Jump to content


Photo

Speed's ultimate price: the toll...


  • Please log in to reply
3023 replies to this topic

#201 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 21 November 2000 - 01:08

There was another driver killed in the accident that claimed the life of Don Branson. He was Dick Atkins and he was driving a Meskowski-Chevrolet sprintcar when Branson's car bounced off the wall at Ascot Park, California, and into his path. The date was November 12, 1966.

Advertisement

#202 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 21 November 2000 - 01:45

Jean Rolland, aged 32, the French rally and racing driver was killed at Montlhery on September 17, 1967 while testing a Type 33 Alfa Romeo in preparation for the 1,000 kilometre race.

#203 Indy500

Indy500
  • Member

  • 44 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 21 November 2000 - 21:03

I've been reading a novell recently called (in Dutch) 'De meute' by Heike Doutiné. It's a crap story but every time a new chapter (or race) starts she tells a tale of a pilot who crashed fataly on that circuit.

When she comes to Monza she also gives a list with names of pilots that perished on the autodromo.

There are a few pilots that are not in my list, but I've got some doubts about the accuracy of her list.

Her list :

1931 Philippe Etancelin (I think that's impossible because he drove in the WC F1 in 1950)
1931 in the same accident there were 2 spectators killed
1954 Rupert Hollaus (totaly unknown)
1961 Tirri F. (totaly unknown)
1964 Bagnalasta Norberto (totaly unknown)
1965 Spychinger, Tommy (totaly unknown)
1967 Pittard, Boley (totaly unknown)
1976 Tordi (totaly unknown)
1976 Buscherini (totaly unknown)

Has anyone got more info on those drivers ?





#204 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 21 November 2000 - 21:35

1931 Philippe Etancelin (I think that's impossible because he drove in the WC F1 in 1950)
1931 in the same accident there were 2 spectators killed

Phi-Phi actually crashed at the 1931 Monza GP, killing three spectators

1954 Rupert Hollaus (totaly unknown)

Austrian Bike racer, posthumously World Champion that year in 125cc class. Died at Lesmo while practicing.

1961 Tirri F. (totaly unknown)
1964 Bagnalasta Norberto (totaly unknown)
1965 Spychinger, Tommy (totaly unknown)

Swiss (?) Sports Car racer

1967 Pittard, Boley (totaly unknown)

The name rings a couple of bells, but I don't know the tune...

1976 Tordi (totaly unknown)
1976 Buscherini (totaly unknown)

Otelo Buscherini, Italian Bike racer

#205 Don Capps

Don Capps
  • Member

  • 5,933 posts
  • Joined: May 99

Posted 21 November 2000 - 22:02

1965 Spychinger, Tommy (totaly unknown) -- Killed at the Monza 1000kms (April?) driving a Ferrari if I recall. Horrible accident, big crash and he was decapitated, the photos of which were in at least one paper the next day. Ugh.


1967 Pittard, Boley (totaly unknown) I think he has already been mentioned -- details escape me at the moment, but had been a pretty fair F3 driver for a few seasons.

#206 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 10,872 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 22 November 2000 - 07:51

Without resorting to any books, I can confirm that Bo Pittard was an F3 driver, and I think he was killed during one of those mad Lottery Grand Prix scrambles that used to take place about 10 times a year at Monza.

#207 Don Capps

Don Capps
  • Member

  • 5,933 posts
  • Joined: May 99

Posted 23 November 2000 - 16:21

Sadly, I keep stumbling across more names to add to The List:

Luciano Lombardi, works Lancia driver & co-driver with Sandro Munari, was killed during the Monte Carlo Rallye in January 1968 when the Fulva coupe collided with a non-competing vehicle. He was 36.

Les Stanway, 71 years old, died of injuries when Stephen Nairn's BMW crashed at Oulton Park on May 25 1980. He died the following Friday. At the time of the accident, he was serving as an Observer. Previously, he had been a marshal at Oulton Park and other circuit for 27 years.

I hate to even think of what The List looks like now after all these additions; worse, there are more that we keep finding.

#208 Darren Galpin

Darren Galpin
  • Member

  • 2,140 posts
  • Joined: April 00

Posted 24 November 2000 - 10:55

In addition to all of this, a spectator was killed at Macau on the 19th November. A Renault Megane touring car had its brakes fail on the main straight at 140mph, and it shot up the escape road. It went through several tyre barriers, glanced off a stationary safety car, before exiting the circuit, hitting two pedestrians, and coming to rest against a truck in the middle of a roundabout. One of the pedestrians subsequently died.

