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The book thread: In memory of Pete Fenelon


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#4801 helioseism

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 00:50

Newish books on American racing:

Leader Card Racers - A Dynasty of Speed
Author: Gordon E. White
The remarkable story of one family’s four-generation passion for auto racing. Beginning with a team of midgets before WW II, successful paper manufacturer Bob Wilke, his son Ralph, and now his Grandsons have owned and sponsored winning racing cars on the Championship trail, on dirt track, and currently with a successful return to midgets. Superbly chronicled by noted author Gordon White, the story of Leader Card Racers is a testament to the Wilke family’s devotion to motor sport and to the history of American oval track racing.
Price: $45.00
Link

Throttle Magazine 1941 - The Complete Collection
Throttle was the very first hot rod-oriented magazine. Introduced in 1941, covering the burgeoning dry lakes and circle track scenes, it only lasted one year. The twelve issues of that year include an Indy 500 special edition as well as its first anniversary issue, which would be its last. Publication of Throttle ceased with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the onslaught of World War II as publisher, Jack Peters went off to serve in the armed forces.

In several of the issues of Throttle throughout this book you will recognize pioneers as they entered their hot rod beginnings such as Wally Parks, Bill Burke, and Lou Senter. You will also find some of the earliest advertising for iconic brands such as Edelbrock, Bell Auto Parts, Eddie Meyer, and Sandy's Muffler. Each issue also contains several features that display the excitement of hot rodding and racing beginnings written by the people who were there. This new publication also contains a new chapter delving into the story of the men who originally published Throttle.

Hardcover book in box. 10.75" X 8.5"
Price: $39.95
Link

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#4802 sterling49

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 12:14

Currently reading "Go Like Hell" the story of the Ford-Ferrari Le Mans battle in the '60s, some fascinating insights into what went on with main players like John Wyer, Ken Miles, Leo Beebe, Carrol Shelby.
I was a little sceptical upon receiving this as a Crimbo present after seeing the author is the motoring correspondent with Playboy magazine, but it has proved a great read so far, well researched and very informative. A lot of information on Ferrari too, a great source of knowledge. It has certainly put some meat on the bare bones that I remember from those long distant, hot summer days in '60s with asoundtrack by The Fab Four and the Stones.

#4803 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 21:05

I have just finished reading The Man Who Supercharged Bond by our own Paul Kenny. Normally I would just send Paul an email, but I thought I would share my impressions with all TNFers as has been mentioned above.

This is really a splendid book. Having a subject as fascinating as Villiers must make the author's job a little easier, but Paul has really hit this out of the park. I have a bias toward the between-the-wars period anyway, so I was ready to be impressed and I was not let down. The amount of research that went into the book is evident, as is the affection the author has for his subject, without coming anywhere near hagiography. Unlike many other bios about prominent subjects, this book does not come across as an appointments diary with a little meat on the bones. It's almost as if I'd met Amherst Villiers myself.

Paul, if you see this could you fill in a few blanks for me? What is the current ownership/location of Amherst's personal Blower, and the Phantom III? You briefly mentioned a Ferrari 250 GT. Do you have more details....chassis number, model, the shop that carried out the restoration?

And, how are Charles and Janie getting on?

I recommend this book highly.

Jack

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 08 January 2010 - 21:07.


#4804 Geza Sury

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 14:43

Just to let you know, that Simon Lewis has posted some excellent news in this thread. Check it out!

