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Who was Alfred Neubauer, and what was he like?


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#1 EvDelft

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 08:50

Hi guys, me again.

Before I ask my question, I'll tell you why I am asking this.

Currently I am writing a story, hopefully it will turn into a real book, wich is situated in 1963. It is a made-up story about the Formula 1 and Alfred Neubauer and Mercedes are still part of it. The main character is contracted by another team and Neubauer wants him in his team.

It really is a 'What if'-story.

What I can't find but want to know for my book, is something about the character of Neubauer:
- How was he in person?
- How was his technical knowledge?
- Was he the kind of person to 'try you out', for example if he know the answer, would he still ask you to find out if you knew it?

Everything can be helpful, please help me out in this!

Thanks again!

Erwin.

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#2 cdrewett

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 10:39

Hi guys, me again.

Before I ask my question, I'll tell you why I am asking this.

Currently I am writing a story, hopefully it will turn into a real book, wich is situated in 1963. It is a made-up story about the Formula 1 and Alfred Neubauer and Mercedes are still part of it. The main character is contracted by another team and Neubauer wants him in his team.

It really is a 'What if'-story.

What I can't find but want to know for my book, is something about the character of Neubauer:
- How was he in person?
- How was his technical knowledge?
- Was he the kind of person to 'try you out', for example if he know the answer, would he still ask you to find out if you knew it?

Everything can be helpful, please help me out in this!

Thanks again!

Erwin.

I talked to Stirling last year at Goodwood about Neubauer. He said that as well as being a brilliant and meticulous organiser he was a very kind and humourous man. He told a number of stories about the great man thumbing his nose at Nurburgring officialdom, as well as practical jokes on a flight to South America. I've saved the interview on my computer, but I'm not sure about copyright.
Chris

#3 Bloggsworth

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 10:56

I talked to Stirling last year at Goodwood about Neubauer. He said that as well as being a brilliant and meticulous organiser he was a very kind and humourous man. He told a number of stories about the great man thumbing his nose at Nurburgring officialdom, as well as practical jokes on a flight to South America. I've saved the interview on my computer, but I'm not sure about copyright.
Chris


If you recorded it for your own use, and cdrewett just uses it for info and character building, and does not quote directly from it, there should be no problems. If the story is fictional, and cdr "describes" Neubauer as an amusing man, rather than have a character "speak" the exact words used in the intervview, that's fine. If in the recorded interview Moss says "Neubauer always made me laugh when we were flying", then Mr. Racedriver in the book cannot say "Neubauer always made me laugh when we were flying", that would be breach of someone's copyright, and probably the person/organisation that made the recording - Strangely, not Stirling Moss', as by giving the interview he in effect assigned the copyright to the person making the recording, unless terms were agreed beforehand.

Double-check this, but I think I am correct. Go to the library and get a text on copyright law, or bug a friend in the legal profession.

Edited by Bloggsworth, 22 July 2010 - 11:00.


#4 EvDelft

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 12:44

So I note that Neubauer was a man who liked a good joke. And on the technical side? Brilliant, nit-wit? (thougt the first). Was he rude when he had to be? Or could he try you out by asking a question when he already knew the answer (technical)?

For example: I am trying to let Neubauer let the driver (Gütz) test his new Mercedes-car, while under contract of an other team. How would he let Gütz find an answer to a question that he already knows himself? (too much power, lack of grip, i.e.).
In my case, the driver knows the answer and starts wondering why Neubauer didn't figure that out himself (of someone in the team).

BTW Bloggsworth, about copyright you're correct.

Edited by EvDelft, 22 July 2010 - 12:44.


#5 D-Type

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 12:52

My understanding is that Neubauer had very little to do with technical issues which were left to Uhlenhaut and his ilk.

#6 EvDelft

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 13:22

My understanding is that Neubauer had very little to do with technical issues which were left to Uhlenhaut and his ilk.

'ilk'? Don't know the word, suppose you are referring to his 'men'?

And Ulhenhaut, anything known about him?

Want my story to be as realistic as possible, you know...;)

I understand that he drove the W25 in 1936 and made it competitive again, but how was his character? He must have been strong on the side of techincal knowledge, I suppose.