#209 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 24 November 2000 - 11:12

Strange that the Monza list didn't include the better known ones...
Barry, change your date on Reg Smith, it was 1960. Also, put into the annals Tony Burke, who died racing a midget in the sixties after killing the spectators at Bathurst in 1955.
I looked over the Ian Mountain car at Ian Tate's in Melbourne, he's about to get serious about rebuilding it... the crash that killed Mountian was also 1955 at Gnoo Blas.
The Pryce accident has always given me the horrors, now I see this picture, the first image I have ever seen of it.

#210 jmcgavin

jmcgavin
  • Member

  • 180 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 24 November 2000 - 17:53

I always have extremly mixed feeling about that sort of stuff, a mate once bought a video with loads of stuff like the Tom Pryce accident, plus others like Ronnie and Villeneuve and Paletti when we were all young teenagers and if its anything like as horrific as I remember I don't want anything to do with it really

#211 Don Capps

Don Capps
  • Member

  • 5,933 posts
  • Joined: May 99

Posted 24 November 2000 - 22:55

Sadly, yet more names to add to The List:

Robin Smith, 1968.April.06, Silverstone -- BARC Meeting. His Ford Mustang hit the bank at Woodcote. He was from Liverpool.

Brent Hawes, 1969.April.20, Ruapuna Park, NZ., Canterbury CC Meeting. Aged 30. His Beggs-Chevy ran off the track at the end of the straight and hit the banking; he was ejected and thrown 35m to his death.

Dickie (James Richard) Stoop, 1968.May.19, Croft. While driving his Porsche 911S, suffered coronary thrombosis, veered off track into banking.

John Woodbridge & John Harvey, 1968.June, during a private practice session at Snetterton when the Jaguar XK-E which Woodbridge was driving & Harvey was the passenger, crashed.

Stuart Howitt, 1968.June.15, Oulton Park. Crashed while driving his Hillman Imp.

Chris Lambert, 1968.July.28, Zandvoort. Collided with Regazzoni during the Grote Prijs van Zandvoort Euro F2 round. Was driving a Brabham BT23.

Ab Goedemans, 1968.August.30, Nurburgring. Crashed during Frday practice for the 500km race. Driving an Abarth 1000SP. From the Netherlands.

Jimmy Goddard, 1968.September.02, Croft. Crashed during practice on Monday driving his TVR Vixen. He was 35.

David Pearson, 1968.September.16, Cadwell Park. Spun his Ford Anglia, which rolled, tossing him out. He died a day after the accident. He was 29.

Leon Dernier -- "Elde" -- 1969.July.26, Spa-Francorchamps. Hit telephone pole at the Masta Kink at the wheel of a Mazda 10A sedan early on in the 24 hour race. He was 57.

#212 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 25 November 2000 - 01:59

Another two to add to this ever-growing list.

Jon Thorne was killed when he crashed his Formula Ford Merlyn at Snetterton on July 14, 1974.

Geoff Coles died after crashing his MG J4 at Snetterton on August 18, 1974. Coles had been competing since 1937 but his final race was his first at Snetterton since 1950. His car was not fitted with seat belts and Coles was thrown from the vehicle after hitting the bank at Russell.

#213 Indy500

Indy500
  • Member

  • 44 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 26 November 2000 - 10:04

I'm now reading Driving Forces, and I found a few other fatalaties in that race, but there is one accident on wich I don't know if the driver got away with it or not.

In the book Rudolf Carraciola's girlfriend Charly is talking to Rudy about the wife of the French driver Chassagne (riding a Talbot) that had crashed and how his wife prayed and cried, but the writer doesn't specify if he was killed or not ?

Anyone got some more on this crash ?


I've now converted the excel sheet into a access database, so for those who want it, let me know


#214 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 28 November 2000 - 08:49

Joe Gregory died on September 1, 1974 after crashing his car (an Anglia I believe) the previous day at Llandow.

Tom Hilliar died in a road accident near his home in Essex, Connecticut. Aged 32, Hilliar did a season in Europe in 1973 with a F3 Ensign. He was also runner-up in the SCCA National Formula C Championship in 1970 and 1972.

Phil Scragg died on November16, 1974 while competing in a sprint meeting on the Silverstone circuit. He spun his V12 E-type backwards into the bank at Stowe. In a strange twist Phil's 20-year-old son died only hours later at the wheel of his Ferrari in a road accident in Cheshire.

Chris White died when he crashed his TVR Tuscan at Knicker Brook at Oulton Park on July 27. 1974.

Paulo Monti died in a road accident near his home in Italy in July 1974. He had been a class winner in the 1974 Monza 1000 kms co-driving a 2-litre Chevron with Peter Smith.

Hiroshi Kazato died on June 2, 1974 while racing a Chevron B23 sports car at the Mount Fuji circuit. He was involved in a multiple collison.

