Jump to content


Photo

Talk about model cars


  • Please log in to reply
372 replies to this topic

#151 Mal9444

Mal9444
  • Member

  • 1,289 posts
  • Joined: December 05

Posted 21 May 2009 - 17:59

Can anyone tell me if the numbers on this model (undefined) of Moss's 1955 Monza W196 Streamliner are correct. They are solid red, rather than the Mercedes house-style of red with a black outline.

I can tell you that the GMH does not (hardly surprisingly!) now recall what colour the numbers were - but he does think that the numbers were probably painted on at the last minute by the race organisers, rather than at the Mercedes factory, because of all the last minute toing and froing and general uncertainty about which cars would actually be used in the race. This would explain (if the model is correct) the lack of the trade-mark black outline.

What we need is a (preferably colour) photo of the car taken on the day. (I have seen a b/w photo of the car, but it is too indisticnt to provide positive proof one way or t'other),

Edited by Mal9444, 21 May 2009 - 18:03.


Advertisement

#152 Alan Cox

Alan Cox
  • Member

  • 8,332 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 21 May 2009 - 21:10

I think this Bernard Cahier shot shows that there was no black edging to the number roundel
http://www.grandprix...italy_01_bc.jpg

#153 Mal9444

Mal9444
  • Member

  • 1,289 posts
  • Joined: December 05

Posted 22 May 2009 - 07:27

I think this Bernard Cahier shot shows that there was no black edging to the number roundel
http://www.grandprix...italy_01_bc.jpg


Alan, thank you. That is the very shot to which I refer. If one blows it up, I think there does appear to be thin black edging on the numbers - or in b/w photo terms, a darker shade of grey.

Hmmmm.

#154 Bjorn Kjer

Bjorn Kjer
  • Member

  • 3,672 posts
  • Joined: February 06

Posted 11 June 2009 - 19:51

Should anyone be interested in seeing my small 50 piece 1/43 collection , please mail me , as I cannot scan/post.

kjerbjoern@hotmail.com (((oh yes , they are all for sale...sshhhh)))

#155 Alan Cox

Alan Cox
  • Member

  • 8,332 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 24 June 2009 - 18:47

Seeing this model figure, I wonder how long it will be before a model of TNF's own GP correspondent, Simon Arron, will appear in the shops..
http://www.grandprix...t...RES&back2=1

#156 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Member

  • 13,576 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 25 June 2009 - 10:32

Seeing this model figure, I wonder how long it will be before a model of TNF's own GP correspondent, Simon Arron, will appear in the shops..
http://www.grandprix...t...RES&back2=1


I thought JB was a long time Canon man!

#157 Macca

Macca
  • Member

  • 3,525 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 25 June 2009 - 12:43

I think, for historic dioramas and pitlanes/paddocks, there should be models of DSJ, Jabby Crombac, and Henry N. Manney...........the DSJ figurine would have to be cheapest on account of using less material.

Paul M

#158 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,516 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 25 June 2009 - 13:16

...the DSJ figurine would have to be cheapest on account of using less material.

Paul M


Are you taking the beard into account?


#159 Jager

Jager
  • Member

  • 380 posts
  • Joined: October 06

Posted 25 June 2009 - 13:42

20 Years of Progress in Diecast Manufacturing - the 1979 Le Mans Winner

I received my 1979 Le Mans winner from Spark, so thought I'd do a quick comparison with my 20 year old Quartzo version (I believe they were released in the late 80's - early '90's) which I thought might interest some of you.

Putting the two models side by side, the first thing you notice is that the newer Spark version (on top) is slightly longer and sits lower. I never really had a problem with the shape of the old Quartzo version, but now it looks too short, too high and too 'stubby'.

Posted Image

As you can see here, the Quartzo version sits very high and looks more like a 4x4 than a sports car. This picture also highlights the superior wheels on the Spark (on the left) although there are no Dunlop markings on the tyres.

Posted Image

The height difference is even more noticeable at the rear, where the Quartzo rear wing (nearest the camera) sits significantly higher than the Spark. The wing should be below the height of the roofline, so in this respect the Spark is more accurate. Also note the Naca ducts on the side supports of the rear wing are only decals on the Quartzo, but are proper cut-outs in the casting of the Spark.



