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'Fangio - The Film' directed by Hugh Hudson


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#1 flat-16

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 14:41

Following the revelation in this thread ,that the respected director, Hugh Hudson, made a film about Fangio's life in the early seventies, and with a search suggesting the film hasn’t had a thread dedicated to it before, I believe a film of such potential importance deserves a dedicated thread.

Alan - what happened when your friend pursued releasing the film?

How many members here have seen the film? Was it ever transcribed into different formats, or has it always been under lock and key on cellulose?

Is there anything that could be done to persuade the copyright owners to release a DVD? Or even a limited screening at a specialist cinema?

Considering Hudson’s reputation, I’d expect the film to be pretty good.

Alan Cox provided a link to the book:
http://www.abebooks....3&sts=t&x=0&y=0

Bill Gavin gives some background information

The film even has a website in its honour: http://www.fangiofilm.com/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1052346/


Any info relating to how one could get to see this film would be gratefully received.


Justin

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#2 Alan Cox

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 14:48

Good idea to separate the various posts which have appeared here and there on TNF over the years.

My friend didn't get very far, possibly because he struggled to raise meaningful finance. I do seem to remember that it was Bill Gavin with whom he had some discussion, so Bill is probably better able to fill in a bit more detail.

As far as I am aware, it never progressed beyond the celluloid print.

#3 flat-16

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 15:00

Thanks, Alan.

I just put the phone down to a friend whose family run a Soho-based film distributor. He didn't know anything about the film. I've dangled a carrot by saying that such a film would have a potentially massive audience if released today, but it's probably a million to one shot... Most film distributors these days are looking for a really 'safe bet', often something that's formulaic and guaranteed to turn over some cash...

Is Giovanni Volpi still around? The problem as I see it is likely to be that Volpi isn't exactly short of cash, so you're unlikely to get much joy trying that tactic.


Justin

#4 jgm

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 10:47

I remember seeing this film at what must have been its 'premiere' in London. It was shown at the Commonwealth Institute in Kensington before a large audience. I can't recall the exact date. There was a Maserati 250F parked outside the hall and before the film DSJ went up onto the platform to give an introductory talk. It was a memorable evening.

#5 Rob Semmeling

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 11:54

This photo can be found in an obscure Nürburgring book published in 1971:


Posted Image


It shows a filmshoot with Fangio and Neubauer at the Ring in 1970. Presumably the HH one?

#6 David McKinney

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 12:02

1970 filming for a 1981 film?

#7 flat-16

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 12:41

It's a small world... One minute you post a query at TNF, the next, the owner of the distribution rights for the film contacts you...

I've been told that a DVD of the film will be available in the latter half of 2008 :up:

To say I can't wait would be an understatement.

If any of you would like a copy, my suggestion is to post your intention here so as to make the owner of the distribution rights aware that there's plenty of interest. Personally, I think that with the right publicity / getting mentioned in newpapers and journals etc, the DVD could really see some sales.


Justin

#8 Scuderia SSS

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 13:33

Originally posted by flat-16



Is Giovanni Volpi still around? The problem as I see it is likely to be that Volpi isn't exactly short of cash, so you're unlikely to get much joy trying that tactic.


Justin


Yes he is, living in the US, and somewhat particular about what questions he answers and what ones he doesn't.

#9 David McKinney

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 14:29

Which film, flat?
The Hudson cut or the (allegedly inferior) Volpi cut?

#10 bradbury west

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 15:46

Originally posted by jgm
I remember seeing this film at what must have been its 'premiere' in London..... I can't recall the exact date. There was a Maserati 250F parked outside the hall and before the film DSJ went up onto the platform to give an introductory talk. It was a memorable evening.


Since Jenks had been the official technical advisor to the Volpi/Hudson film it is logical that he should have been there at the screening. The notes in the eponymous DSJ book on Fangio linked to the film make Jenks' role clear. About the filming of the later race circuit sequences, it says,
Throughout 1971 nostalgic re enactments were filmed at racing speeds of the circuits odf Monaco, Reims, Silverstone and the Nurburgring all with Fangio at the wheel of his original cars.......Lancia Ferrari D50..... and so it goes on, mentioning also Neubauer's positive support.
Book details are
Fangio, edited by DSJ copyright Beachplex Ltd 1973
ISBN 0 7181 1079 X
Published by Michael Joseph Ltd etc etc.
We have discussed the book before, IIRC, on a thread about the JMF Chevrolet.
Roger Lund.