Silvio Moser died on May 28, 1974 in a Swiss hospital where he had been taken following his crash in the Monza 1000 kms on April 25. His 2-litre Lola-BMW ran out of road and collided with a car that had been abandoned on the side of the track. Minutes before Moser had made a pit stop and, trying to protect a slim lead in the 2-litre class, had left the pits without doing up his seat belts. Apparently he was only doing 80 mph when he hit the stationary car, an impact he would surely have survived had he been wearing his belts.

An unusual death was the drowning of Marc Dinh. One of the Far East's better known rally drivers, Dinh was swept away by a wave when his car was washed from a river causeway while recceing for the Caledonian Safari. He had been entered in the rally to drive a Toyota Celica.


#215 Indy500

Indy500
  • Member

  • 44 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 28 November 2000 - 16:16

Has anyone got a list of people who died in the Paris-Dakar rallyraid ?

That amount should rise to about 40 I imagine.

Anyone on that ?


#216 Dave Ware

Dave Ware
  • Member

  • 747 posts
  • Joined: March 00

Posted 28 November 2000 - 18:10

Another source of info would be every issue of RACER magazine. In each issue they have a small, respectful section ("We Remember") to remember those who have died, although they also list those who died of natural causes. Ummm...I do have every issue of RACER, in a very disorgainzed fashion. I might be able to help somewhat.

Or, you might try contacting RACER to see where their source info came from.

No one has yet mentioned the American driver B. J. Swanson, who during his brief professional career, nipped closely at the heels of Redman and Andretti in American F5000. I would like to include in the post some of Gordon Kirby's comments, so I will post that when I next log in from home, perhaps this weekend.

Nothing wrong with compiling this list. It is the danger, and the occasional death, that gives racing it's meaning. Otherwise this is just high-tech bumper cars, with drivers who aren't doing anything really special.

Dave

#217 Francis

Francis
  • Member

  • 42 posts
  • Joined: June 00

Posted 29 November 2000 - 00:00


I have just stumbled upon the Autosport report of Mark Colton's accident during the British Hillclimb event on the 5th August 1995 at Craigantlet.

During his opening practice run the front wing failed and folded back under the car, and he struck a telegraph pole head-on.

The report also states that his was the first fatal accident on a hillclimb in Northern Ireland since Neville Johnson at Spelga Dam 'more than twenty years ago.'

It also mentions that he was only the third driver to be killed in a British Hillclimb Championship event.

The other two were;

Bill Sleeman, from Jersey, killed when he crashed his blown Cooper-JAP at Bouley Bay in 1955.

Mike Gray who died when he flipped his Cooper T45-Chevrolet at Barbon Manor's first bend in 1964.


#218 Dave Ware

Dave Ware
  • Member

  • 747 posts
  • Joined: March 00

Posted 29 November 2000 - 01:14

Here is what Gordon Kirby wrote about B. J. Swanson in 1975:

"It is exquisitely rare. It has happened only once or twice in a generation of American road racing. A driver comes from nowhere and is almost immediately running with the best. There have been others before, Dan Gurney, Mark Donohue. This time it was B. J. Swanson.

There was something special about Swanson. Something that triggered memories of a young Gurney or a young Donohue. It was partly his smoothness. On the track he was cool, precise, consistant. His driving had that stamp of inbred maturity drawn from a source more amorphus than experience.

Away from the track he was matter of fact. He seemed to accept the fact that he was capable of driving his Bay Racing Lola only a tick or two slower than Andretti or Redman, as if it was a perfectly natural occurance. Yet, he did so with a modesty that rang true. He would give a calm assessment of his performance that would virtually lull a listener into believing that there was nothing very special about a young driver, only months removed from club racing, emerging as a serious challenger to two of the fastest and most experienced driver/team combinations in motor racing.

July thirteenth at Watkins Glen was potential realized. Racing for the first time on that very fast and demanding New York circuit, Swanson qualified fourth, bested only by Andretti, Redman, and Jean-Pierre Jarier. In that, his third professional race, Swanson was faster than Al Unser, Jackie Oliver, David Hobbs, Graham McRae, and Warwick Brown. In the feature he was nipping at Unser's tail and cooling holding off the accomplished Jarier. He finished a spectacular third."

(I live two hours from Mid-Ohio. I can't imagine why I didn't go to the 1975 race.) On the first lap of the August 10, 1975 event his throttle jammed open on the first lap, and he crashed into the earthen embankment of the auto bridge. Kirby reports that he died three days later. He was twenty-six.

I saw Swanson in the garages at Watkins Glen that year. There was a fan who was taking a photo of Swanson with his arm around the fans' wife. "Kiss him, Bev," the guy said. Corny, but Swanson smiled and played the part gracefully. As would Gurney or Donohue.