From overhead the most obvious difference is the interior detail. The Spark (on the left) actually looks a bit sparse compared to the Quartzo, but I haven't as yet found a picture to determine which is correct. Note the small roof lights on the Spark (as per the real car) which is a very nice touch.

Posted Image

Finally, for those like me that like to compare their models with pictures of the real thing, here's a picture of the Spark model and a picture from the 'Porsche at Le Mans" book to save you the effort. The one thing it highlights for me are the vents on the front wings and I wonder if Spark could have done a better job of replicating these to make them more realistic.

Posted Image

In general the Quartzo has aged fairly well, and on a stand alone basis was quite an acceptable model. However, it looks rather second rate alongside the Spark which I guess you'd expect for a 20 year old model. Note however that the biggest differences are the shape and stance which actually have very little to do with developments in diecast manufacturing in the last 20 years.



Advertisement

#160 Derek Pitt

Derek Pitt
  • Member

  • 296 posts
  • Joined: June 08

Posted 25 June 2009 - 13:53

I think, for historic dioramas and pitlanes/paddocks, there should be models of DSJ, Jabby Crombac, and Henry N. Manney...........the DSJ figurine would have to be cheapest on account of using less material.

Paul M


I have a collection of Leyland Comets and Fodens ..British commercial vehicles ..and a Leyland Octopus or two ...I am not interested in the sexuality of Senna or DSJ or that of any other person, I dont drop names and I dont use reverse physcology to show that I am really a nice person who has riisen above my humble begnnngs.

Dwewk

#161 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 9,040 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 25 June 2009 - 14:44

I have a collection of Leyland Comets and Fodens ..British commercial vehicles ..and a Leyland Octopus or two ...I am not interested in the sexuality of Senna or DSJ or that of any other person, I dont drop names and I dont use reverse physcology to show that I am really a nice person who has riisen above my humble begnnngs.

Dwewk

:confused:


#162 Hamish Robson

Hamish Robson
  • Member

  • 387 posts
  • Joined: May 09

Posted 25 June 2009 - 15:33

Comparison of the two 935s - very interesting.

Comment from Derek P - what the...?

#163 Mal9444

Mal9444
  • Member

  • 1,289 posts
  • Joined: December 05

Posted 25 June 2009 - 15:36

Comparison of the two 935s - very interesting.

Comment from Derek P - what the...?


I'm glad it was not only me that missed the point of Derek's post

#164 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 11,316 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 25 June 2009 - 16:07

Very interesting comparison indeed, Mr. Jager!

What a sad day that was when a car looking like that won the 24 hour race!

#165 Macca

Macca
  • Member

  • 3,525 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 25 June 2009 - 18:06

Are you taking the beard into account?


Oh yes - it would be counterbalanced by the flat cap and pipe on the Crombac and the deerstalker and bushy moustache on the Manney..............

Paul M


#166 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,516 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 25 June 2009 - 22:30

Oh yes - it would be counterbalanced by the flat cap and pipe on the Crombac and the deerstalker and bushy moustache on the Manney..............

Paul M


Yes, that sounds about right. A great deal of DSJ's beard ended up inside his Motor Sport typewriter, which had to be regularly cleaned by a small man using a mixture of methylated spirits and disgust.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 25 June 2009 - 22:30.


#167 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 9,040 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 25 June 2009 - 22:43

Yes, that sounds about right. A great deal of DSJ's beard ended up inside his Motor Sport typewriter, which had to be regularly cleaned by a small man using a mixture of methylated spirits and disgust.

:rotfl: Nice one!
(But, in the interests of historical accuracy, I have to point out that Jenks didn't type - he hand wrote his copy.)

Edited by D-Type, 25 June 2009 - 22:43.


#168 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,516 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 25 June 2009 - 22:51

:rotfl: Nice one!
(But, in the interests of historical accuracy, I have to point out that Jenks didn't type - he hand wrote his copy.)


Believe me, Duncan, there was a typwriter at his desk in Molly's office, where he infrequently sat and pondered, the while fiddling with his beard, I never said he typed!