#4805 red stick

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 15:45

A few posts ago, I was bemoaning the lack of proper book reviews recently on this thread, so practicing what I preach, here’s a small contribution. I've just finished Williams by Maurice Hamilton, and found it a lot more interesting than I'd expected, I have done a quick search here, and no-one else seems to have mentioned it yet. I've never been a big Williams fan, absolutely nothing against them, and always pleased when they won, it's just that I liked one or two other teams rather more, though Alan, Keke and Damon were always the tops for me. I don't think I've read a biography quite like this before, the way it's done is fairly novel, and on the whole it works well. Each chapter starts in the usual way, and then follow a number of 1st person narratives, each giving comments, background detail, or their own version of contentious or significant events, so Hamilton starts every chapter with a general view, then the likes of Patrick Head, Adrian Newey, Damon, Nigel, Nelson, Keke and all the others, Frank Dernie, mechanics and truckies and the like and Sir Frank himself, all add their own side of the story. I found this especially interesting in the case of the 1986 Hungarian GP, where Mansell is still whingeing today about having been tricked by Nelson Piquet, who he claims used some kind of trick diff, keeping the secret advantage to himself until after the race, but according to Head, Dernie, Williams, and others, it really wasn’t as Nigel and some sections of the UK press reported at the time. The book heightened my admiration for Sir Frank, though I found it rather too eulogistic in many places, Maurice Hamilton is clearly FW’s greatest fan, and I felt that he overdid the praise at times, making him out to be Superman in a wheelchair. He is also not exactly a cheerleader for Damon Hill, who I’d say doesn’t always get a fair write-up, Maurice dwells on the negatives far more than the positive side, whereas Nigel Mansell comes out of his time with Williams rather better than he deserves in my (biassed) opinion. The book is well written, as most would expect, and clearly very well researched. The only really disappointing feature of this book are the photos, which are few in number, too small, not terribly well reproduced at least in my copy, and generally somewhat uninspiring, also almost all of them have been published many times before, you’d have thought that those responsible could have done much better. Overall maybe 8 out of 10, an interesting story imaginatively told, but just too much like a Williams PR job at times.


Thanks. I was curious about this book and appreciate the thoroughness of your review, both the highs and the (relatively speaking) lows.

#4806 Rob G

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 02:35

Being someone who owns books on pre-war grand prix racing that focus on the Germans and on Bugatti, I am looking for a (reasonably-priced) book that discusses the Italian teams during this era. I'm curious about Italian Racing Red, Anthony Pritchard's Maserati: A Racing History, and Karl Ludvigsen's Red Hot Rivalry. Would anyone recommend one over the others, or do you have any other suggestions? I'd love David Venables' First Among Champions: The Alfa Romeo Cars, but I can't find a copy that's anywhere near my price range. I'd also welcome suggestions that cover pre-war GP racing from a more general approach.

Also, I have a copy of Monaco Grand Prix: Portrait of a Pageant, which features the photography of Michael Hewett, and also the Schlegelmilch Monaco GP book. I am interested in Hewett's own Monaco GP tome, Monaco Grand Prix: A Photographic Portrait of the World's Most Prestigious Motor Race. Is there a lot of duplication of photos between that book and each of the other two?

Thanks in advance.

#4807 Vitesse2

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 13:55

Being someone who owns books on pre-war grand prix racing that focus on the Germans and on Bugatti, I am looking for a (reasonably-priced) book that discusses the Italian teams during this era. I'm curious about Italian Racing Red, Anthony Pritchard's Maserati: A Racing History, and Karl Ludvigsen's Red Hot Rivalry. Would anyone recommend one over the others, or do you have any other suggestions? I'd love David Venables' First Among Champions: The Alfa Romeo Cars, but I can't find a copy that's anywhere near my price range. I'd also welcome suggestions that cover pre-war GP racing from a more general approach.

I don't think the definitive history of either Maserati or Alfa in the 30s has yet been written, Rob. David Venables' Alfa book really is the best of the bunch - bite the bullet! - and 'Alfetta' by Ed McDonough is also worth getting (and currently still reasonably priced), although a bit inaccurate in places and inconclusive on a number of questions. The Pritchard volume is a bit better than his previous effort published in the 70s ('Maserati: a History'), but still not totally comprehensive - I found myself asking "And so?" a lot while reading it. But of course - like Venables' Bugatti book in the same series - they cover the whole history of the marques and the Alfa and Maserati stories in the 30s are only a small part of their histories.

I believe (haven't seen it) that 'Red Hot Rivals' concentrates mainly on the 50s rather than the 30s. I don't have 'Italian Racing Red', but was somewhat disappointed with 'British Racing Green' in the same series - a bit sketchy, I thought.

Blight's 'French Sports Car Revolution' is also a must - the title is somewhat misleading as it covers much more than France - but that goes for really silly money these days! Sadly, the author died before completing the last two sections covering 1938-39 which, to my mind, are potentially the most interesting.

#4808 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 14:27

...but was somewhat disappointed with 'British Racing Green' in the same series - a bit sketchy, I thought.


My understanding is that the "Racing Colours" Series is -- was, to the best of my knowledge -- intended for what I guess we refer to as the "general" audience, rather the specialists.

