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The David Beard Memorial photographers' thread


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#151 bradbury west

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:29

These are very nice images. Apologies if misinterpreted.

No offence taken, I assure you. I am very grateful for what these digicameras help me to do, but very aware of what I cannot do with them. Looking into the sunset the image on the screen looked quite light, so I pushed the prefocus button with the lens facing to the sky and then shoot the sunset so the image is darker than real. Any other way makes the picture too light and pasty, so useless, even if I use the flash locked on, as Patrick Lichfield advised years ago in an article when shooting into the direction of the sun with digitals. He used a little Miu camera as a tester when he stopped using a Polaroid apparently.
Roger Lund

Edited by bradbury west, 23 January 2011 - 20:30.


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#152 elansprint72

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:43

.......................... to me the "pre-visualization" factor in photography was what separated the pros from the amateurs. In the past, the pro could see as if they WERE the film, and proper exposure on reversal film was paramount. Without it, there was nothing. The amateurs had to "hope it would turn out"..........



What condescending nonsense! The vast majority of the Royal Photographic society are amateurs, are you suggesting that none of them could use reversal film properly?

#153 Phil Rainford

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:46

Have you looked at the Cutaway Artists thread. There a few legends on there who saw the writing on the wall when perhaps I should have done. The world is a different place from 20 years ago ):


If we are talking business then "if we stand still we go backwards " will and I am sure has always been true

However " true quality " will always be appreciated ..................even if it doesn't always pay the bills


PAR

#154 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:46

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Posting one's own photographs is a bit nerve-wracking, but here we go. The Benetton wind tunnel, before it became the Renault wind tunnel!

#155 elansprint72

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:50

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Posting one's own photographs is a bit nerve-wracking, but here we go. The Benetton wind tunnel, before it became the Renault wind tunnel!

Tony,
I like this shot but find it a little unsettling; if I went in there I would want to take the key which starts the fan in with me, just to be sure!


#156 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 20:55

As a properly trained working-stock Springer she does not bother about sheep or cattle
RL

I wouldn't expect anything less, Roger. As usual I was being a little flippant, but not, I hope, offensive.

#157 arttidesco

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 21:28

Same idea.......dusk at Le Mans

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PAR


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Similar idea at dusk when I was running late to catch a plane in Berlin :rolleyes:

#158 elansprint72

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 21:34

Different idea: the Breadvan. I used to see this car quite often at Oulton Park in clubbies but did not really take too much notice of it back then. Having read the book about it- "Rebel Rebel" I wish that I had taken more shots than I did.

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#159 E1pix

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 21:36

What condescending nonsense! The vast majority of the Royal Photographic society are amateurs, are you suggesting that none of them could use reversal film properly?


My Goodness.... I already apologized if anyone misinterpreted what I said. There was no intended or implied condescension, and I'm not here to argue.

I was an amateur once, too, for many years. During that time, I assumed I knew nothing so I'd be able to learn and someday know better. It took years to achieve what one can do in days now, technically speaking only.

You're likely referring to advanced amateurs. My keep rate was still pretty low when I was one, and part of that is because I only used slide film. It was a very difficult craft, if only in getting perfect exposure every time using meters that are junk compared to today's. Until I knew EXACTLY how a given film stock rendered EVERY image in ANY kind of light, I too was guessing what I'd get. There's no offense in that learning process, or recognizing one's not as proficient as one thinks they are.

I was referencing what was written about Ansel Adams.... and adding how technology has made it easier to have a higher keep rate, and how that and other techno-factors have affected the business of photography, and many arts.

If any of that offends your ego, you might want to work on that.



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#160 elansprint72

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 21:48

..................
If any of that offends your ego, you might want to work on that.


Welcome to the form; nice start.


#161 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 22:03

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Another quirky one, a result of being delayed for hours and having some B&W film left, but I like the result. Enough from me for a while...

#162 elansprint72

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 22:10

Where were we? :rolleyes:

For most of the years that I've been shooting motor sports I've used long lenses; the brief for last year's Le Mans Classic was somewhat different- "behind the scenes". Nearly all of my photos were taken with an 18-35mm zoom on the D700, it was certainly a different set of challenges but very enjoyable. Even the "pit wall at night" shots were with this lens, I'm only now getting through the out-takes and have to say that the Nikon sensor is incredible in low light; lots of detail, no noise. Try that with Agfa slide film. :smoking:

This one was at the concours enclosure.

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#163 elansprint72

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 22:11

Another quirky one, a result of being delayed for hours and having some B&W film left, but I like the result. Enough from me for a while...