#169 tonyb

tonyb
  • Member

  • 363 posts
  • Joined: December 06

Posted 26 June 2009 - 09:50

Some of you will know that SMTS have recently produced a 1:43 model of Mike Hawthorn's Jaguar Mk1, the car that he was eventually killed in.

I have one here and was very disappointed at what came out of the box for over £100 from Grand Prix Legends. I've also had some strange emails after I commented on the JMH web site that I wasn't very impressed.

So can I have some other comments please as I want to post a more detailed review - maybe I'm being too unkind? Below are some photos of the model - there are a number of problems the most obvious of which, and one I just don't understand how it got through, is that it has a Jaguar Mk 2 grill.... And then there is the overall view from the front... and ...

For reference there are also a few photos of the original car plus a colour one of Nigel Webb's recreation that is itself a pretty accurate 1:1 representation.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I should add that I contacted Grand Prix Legends (as the retailer), on the 10th June with a list of the inaccuracies I had observed for their observations. I received a reply saying I'd receive a response within 24 hours. Another reply confirmed that the next day. So far, there has been no additional response.

Your comments are welcomed, especially from the dedicated collectors, some of whom helped with material for the model section of the JMH book.

Edited by tonyb, 26 June 2009 - 14:25.


#170 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 11,316 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 26 June 2009 - 10:00

Sadly, Tony, this is yet another example of a model maker getting it 'not quite right'. There have been some horrendous examples of inaccuracies and mistakes through the years but these days, to me, there is absolutely NO excuse for getting things wrong.

And as for the list to port (or is it starboard?)... :confused:

#171 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Member

  • 13,576 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 26 June 2009 - 10:18

And as for the list to port (or is it starboard?)... :confused:


It looks to me like the model is twisted rather than listing as the relative angles of 'list' are all over the place.

:wave:

#172 Frank S

Frank S
  • Member

  • 2,160 posts
  • Joined: September 02

Posted 26 June 2009 - 23:48

Looks like a case for money-back and punitive damages. The Devil isn't always in the details. Getting the thing symmetrical in important aspects is basic, no?

I have a twisted stapler I'm rather fond of, but this is not in the same category.

Edited by Frank S, 26 June 2009 - 23:49.


#173 tom58long

tom58long
  • Member

  • 36 posts
  • Joined: June 04

Posted 27 June 2009 - 00:16

SMTS is a very well known company regarding 1:43 f1 kits. i am not an 1:43 guy - but what i saw on pics of f1-models of them looked pretty worth the price. a twisted model is one thing, but looking at these horrible chrome-frames round the windows and the side pic of the model with these ugly doors and the door-handles......i wonder why they could deliver something like that. any matchbox would look much better.

tom

Edited by tom58long, 27 June 2009 - 00:17.


#174 Bjorn Kjer

Bjorn Kjer
  • Member

  • 3,672 posts
  • Joined: February 06

Posted 27 June 2009 - 06:47

That is a very sad model to look at , how many was in the box for that price ! My honest opinion , compared to what you can get from the likes of Minichamps : CRAP !!

#175 David Lawson

David Lawson
  • Member

  • 961 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 27 June 2009 - 10:31

Just in case anyone might be remotely interested…

The Micro Set had no effect, because the Maisto decals were so well-glazed. I tried the Micro Sol (which they recommend for super-softening and ‘burning on’ decals for ‘that painted-on look’) and found it had some effect, but not much. Quite forgetting Barry’s advice about the nail varnish I went in search of the Nitromors which, mercifully as things turned out, I could not for the life of me find in my workshop. So with an ‘Oh Sod It’ I tried a combination of Micro Sol and (I hear you shudder) very fine wet-or-dry. Worked a treat and in only one or two very small, awkward double-curvature places did I have to rub so hard that I removed some of the underlying silver.