#11 Paul Jeffrey

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 15:48

I would certainly be very interested if this film was released. My understanding is that Murray Walker was brought in to 'commentate' over footage of the 1957 German GP. Not sure how that would work but I would hope that the picture quality should at least beat that of other footage of that race.

#12 flat-16

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 12:51

Originally posted by David McKinney
Which film, flat?
The Hudson cut or the (allegedly inferior) Volpi cut?


I didn't get a chance to ask the distributor and I doubt there will be a choice. To be honest, I'd be grateful to see either cut.

As I said in the thread, I have a dreadful feeling that the Monaco link I posted in the Youtube thread here could be taken from the film... The slow-mo sequence looks a tad 'Hudson-esque'...

If anyone's offended, I'll take the link down. I won't for the minute as I am not 100% sure it's from the film. Either way, it makes a great advert for the film :up:


Justin

#13 Arturo Pereira

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 15:51

I think the Monaco laps driving the D50 were part of that film. I have a CD here named Fangio! that also shows that lap, as well as the one at Monza with the Alfetta. The lap at Monaco shows a sign to the upper right corner of the screen that was the sign of an argentine TV channel, #13, so I bet the recording was taken from there. The last time I saw that film here was some years ago, so I also bet the recording is not new. I will dig here for more information about this film.

#14 flat-16

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 17:18

So, Arturo, does the film do justice to the great man? Did you enjoy it?


Justin

#15 JB Miltonian

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 18:54

I have a bad copy of "Fangio" on VHS, given to me (let's say by Mr. X) more than 20 years ago. I didn't realize that there was any question of it being available on VHS.

I haven't watched it for several years, but as I remember it was quite poor. Oh yes, there is plenty of good footage in there, but the orchestration is really bad and really annoying, and the whole thing seems to turn into one of those "Havoc" videos, with nothing at all to do with Fangio. I remember the Bandini crash is in there, and Pedro's crash, and lots of Indianapolis crashes (with musical accompaniment to make them look comical). The interviews weren't very good either. And yes, Murray Walker narrates the opening sequence of the 1957 Nurburgring.

Really, as I remember, less than half of it was about Fangio.

#16 Arturo Pereira

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 19:23

Originally posted by flat-16
So, Arturo, does the film do justice to the great man? Did you enjoy it?


Justin


Well, I enjoy any movie that shows Fangio driving :blush: Imo, the scenes that show Fangio driving and talking about his drivings are worth the view, but you can forget about the rest. Anyway, I would keep it or get it if I were you. If is not easy to find these kind of scenes nowadays :)

#17 flat-16

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 19:57

Thanks, Arturo + JB :up:

Given Hudson's reputation, I would have thought he'd get to the root of the issue, rather than concentrate on the lowest-common-denominator...

I wonder what the differences are in the edits? As Volpi would be considered a 'motor racing insider', you'd think he'd be adept at giving us an idea of what made JMF tick, wouldn't you?

I'm most distressed to hear there are fatal crashes set to music - very tasteless :down:

I'll still get the video though; if there's only a few more minutes like the Monaco footage it'll be worth having.


Justin

#18 Hackrider

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 06:32

Hi, New here and this is my first post. I would love to have a copy of the film/documentary both the original and the soon to be released version. My interest is piqued due to my owning one of the Maserati 250F recreations constructed for the film. It is my understanding that it/they were used at speed for filming. I have ordered Jenks book and hope it will shed some light on the history of the car for me. I wonder how many of the "several similar" cars are still around. I was interested to see the post from JGM, that he saw one of the cars at the premier in London in about 1981, I would like to hear more about what he remembered.

There are some threads on ferrarichat.com that have some recent comments on 1960's racing by Count Volpi and others that were there. No mention of the film tho.

Any research or other information about Fangio, the film or cars here or by PM would be appreciated. Oh here's a link to a pic of the 250F

http://autocollectio.....reation f.jpg

Hack :clap:

#19 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 12:24

Good work Hack, lovely looking car. Were the re-creation's based on anything or were the a completely new build?

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#20 bradbury west

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 13:04

[i]Originally posted by Hackrider . My interest is piqued due to my owning one of the Maserati 250F recreations constructed for the film..... I have ordered Jenks book and hope it will shed some light on the history of the car for me. I wonder how many of the "several similar" cars are still around. ]

In terms of 250F history, you may be interested to know that the very well reviewed book on the model by TNF's David McKinney is still available.
Usual disclaimer
Roger Lund

#21 Hackrider

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 16:56

The monoposto is a new build (1970ish) with an Alfa 2l engine and trans. There are many things that are made to look like the original but arenot functional like the rear suspenion. It is a hidden coil over system with leaf spring stubs out to the hub but not attached (when I figure out how to post pics I will show you) It also has disc brakes disguised as drum ones. The shifter is on the left side where the origional is on the right. So looks is what they were after, however, it is FAST, and I was suprised at the narrow tread pattern allows you to drift around corners quickly.