Dave

#219 Mike Argetsinger

Mike Argetsinger
  • Member

  • 948 posts
  • Joined: April 00

Posted 29 November 2000 - 02:31

Dave - Thank you for that wonderful post on B.J. Swanson. He certainly was a rare talent and his death tragic. It is great to have him remembered and that is why I think this particular thread is so worthwhile. It really does honor the memories of those who lost their lives in our sport - particularly the lesser known names who also deserve to be remembered.

Denis Jenkinson has this to say in "The Racing Driver."

To reach the ultimate one must "Dice With Death" and often Death claims a victim, but when he does so under such circumstances let us not bewail the fact, but rather salute and admire a man who died doing his utmost in his own specialised sphere.



Advertisement

#220 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 29 November 2000 - 09:46

The mention of Phil Scragg and his son dying within hours reminds me of the deaths of Boris and Andrew Osman. They featured in a semi-documentary about the Granville train disaster of 1977, in which a train hit a staunchion of a bridge as it derailed, the bridge fell on the train and 80+ people died.
Boris, the father, was in charge of the investigation. He was also a serious member of the Australian Automobile Racing Club, the crowd that ran Warwick Farm. Andrew owned a Cooper Climax and went Historic Racing from a young age.
The closing scene in the mini-series was of the two of them (along with many others) throwing roses from the new bridge onto the railway line below at the scene of the horror.
Within months both were dead. Boris and Andrew died within a couple of days, Boris not unexpectedly, Andrew from the ruins of Crohn's disease, which he'd had for nearly twenty years, combined, I am told, with a belief that he need not give up alcohol. His mother denies this.
Andrew had a reputation as a hard charger both on the circuit and on the road. In Mille Miglia retrospectives he carved up the competitors (including Stirling Moss!) with his service car. In the Daytona 24-hour he drove Bruce Trenery's Camaro, and also at Sebring, and he ran the Panamerica event, too, whatever that was called.
For the date, Barry, it was a day or two after the Phillip Island Historic meeting of 1999.

#221 Rainer Nyberg

Rainer Nyberg
  • Member

  • 1,765 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 29 November 2000 - 16:14

I recently discovered some stuff on B.J. Swanson.
It was from his F5000 days. Apparently with just a few seasons of Formula Ford experience he was hired by Bob Bay and Jerry Eisert. They had purchased an ex-Brian Redman Lola T332 for Swanson.

His promising but brief career in 1975.
Long Beach - An inpressive 7th in his début.
Mosport - Retired whilst in 6th.
Watkins Glen - A very fine 3rd place in his 3rd F5000 race.
Elkhart Lake - 4th place
Mid Ohio - Crashed fatally in the the first turn, his head hit the Armco and he died three days later, never having gained consciousness. He was 25 or 26 years old.

Info from Formula Car magazine, 1975 F5000 Season Review by Gordon Kirby.

Rainer



#222 Dave Ware

Dave Ware
  • Member

  • 747 posts
  • Joined: March 00

Posted 29 November 2000 - 18:23

Thanks, Mike and Rainer.

An odd footnote: The following year Bob Bay hired Warwick Brown to drive the F5000 car. They had a third at the Glen, and a fourth at Elkhart, as did Swanson in '75. Then, before going to Mid-Ohio, Bay ended his racing operation, for reasons that always remained a mystery to this racing fan. I always wondered if it was some kind of superstition on his part.

Dave

#223 MrAerodynamicist

MrAerodynamicist
  • Member

  • 13,712 posts
  • Joined: March 99

Posted 29 November 2000 - 21:56

It always amazes me the amount you guys can manage to dig up. Has all this been collected into one organised set? [Other than the .doc link on the first page?]

Also, how about those who died in search of the land speed record? I don't think thats too long a list but I expect their have been a few - Donald Campbell, although he died trying out a boat.

#224 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 29 November 2000 - 22:12

Malcolm Campbell and (I think) John Cobb also died trying for the Water Speed Record. I think you'll find a lot of bodies on that trail, too. Especially in the days of the beaches, like Daytona (claimed an American using two Miller engines in the one car, can't remember his name) and Pendine Sands, where Parry Thomas died. Both in the twenties, or was the Daytona one early in the thirties.. one of the engines came here and was used by Kleinig.

#225 MrAerodynamicist

MrAerodynamicist
  • Member

  • 13,712 posts
  • Joined: March 99

Posted 29 November 2000 - 22:22

Ray, after you mentioned Sir Malcolm, I wasn't sure which one it was I was thikning off. Anyway, it turns out that Malcolm died from illness.

#226 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 29 November 2000 - 23:17

True? I was sure he died trying to get the water record. Cobb must have, then. Have you been watching the Toyota ads?