I made up new number plates using materials and a pvc cutter kindly given me some time ago by Barry (I use it with Letraset numerals when re-numbering 1/43rd scales). I spent quite a bit of time in Microsoft Word finding a font that was a close match to that used for the original numbers. The photos in Doug’s My Cars My Career provided invaluable and comprehensive guidance. I used, for the first time, Lazertran Inkjet Waterslide Decal Paper on which to print the numbers (I’ve tried it before for other things, with no success) and fixed them to the vinyl number plates with the aforementioned Micro Set – so the trip to Hannamans wasn’t a complete waste of an afternoon and thank you for pointing me at it.


Sorry, I've only just spotted this reply.

When you are removing decals with the Micro Set and Micro Sol you sometimes do need numerous applications over a period of an hour or so to loosen the decal, my apologies as I didn't fully explain that in my previous post. I'm glad that you did find a use for it in the end, you will find it lasts ages and it is invaluable for getting decals to conform to irregular shaped surfaces.

David


#176 T54

T54
  • Member

  • 2,489 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 27 June 2009 - 15:10

I agree with David and must say that Microscale products are really good, especially if you have some NOS bottles of the stuff from 30 years ago that appear to be stronger than the current stuff.

As one of my multiple "retirement" functions is the restoration of old 1960's slot cars for a museum in Los Angeles, these products help me to salvage some rare bodies on some rare cars and bring them back to pristine original condition.

Posted Image

:)



#177 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 27 June 2009 - 15:23

I agree with David and must say that Microscale products are really good, especially if you have some NOS bottles of the stuff from 30 years ago that appear to be stronger than the current stuff.

As one of my multiple "retirement" functions is the restoration of old 1960's slot cars for a museum in Los Angeles, these products help me to salvage some rare bodies on some rare cars and bring them back to pristine original condition.

Posted Image

:)




That's one of the best looking slot cars I've seen in a long time, but I would like it better with more accurate wheels...!

Edited by dretceterini, 27 June 2009 - 15:31.


#178 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 27 June 2009 - 15:27

Here is one of the models from the new Alfa Collection. The price is only about 20 Euros plus shipping, and it is as good as many more expensive hand-mades in 1/43rd. The car is the 1923 Targa Florio winning Alfa Romeo RLTF..certainly a lot better than the old John Day kit of the same car..


Posted Image

Edited by dretceterini, 27 June 2009 - 15:28.


#179 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 27 June 2009 - 15:30

It looks to me like the model is twisted rather than listing as the relative angles of 'list' are all over the place.

:wave:




I would send the model back and demand a refund. The problem is in the casting, and there is no way it can be fixed...

Advertisement

#180 tonyb

tonyb
  • Member

  • 363 posts
  • Joined: December 06

Posted 27 June 2009 - 15:51

Thanks for the comments and pretty much what I expected to read..

FWIW the model does appear to be diecast from the weight (276g with wooden base) and the fact that it's described in Grand Prix Legends Diecast Monthly. So the twist (I think it is actually malformed having less height on the offside) must surely be a mould fault as dretceterini has suggested?

It's not just the body fault and misalignment of items on the front aspect (even the the headlamps are asymmetric to the centre line) and the chunky appearance, but the inaccuracies that are present given that there is plenty of reference material available (and I know SMTS had the JMH book to use with loads of photos). Okay, I am probably more critical here than most as I did watch the full size replica being built over 13 years to get it exactly right (except for a few items that were the builders specific choice not to replicate). What I see is:

1) A Jaguar Mk2 grille - so obvious a mistake as well! The grill itself is a different shape to the Mk1's and has a thick central divider as part of the outer moulding. In this example, the vertical ribs are also malformed/damaged, but looking at what other photos are available of this model that may be a one-off in which case it should never have got past QA inspection

2) The twin pipe exhaust is mounted centrally on the model and goes back underneath - I think centrally is impossible on this car as it would have to go under the diff and then foul the ground. They should be located closer to the nearside as per the original photo

3) The reversing lap is on the wrong side of the rear overrider

4) The chrome on the quarter lights is way too heavy - and the whole frame is chromed anyway on the original

5) The rear number plate isn't aligned horizontally - but in its favour it does at least have raised lettering!

Trying to be positive, the body colour painted wheel spokes are also correct, although Mike did have chrome ones as well. And it does have a four-spoke steering wheel and the seats/carpet are in green all of which is very good detail for this specific car - Mike's fiancee Jean Howarth who had travelled in the car many times confirmed all of this for the full size replica.