Posted Image

Hack

#22 Jerry Entin

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 22:58

Posted Image
Richard Macon in the ex Fangio 250 F Maserati.
photo Richard Macon collection.

#23 Hackrider

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 00:22

Nice, that's a real one.

Hack

#24 David McKinney

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 07:47

There seems to be some confusion over your car, Hackrider.
I didn't recall any cars being built for the Fangio film, and the link indeed shows yours is one of those built by ASD long after the film was made. I'm mystified as to what the letter of "authenticaton" is based on

#25 Hackrider

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 10:26

Thanks for your input. That is one of the reasons I am searching for more information and documentation, to either authenticate or refute the claims about it. If you have more info please pass it along. PM me for my email and phone.

Hack

#26 Alan Cox

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 10:39

I would agree with Mr McKinney (how could one disagree when it comes to 250F matters?!) that the car Fangio used for in-car shots in the film was a genuine car - see the Jenks book where it is shown with cameraman mounted on the tail.

#27 Hackrider

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 11:40

This is great, The ID#ASD250IIM obviously is an ASD build # so it was made years after the film was shot. I wonder if the reference may be to the use at the London premier referred to in a previous response? I have sent an email to ASD to see if they can shed anymore light on this. Anyone have info on the ASD cars? Dates? Numbers built? etc...

Research is half the fun owning old cars.

Hack

#28 Doug Nye

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 14:56

The Hugh Hudson 'Fangio' film became a tragic disaster movie.

Hudson's direction captured miles of magnificent footage with the old boy driving important cars.

But Volpi was not the only backer, I believe, and the others developed cold feet when they saw the original cut and deemed it 'too specialist' for release.

Volpi was always mercurial and (again if I recall correctly) he fell out with the co-financiers, they ordered a re-cut to 'enhance' the finished job's public appeal and the end result was a movie which was about 60/40 sheer genius/horrific schlock fatal accident footage. It was utterly gratuitous and many of those at the preview gave up in disgust and walked out...Jenks included.

I think Volpi successfully blocked its release.

Hugh Hudson had long since gone off to pastures new working with infinitely better and more discerning people.

To find a pristine quality original director's cut of 'Fangio' has become something of a motor racing movie buff's Holy Grail.

DCN

#29 coco

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 15:22

Originally posted by Hackrider
This is great, The ID#ASD250IIM obviously is an ASD build # so it was made years after the film was shot. I wonder if the reference may be to the use at the London premier referred to in a previous response? I have sent an email to ASD to see if they can shed anymore light on this. Anyone have info on the ASD cars? Dates? Numbers built? etc...

Research is half the fun owning old cars.

Hack

The late Cameron Millar mentioned to me that at least 2 of his 250F re-creations were used in that film. He also showed me some photos of Fangio sitting and driving his car(s) in Aintree for that movie.
Then I knew a photo that shows the ol` man behind the wheel and a camera mounted on the back of the 250F (not to confuse anybody: no! - this photo where not taken during the filming of the well known footage on the Modena Autodromo. That was in the 57!).

Perhaps your car had been thought as one of the car to fill up the gaps in the background!

Ciao!
Walter

#30 coco

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 15:22

Originally posted by Jerry Entin
Posted Image
Richard Macon in the ex Fangio 250 F Maserati.
photo Richard Macon collection.

Chassis #2529! A magical car!

Ciao!
Walter

#31 Peter Morley

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 17:04

Originally posted by Hackrider
This is great, The ID#ASD250IIM obviously is an ASD build # so it was made years after the film was shot. I wonder if the reference may be to the use at the London premier referred to in a previous response? I have sent an email to ASD to see if they can shed anymore light on this. Anyone have info on the ASD cars? Dates? Numbers built? etc...

Research is half the fun owning old cars.

Hack


I saw your car when it was being built - early 1990s.
I think they only made one 250F, they started on the Vanwll body buck but I don't think that progressed much further.
They then made an Aston Martin DBR using an Aston Martin DB4/5/6 type engine.
My understanding was the F1 cars were being made for a Mike Hawthorn/Peter Collins films based on the book Mon Ami Mate.