#227 MrAerodynamicist

MrAerodynamicist
  • Member

  • 13,712 posts
  • Joined: March 99

Posted 29 November 2000 - 23:27

Well my research wasn't conclusive but according to http://www.brookland...st/campbell.htm thats how he died.

As for Toyota ads, no. Plus I'm a pommie so even if I did see a Toyota ad it would no doubt be different. [I assume you're refering to my sig, but this is prolly not the place for a discussion on my sig :)]

#228 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 29 November 2000 - 23:35

Okay, I'll go back to the Paddock for that...
Still surprised about old Mal...

#229 jmcgavin

jmcgavin
  • Member

  • 180 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 30 November 2000 - 12:50

A guy called Glen Leasher died at Bonneville in a LSR car called Infinity in 1960, the same session that Donald Campbell had a major accident



#230 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 01 December 2000 - 00:46

The American with the two Miller engines was, of course, Frank Lockhart, April 25, 1928.

#231 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 01 December 2000 - 00:57

Thanks for that... and Leasher's name was spelled incorrectly, it was 'Glenn'... or at least I'm fairly sure it was. I notice these things, 'Glen' is my middle name. Right before 'proofreader'...

#232 Dave Ware

Dave Ware
  • Member

  • 747 posts
  • Joined: March 00

Posted 02 December 2000 - 00:02

Hmmm...there were two Campbells, father and son, both in search of the World Land Speed Record. The son died trying for the record on water. I think it was a jet-powered boat. There was a special on Speedvision. Showed the fatal accident. The nose just lifted and turned the boat upside down. I forget how fast he was going.

If it is Sir Malcolm then Douglas must be the son. Or if is is Sir Douglas the Malcolm was the son.

Dave

#233 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 03 December 2000 - 06:56

Some more New Zealand dates:
•Waihi Beach meeting, 17 April 1926: A Hudson rolled on the last corner of the 12-mile feature handicap, killing its yound riding mechanic. Name of Tanner, from memory (no, not memory of 1927, but of when I read about the accident in the 1960s...)
•Ninety Mile Beach, 17 February 1927: A five-lap handicap race was stopped after a non-competing car hurtled down the beach and collided with Bert Fitzherbert’s Dort, killing its lady passenger.
•Greg Anderson was killed at a grasstrack meeting near Oamaru in 1956
•Les Moore’s accident was at Saltwater Creek, Timaru, in October 1960. He was 57.
•Ken Wharton’s Ardmore accident was on 12 January 1957 (or did someone already mention that?)
•Duncan Mackenzie, 22, was killed at Levin autumn 1961 (March? April?) when his T43 Cooper-Climax overturned on the first lap.
And some from South Africa:
•Tex Kingon 12 July 1955 East London
•Doug Duff 1956 East London
•Allan Shiers 8 July 1957 East London
Plus one in Rhodesia:
•Mike Stafford November 1957 Bulawayo


#234 MrAerodynamicist

MrAerodynamicist
  • Member

  • 13,712 posts
  • Joined: March 99

Posted 03 December 2000 - 12:41

Was wondering, how many deaths have been accounted for? It would be interesting (if morbid) to compare it to the number of deaths on roads.

#235 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 03 December 2000 - 23:53

Not even in the hunt... even assuming two or three thousand (which may not be out of context) for racing, there were years when there were that many deaths on Australian roads (and more) alone. NSW reached a high of about 1200 a year in the late sixties.
What are the American road death figures for that era, before belts, random breath tests and (finally) more impact-protective cars came into play?

#236 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 04 December 2000 - 00:03

You would have to relate that to the distance covered in racing and ordinary driving. I once did a calculation on such lines and came up with a ratio of around 10:1, i.e. 10 racing drivers killed to one road fatality. But, of course, such calculations can never be accurate!

#237 Don Capps

Don Capps
  • Member

  • 5,933 posts
  • Joined: May 99

Posted 07 December 2000 - 02:05

More on Tommy Spychiger:

I found this which looking for info on Buck Fulp (Yes! Another project...)

Ferrari 330P
S/N 0824

20/9/64 DNF (engine) Bridgehampton,#80 w/Scarfiotti (white with dark
rocker panels; '64 body; No Basket handle; 2 angled slots in the front
fenders and in the rear flank; some reports say it was a factory car
although it was under NART control it did not have NART markings; flat
rear deck with upright scoops in rearfenders).
27/9/64 2nd Mosport Canadian GP, #3, w/Scarfiotti

Scuderia Fillipinetti Car

18-19/4/65 6th Le Mans Trials, #15, w/Muller-Spychiger (although the
basket handle has been replaced it does have two angled slots in the
front fender! Red with white central stripe)

25/4/65 DNF (crash while lying 2nd, lap 35, Tommy Spychiger killed),
Monza 1000 Kms, #66, w/Spychiger-Muller


Fillipinetti sold the wreck together with the complete P3/4 0848 to
Bardinon in 1967.