Edited by EvDelft, 22 July 2010 - 13:29.


#7 Bloggsworth

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 13:41

'ilk'? Don't know the word, suppose you are referring to his 'men'?


Scottish - Family or Clan - In common usage to mean of his type/group etc.

#8 Bloggsworth

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 13:42

BTW Bloggsworth, about copyright you're correct.


So my years testing Articled Clerks before their Law Exams weren't completely wasted....

#9 Doug Nye

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 13:55

'ilk'? Don't know the word, suppose you are referring to his 'men'?

And Ulhenhaut, anything known about him?

Want my story to be as realistic as possible, you know...;)

I understand that he drove the W25 in 1936 and made it competitive again, but how was his character? He must have been strong on the side of techincal knowledge, I suppose.


No he was no great shakes as a driver, and certainly not as an engineer. He contributed nothing to the 1936 car either in testing or technically. You are confusing him here with Rudi Uhlenhaut - who was in contrast a superb driver and a fine engineer.

Neubauer was extremely methodical, a good organiser and team director, and a far-sighted one. He could appear formidable and commanding - due partly to his physical size and booming voice - but he had good antennae for team morale and the sensitivities of his drivers. He proved quite clever at keeping them all, generally, happy. In more relaxed circumstances he could evidently play the clown, and was a brilliant mimic and raconteur. He tended to speak loud - and long - and seldom permitted anyone else to get a word in edgeways. But with senior company board members present he would equally be very much the Wehrmacht sergeant - very respectful to his superiors. At the races Uhlenhaut told me Neubauer was relied upon to keep the press away from the engineers who had serious work to do. He was good at that, too.

I have to say that it seems bizarre to put Neubauer into a 1960s setting. Times had changed by then. Team management characters were of a different type.

DCN

Edited by Doug Nye, 22 July 2010 - 13:57.


#10 EvDelft

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 14:14

I have to say that it seems bizarre to put Neubauer into a 1960s setting. Times had changed by then. Team management characters were of a different type.

Depends on how you situate the whole thing. I don't want to give everything away, because I need the approval of a Dutch singer for using his concept, but it isn't in the world as we have known it. It is a real 'what if'-story, in every way of the word.;)

Anyway, thanks for your contribution, I will mention everything in the references. Don't worry. And when (almost) ready, I'll ask some Dutchmen here to read it for me. They'll be able to tell you. Am really working on it at the moment. Chapter 1 is allmost finished, the story is in my head.

#11 RStock

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 16:30

If you recorded it for your own use, and cdrewett just uses it for info and character building, and does not quote directly from it, there should be no problems. If the story is fictional, and cdr "describes" Neubauer as an amusing man, rather than have a character "speak" the exact words used in the intervview, that's fine. If in the recorded interview Moss says "Neubauer always made me laugh when we were flying", then Mr. Racedriver in the book cannot say "Neubauer always made me laugh when we were flying", that would be breach of someone's copyright, and probably the person/organisation that made the recording - Strangely, not Stirling Moss', as by giving the interview he in effect assigned the copyright to the person making the recording, unless terms were agreed beforehand.

Double-check this, but I think I am correct. Go to the library and get a text on copyright law, or bug a friend in the legal profession.


I was reading about this subject awhile back and I'm pretty sure it can be used as long as permission is sought and obtained from the person/corporation holding the copyright, which might also include a usage fee.

#12 D-Type

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 16:50

I think cdrewett may have been referring to another copyright issue. Although he has the transcription of the interview on his computer, as he was commissioned to carry out the interview, the copyright is not his but belongs to the party that commissioned him. Hence he cannot let anyone have a copy.

Sorry, Evdelft, I forgot that those who are not native English speakers may not understand idiomatic phrases. By "... Uhlenhaut and his ilk" I meant "... Uhlenhaut and others like him". I could have written "... engineers, such as Uhlenhaut".


Edited by D-Type, 22 July 2010 - 16:58.


#13 West3

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 19:52

Erwin,

For a wonderful piece of historical fiction concerning Neubauer, his life and times, I suggest you get a copy of "Speed Was My Life" written by Alfred himself. Terrific tales, some of which are actually true!