If you have problems finding Bob Egginton, last time I saw him he was working with Beaufort Restorations, they should be able to put you in touch with him.

#32 Hackrider

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 19:37

It's getting more interesting the deeper I get into this. I am going to call both ASD & Beaufort on
Monday, try to get Bob Eggington if he will talk to me.

I'll post more pics if anyone wants me to.

Hack

#33 Pablo Vignone

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 22:22

In Argentina, the film was released in 1976, five years after the filming. I recall going to a downtown theatre to see it in my tender age of 13.
The Fangio Museum sell copies of the film.

#34 Hackrider

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 22:23

Thanks for the film info. I didn't see it on their web site so I'll send them a note and order one.

Hack

#35 Pavel Lifintsev

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 15:54

This photo was discussed four years ago here at TNF, when I asked for its identification. I thought I would post it again.
So, it's the filming at the Ring with the Alfetta. Standing on the left is Augusto Zanardi, who used to be Fangio's mechanic in his years with Alfa Corse. He also co-drove JMF to the 3rd place in the 1950 Mille Miglia.

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Copyright: unknown
Picture posted on a principle of fair use and will be removed on request.


#36 Arturo Pereira

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 19:00

Originally posted by .ru
This photo was discussed four years ago here at TNF, when I asked for its identification. I thought I would post it again.
So, it's the filming at the Ring with the Alfetta. Standing on the left is Augusto Zanardi, who used to be Fangio's mechanic in his years with Alfa Corse. He also co-drove JMF to the 3rd place in the 1950 Mille Miglia.

Posted Image
Copyright: unknown
Picture posted on a principle of fair use and will be removed on request.


Hi :)

I think that picture was taken at Monza, where Fangio drove the Alfetta in the film.

#37 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 19:39

Definitely Monza. It's obvious from pit building and also publicity on it: FINA, Castrol, Tudor, Magnetti Marelli.

#38 paulhooft

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 20:26

Please give us the correct link to the Museum....
and the movie...
Kindest regards
PcH

#39 Alan Cox

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 20:35

Originally posted by paulhooft
Please give us the correct link to the Museum....



http://www.museofangio.com/
http://www.museofang...?products_id=35

I couldn't find any price quoted for the film. You will probably need to email them

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#40 canon1753

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 03:01

What DVD standard does Argentina use? Is it the same as for the US or GB?

#41 siemprefangio

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 15:35

Amigos, no busquen mas, hace tiempo vengo subiendo a Youtube algunos fragmentos de esta película (ya me han robado varios también) ahora subí la película completa para que todos puedan disfrutarla y no se pierda en la noche de los tiempos, como decía alguien por ahí fué grabada de la tv hace años, de canal 13 de Buenos Aires, les sugiero que se apuren antes de que a alguien le parezca mal y la saquen, espero que no, que la disfruten, el único inconveniente para ustedes es que está en Español, es la voz del propio Fangio, un abrazo desde Argentina


Traducido con google:
Friends, look no further, come up some time on Youtube a few fragments of this film (and I have won several also) now got the full movie for everyone to enjoy it and not get lost in the mists of time, as someone said there was recorded from tv years ago, Channel 13 of Buenos Aires, I suggest you hurry up before someone will look bad and take out, I hope not, you enjoy it, the only drawback to you is that is Spanish is the voice of their own Fangio, a hug from Argentina

#42 Jones Foyer

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 17:09

Amigos, no busquen mas, hace tiempo vengo subiendo a Youtube algunos fragmentos de esta película (ya me han robado varios también) ahora subí la película completa para que todos puedan disfrutarla y no se pierda en la noche de los tiempos, como decía alguien por ahí fué grabada de la tv hace años, de canal 13 de Buenos Aires, les sugiero que se apuren antes de que a alguien le parezca mal y la saquen, espero que no, que la disfruten, el único inconveniente para ustedes es que está en Español, es la voz del propio Fangio, un abrazo desde Argentina


Traducido con google:
Friends, look no further, come up some time on Youtube a few fragments of this film (and I have won several also) now got the full movie for everyone to enjoy it and not get lost in the mists of time, as someone said there was recorded from tv years ago, Channel 13 of Buenos Aires, I suggest you hurry up before someone will look bad and take out, I hope not, you enjoy it, the only drawback to you is that is Spanish is the voice of their own Fangio, a hug from Argentina


Looks like some great footage. I'll definitely pick up the DVD. (Edit: oh, news of the DVD was back in 2008...it looks like it won't come out after all)

Edited by Jones Foyer, 22 April 2010 - 00:08.