1988 to Fabrizio Violati; Maranello Rosso (frame and parts)

1989 sold to David Piper

1990 rebuilt with new chassis and body by Allegretti; acquired engine
S/N 0822.

25/7/92 Christies's Meeting S/Stone, w/Piper

25/7/97 Coy's Historics w/Piper
1998 Piper rebuilt 0824 with original frame from 365 P plus engine from
S/N 0836
10/98 1st race of new 0824 at Imola
Piper has 2 x 0824's!!


#238 Ben Murphy

Ben Murphy
  • New Member

  • 1 posts
  • Joined: December 00

Posted 10 December 2000 - 06:31

I found a few others to add to the lists.

I have not seen this one on any list or i any perivous posts (sorry if i've missed it), but its hard to believe we've all forgotton the tragety of this years Goodwood festival of Speed, when John Dawson-Damer crashed his Lotus 63 at the end of the hill climb killing himself and one marshal. It happened on the 24th of June this year. He was living in Australia but he was from England originally right?

These others i found in Motor Racing Australia Magazine. They were found in the closed circuts section so they dont give any real dates for some of them, only the year (if lucky) so if anyone else can remeber anything about these plese help. Sorry again if there repeated.

On the 8th of Jan 1927 Australian Phil Gerlick died at the Maroubra Speedway after he went over the banking and hit a light pole. Dont know the car. The artical said that there were four peolpe killed at Maroubra but they only mention 1one.

Campbell Graham and his riding mechanic Alfred Peter both Australians crashed there P-Type MG at Needle Eye on the Pre-War Phillip Island track. It happend on the 1/1/35.

Les Cramp also passed away after crashing his 2-litre Ballot on the straight Betwee Young & Jakson and Gentle Ann corners on the Pre-war Phillip Island Track. This occoured in 1935, not sure of the date. He was Australian.

Jack Lanham was killed at Altona in his Vauxhall Lombard. There cars went into a corner side by side, Jack was in the middle and he got squeezed. He went up into the air and straight into these silly bolders they had lining the circut. This happened in 1954 but again i do not have a date. He was Australian.

H Lofts was killed on the 5/10/25 at Penrith Speedway. Thats al i got for that one.

Thats all at the moment.
Ben

#239 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 10 December 2000 - 08:07

Walter Czadek, 32, was killed at the Nurburgring on June 30, 1975 when his BMW 2002 crashed during the final practice for the next day's 1000km race.

Advertisement

#240 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 54,121 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 10 December 2000 - 13:45

Garlick, of course, died in an Alvis. The date of that Altona meeting is in the story (or the lap record schedule, at least), Ben, and it was either the first or second meeting, from memory. Also mentioned in this series as dying on one of the closed circuits was Vern Leech (AGP, 1939 at Lobethal), and Mick Geneve, who died in a minor race supporting the 6-hour event of 1959 (either Easter or June long weekend) in the same car that claimed Cramp's life.
This latter one was really strange. The car had been through the axe and handle replacement process several times, so no longer resembled the 1922 Targa Florio Ballot in any way. But the axles and wheels remained.
Cramp, an ex-motorcyclist, ran off the road and rolled the car on a straight at Phillip Island.
Geneve, an ex-motorcyclist, got into trouble and rolled the car on the straight at Caversham.

#241 Criceto

Criceto
  • Member

  • 201 posts
  • Joined: August 00

Posted 10 December 2000 - 17:29

I'm surprised that there has been little mention so far of the Brooklands motor course in this thread.

While the list of incidents there is grim indeed, it could be argued that a concrete speed bowl, with pre war safety standards, could be expected to have claimed more competitors than it actually did.

Here then, in date order, is what I have turned up on Brooklands.

August 3rd 1908, during the First O'Gorman Trophy
C Lane's Mercedes got into a slide, and hit the parapet of the bridge over the River Wey. Lane survived, but his riding mechanic, named Burke, was thrown across the river, and died instantly.

1913, Captain Percy Lambert lost his life during a speed record attempt on a 25hp Talbot.

August 7th 1922, during the BARC 6th 90mph Long Handicap
David Gibson left the Byfleet banking, touched the grass infield, and speared off the course, colliding with a corrugated iron marker on the track border. Gibson was competing in his first day's racing, and although his 1914 Grand Prix type Vauxhall was destroyed, his cousin, riding as mechanic, survived.

