch of WH Smith for collection for the same price, £26. Hello................. :drunk:


Sounds like a business school textbook (no pun intended) model of the left hand and right hand not having the best coordination. It appears the WH Smith bricks-and-mortar and on-line business models are run as entirely distinct entities.

Jack.


#4727 kayemod

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 14:32

Sounds like a business school textbook (no pun intended) model of the left hand and right hand not having the best coordination. It appears the WH Smith bricks-and-mortar and on-line business models are run as entirely distinct entities.

Jack.


That kind of thing isn't uncommon. I wanted a new satnav, the one installed in my car is useless. I went along to my local Halfords, found a nice non-spotty youth who really knew what he was talking about, and on his recommendation, decided I wanted one of the better Garmins. Back home, I looked on comparison site Kelkoo, found that the cheapest for the model I wanted was Amazon, but apparently Halfords have a not much advertised policy of 'Never knowingly undersold', and if you ordered online and put in a long and complicated code, they'd sell you one at the Amazon price. They also have an advertised policy on their website that you can order online, and pick the item up at your local store. So to try to reward non-spotty youth in some way I ordered online, but clicked on the 'pick up from your local store' option, which it wouldn't accept. Apparently because I'd used this 'special' code, only the 'free next day delivery for orders over £££' applied. So I ordered online, paid, and the very next day a courier delivered my new satnav. Thing is though, that my local Halfords where the non-spotty youth who really made the sale works, is only about 500 yards from my home, a five minute walk. None of this really bothered me, no added expense or delay as far as I was concerned, but it's a hell of a way to run a business isn't it? If I tried to run my own business along these lines, I don't think I'd survive very long, but like I said at the beginning, there's a lot of it about today, W H Smith are by no means the only offenders.


#4728 fbarrett

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 01:33

Folks:

Thanks to publishers and distributors who sell to them for less than they sell to booksellers, Amazon is rapidly killing brick-and-mortar bookstores, and even other web-based book retailers, from the biggest to the smallest. I've been selling automotive books since 1978, first as a sideline, now as a full-time business. My defenses (American spelling, sorry) against Amazon are:

1) If I can't kill 'em, I'll join 'em, by becoming an Amazon seller and offering out-of-print and used books. Just started this, and so far it's been slow.

2) Sell books they don't have or can't get: high-priced collector books, self-published books, rare and out-of-print books, etc.

3) Provide the best possible customer service, especially advice on what to buy and details of new books, to encourage return customers.

4) Advertise in niche publications. When did you last see an Amazon ad in a Porsche club magazine?

5) Sell at swap meets. When did you last see an Amazon stand at a swap meet?

6) Establish an internet presence among niche groups such as TNF, clubs, and other forums.

7) Uh, well, that's about it, but so far I'm hanging in there.

As I said, this situation is largely the fault of distributors and publishers who sell books to Amazon at unrealistic prices. Thank goodness for the few publishers who have decided to remain loyal to their specialist booksellers and thus can afford to continue to publish truly high-quality books (David Bull, for one).

Frank
Toad Hall Motorbooks
www.toadhallbook.com

Edited by fbarrett, 08 December 2009 - 01:41.


#4729 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 02:44

Frank, I think there will always be a place for booksellers such as you and publishers like Bull, Palawan, etc., who cater to a specialized audience and serve that audience very well, anticipating the books they'll be interested in and delivering a premium product. There will now also always be a big place for on-line sellers like Amazon, because now only a part of their revenues comes from books. The losers will be the large brick and mortar chains like Borders and B&N unless they can duplicate the Amazon business model which seems unlikely.

I definitely miss the small independent bookshop, but the day seems to be gone when someone can open a local bookshop and have a successful business model trying to sell at retail, pay premium overhead, deal with the burdens government relentlessly piles onto small businesses and still earn a decent living for his family. Unfortunately, that is true of more and more retail businesses.

Jack.

(Not to mention occasionally having to disinfect the inventory).

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 08 December 2009 - 03:55.


#4730 Tuboscocca

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 08:25

New Book on John WOOLFE.

Just published in French, a biography on John Woolfe.
Link: http://www.l-oree.org/

It is 25 Euro+ postage

Regards Michael

#4731 RS2000

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 16:14

The Works (or my local branch at least) currently has:
Memories of Ayrton £2.99
Stirling Moss My Cars My Career £3.99
Stirling Moss Racing With the Maestro £3.99

#4732 Alan Cox

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 17:09

The Works (or my local branch at least) currently has:

Stirling Moss My Cars My Career £3.99

Looks like a bargain.

#4733 Mark Godfrey

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 18:25

I agree with Frank's take on the situation regarding Amazon.

As a publisher of three historic racing books, and as a retailer for few dozen more (online and the occasional special event), I will give a few points from my perspective:

Lack of a "flat playing field" is a major problem and one that for the most part should not exist. By law discounts should not vary within an industry group. I provide the same discounts to both retailers & wholesalers, based on quantity -- cumulative for the account. This rewards the retailer who over time sells a great quantity, and also allows me to restock the wholesaler or Amazon at the earned deep discount on all orders.

