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Commercial vehicle nostalgia


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#801 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 00:44

The diffs and in some cases widened wheels from those Morris Commercials were in the past  common fare in Speedway sedans and stockrods as well. Strong,,, but HEAVY!



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#802 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 23:52

Nobody has responded to my question about engine capacity and versatility yet...

If I can ask again, does anyone know the capacity of the 4-cyl post-war engine and if it was used in other vehicles?

#803 Ray Bell

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 09:54

I finally got the details on the Morris Commercial engine...

2050cc (125cu.in)
Bore 80mm (3.1496in)
Stroke 102 mm (4.0157)
42 BHP at 3250rpm.
The NPFC/5 engine developed 91 lb.ft torque at 1500 rpm.
The pre war NEB engine with the same bore and stroke was 44 BHP

Well, it is more horsepower than an early VW Kombi had.

#804 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 11:49

Negated by the weight.

I suspect that bore and stroke has been metricised,, a very Pommy engine. Probably 3 1/8 x 4"

I have seen similar on some sites re Chevs, 102mm is not the 4" they actually are.

 Most English and American engines were made in imperial measurments. As would be commonsense for the period.

Conversions  to metric sometimes are lost. 

With wheels,, 4" is usually called that, 4 1/4 is called 108 but is actually 107 .8 or so. 4.5" is called 114.3 and then we have 120,, and 120.65 which is 4.75.

A lot of home and engineering sizes too are lost in translation.


Edited by Lee Nicolle, 25 July 2019 - 00:19.


#805 Dipster

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 13:34

I always found that older long stroke engines were often relying on torque rather than horse power, not unlike old US V8s did.

 

102mm is surely a "rounded up" sum of 25.4 mm (the recognised and commonly accepted dead accurate number of mm to one inch) multiplied by 4 inches. Instead of the accurate 101.6 they give 102. No idea why they would though..... 



#806 Ray Bell

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 14:57

I still haven't learned if the engine had other uses than in these trucks...

Were they, for instance, used in Nuffield tractors?

#807 Myhinpaa

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 22:14

TVO and petrol engines in the Nuffield tractor were sidevalve and the prototype used the EHB engine. (1931ish origin)

Production version engines had the codes ETA (3.77 litre, 33-36 bhp.) and was used until the petrol engine version was discontinued in 1957.

BMC own diesel engine (OEA2) came as the tractor version in 1954 and had a 3.4 litre capacity and 45 bhp.



#808 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 00:30

I always found that older long stroke engines were often relying on torque rather than horse power, not unlike old US V8s did.

 

102mm is surely a "rounded up" sum of 25.4 mm (the recognised and commonly accepted dead accurate number of mm to one inch) multiplied by 4 inches. Instead of the accurate 101.6 they give 102. No idea why they would though..... 

Most older engines were torquey. Small bore and long stroke complete with  huge flywheel weight. Which by the 50s was more changed to big bore shorter stroke that revved harder. Which required far more valve space.

Though HP is measured several different ways over the decades.

English vehicles were more 'taxable' power, American engines were measured without any accesories  until recent time and they are now measured with all ancillaries.