I've also always believed that SMTS made excellent models, as someone else remarked - does anyone have a different example for comparision? Maybe this is a one off problem and they'll replace it quickly with a nicer model??

There is also a 1:12 AUTOart of Mike's 1955 Le Mans D-type available now and from everything I've heard from proud owners, this is really excellent which it needs to be at 1p short of £370.

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

These are from AUTOart's web site and show another error - the car has a three spoke steering wheel instead of a four spoke one. However, this looks like it's been spotted for production as Grand Prix Model's catalogue shows it with the correct four-spoke. It also lacks the vertical white ID stripe Lofty England had painted on the offside of the rear fin on the web site photos but does have the matching white nose paint! Again, this has been corrected in the GPM photos.

If one wants to be really picky, it has no internal perspex-mounted nearside mirror but that's only been really discussed publicly on this forum in the past few days so we'll let them off. But the AUTOart site shows it with an offside rear side mirror mounted on the driver's door frame that wasn't there in 1955. Again, the GPM site shows it without though. Better get out of anorak mode I guess :smoking:


#181 T54

T54
  • Member

  • 2,489 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 27 June 2009 - 17:28

That's one of the best looking slot cars I've seen in a long time, but I would like it better with more accurate wheels...!

I would have loved to install the beautiful Lola die-cast aluminum wheels made in the day by Russkit, but this is a 100% original model built by GM's R&D engineer Jerry Mrlik also of Chaparral fame in 1967. Hence... I only repaired what what needed to be, while keeping the model as original as possible.
Mrlik was deeply involved with Jim Hall on aerodynamics and mechanical and also the slot car enthusiast group at GM that included Larry Shinoda and other luminaries.
Jerry died a few years ago from cancer, I am told.
Interestingly it appears that there was a similar group at Chrysler, I am investigating it at this time.

While most of you sophisticated collectors looking for scaled down main jets on 1/18 scale Weber 58DCOE will regard the following models with utter disdain, these below are some of the original slot car racing models of which the bodies were designed by and actually hand molded by Larry Shinoda himself in the R&D at GM, I am not telling if it was at lunch time or after hours...

Posted Image

:wave:

#182 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,516 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 27 June 2009 - 18:47

I have one here and was very disappointed at what came out of the box for over £100 from Grand Prix Legends.


Your comments are welcomed, especially from the dedicated collectors, some of whom helped with material for the model section of the JMH book.


Tony, I've just read your post properly rather than skim and look at the photographs - as one does sometimes - and I have to confess that initially I assumed that you had struggled to make this from an inaccurate and very badly produced resin kit. Now I see that you paid a lot of money for what is - esentially - crap. I think it's money-back time, unless you are desperate to hang on to it for what it represents, but it is an unmitigated dog.


#183 dretceterini

dretceterini
  • Member

  • 2,991 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 28 June 2009 - 01:59

I would have loved to install the beautiful Lola die-cast aluminum wheels made in the day by Russkit, but this is a 100% original model built by GM's R&D engineer Jerry Mrlik also of Chaparral fame in 1967. Hence... I only repaired what what needed to be, while keeping the model as original as possible.
Mrlik was deeply involved with Jim Hall on aerodynamics and mechanical and also the slot car enthusiast group at GM that included Larry Shinoda and other luminaries.
Jerry died a few years ago from cancer, I am told.
Interestingly it appears that there was a similar group at Chrysler, I am investigating it at this time.

While most of you sophisticated collectors looking for scaled down main jets on 1/18 scale Weber 58DCOE will regard the following models with utter disdain, these below are some of the original slot car racing models of which the bodies were designed by and actually hand molded by Larry Shinoda himself in the R&D at GM, I am not telling if it was at lunch time or after hours...

Posted Image

:wave:



As to the Lola, why not make an exact (or as close as possible) "replicar" with the Russkit wheels and add more detail...or are you just to damn busy with Electric Dreams (which would be good, IMO)?

As to the Larry Shinoda models, they look more like pornagraphic objects than cars!