Small retail stores and managers at chain outlets often buy our books prepaid (credit card or check) for a 35% discount on a single book (historically known to the general trade as a STOP, or Single Title Order Plan). I also provide books we have published on consignment to both the wholesale and retail, based on ability to pay and quantity wanted.

Amazon brings a great number of new specialty books to a wide audience in part by working directly with small publishers, bypassing (when required) an unworkable general book wholesale market, controlled in the US by Ingram.

I'm grateful we have specialty wholesalers, such as Transportation Book Service in the US, so even a small retailer can receive a decent discount on a mix of automotive titles, without having to order a publishers' minimum (often to my mind unrealistic) quantity to achieve a reasonable discount.

Mark
Brown Fox Books
Carpinteria, CA

#4734 fbarrett

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 18:43

I'm grateful we have specialty wholesalers, such as Transportation Book Service in the US, so even a small retailer can receive a decent discount on a mix of automotive titles, without having to order a publishers' minimum (often to my mind unrealistic) quantity to achieve a reasonable discount.


Mark:

Tom Warth and Rick Seymour at TBS are doing a great job of making little-known, low-volume specialist automotive books available to small retailers at a fair discount. If you ever get the chance to browse through their warehouse in Hudson, Wisconsin, do it!

Frank

#4735 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 02:32

I'm getting interested in woodies :blush: . (Go ahead....Insert your joke here). While it isn't strictly a motorsport subject, can anyone suggest some good books (or web sites) that would help me learn about the subject?

Thanks.

Jack.

#4736 philippe charuest

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 17:17

just to be sure by woodies you mean those old station wagon with wood (real or fake ) on the side not the australian double tennis team . btw it look that the fake wood is back in the new american luxury car like the big SUV pardon crossover

#4737 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 19:00

just to be sure by woodies you mean those old station wagon with wood (real or fake ) on the side not the australian double tennis team . btw it look that the fake wood is back in the new american luxury car like the big SUV pardon crossover


Hi, Philippe.

Yes, I'm talking about the old station wagons (mostly) with the wood trim. I'm thinking of getting one in the future but need to educate myself about them first. I tend to do a lot of research about cars I'm interested in before I buy one.

Jack.


#4738 philippe charuest

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 19:43

http://www.stationwa...y/gallery2.html
The Station Wagon Gallery

#4739 Michael Ferner

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 08:41

Has anyone read this book yet? Go Like Hell: Ford, Ferrari, and Their Battle for Speed and Glory at Le Mans by AJ Baime.
Or this one, Performance at the Limit: Business Lessons from Formula 1 Motor Racing by Mark Jenkins.

I have the second one, got it as a gift. Can't really say I read it, because of my limited interest in current F1, to say nothing of my basically non-existant interest in business lessons! What exactly are you expecting of it?

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#4740 helioseism

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 05:02

New book:

To Indy and Beyond – The Life of Racing Legend Jack Zink
by Dr. Bob L. Blackburn
Hard cover, 206 pages.
Price: $34.95

Jack Zink is a legend in the world of car racing. As a driver for more than twenty years, he won stock car races on dirt tracks, accumulated trophies in off-road dune buggies, and even set a flying mile speed record in a 1957 Pontiac he designed and built for the early NASCAR circuit. As a team leader, mechanic, and engineer, he pushed the limits of technology with his innovative designs for cars that were lighter, lower, and more powerful. Even his failures, such as the attempted use of a turbine engine in a car, opened new doors that others rushed through in the pursuit of speed and durability.

Perhaps he is best remembered for his victories at the greatest track in the world, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and the greatest race in the world, the Indianapolis 500. From 1950 to 1967, Jack walked shoulder to shoulder with the greatest team owners, mechanics, and drivers in racing history. Twice, his team won the coveted Borg Warner Trophy, in back-to-back Indy victories (1955 and 1956).

But Jack was much more than a pioneer in car racing. He raced sailboats. He raced motorcycles. He also was a skilled engineer and businessman, ultimately building not one but two companies into international giants that still dominate the combustion industry with burners, flares, and incinerators that greatly reduce pollution. Even with all these accomplishments, Jack was most proud of his service to his community, especially the Zink Ranch, a 33,000-acre nature preserve in the Osage Hills of Oklahoma that will perpetually provide open space in an increasingly crowded and urban world.

This biography weaves all of these stories into a portrait of Jack Zink. Along the way are the friends and family members who were part of the adventure, as well as the challenges and opportunities that drove him forward. Here is the story of one amazing man who lived by a simple code: "The man who wins is the man who tries."