It is as difficult, perhaps more so in many ways, to write a book for the "general" audience as it is to produce one for the anorak crowd. Believe me, had "American Racing Blue and White" seen the light of day that the amount of effort already expended probably exceeded that for my thesis -- making it "simple" within a set of parameters is a real challenge. It gave me a better appreciation for what many of the current writers have to deal with in today's world. Oh, well, it was fun doing the work regardless of the outcome....


#4809 longhorn

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 16:43

Being someone who owns books on pre-war grand prix racing that focus on the Germans and on Bugatti, I am looking for a (reasonably-priced) book that discusses the Italian teams during this era. I'm curious about Italian Racing Red, Anthony Pritchard's Maserati: A Racing History, and Karl Ludvigsen's Red Hot Rivalry. Would anyone recommend one over the others, or do you have any other suggestions? I'd love David Venables' First Among Champions: The Alfa Romeo Cars, but I can't find a copy that's anywhere near my price range. I'd also welcome suggestions that cover pre-war GP racing from a more general approach.


Thanks in advance.


Another book is Alfa Romeo Tradition by Borgeson which looks at each "engineering period" such as Ferrari, Jano, Colombo, Ricart etc. There is a copy at ABEbooks for £18.00 + p&p, rather less than this book usually goes for.

The other good ones, other than those mentioned by vitesse2, would be the Orsini/Zagari books, Scuderia Ferrari and Maserati but they command a high price these days as do the various Fusi tiltles.

#4810 ERault

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 17:23

I believe (haven't seen it) that 'Red Hot Rivals' concentrates mainly on the 50s rather than the 30s. I don't have 'Italian Racing Red', but was somewhat disappointed with 'British Racing Green' in the same series - a bit sketchy, I thought.


Indeed, Red Hot Rivals covers the Maserati vs Ferrari war on the technical side, and does it remarkably well. However, it covers 1947-69 only and does not look at the Scuderia Ferrari run Alfa Romeos in the 30s.

#4811 Vitesse2

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 18:10

Another book is Alfa Romeo Tradition by Borgeson which looks at each "engineering period" such as Ferrari, Jano, Colombo, Ricart etc. There is a copy at ABEbooks for £18.00 + p&p, rather less than this book usually goes for.

I paid less than that on eBay :p Good on the technical side, but I found it a bit dry.

The other good ones, other than those mentioned by vitesse2, would be the Orsini/Zagari books, Scuderia Ferrari and Maserati but they command a high price these days as do the various Fusi tiltles.

Those make Blight look cheap!! :lol:


#4812 philippe charuest

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 20:57

Being someone who owns books on pre-war grand prix racing that focus on the Germans and on Bugatti, I am looking for a (reasonably-priced) book that discusses the Italian teams during this era. I'm curious about Italian Racing Red, Anthony Pritchard's Maserati: A Racing History, and Karl Ludvigsen's Red Hot Rivalry. Would anyone recommend one over the others, or do you have any other suggestions? I'd love David Venables' , but I can't find a copy that's anywhere near my price range. I'd also welcome suggestions that cover pre-war GP racing from a more general approach.

all the haynes series anthony pritchard "Maserati a racing history" and the two books of David venables on alfa romeo ( First Among Champions: The Alfa Romeo Cars) and(bugatti a racing history )are very good and they were at a very decent price when they were put on the market . i dont know about that new series "racing colors" . but for a general approach you cant be wrong with that one
http://cgi.ebay.ca/P...=item20ae2180a0
POWER AND GLORY BY WILLIAM COURT BOOK FORMULA 1 RACING

#4813 Lotus23

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 00:20

Post #4805 mentions the 12-issue hardbound compendium of Throttle magazine for Jan-Dec 1941. Its final issue came off the press on 5 Dec 41; what happened 2 days later shut the magazine, and its subject material, down for the duration. The tale of tracking down 12 original copies is a minor saga in itself.

I just received my copy a few hours ago and have greatly enjoyed it thus far. Well worth its modest price, it is a great time machine for those of us of a Certain Age. It's amazing what those young guys accomplished with large amounts of ingenuity and sweat equity.

Edited by Lotus23, 12 January 2010 - 00:21.