Not 1/18th, but where can I get parts for circa 1947 Weber carbs in 1/43rd scale? I need some for a pair of 1bbl downdraft 28DRSs on a 1940 Mille Miglia Siata Pescara I'm building..the real car was built in 1939 with a Topo engine and a single 1bbl sidedraft Cozette, and ran the MM in 1940, where it was a DNF. It won the 750cc class in the 1948MM with the new Topo motor with 3, rather than 2 main bearings and 2 1bbl downdraft Webers and a new nose on the car, and was a DNF in the 1950MM...

In other words, fantasy models don't do a thing for me, no matter how valuable they are.

:p

Edited by dretceterini, 28 June 2009 - 02:00.


#184 helioseism

helioseism
  • Member

  • 1,429 posts
  • Joined: December 05

Posted 28 June 2009 - 04:08

The latest issue of Scale Auto Enthusiast has an ad for a new 1/12 scale plastic kit of the Ford GT 40 Mk II, the winning car #2 from the '66 Le mans 24 Hours. It's manufactured by Trumpeter, kit #5403, and will be available in July from Stevens International, www.stevenshobby.com. It's expensive -- $259.95. Also available from Mission Models for $199.95. Test shots of the kit can be viewed here. And, it's already available on eBay.

#185 T54

T54
  • Member

  • 2,489 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 28 June 2009 - 15:35

In other words, fantasy models don't do a thing for me, no matter how valuable they are.


The lives of brilliant people like Larry Shinoda or Jerry Mrlik are documented to a point. The purpose of the museum we have created in Los Angeles is to offer something utterly unknown by the Modern World, that of their passion for one of the greatest forms of automotive hobbies that was ever devised, the ability to not only having beautiful models of a given automobile on display, but the ability to also drive them at high speeds on large specialty tracks. Beats video games 100 to 1.
The research for speed and scale was Jerry's purpose, and all his surviving hand-built slot cars reflect that purpose. So the wheels are not exactly what they should be to make a perfect scale model. Who cares, the wholesomeness of the model is still amazing. Why trying to put Madonna's brassiere on Grace Kelly?

The research for speed with style was Larry Shinoda's passion, and the 30-some dream-car designs known to exist in the 1/24 scale (that he aptly named "Thingies" on the paper tags that were the marketing tool for these clear-plastic bodies), created and hand-built in the GM R&D between 1966 and 1968 are a part of this man's legacy. One may like it or not, but these little cars have as much historical value as some of Larry's full-size creations such as the Mako Shark or Corvette SS dream cars.
Size does not matter here, but I do not fail to notice the drooling of spectators at Pebble when confronted with the GM 1950's turbine cars, and the drooling of enthusiast at our museum when shown these artifacts. So you may not, but others DO care.
Monetary value is utterly non important here.

#186 RCH

RCH
  • Member

  • 906 posts
  • Joined: December 08

Posted 29 June 2009 - 09:46

Since I still make a living, partially, from selling model cars I should take more notice of this thread. I've just seen Tony b's pictures of the SMTS Mk. 1, I am truly appalled! This should go straight back to GP Legends. I suspect that they probably never actually checked it before dispatching.

Clearly there was a fault in the casting process, possibly removing it from the mould, but why was it allowed to go through the proceedure of fettling, painting, assembly when it was clearly so badly misshapen? This casting should have gone straight back into the melting pot as soon as it emerged from the mould. I can only assume that a whole batch was the same and SMTS hoped they could get away with it. I've not dealt with SMTS for some years ago but my experience was that they were certainly better than that.

The SMTS Mk. 1 is clearly old technology, even if this is a newish release. I don't think I have actually seen one of their Mk 1s but this looks like old fashioned, heavy white metal technology. The detailing is to a level that that was acceptable 10 or 12 years ago but the standards now being achieved by "die-casts" like Minichamps and Spark (technically not diecasts!) means that to survive the hand-built "artisan" manufacturers need to up their game or go. Most have gone but if SMTS are still producing to this level then they are not helping themselves.

Rant over!

#187 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 11,316 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 29 June 2009 - 10:57

Well said, Sir!