-Will

#14 D-Type

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 20:55

Erwin,
A couple of points to bear in mind.
(1) Mercedes made a comeback into GP racing in 1924, 1934 and 1954 so logically the next one should have been 1964 not 1963
(2) Neubauer was born in 1891 and Uhlenhaut in 1906, so in 1963 they would have been 72 and 57 respectively. So Neubauer would probably have been some sort of titular head and a younger man would have been the team manager running the racing department - Uhlenhaut?

#15 Ray Bell

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 21:28

Originally posted by Doug Nye
.....Times had changed by then. Team management characters were of a different type.


Like Tim Parnell?

Doug, if you re-read the previous post, you'll see that it's Uhlenhaut that's referred to as doing the good things in '36...

#16 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 22:09

Erwin, here may help reading separate books to get an idea.

Would love to proof read your first chapter!



#17 EvDelft

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 10:35

I think cdrewett may have been referring to another copyright issue. Although he has the transcription of the interview on his computer, as he was commissioned to carry out the interview, the copyright is not his but belongs to the party that commissioned him. Hence he cannot let anyone have a copy.

No problem, I contacted him and he told me the same. No hard feelings. If you don't ask, you'll never know! :p

Sorry, Evdelft, I forgot that those who are not native English speakers may not understand idiomatic phrases. By "... Uhlenhaut and his ilk" I meant "... Uhlenhaut and others like him". I could have written "... engineers, such as Uhlenhaut".

No problem, I just wanted to know for sure! :D

Erwin,

For a wonderful piece of historical fiction concerning Neubauer, his life and times, I suggest you get a copy of "Speed Was My Life" written by Alfred himself. Terrific tales, some of which are actually true!

-Will

I will try to find that book! Thanks, it will be helpfull for sure!


Erwin,
A couple of points to bear in mind.
(1) Mercedes made a comeback into GP racing in 1924, 1934 and 1954 so logically the next one should have been 1964 not 1963
(2) Neubauer was born in 1891 and Uhlenhaut in 1906, so in 1963 they would have been 72 and 57 respectively. So Neubauer would probably have been some sort of titular head and a younger man would have been the team manager running the racing department - Uhlenhaut?

Mmm... Good, I forgot to think about that. Already wrote that Neubauer would be well at age, and more like a senior instead, but still in charge of the factory.

May be I could make Uhlenhaut the head of the racingteam, not a bad idea at all!

Besides, I was not talking about a comeback, they never left after the war was won (so, there, I gave away the whole situation!);)

Erwin, here may help reading separate books to get an idea.

Would love to proof read your first chapter!

Arjen, check your PM.

#18 Rennmax

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 07:19

Hi gents, if you are looking for the Neubauer books in the German language area, the original titles are "Herr über 1000 PS" (=master of 1000 hp) and ""Männer, Frauen und Motoren" (=men, women and engines). Nice little vid here, Mr. Neubauer is obviously playing himself....



#19 kayemod

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 08:47

Besides, I was not talking about a comeback, they never left after the war was won (so, there, I gave away the whole situation!);)


This sounds like a cross between Robert Harris's Fatherland and something by Robert Daley. Probably less gripping than the first, but hopefully better than the second. Have you got Max's dad in your story as der Englishche Puppenkanzler?

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#20 brucemoxon

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 09:00

This sounds like a cross between Robert Harris's Fatherland and something by Robert Daley. Probably less gripping than the first, but hopefully better than the second. Have you got Max's dad in your story as der Englishche Puppenkanzler?


Or 'In The Presence of Mine Enemies' by Harry Turtledove.




Bruce Moxon


#21 Vitesse2

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 09:05

This sounds like a cross between Robert Harris's Fatherland and something by Robert Daley. Probably less gripping than the first, but hopefully better than the second. Have you got Max's dad in your story as der Englishche Puppenkanzler?

And a restored to the throne King Edward VIII? The Prince Bernhard situation would be somewhat interesting too ... ;)

#22 Allan Lupton

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 13:48

The Prince Bernhard situation would be somewhat interesting too ...;)

Oh, the Lockheed agent . . . . :rolleyes:

#23 Vitesse2

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 14:07

Oh, the Lockheed agent . . . . :rolleyes:

... and motor racing enthusiast. The presence of both German GP teams to give demonstration runs at the 1939 Zandvoort race meeting was apparently at his personal invitation. But he was never a Nazi. :rolleyes:

#24 EvDelft

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 20:38

Hi gents, if you are looking for the Neubauer books in the German language area, the original titles are "Herr über 1000 PS" (=master of 1000 hp) and ""Männer, Frauen und Motoren" (=men, women and engines). Nice little vid here, Mr. Neubauer is obviously playing himself....