Not surprised you were delayed- look at all those UFOs. :smoking:

#164 E1pix

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 23:40

No offence taken, I assure you. I am very grateful for what these digicameras help me to do, but very aware of what I cannot do with them. Looking into the sunset the image on the screen looked quite light, so I pushed the prefocus button with the lens facing to the sky and then shoot the sunset so the image is darker than real. Any other way makes the picture too light and pasty, so useless, even if I use the flash locked on, as Patrick Lichfield advised years ago in an article when shooting into the direction of the sun with digitals. He used a little Miu camera as a tester when he stopped using a Polaroid apparently.
Roger Lund


You're wise to use any technique of re-metering (I think that's what your camera's doing when "pre-focusing"). Your method aptly "fools" the meter and at times is the best solution.

I don't know your experience, so no pretense.... hand-held, using your metering method, it's hard to get the exact same composition twice.... but notating where the centerpoint, or a corner, of the viewfinder is makes for easier alignment. Regardless of technique, digital or film, bracketing is very important (obviously not possible shooting a moving race car, though!).

To adjust exposure without reframing your composition, you might wish to use A (Aperture Priority mode) so you can adjust shutter speed to bracket exposures while keeping your aperture the same. One variable of that is if you're pushing the "1:1 handheld rule," to always use a shutter speed slightly faster than your lens length. In those times you may prefer S (Shutter Priority mode) so your shutter speed is fast enough in lower-light conditions with longer lenses — and then bracket exposures via aperture.

For racing I almost always prioritize shutter speeds for what I want to do, but depth of field is always in mind as well. Wide open is not necessarily best, except for very tight images where focus becomes compositional. I like one-half stop brackets with film (Fuji Velvia 50), and maybe one-stop brackets with digital, both depending on contrast. The greater the contrast, the more I lean towards tighter bracket spacings. Some experimenting will soon dictate which is best for what circumstance.

Enjoy the ride and record your memories.... that's what it's all about, regardless of a given image's success. I still enjoy looking at my old images even when they're flawed.



#165 E1pix

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 23:45

Bradbury West:

Whoops, left out something....

I didn't read the post you quote about using flash when shooting into the sun.

My bet is the writer was specifically referring to images of people, or other near foregrounds, lit with flash against a bright background.

If so, that is exactly correct. A flash will not change a meter reading or exposure unless it's lighting something in the viewfinder.


#166 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 00:10

Not surprised you were delayed- look at all those UFOs. :smoking:

The truck driver took one look and exited stage left...

#167 E1pix

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 01:41

This has been the most enjoyable thread for ages, even though I have spent far to long looking at great the work of photographers, including many that I've never heard of :))

I'll add my contribution from my purely amateur portfolio.

In the 70's I brought a cheap Miranda with an even cheaper 150mm lens. As I marshalled at most meetings I went to, I didn't take that many photos and unfortunately most were lost when my mother decided to have a clear out after I left home. I thought some were quite good at the time but if I ever found them again, they would probably look crap.

In the early 80's I needed a camera for work and brought a screw thread Pentax SP1000 from a 2nd hand Camera Shop on Cheetham Hill Road in Manchester. It came in it's original box along with the receipt when it was first brought in 1972. I added a cheap Sunagor 300m zoom for my racing stuff as it was all I could afford. It actually wasn't that bad as long as there was enough light, but had it's limitations.


This was taken at Mosport Park in 1985. There was a spot where spectators could view through a gap in the barriers. You get quite low down and the marshals stood far enough apart so that we could shoot between them. There were 6 or 7 of us all wanting the same position so we took it in turns. All very friendly.

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I quite like this. FF2000 Swifts lined up.

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This at the Ostcurve Chicane at Hockenheim. I found a spot where the debris fencing was damaged, so there just enough space to shoot through the gap.

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Hockenheim again. I wish I had the courage to drop the shutter speed a bit.

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Close Formula Ford racing.

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All I had left near the end of a Formula Ford Festival was a 100ASA colour film. The light had gone but I quite liked this one. Nothings really in focus but it has a sense of speed.

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A couple of years ago I again needed a camera for work and picked up an Olympus E500 in Florida for about half the price in the UK. Perfect for work but again it does struggle a bit with bad light. Lenses are a bit limited but I picked up a 40-150 zoom on Ebay for £90 and I actually quite like it.

I'm happier to reduce the shutter speeds as I'm not wasting film any more.

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The Olympus struggles with light and for some reason I can't find how to raise the ISO above 400, but it didn't do too bad at a wet Anglesey the other year, although the lens seems to throw up a few spots.

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The settings were totally wrong when I took this but I like the 60's feel of the colours even though there's a modern van and wheelie bins at the top. I just wish I could remember what the camera settings were!!

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Hey, Alansart:

I didn't log on early enough today to view your pics.... AWESOME photos!

#168 WDH74

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 02:05

Been meaning to ask, but what are we looking at in this photo? They look like Facellias, but to three-quarter scale. Unless there's something about the angle that's throwing me off.