#4814 Rob G

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 01:08

all the haynes series anthony pritchard "Maserati a racing history" and the two books of David venables on alfa romeo ( First Among Champions: The Alfa Romeo Cars) and(bugatti a racing history )are very good and they were at a very decent price when they were put on the market . i dont know about that new series "racing colors" . but for a general approach you cant be wrong with that one
http://cgi.ebay.ca/P...=item20ae2180a0
POWER AND GLORY BY WILLIAM COURT BOOK FORMULA 1 RACING

Thanks to everybody for their input. I do have Venables' Bugatti book as well as Power and Glory and enjoy them both tremendously. I'll look into the McDonough and Borgeson books. :up:

#4815 MattKellett

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 18:04

Blight's 'French Sports Car Revolution' is also a must - the title is somewhat misleading as it covers much more than France - but that goes for really silly money these days! Sadly, the author died before completing the last two sections covering 1938-39 which, to my mind, are potentially the most interesting.


I must have been lucky to pick up a copy of this on the remainder table for 25 pounds, back in the mid 90's.


Matt

Edited by MattKellett, 12 January 2010 - 18:05.


#4816 philippe charuest

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 19:15

talking of book on french car. does someone here bought the Amilcar by gilles Fournier . i know it was tranlated in english and published by Dalton-Watson

#4817 longhorn

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 19:45

talking of book on french car. does someone here bought the Amilcar by gilles Fournier . i know it was tranlated in english and published by Dalton-Watson


I have the original 1994 French version. Why?

#4818 philippe charuest

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 19:58

I have the original 1994 French version. Why?

just want to know your opinion how good (or not) it is . at 180 some $ its a think twice before buying it ,french is good .even better ,i just mention the english edition cause i know that around here most people are not familiar with the langue of rabelais


#4819 longhorn

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 20:25

just want to know your opinion how good (or not) it is . at 180 some $ its a think twice before buying it ,french is good .even better ,i just mention the english edition cause i know that around here most people are not familiar with the langue of rabelais


Well I learnt French at school - and I may not have improved since then. I had nothing on Amilcar when the original French text book came out so I bought a copy. It is superb, covers all of the road and competition cars and has excellent black & white photos throughout. I would recommend it without hesitation.

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#4820 Michael Ferner

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 10:07

Amilcar by Fournier - I leafed (leaft?) through it on a Horton's stand once, and was VERY tempted to buy it inspite of its tears-evoking price tag, but finally (it must've taken an hour or so) decided against it based on my limited (read: non-existant) interest in the road cars, which rendered a substantial part of the book useless to me.

#4821 longhorn

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 13:37

Amilcar by Fournier - I leafed (leaft?) through it on a Horton's stand once, and was VERY tempted to buy it inspite of its tears-evoking price tag, but finally (it must've taken an hour or so) decided against it based on my limited (read: non-existant) interest in the road cars, which rendered a substantial part of the book useless to me.



Memories can and do play tricks on us. I don't have a vested interest here but of the 260+ pages, more than half are about competition cars (racing, rallying, trials with emphasis on the former), a large part on the sporting cars, and a small part on the normal road cars. For me it rates alongside Portway's Vauxhall 30/98 book.

#4822 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 14:43

I have just finished reading The Man Who Supercharged Bond by our own Paul Kenny. Normally I would just send Paul an email, but I thought I would share my impressions with all TNFers as has been mentioned above.

This is really a splendid book. Having a subject as fascinating as Villiers must make the author's job a little easier, but Paul has really hit this out of the park. I have a bias toward the between-the-wars period anyway, so I was ready to be impressed and I was not let down. The amount of research that went into the book is evident, as is the affection the author has for his subject, without coming anywhere near hagiography. Unlike many other bios about prominent subjects, this book does not come across as an appointments diary with a little meat on the bones. It's almost as if I'd met Amherst Villiers myself.

Paul, if you see this could you fill in a few blanks for me? What is the current ownership/location of Amherst's personal Blower, and the Phantom III? You briefly mentioned a Ferrari 250 GT. Do you have more details....chassis number, model, the shop that carried out the restoration?

And, how are Charles and Janie getting on?

I recommend this book highly.

Jack


Well, first let me thank Graham Gauld for his 'Am I Alone' topic (http://forums.autosp...howtopic=121683). Without that, I may never have learned about display options on this board, and may have continued to think that my inability to sensibly follow a thread while munching a pasta in the office had been caused by the colleagues who euphemistically call themselves Support! And I might never have found your lovely comments Jack, for which I thank you heartily.