Thanks, I'll try to find the book!

#25 Risil

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 22:48

The Mercedes in the High Castle? :stoned:

#26 Charlieman

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 19:54

To my shame, I have just finished reading the Chris Nixon book on the Silver Arrows for the first time. Neubauer is a central character in that book and he was clearly a bit of a character.

The anecdote from Stirling Moss sounds a bit off. In the 1930s at least, Neubauer only spoke German. Uhlenhaut was the linguist and he helped Dick Seaman to settle in, by all accounts.

Neubauer liked his food and drink. But we could guess that from the photos.

Note the way that Neubauer dresses. Even for the 1930s and 1950s, his style is more formal than others in the pits.

#27 speedman13

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 11:33

Thanks, I'll try to find the book!


I have a copy of Manner-Frauen und Motoren for sale.
It is a hardback in very good condition with a dust jacket.
Price £40.00

Also available
Mein Leben als Rennfahrer by Rudolf Caracciola published in 1939.
Hardback in very good condition with dust jacket.
Price £40.00

Hinter Drohnenden Motoren by Ludwig Sebastian published in 1952.
Hardback in good condition.
Price £90.00

#28 EvDelft

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 12:03

No he was no great shakes as a driver, and certainly not as an engineer. He contributed nothing to the 1936 car either in testing or technically. You are confusing him here with Rudi Uhlenhaut - who was in contrast a superb driver and a fine engineer.

Neubauer was extremely methodical, a good organiser and team director, and a far-sighted one. He could appear formidable and commanding - due partly to his physical size and booming voice - but he had good antennae for team morale and the sensitivities of his drivers. He proved quite clever at keeping them all, generally, happy. In more relaxed circumstances he could evidently play the clown, and was a brilliant mimic and raconteur. He tended to speak loud - and long - and seldom permitted anyone else to get a word in edgeways. But with senior company board members present he would equally be very much the Wehrmacht sergeant - very respectful to his superiors. At the races Uhlenhaut told me Neubauer was relied upon to keep the press away from the engineers who had serious work to do. He was good at that, too.

I have to say that it seems bizarre to put Neubauer into a 1960s setting. Times had changed by then. Team management characters were of a different type.

DCN

About this man called Uhlenhaut. If it wasn't Rudolf, what was his first name?

I am actually thinking of making him the team principle, and Neubauer just the head of the whole clan :drunk: without actually being involved in the story too deep. That means my driver will have to deal with Uhlenhaut. Who and how was he?

Tnx again! :rolleyes: :love: :up: :clap:

#29 Tim Murray

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 12:17

About this man called Uhlenhaut. If it wasn't Rudolf, what was his first name?

Definitely Rudolf (diminutive - Rudi).

As I understand it Karl Kling took over from Neubauer as Daimler-Benz competitions manager - would he not be a better candidate for your team manager than Uhlenhaut, who I suspect would have preferred to stay on the engineering side of things.

#30 EvDelft

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 12:20

Yeah, that's a good thought!

You see, the story will become plausible. :D

#31 Eric Dunsdon

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 13:09

I always thought it odd that Neubauer didnt consider Stirling Moss to be experienced enough for Formula One in 1954 and then chose Karl Kling and Hans Herrmann for his Mercedes-Benz team . :rotfl:

#32 EvDelft

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 13:26

I always thought it odd that Neubauer didnt consider Stirling Moss to be experienced enough for Formula One in 1954 and then chose Karl Kling and Hans Herrmann for his Mercedes-Benz team . :rotfl:

Due to the world-wide situation in my story, Brittains don't play any role in the book. Germans do.;)

#33 Eric Dunsdon

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 14:37

Due to the world-wide situation in my story, Brittains don't play any role in the book. Germans do.;)


And your book is set in the year 1963?!!!!. :mad:


#34 David McKinney

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 14:38

I always thought it odd that Neubauer didnt consider Stirling Moss to be experienced enough for Formula One in 1954 and then chose Karl Kling and Hans Herrmann for his Mercedes-Benz team . :rotfl:

Almost justifiable. Kling was an F2 ace (in Germany) and had shown well in the team 300SLs in 1952. Herrmann was the rising Porsche star and had also shown promise in F2

I think it was the pre-war approach over again. Pack the team with German drivers but hire a world champion to set the benchmark. By 1955 they had to have Moss as well, or Maseratis might have been more of an embarrassment than they were (with apologies to the Behra fans out there)

#35 EvDelft

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 14:51

And your book is set in the year 1963?!!!!. :mad:

Yep. As I said, it is a 'what-if'-story.

Edited by EvDelft, 13 August 2010 - 14:51.


#36 kayemod

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 14:55

Due to the world-wide situation in my story, Brittains don't play any role in the book. Germans do.;)


Does Herr Colin von Chapman appear in your story?


#37 D-Type

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 15:11

Due to the world-wide situation in my story, Brittains don't play any role in the book. Germans do.;)

Of course had Germany won the war with his Jewish background Moss would never have been considered. Or perhaps you don't want to go there!

Karl Kling as racing manager succeeding Neubauer sounds good.

By 1963 Rudolf Uhlenhaut would have reached the level of engineering director or similar with management responsibility for the race engineering but no longer having a "hands-on" role in the design. This gives you the freedom to introduce a fictitious chief designer

You could maybe bring in Manfred von Brautisch (spelling?) and Husche von Hanstein in background roles or Hermann Lang if you want a more "blue collar" than "blue blood" background.

#38 Vitesse2

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 15:43

You could maybe bring in Manfred von Brautisch (spelling?)

Manfred would by then have probably been comfortably retired, running his llingerie shop in Prague ...

#39 Eric Dunsdon

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 16:51

Almost justifiable. Kling was an F2 ace (in Germany) and had shown well in the team 300SLs in 1952. Herrmann was the rising Porsche star and had also shown promise in F2

I think it was the pre-war approach over again. Pack the team with German drivers but hire a world champion to set the benchmark. By 1955 they had to have Moss as well, or Maseratis might have been more of an embarrassment than they were (with apologies to the Behra fans out there)


Point taken David, but Stirling Moss was even more of an F2 ace and was certainly an embarrassment to Kling and Mercedes-Benz, not to mention Neubauer's judgement throughout 1954.

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#40 Eric Dunsdon

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 16:54

Does Herr Colin von Chapman appear in your story?


And what about those British Racing Motors?. :clap:

#41 Risil

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 17:29

Don't forget how Walter Kaaden's tuned-exhaust MZs are currently dominating the Grand Prix motorcycle scene. ;) Unless supercharging has never received its FIM ban, of course...

#42 EvDelft

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 05:39

Of course had Germany won the war with his Jewish background Moss would never have been considered. Or perhaps you don't want to go there!

Karl Kling as racing manager succeeding Neubauer sounds good.

By 1963 Rudolf Uhlenhaut would have reached the level of engineering director or similar with management responsibility for the race engineering but no longer having a "hands-on" role in the design. This gives you the freedom to introduce a fictitious chief designer

You could maybe bring in Manfred von Brautisch (spelling?) and Husche von Hanstein in background roles or Hermann Lang if you want a more "blue collar" than "blue blood" background.

That is exactly where I want to go to! That is the whole situation. But because of the many unknowns, like who is where at the time, I want to place the right characters in the position where they most likely would have been. It also excludes Von Trips, i.e., for Mercedes or Auto Union.

Because I use teams that exist(ed) I also have to use characters that exist(ed). So there is my point: who is where, who was who (in personality).

So:
Neubauer: head of the whole organization
Uhlenhaut: head of the engineering department
Kling: team principle
Main drivers (made up names): Andreas Gütz and Karl Meier.

I can use the other drivers you mentioned. I will think of that!!



#43 uechtel

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 06:57

Don't forget how Walter Kaaden's tuned-exhaust MZs are currently dominating the Grand Prix motorcycle scene.;) Unless supercharging has never received its FIM ban, of course...