June 9th 1924, during the BARC 38th 100mph Long Handicap
Captain Jack Toop, driving Brocklebank's 1913 GP Peugeot, experienced wheel wobble high on the Byfleet banking, and had the misfortune to run over the top edge. His car landed on him.

March 22nd 1930.
Leonard Headlam was killed in a road accident on the way to the opening BARC meeting of the year. Reports vary, but it is suggested that he was driving his racing Delage at the time.

May 9th 1930 during the JCC Double-12 hours race
Two of the works Talbot 90s touched on the finishing straight, and Colonel CEC Rabagliati's car was flung into the spectator railings at the side of the circuit. While Rabagliati ultimately recovered from his injuries, his mechanic, HF Wolfe, was killed, as was an unfortunate spectator.

September 6th 1930, at a Brighton & Hove Motor Club event
AES Walter, a clubman running an M-Type MG Midget, attempted to take a corner on the Mountain course too quickly, apparently in pursuit of an Austin, and touched a sandbank. The car somersaulted, inflicting fatal injuries on the driver.

June 3rd 1932, at the JCC 1000 miles race
Harry Leeson, driving an MG C-Type Montlhery Midget, experienced a series of slides, which eventually pitched him into the parapet of the bridge over the paddock road. The car fell onto the road, narrowly missing a non-competing car.

September 24th 1932, during the BRDC 500 miles race
Perhaps the most well-known of Brooklands incidents, because of the ghastly, but often played newsreel footage that exists, and because of the controversy in recent times over the car involved. Clive Dunfee, shortly after taking on a driving stint from his brother Jack, put the wheel of his Bentley "Old Number One" over the lip of the Members Banking, close to the bridge. The car cartwheeled over the top, and again, narrowly missed a spectator's car on the approach road. Poor Dunfee was thrown onto the track.

September 16th 1933, in the BRDC 500 miles race
Maurice Watson, driving a C-Type Montlhery MG, lost control exiting Byfleet Banking, and crashed. The car somersaulted end over end, and the fuel tank ruptured, causing a fire which blocked the course. Poor Watson was beyond help, but blessedly was never conscious of what happened.

June 23rd 1934, at the BRDC British Empire Trophy
John Houldsworth, a novice driver on a Bugatti, attempted to give way for the faster Whitney Straight at the home banking turn under the Members Bridge. The car, out of shape, struck a straw bale and rolled.

June 1st 1936, before the Whitsun BARC meeting
On race morning, Kenneth Carr, a newcomer to racing, was practicing Harry Rose's "Monza" Alfa Romeo, when a spin on the banking resulted in a roll.

May 7th 1938, JCC International Trophy
This unfortunate incident, while not resulting in any competitor fatality, changed the course of racing car design, in a sad and unknowable way.

Joseph Paul's Delage caught fire opposite the pits, due to unspent fuel accumulating in a pool in the undershield. The inevitable spark caused flames to burst into the cockpit, and Joseph Paul attempted to get the car to the edge of the track. Baulked by AC Lace's Talbot-Darracq, badly burned and partly gassed, Paul touched the Talbot as it passed him, and both cars were pitched into a spectator area. A young woman named Peggy Williams was killed, and so too was Murray Jamieson, the brilliant young designer of the single-seat Austin racing cars.

Murray Jamieson's contribution to racing car development was already considerable, but it is easy to believe that had he lived, we would be uttering his name in the same breath as that of Reid Railton, Alec Issigonis and the like.

#242 Mike Argetsinger

Mike Argetsinger
  • Member

  • 948 posts
  • Joined: April 00

Posted 17 December 2000 - 23:12

Bob Goldich - March 1957 - Sebring 12 Hour - Arnolt Bristol

Bob McLean - March 1966 - Sebring 12 Hour - Ford GT-40

I believe with reasonable certainty that these were the only driver fatalities at Sebring through 1969. Both accidents happened during the race itself.

#243 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 28 December 2000 - 03:21

I've been going through some old Autosports and have found another two names to add to the list.

Roy Bloxam, 34, was killed at Goodwood on May 22, 1961 when his Lister-Jaguar caught fire and crashed.

Leo Cella, 31, was killed sometime on the weekend of February 17/18, 1968 while testing an Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 on Alfa's private test track at Balocco.
Cella started his career in rallying and was twice Italian Rally Champion driving for Lancia. He also competed on the track for Lancia, finishing second in class at Sebring and winning a Group 2 race at Snetterton in a Fulvia. He finished a close second in the 1967 Targa Florio driving a Porsche 910. For 1968 he was to have continued rallying for Lancia and racing for Alfa Romeo.

#244 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 28 December 2000 - 05:27

I seem to remember that it was Roy Bloxham who actually died because he inhaled his chewing gum and it lodged in his wind pipe. He apparently had gasped when the emergency arose, and down went the gum.