Link


#4741 Frank S

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 19:44

My Zink memorabilia:

Zink matchbook
Zink matchbook 2

#4742 philippe charuest

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 20:46

is he related to the formula vee and super vee of the same name

#4743 D-Type

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 21:59

The Works (or my local branch at least) currently has:
Memories of Ayrton £2.99
Stirling Moss My Cars My Career £3.99
Stirling Moss Racing With the Maestro £3.99

Unfortunately mine has none of them :( - but it has a good stock of colouring books, coloured pencils, Christmas paper etc

#4744 RA Historian

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 22:51

is he related to the formula vee and super vee of the same name

No. John (Jack) Zink was out of Tulsa, Oklahoma, while Ed Zink, who built Zink race cars, did so in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Tom

#4745 MattKellett

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Posted 14 December 2009 - 03:59

I believe I was totally spoiled with the first two motor sports books I bought: Archie And The Listers and Stirling Moss, My Cars My Career.

I think I bought both in 1994, when my knowledge of motor sport was very limited. I spotted the Archie book in Waterstone's and thought it looked interesting, it's almost the same as receiving a Ferrari after passing your drivers test - I found it that good and it's been one of my favorites ever since.

The Stirling Moss book I bought just because I had always wanted to read more about him and I thought this was an interesting approach to his life in motor sport by commenting on all the cars he drove.

Years have passed and more and more books are on my shelf, but these two give me the fondest memories and most pleasure, even if just seeing them on the shelf.

I'm sure I'm not alone with this.

#4746 proviz

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Posted 14 December 2009 - 09:35

A new photobook from Finland: “Kilvanajoa”, 176 pp., 500+ photos, €46 (+p&p)
TNF contributor Scuderia Naftalin is in possession of an enormous collection of photos shot by the late Holger and Marita Eklund in a career spanning some 50 years. He has now done credit to this remarkable couple by publishing a photobook covering virtually all things of importance in Finnish motor sport (incl. bikes) from early 50’s to mid 90’s, with emphasis on the first three decades.
Some coverage of foreign events is included, such as Monte Carlo and RAC Rally material, the odd shot of Keke Rosberg, Gilles Villeneuve or Ronnie Peterson in Anderstorp or Zolder, as well as a quirky one of the great Jarno Saarinen sitting in Frank Williams’ Politoys F1 at a Marlboro function in Switzerland.
Most of the content, however is from Finland, ranging from dirt and ice racing to Keimola and other domestic racing circuits, 1000 Lakes and various other rallies, Imatra motorcycle GPs (nice scenes of Hailwood, Agostini, Read, Ivy, etc. sharing a laugh or two with the crowd), rallycross and even karting (with Keke & co).
The lay-out may divide opinion, but to thrust over 500 photos in less than 200 pages most of them must be quite small. This also allows some sequences to actually tell a story in one page or spread. Captions are in Finnish, but the names in them should help as a reference.
From a Finnish perspective I’d say this work gives a very good idea of where the Flying Finns came from. I would definitely buy a similar book about the domestic scene of, say Mexico, Japan, Brazil or New-Zealand.
Contact for Scuderia Naftalin is fv.henrietta@elisanet.fi


#4747 D-Type

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Posted 14 December 2009 - 15:27

With the 100% wisdom of hindsight, given that the main content of the book is photographs, surely it would not have been too difficult an exercise to include a translation to other languages: German, French, Italian and English, say. This would have increased the sales potential 5-fold.

I have seen this done very effectively with the body of the book being laid out in the original language with the the translations in appendices as simple lists in a smaller font. This avoids the mess that milti-lingual captions create and does not detract from the original book in any way..

#4748 Tuboscocca

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 10:10

Just to let you know:

the famous 2-volume Book 'Le Mans 1923-1992' by Editions Barthlemy (now long op and expensive), will be republished in next July .
Then as a three volume set ,each Volume 448 pages. Title is 'Le Mans 1923-2010'.
To all not familiar with the book: the authors set their goal to show a photo of (nearly) every entrant,plus the Poster of the year,plus the results and a description of the race.
What makes this book so valuable are the photos.Of course the older ones.

Two editions are planned: 500 edition which are numbered and in a metal case (22kg!!!) for 1000 euros ,and a 'public' version for 300 Euros (still weighing 15 Kg)
It will be produced by:

www.lemans-racing.com

These are also the makers of the magazine Le Mans Racing

Best regards an reinforce your shels
Michael

#4749 Scuderia Naftalin

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 10:34

Thanks D-type,
one of my alternatives and plans for the "international market" has been to write a separate Appendix / leaflet, translating the original texts into at least English. Due to time constraints and some pressure to get this book out, it has not happened yet. But as the photos are 20-60 years old anyway, next year will have to do...
It sounds like a good idea to produce a multi-lingual appendix instead of English only - the only complication being my poor French. I'll see if I can find some help to cover the latin languages. I can't make any promises yet...

#4750 Tuboscocca

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 12:28

Not entirely new, but worth a look:

CORVETTE RACE LEGENDS

http://www.corvetteracinglegends.com/

Great pictures--just imagine the sound!!

Regards Michael