Yes, Amherst's eventful, wide-ranging 91 years did represent one hell of an opportunity and it still puzzles me that his story was still up for grabs. I have to say that right now is a wonderful time for biographers. The folk whose lives should be recorded for posterity often wrote letters and their correspondents often kept them, whereas who files emails today? Then again, without google, I'd never have found the Villiers family correspondence in Limerick University, Amherst's plans for a seaplane race on Lake Michigan in a Chicago University archive, or his correspondence with Sir Winston Churchill about a painting. If any TNFer is even vaguely thinking about writing a book, my advice is ... DO IT NOW!

To answer your specific questions:
Last I heard, Amherst's old Blower was still owned by John Bentley in Yorkshire.
The latest restoration of the PIII can be followed on Alpine Eagle's web site at http://www.alpineeag.../Malaysian.html
I have no detail on the Ferrari, aside from passing comments in contemporary interviews and family correspondence, though I recall the workshop was in Woking
Charles and I have been in regular email dialogue since he read the book. The credit crunch hasn't been kind to modern art practitioners but he's well and he's getting by.
Janie isn't a great fan of me personally and I understand doesn't like the book. Her health isn't good but she too is getting by and she still lives in the Kensington studio designed by her father.

Mention of my subject's children reminds me of a piece I read on Ion Trewin's web site last night. I've just finished his splendid biography of diarist/historian/politician/philanderer Alan Clark. The courage of Clark's widow in authorising the biography and just letting Trewin get on with it is impressive. As you'd expect, Clark comes out of it less well than he does in his own Diaries, and he was hardly a paragon of virtue in them! Anyway, the hyperlinks on Ion's website are misbehaving on my machine, but for a fascinating consideration of whether it is nobler in the mind to write an authorised or unauthorised biography, go to www.iontrewin.com, click on the Alan Clark tab and then scroll down to Ion's article in the Independent, 'Whose Life Is It Anyway?'

Thanks again Jack.

And best wishes to TNF and all who read her for a wonderful 2010.

Paul

#4823 KJJ

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 22:35

[edit] Can anybody remind me of Mrs Lace's first name? It seems to have slipped my memory!


Mrs Alfred Clucas Lace ....... I believe it was Nellie.

#4824 ndpndp

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 07:37

Mrs Alfred Clucas Lace ....... I believe it was Nellie.

Ken, AFAIK it was Betty, but I could be wrong......

ADAM

#4825 KJJ

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:00

Ken, AFAIK it was Betty, but I could be wrong......

ADAM


Hi Adam - Maybe that 1930s fashion for calling folk by first names that are totally unrelated to what is on their birth certificate is to blame? I've seen A C Lace called Bob and Tom but if he was indeed Alfred C then the only bride who married an Alfred C Lace in England and Wales in the appropriate time slot was called Nellie Shaw ..... of course they could have got married in Scotland!

Perhaps Vitesse will regain his memory?

#4826 ndpndp

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:14

Hi Adam - Maybe that 1930s fashion for calling folk by first names that are totally unrelated to what is on their birth certificate is to blame? I've seen A C Lace called Bob and Tom but if he was indeed Alfred C then the only bride who married an Alfred C Lace in England and Wales in the appropriate time slot was called Nellie Shaw ..... of course they could have got married in Scotland!

Perhaps Vitesse will regain his memory?

Yes, Ken. You are right re. 1930s "names".
I believe she was from the Isle of Man, where ACL's grandfather owned a hotel. Her names were Phoebe Elizabeth.
Of course following the convention of the time she was almost always referred to as Mrs. A.C. Lace.

ADAM

#4827 David McKinney

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 10:23

Of course following the convention of the time she was almost always referred to as Mrs. A.C. Lace.
ADAM

And her husband too was always referred to simply by his initials. I didn't know until today that he actually had any first names :)

#4828 KJJ

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 12:15

Thanks Adam

Googling around it seems that Mr Lace volunteered to fight for Finland against the Soviets in the Winter War. Tried to get back to England from Sweden in 1942 but his vessel was intercepted by the Germans and scuttled. He didn't die until 1978 though. For the collectors of birthdates he was born 4 April 1897.

Sorry to have taken the thread off topic.

Edited by KJJ, 14 January 2010 - 12:18.


#4829 karlcars

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 18:18

I see that someone said the following about "Red-Hot Rivals":

"Indeed, Red Hot Rivals covers the Maserati vs Ferrari war on the technical side, and does it remarkably well. However, it covers 1947-69 only and does not look at the Scuderia Ferrari run Alfa Romeos in the 30s."