#43 FalconMk111

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 18:05

I actually spent a few days on the set of this film when the crew were shooting in Monte Carlo and had the chance to see Fangio in action even if it was mostly drive through shots one or two bends at a time. I remember seeing him ripping out past Rosie's and into the casino square and was particularly taken by the intensity of his face and that big nose. The most amusing part came when he
stopped, took off his old helmet and someone in the entourage handed him a comb with which he raked the half dozen long hairs on the top of his head and grinning from ear to ear more like a chubby Italian baker. The previous year or two Hugh Hudson had won a lot of awards with the Pirelli short film 'The Tortoise and the Hare' and that was probably why he and Volpi got together. The film was released somewhere because the Manoir de L'Auto in Loheac in France has a poster of it on display.

#44 paulhooft

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 18:38

I actually spent a few days on the set of this film when the crew were shooting in Monte Carlo and had the chance to see Fangio in action even if it was mostly drive through shots one or two bends at a time. I remember seeing him ripping out past Rosie's and into the casino square and was particularly taken by the intensity of his face and that big nose. The most amusing part came when he
stopped, took off his old helmet and someone in the entourage handed him a comb with which he raked the half dozen long hairs on the top of his head and grinning from ear to ear more like a chubby Italian baker. The previous year or two Hugh Hudson had won a lot of awards with the Pirelli short film 'The Tortoise and the Hare' and that was probably why he and Volpi got together. The film was released somewhere because the Manoir de L'Auto in Loheac in France has a poster of it on display.


I heard about the movie and have the book Fangio by Denis Jenkinson for ages:
however, never saw the Movie released in Europe.
Paul Hooft

#45 siemprefangio

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 01:03

I heard about the movie and have the book Fangio by Denis Jenkinson for ages:
however, never saw the Movie released in Europe.
Paul Hooft


Translated with google
I have understood that the English version is called "life Fangio to 300 km / h" I put it on Youtube is the version for Latin America and is called "Fangio" and have told me that in Europe passes through tv quite often.


#46 Pullman99

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 08:35

The Hugh Hudson 'Fangio' film became a tragic disaster movie. Hudson's direction captured miles of magnificent footage with the old boy driving important cars. But Volpi was not the only backer, I believe, and the others developed cold feet when they saw the original cut and deemed it 'too specialist' for release. Volpi was always mercurial and (again if I recall correctly) he fell out with the co-financiers, they ordered a re-cut to 'enhance' the finished job's public appeal and the end result was a movie which was about 60/40 sheer genius/horrific schlock fatal accident footage. It was utterly gratuitous and many of those at the preview gave up in disgust and walked out...Jenks included.I think Volpi successfully blocked its release. Hugh Hudson had long since gone off to pastures new working with infinitely better and more discerning people. To find a pristine quality original director's cut of 'Fangio' has become something of a motor racing movie buff's Holy Grail.DCN


I was just thinking about this film this morning for some obscure reason (serendipity, or what). The 750 Motor Club obtained a print to show at their annual (?) film evening at The Commonwealth Institute in London in 1975. I saw the film then, having been aeware of it from 1970. Cameron Millar had loaned one of his Maserati 250Fs to display outside the entrance and the event was very well attended.

In 1984 I had organsied one of the National Motor Museum's archive events at The National Film Theatre and the theme was "fiulms that had been produced but not released". We had a number of gems including "Fangio". Jenks and Murray Walker were principal guests and I do remember Jenks almost walking out when he realised which print we were showing. I had contacted Hugh Hudson to see if we could use the film and was told that the "later cut" was done for supposedly commercial reasons (it contains many scenes of carnage from well before Fangio's time to well after including Jochen Rindt';s accident at Monza in 1970) as described by Doug. This cut has the 1957 German GP (with Murray's commentary added in the studio at the time of the film's production) at the beginning. The original cut (that I have not seen) has this towards the end, I believe. I had a private preview viewing in the theatre at Hugh Hudson's offices prior to the NFT event and did ask if the original cut was available as I just knew it would be controversial.

Despite all this, the film does contain some great footage. The Argentinian sequences with a recreated Chevrolet are superb but my most vivid memory is of Fangio sliding the Lancia Ferrari (the D50 from the Biscaretti?) around Monaco with some truly magic opposite lock slow motion!

Is now the time to revisit this for a potential release?

Edited by Pullman99, 22 April 2010 - 11:28.