You mean the DKW of course? I don´t think there would have been products from a VEB in this scenario...

Also I don´t know how Kling should have come into the GP team. He was a good endurance driver before the war, but his racing career started very much in the post war circumstances and without Mercedes backing. I don´t think they would have invited him to one of their tests of 'newcomer talents'.




#44 David McKinney

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 09:08

I don´t think they would have invited [Kling] to one of their tests of 'newcomer talents'.

If you're referring to the pre-war period, I'm sure you're right

But if you mean '50s, they'd have been nuts to overlook him after his domination of German F2 racing and his performances with the 300SLs in 1952


#45 Risil

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 10:32

You mean the DKW of course? I don´t think there would have been products from a VEB in this scenario...


DKW made two-strokes work pre-war with superchargers (by 1939 ubiquitous) alleviating the engine breathing problems inherent in such a configuration. Dr Kaaden's his genius tuned exhaust system seems very much conditional on the lack of an alternative. And, perhaps, the lack of resources to make a four-stroke Grand Prix bike competitive... [EDIT] I see now that MZ was essentially formed out of the Auto Union/DKW assets left in the Eastern Bloc... :blush: Interesting to think what direction a big concern like Deek would've taken after the war, especially given Kevin Cameron's maxim that motorcycle technology, being inconvertible to a weapon of mass destruction, is basically untouched by the usual effects of war R&D.

Given that post-war bike racing was dominated, and still is dominated, by the former Axis powers would make this scenario an interesting 'study', though. Perhaps Great Britain or France would have required cheap, low-displacement transport instead. Certainly with a properly-funded engine programme, the Nortons would've been unbeatable.

Edited by Risil, 16 August 2010 - 10:46.


#46 uechtel

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 11:36

If you're referring to the pre-war period, I'm sure you're right

But if you mean '50s, they'd have been nuts to overlook him after his domination of German F2 racing and his performances with the 300SLs in 1952


Yes, but my point is, in this scenario there would not have been such a 'private' postwar Formula 2 scene in Germany, maybe not even a 300 SL.

Edited by uechtel, 16 August 2010 - 11:36.


#47 EvDelft

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 11:46

Yes, but my point is, in this scenario there would not have been such a 'private' postwar Formula 2 scene in Germany, maybe not even a 300 SL.

Well, some assumptions have to be made to make a story. I assume that the development of the German cars went as it did in real. So in 1963 there will be a 300SL, a 300d, and so on. Only Borgward will not go bankrupt (American story) and Auto Union is still fighting in F1. Have to rename the FIA btw into something German (Die Groß Deutsche Automobil Federation - GDAF, for example).

What makes it more difficult is to write down the little things that are supposed to be normal in that situation, but are not for us now. That's why it takes a little longer.

#48 David McKinney

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 11:57

Yes, but my point is, in this scenario there would not have been such a 'private' postwar Formula 2 scene in Germany, maybe not even a 300 SL.

You mean in EvDelft's scenario?

Edited by David McKinney, 16 August 2010 - 11:58.


#49 uechtel

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 14:23

Yes indeed.

I think if Germany (with Italy of course) would have won the war then we would have seen a continuation of the works domination in the sport. In contrast the blossom of Formula 2 was very much on a privateer basis, which was not really what the authorities would have liked. Before the war they made successful efforts to get everything under organizational control, so I think they would have changed this philosophy.

And the 300 SL, hm, wasn´t it more or less also a stop gap project preparing the re-entry of GP racing? I think such a project ould not have been necessary either.



#50 Henk Vasmel

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 21:35

Yes indeed.

I think if Germany (with Italy of course) would have won the war then we would have seen a continuation of the works domination in the sport. In contrast the blossom of Formula 2 was very much on a privateer basis, which was not really what the authorities would have liked. Before the war they made successful efforts to get everything under organizational control, so I think they would have changed this philosophy.

And the 300 SL, hm, wasn´t it more or less also a stop gap project preparing the re-entry of GP racing? I think such a project ould not have been necessary either.


Don't forget that the originally proposed name for the 300SL was 300SS (SuperSports). For obvious reasons that name could not be used, but in your scenario, those reasons do not apply.