This is not so as the book has an opening chapter that sets the scene for the future conflicts, covering the 1930s and the battles between Maserati and the cars of the Scuderia Ferrari. Yes, it does deal with the "technical side" but not exclusively.

I guess I have to defend "Italian Racing Red" as well. It is written like its counterparts to cover a wide spectrum, to be sure, but reviewers have been kind about the insights and excursions into little-known topics provided by these books.

#4830 ERault

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 19:18

I see that someone said the following about "Red-Hot Rivals":

"Indeed, Red Hot Rivals covers the Maserati vs Ferrari war on the technical side, and does it remarkably well. However, it covers 1947-69 only and does not look at the Scuderia Ferrari run Alfa Romeos in the 30s."

This is not so as the book has an opening chapter that sets the scene for the future conflicts, covering the 1930s and the battles between Maserati and the cars of the Scuderia Ferrari. Yes, it does deal with the "technical side" but not exclusively.


I wonder, Mr Ludvigsen, if you set yourself to prove that great books can be written by petty men. Yes, if you must insist, Red Hot Rivals offers a chapter, or around 12 pages (for a 336 pages book), on the prewar years. Does that make it the book to recommend to someone looking to learn about italian teams in prewar Grand Prix racing ? I don't think so. That does not, however, detract from the high regard I have for your book on the area it does cover in details, as I said above.

E. RAULT

#4831 helioseism

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 04:01

New book:

SACRAMENTO – Dirt Capital of the West
by Tom Motter

Here at last is the long-awaited volume on the history of Sacramento-area race tracks, including West Capital Speedway, Hughes Stadium, Lazy J Speedway, Old Sacramento Fairgrounds, Cal-Expo Fairgrounds, and Sportsman K-9 Park. The book is a photographic lesson in why “dirt is beautiful,” from a 1913 auto road race to the Silver Crown 100 in 2000 and covers midgets, sprints, super-modifieds, dirt Indy cars and Silver Crown cars.

Hard cover with dust jacket, 203 pages, over 175 B&W photos.

Price: $69.95

Link

#4832 longhorn

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 10:52

A new book on Varzi from Giorgio Nada Editore. The 12th book in the superb "Racing Lives" series, this is an expanded (hardback plus dustwrapper) version of Una Curva Cieca by Teruzzi & edited by Cancellieri. Italian text with over 200 b&w photos.

Details at http://en.giorgionad...odotto_357.aspx

#4833 maoricar

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 16:18

Could anyone suggest booklists / titles / authors covering :

History of motorsport in NZ esp. from the earliest days to, say. the 1970's. This might also include annuals / histories of various car clubs or organizations.
History of the development of motoring and the motor industry in NZ.
As an alternative, maybe a suggestion as to a reputable and knowlegable book seller, someone who could be worked with from a distance, would be equally helpful

All suggestions appreciated, thanks

Neville MILNE







#4834 monoposto

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 17:33

Could anyone suggest booklists / titles / authors covering :

History of motorsport in NZ esp. from the earliest days to, say. the 1970's. This might also include annuals / histories of various car clubs or organizations.
History of the development of motoring and the motor industry in NZ.
As an alternative, maybe a suggestion as to a reputable and knowlegable book seller, someone who could be worked with from a distance, would be equally helpful

All suggestions appreciated, thanks

Neville MILNE


"Flat to the Boards" - A history of motor sport in New Zealand from 1901 - 1940

A.R.E. ( Dick ) Messenger and Douglas E. Wood
Printed and distributed by Craig Printing Co. Ltd
67 Tay Street, Invercargill, New Zealand

1985

ISBN 0 473 00322 8

I do not know if it is still available - mine cost NZ$ 34.95 from Technical Books, Auckland, some time ago !

There are a couple available on abebooks :

http://www.abebooks....T TO THE BOARDS

including one in the US




Edited by monoposto, 16 January 2010 - 17:47.


#4835 sterling49

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 19:31

A great present from mum at Christmas, "Safari Rally" by Reinhard Klein, John Davenport and Helmut Deimel. A fantastic record of the Safari Rally through all its manifestations.......superb colour photos in a large format, so evocative in showing the African plains and skies. Regular TNF poster, Fred Gallagher, has a few entries in the book, winning the event three times and being placed highly on numerous other occassions. I visited Kenya in 1993, just my luck to stay at Bamburi Beach, just after the cars had left there..............A great book for any rally enthusiasts :up:

Edited by sterling49, 16 January 2010 - 19:32.