In any case, when I read that (in Motor Sport, I think, DSJ) I stopped chewing gum while I was racing.

Does anyone else remember reading this?

#245 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 28 December 2000 - 10:36

Barry

I can find no reference in the Motor Sport mags around the time of the accident about Bloxam/Bloxham having swallowed his chewing gum. The report in Autosport spells his name without the "h" and says that the Lister-Jaguar caught fire before crashing while the Motor Sport report, written by W.B. has his name with the "h" and says that the car crashed and was burnt out.

The very next meeting at Goodwood on June 10, 1961 was also marred by a fatality. P.W.Thomas was killed when his Lotus-Ford crashed at Lavant Corner on the first lap of the second race.

#246 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 28 December 2000 - 16:05

Milan

It could have been someone else. Thanks for looking, though.

My memory links Bloxham with an Aston Martin (DB3S?).

And I think his wife, Jean Bloxham, also raced.

It is a long time ago, though...

#247 Milan Fistonic

Milan Fistonic
  • Member

  • 1,767 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 28 December 2000 - 16:56

Barry

I think you are right about the Aston Martin. That rings a bell with me as well. Yes Bloxham's wife did race. Boddy mentions her in his report.

#248 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 28 December 2000 - 17:12

There was no ‘h’ in the name. Roy was a well-known UK club driver in HWM-Jaguar, Lister-Jaguar etc. His wife raced a DB3S coupé amongst other things. I believe she has been Mrs Mike Salmon for many years.


#249 KzKiwi

KzKiwi
  • Member

  • 150 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 29 December 2000 - 20:28

I thought some of you may be interested in recent events that have occurred here in New Zealand, with regards to the deaths of 2 spectators at an historic race meeting held in Queenstown in 1998 (Slightly OT I know, but the repercussions should make you stop and ponder).

Below is a statement from MotorSport NZ that explains the incident and the consequences that have resulted from it.

There is deep concern throughout motorsport circles in New Zealand following the decision by the New Zealand Police to prosecute four volunteer officals involved with the Queenstown Street Road Race two years ago.

At the event Two spectators were killed following an accident where a competitors car left the circuit and entered an area where the spectators concerned were sitting.

"We have worked closely with the Police in their investigation of the incident and cannot agree with the decision they have reached to proceed with these prosecutions," President of MotorSport New Zealand, Stephen Kennedy, said. "At the request of the Police, we have an FIA International Circuit Inspector coming to New Zealand whose opinion we believe will have considerable impact on the outcome of the investigation. The Police decision to proceed before that report is available we believe to be exceptionally harsh on those charged. The four men concerned have the full support of MotorSport New Zealand and we have engaged senior counsel for their defence. It continues to be a very difficult period for them and their families as it will be some time yet before the matter goes to a full trial."

"Motorsport, like many other sports in New Zealand, relies heavily on volunteers. We will continue to provide all our officials with the full backing of our organisation. It is vital that we have trained and experienced track inspectors, licensed clerks of course, and stewards to provide oversight and management at events."

"Safety of both spectators and competitors is paramount in our sport. Our safety record is excellent given that there are over 900 events a year run under the umbrella of MotorSport New Zealand, with over 15,000 active participants plus hundreds of volunteers on whom we depend heavily."

"Because the matter is now before the Courts we cannot comment further on the details of this case but the fact the Police have taken it raises serious questions for offficials and volunteers in any sport or leisure activity that includes risk to either participants or spectators," Mr Kennedy said.


That last paragraph summarises my thoughts on the subject.

Imagine, if you will, the local club official at the Petanque club where you play being charged with manslaughter (or should that be personslaughter in todays politically correct world?) because a spectator was killed due to a ball that ricocheted off another ball?

The consequences of such cases are endless and only highlight the stupidity and shallowness of some legal systems, in the pursuit of finding someone or something accountable. After all, isn't motor racing termed a dangerous sport, and they don't print "Motor racing is dangerous, you enter at your own risk" on motor race meeting entry tickets for nothing.

There is a donation appeal currently doing the rounds at every motorsport meeting in NZ that is to contribute to the court and legal costs of the 4 volunteers charged. But it should not have to come to this!

I would be interested on members comments on all of the above, and am keen to know what other countries legal systems would allow similar situations like this to occur! Italy is one place that springs to mind.

Regards,

Kirk.






#250 Barry Lake

Barry Lake
  • Member

  • 2,169 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 30 December 2000 - 07:05

David

Surely if William Boddy spelled his name with an "h", that's the final word, isn't it? :lol:

Bloxam's family must have been spelling it incorrectly for generations.