#188 tonyb

tonyb
  • Member

  • 363 posts
  • Joined: December 06

Posted 30 June 2009 - 07:46

Tony, I've just read your post properly rather than skim and look at the photographs - as one does sometimes - and I have to confess that initially I assumed that you had struggled to make this from an inaccurate and very badly produced resin kit. Now I see that you paid a lot of money for what is - esentially - crap. I think it's money-back time, unless you are desperate to hang on to it for what it represents, but it is an unmitigated dog.


Since I still make a living, partially, from selling model cars I should take more notice of this thread. I've just seen Tony b's pictures of the SMTS Mk. 1, I am truly appalled! This should go straight back to GP Legends. I suspect that they probably never actually checked it before dispatching.

Clearly there was a fault in the casting process, possibly removing it from the mould, but why was it allowed to go through the proceedure of fettling, painting, assembly when it was clearly so badly misshapen? This casting should have gone straight back into the melting pot as soon as it emerged from the mould. I can only assume that a whole batch was the same and SMTS hoped they could get away with it. I've not dealt with SMTS for some years ago but my experience was that they were certainly better than that.

The SMTS Mk. 1 is clearly old technology, even if this is a newish release. I don't think I have actually seen one of their Mk 1s but this looks like old fashioned, heavy white metal technology. The detailing is to a level that that was acceptable 10 or 12 years ago but the standards now being achieved by "die-casts" like Minichamps and Spark (technically not diecasts!) means that to survive the hand-built "artisan" manufacturers need to up their game or go. Most have gone but if SMTS are still producing to this level then they are not helping themselves.

Rant over!


Well said, Sir!

Thanks very much to Tony, Rod, Barry and others for the additional comments. I've still had no response from GPL so I can only assume they don't really care that much. I will keep the model as an example of the only available one and also of what not to buy.

Maybe hope someone will get their house in order and produce a decent scale replica of Mike's car. There is a Jaguar Mk1 Provence Moulage resin kit in 1:43 that could be used for a home build but am not aware of any other reasonably recent diecast Mk1.

Edited by tonyb, 30 June 2009 - 07:48.


#189 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 9,040 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 30 June 2009 - 08:58

I see from their website that Grand Prix Legends will be at Goodwood. If you're going you can ask them why they haven't responded etc

#190 tonyb

tonyb
  • Member

  • 363 posts
  • Joined: December 06

Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:10

I see from their website that Grand Prix Legends will be at Goodwood. If you're going you can ask them why they haven't responded etc

That might be interesting...

Someone just mailed me to say that Oxford Diecast have a 1:76 model of VDU 881 complete with its race number 33 from Silverstone in 1958.

Here's a pic:

Posted Image

Anyone notice a problem .... :wave: :well:

#191 Barry Boor

Barry Boor
  • Member

  • 11,316 posts
  • Joined: October 00

Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:21

Wheels?

#192 tonyb

tonyb
  • Member

  • 363 posts
  • Joined: December 06

Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:23

Wheels?

Well that's one problem but there is something even more profound....


#193 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 8,879 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:29

Well that's one problem but there is something even more profound....



It's a much later car, not a Mk 1.

#194 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 8,879 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:55

Well that's one problem but there is something even more profound....


...it has to be said though, that even though it's a Mk2, it looks a lot more like Mike's Mk1 than the SMTS 'authentic replica' does.


#195 RCH

RCH
  • Member

  • 906 posts
  • Joined: December 08

Posted 30 June 2009 - 14:32

Thanks very much to Tony, Rod, Barry and others for the additional comments. I've still had no response from GPL so I can only assume they don't really care that much. I will keep the model as an example of the only available one and also of what not to buy.

Maybe hope someone will get their house in order and produce a decent scale replica of Mike's car. There is a Jaguar Mk1 Provence Moulage resin kit in 1:43 that could be used for a home build but am not aware of any other reasonably recent diecast Mk1.


The PM kit is even older technology and rather "blobby" from memory. Milestone Miniatures (aka Gems & Cobwebs) took over the tooling for this one and produced some not very clever white metal builts which like the SMTS version were not exactly 21st century. Someone may be able to do something with the kit though. I don't think anyone else has done a Mk1.