#4836 maoricar

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 16:40

Monoposto.............thanks for pointing me in the right direction, as a result, I have purchased 'Flat to the boards.." and several other motoring related books relative to NZ, from TE Warth Esq........and the timing is spot-on...a nice birthday present ..to myself.
Thanks again for taking the time

Neville Milne

#4837 monoposto

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 18:07


My pleasure - there is nothing quite like the feeling of expectation of a parcel arriving, especially of motoring books !


#4838 maoricar

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 01:40

Monoposto.............thanks for pointing me in the right direction, as a result, I have purchased 'Flat To The Boards.." and several other motoring related books relative to NZ, from TE Warth Esq........and the timing is spot-on...a nice birthday present ..to myself.
Thanks again for taking the time

Neville Milne

#4839 Alan Cox

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 16:52

There has been some discussion on the Northern TNF meeting's thread about Roger Nathan's (now out of print and difficult to obtain) book, 'An Adventurous Life The Costin-Nathan Story', and the possibility of obtaining copies for interested parties. David McKinney has suggested that it might be of interest to those who never read that particular thread, so here it is http://forums.autosp...p;#entry4084447

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#4840 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 17:11

Is anyone familiar with this new release?

History of Scuderia Ferrari: Motorsport, Scuderia Ferrari, Alfa Romeo, Spa 24 Hours, Alfa Romeo 8C, Alfredo Ferrari, Tazio Nuvolari, Giuseppe Campari, Achille Varzi, Louis Chiron.

According to the graphic of the cover, you are promised: "High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA Articles!"

Yours for only $56.

It seems that the editors (Frederic P. Miller, Agnes F. Vandome, and John McBrewster) are happy to also provide you with other books, all with the same claim it appears, at rather steep prices.

The "books" are published by "Alphascript Publishing," which seems to have caught the attention of even WIKIPEDIA

Am I missing something here?

#4841 David McKinney

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 18:45

So, someone sweats over a piece to share with the world via Wikipedia, then someone else comes a long and makes money out of a book. I hope all contributors are being reimbursed :)

#4842 Mark A

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 20:55


A book question.

I noticed a Grp C & IMSA book on the Hortons stand at Stoneleigh yesterday. It was a double volume with slipcase. Wanted to have a closer look but the chap on the stand seemed to be trying to sell a painting and I gave up after 10mins meaning to go back later but forgot.

Anyone know this book and whether it's any good or not?


Oh and re-sticky the thread please!



Have a look, I think that must be this one :

http://www.johnstark...publish_nr.html

On the subject, you can't go wrong with Ian Briggs' "Endurance Racing 1982-1991".

Edit : just noticed it was supposed to be an update version of Briggs' work I was talking about. I can't comment on the value of the updated bits, but it would prove difficult to go bad starting from this.


Well it took a while (10 Months) but I finally managed to buy a copy of Golden Era The History of Group C & IMSA GTP by Ian Briggs & John Starkey from Hortons at the Autosport show on Sunday.

Really wish I'd got it last year as it looks like a great book packed with loads of info.

(Just realised how cheap it on John Starkey's website now :cry: )

#4843 Herbert

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 15:58

I just bought a used copy of “Mercedes in Motorsport” by Alan Henry. I thought of Henry as a very god author, but what a disappointment! The chapters about the the beginnings of Mercedes in motorsports, the 1930s and the 50s are quite interesting, but also – for my taste - a little bit anglocentric (Moss and DSJ at the Mille Miglia etc.). But they have some nice pictures as well. What really annoyed me was how Henry treated the Sauber-Mercedes era in Group C, DTM and IndyCars. Just 29 lines about the championship and Le Mans winning season in 1989? And just a little bit more about 1990? Sorry, but that’s definitely not enough. And just two pages about the DTM which was in the late 80s and 90s the most important racing program of Mercedes. They spent 40-50 million Mark there per season. But Henry writes nothing about the struggle to win the DTM. That they only succeeded in their fifth year of trying.
But what I never expected were the mistakes in that book. What is a Sauber C76? And the Sauber-Mercedes C291 did not make its race debut at Suzuka in 1990. Oh, and btw AMG did not start to build DTM cars in 1986, they started in 1988… Just to mention a few. It seems that Henry wrote it all in rush without checking the facts or that he didn`t care at all. Probably it was more important to write a nice biography of Norbert Haug (“A modern Neubauer”), so that that Haug would write a Foreword for Henry’s book.

Edited by Herbert, 19 January 2010 - 15:59.


#4844 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 11:42

Michael Olivers book : Tales from the Toolbox is a great little book with a lot of good stories from the mechanics of the 60's and 70's . Plus many good pictures also in colour and even some rather sensational transporter ones. Lots of info from the time then and as well on many of the mechanics who were not just mechanics then. With support from and to the Grand Prix Mechanics Charital Trust it really sells at a low price , I think. A must for any with interest in motor racing , especially those years.

#4845 D-Type

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 20:50

Can I add a little to Bjorn's comments.

Tales from the Toolbox has 11 chapters ranging from "Getting There," which includes stories of rebuilding transporters en route using parts from an Italian scrapyard and the like, through chapters on negotiating customs, all night sessions, helping each other out, after race parties and other elements of a mechanic's life to candid opinions of top drivers, also-rans and team owners.

Michael Oliver has interviewed countless mechanics and ex-mechanics and much of the book is direct quotations. He also includes potted biographies in side boxes which illustrate the different backgrounds and routes that led them to become racing mechanics.

There are some books you read once, there are some you read once and then retain for reference, and there are some you read once and read again and again and dip into to find favourite parts. Tales from the Toolbox most definitely comes into the final category.

If only the book were twice as long! (Hint: Michael, What about More tales from the Toolbox?)

If you haven't got a copy - get one now! I guarantee you won't regret it.

#4846 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 21:36

So right Duncan , I really hope it will be a great succes and I have suggested Michael Oliver a second book along those lines , and in fullsize!

And I could change the line below to : No mechanics - no race !

Edited by Bjørn Kjer, 22 January 2010 - 21:37.


#4847 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 22:04

I'll certainly be buying Tails from the Toolbox. It sounds right up my street. Thanks for the recommendations.

For an older book in the same vein, I strongly recommend Elizabeth Nagle's The Other Bentley Boys (Harrap, 1964). Not perhaps the hardest book in the world to write, just great tracts of quotes from the likes of Nobby Clarke and Leslie Pennal, and a hopeless index, but a wonderful book full of fascinating insights and anecdotes.

And if you're looking for a more recent mechanic's tale, you'll not beat ... The Mechanic's Tale (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1999) by Steve Matchett, an intelligent and articulate writer.

Rgds

Paul

#4848 carplugs

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 21:54

Yes, Ken. You are right re. 1930s "names".
I believe she was from the Isle of Man, where ACL's grandfather owned a hotel. Her names were Phoebe Elizabeth.
Of course following the convention of the time she was almost always referred to as Mrs. A.C. Lace.

ADAM

Betty Lace was in fact Phoebe Elizabeth Mychreest (Maiden Name), she was at the time married to Jerry Macqueen but took the Lace name,
She later married Brian Carbury who became a famous ace in the Battle of Britain.


#4849 helioseism

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 01:27

New book:

History of San Jose Auto Racing 1903-2007
By Dennis Mattish

This is the complete history of San Jose auto racing starting in 1903, when Barney Oldfield barnstormed into San Jose to try and set a world speed record, all the way to the final San Jose Grand Prix held in 2007.

Nearly every great Twentieth Century American race car driver has raced in San Jose at some point in his career. It is documented here, as is year-by-year coverage of all 15 race tracks that ever held a race in San Jose. History of San Jose Auto Racing tells the grim and humorous of the drivers and cars, oval tracks, road courses, and drag strips that were part of the San Jose racing scene from the time the facility was built until its demise. The fate of land afterward is not left out.

History of San Jose Auto Racing was written by author/historian/photographer Dennis Mattish, lifelong racing fan, whose award.wininng photos are contained within.

288 pages
725 photos and illustrations (280 in color)
Forward by Joe Leonard
55-year span of top ten point standings
Track records
Complete list of every Midget race and winner
Complete list of every AAA, USAC, WoO, NARC & GSC race and winner
Complete list of deaths
History of San Jose's first two airports
$69.95

Link


#4850 Ted Walker

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 08:49

A bit of a "plug" The long awaited Paul Skilleter(with the help of Ted Walker on photos) will be launched at Race Retro in April . It is very good(really)