There have been several Mk IIs as you probably know but none of them really satisfactory, I think it may be a difficult shape to get right, so perhaps the same applies to the Mk1. No excuse for poor detailing though.

You could keep the SMTS and display it to look as though it is cornering hard, who knows perhaps that was SMTS's original plan?

#196 Simon Arron

Simon Arron
  • Member

  • 2,438 posts
  • Joined: November 06

Posted 30 June 2009 - 16:16

A great deal of DSJ's beard ended up inside his Motor Sport typewriter, which had to be regularly cleaned by a small man using a mixture of methylated spirits and disgust.

The typewriter repair man was still a fixture at Standard House when I started there in the early 1980s. There was an often-told tale about an incident involving TRM and Jeremy Walton, who was in mid-sentence when his Adler was abruptly swiped one day because TRM had become impatient and wanted to get on with the cleansing process (JW's biscuit crumbs in this instance, rather than DSJ's beard). I can't remember whether JW threw a punch, at which point TRM threw the Adler at him, or whether JW shoved TRM through one of the flimsy partitions. Just another ordinary day in the parallel universe that embraced MN and Motor Sport.

As for Alan Cox's notion of a miniaturised SA (much cheaper than the £3.10 Bloxham, because I only have one camera body and lens, a couple of ballpoints and a slightly dog-eared notebook), you probably need a three-piece Arron/Hughes/Dodgins set for ultimate realism - although you'd have to model a few other things to capture the full essence of Tony D leaving his laptop bag in the press car park (Magny-Cours 2008), locking us out of our rented apartment (Barcelona 2009), leaving his mobile phone at the hotel (Indianapolis 2005), leaving his spare mobile phone in the airport lounge (also Indianapolis 2005), forgetting to take his laptop to the track (Malaysia 2004 and Canada 2007), dropping his laptop in the bath (Enna 1989) or accidentally throwing his mobile phone into a rubbish skip (Spa 2007).

Etc etc etc.

#197 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,516 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 30 June 2009 - 16:27

...one of the flimsy partitions.

Grey metal and reeded glass, I remember them well..

#198 La Sarthe

La Sarthe
  • Member

  • 120 posts
  • Joined: June 09

Posted 30 June 2009 - 17:10

I did a couple of SMTS Ecurie Ecosse D-Type kits a few years ago and they were fine - not absolute top notch in terms of crispness and detail but perfectly OK. They still use white metal though which limits the casting fidelity slightly although it gives a nice weight to the models. No excuses on the quality control front for your model though.

With regards to the 1979 Porsche 935K3, Renaissance have announced a 1:43 kit of the Le Mans winner. It might take a few months (or years) to arrive but they're always worth the wait for kit builders. They've also announced they're doing this year's Peugeot - I've just ordered mine from GPM. Picking up on customer service, you can't go wrong with Grand Prix Models.

Peter

#199 JacnGille

JacnGille
  • Member

  • 2,384 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 01 July 2009 - 00:04

Picking up on customer service, you can't go wrong with Grand Prix Models.


I'll second that statement.


Advertisement

#200 RCH

RCH
  • Member

  • 906 posts
  • Joined: December 08

Posted 01 July 2009 - 10:29

I did a couple of SMTS Ecurie Ecosse D-Type kits a few years ago and they were fine - not absolute top notch in terms of crispness and detail but perfectly OK. They still use white metal though which limits the casting fidelity slightly although it gives a nice weight to the models. No excuses on the quality control front for your model though.

With regards to the 1979 Porsche 935K3, Renaissance have announced a 1:43 kit of the Le Mans winner. It might take a few months (or years) to arrive but they're always worth the wait for kit builders. They've also announced they're doing this year's Peugeot - I've just ordered mine from GPM. Picking up on customer service, you can't go wrong with Grand Prix Models.

Peter


SMTS racing models are usually pretty good, I've always felt the road cars were a compromise, "oh well that looks good enough, lets move on to the F1 Lotus" sort of thing. For some reason, for example, they used the same basic casting for all 3 marks of the XJ6 so none of them looked right.

All this praise for GPM, no wonder the rest of us struggle!