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#169 Simon Arron

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 07:49

I grew up in a house infused with the bromide tang of professional photography. My father's natural aptitude for the task was not genetically transferred, but I had the privilege of being able to use various bits of his kit to record life at Oulton Park and elsewhere. I'd stand and point a light meter at Lodge Corner and the answer always seemed to be 1/250 at f11 from May to August, 1/250 at f8 at most other times or f5.6 if it was raining. I'm not unduly bothered by my compositional incompetence in the following (a sawn-off MGB in the background, fence palings in the foreground, missing bits of people), because the results take me back to a very happy time and place, which is what matters.

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I try to take a bit more compositional care nowadays, without being obsessive. I enjoy photography for what it is – a hobby that complements, erm, various other hobbies. Technological advances mean better results for those like me, who are strictly amateur in terms of status and ability, but when I go to a photo exhibition I remain acutely, painfully aware of the difference between what I do and what a pro achieves. One day, though, the following will take me back to other happy times and places, which is still what matters…
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#170 stevewf1

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 08:02

Speaking of trains - and tracks... Both were taken with a "point & shoot" camera.

40-mph freight at Perth, Indiana
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Sunrise at Reno, Indiana
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Edited by stevewf1, 24 January 2011 - 08:08.


#171 elansprint72

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 08:49

Been meaning to ask, but what are we looking at in this photo? They look like Facellias, but to three-quarter scale. Unless there's something about the angle that's throwing me off.


They are Facellias, the wide-angle lens has produced a "big sky" effect; I was standing very close to the car in the foreground.

#172 E1pix

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 08:55

Simon:

These are lovely. Simply beautiful, less is almost always more.

Love the Lola T294 (296?), and them all.... nothing short of professional grade.

Passion for subject = great memories automatically.

#173 elansprint72

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 08:55

Simon,
Those B&W Oulton shots take me back- how many times I joined in hunts for lost nuts or little spring that flew off into the grass I cannot tell! Happy days. The composition in your more modern shots is none too shabby; have you considered a career in journalism?  ;)

Steve,
That "big sun" shot is excellent.

#174 ellrosso

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:52

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Few shots from Adelaide in '85, '86. '85 were shot on Nikkormat EL with 500mm Nikkor Reflex
and '86 were on F3 with 600mm Sigma Reflex. No pass so had to shoot through the gap in the catch fencing
and try and dodge the working photographers.

#175 jj2728

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 17:29

Watkins Glen 1969. Wind, cold, and rain. Nothing fancy here. From my father's archives. It's one of my favorites actually. Taken with an unmetered Leica M3.

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#176 Option1

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 17:44

Just a note with regards to Ansell Adams. He was renowned for the amount of post-processing he did on his pictures, typically dodging and burning away to his heart's content until he got the final picture he would print. He made no secret of it and there's a wonderful documentary, the name of which I've forgotten, on him where he details his repeated process/print, reprocess/reprint/ad infinitum methods. So no, even Ansell didn't get it right in camera, he just had bloody good stuff on which to do his post work. Personally, I've no doubt he'd have loved the labour-saving possible with digital, particularly the digital darkroom. :)

Neil

#177 E1pix

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 18:04

Just a note with regards to Ansell Adams. He was renowned for the amount of post-processing he did on his pictures, typically dodging and burning away to his heart's content until he got the final picture he would print. He made no secret of it and there's a wonderful documentary, the name of which I've forgotten, on him where he details his repeated process/print, reprocess/reprint/ad infinitum methods. So no, even Ansell didn't get it right in camera, he just had bloody good stuff on which to do his post work. Personally, I've no doubt he'd have loved the labour-saving possible with digital, particularly the digital darkroom. :)

Neil


Agreed, Ansel's "straight" prints were never finals. The prints he was happy with and/or sold were heavily manipulated — by hand. No two matched. He did get it right in the camera, though, meaning the exposures were correct. I agree he'd have loved the possibilities of things like Photoshop and Lightroom, but also know (from people who knew him) he loved handwork. He practiced his craft in a great era, when the art was really hard and only a very few practiced it at all. (can you imagine glass negatives???)

I've seen that documentary recently — if it's the same one that has a few Georgia O' Keefe interviews. An illustrator we met at dinner invited us last Thanksgiving, and it was great — and fittingly enough, in Yosemite. I felt honored to shoot in his tracks.

#178 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 18:05

Personally, I've no doubt he'd have loved the labour-saving possible with digital, particularly the digital darkroom. :)

Neil

He probably would, but he would be starting with the advantage of understanding the Zone System, so no doubt his first effort would be not very wrong! The other difference is the finished print - does an inkjet print on high-quality paper match a selenium-toned print on Kodak or Ilford heavy-wieght fibre-based paper? I haven't seen two side-by-side so I dunno...

#179 David Lawson

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 18:09

I very much agree with the view that a photo takes you back to a wonderful day at a motor racing circuit and as I said in post 101 it is my personal record of the day so the picture only has to please me to be successful.

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I know that there are elements of The Revival that are pantomime but I couldn't resist taking a picture of this scene at Goodwood 2002.

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Back to wonderful Cadwell Park for this picture of these cars climbing out of the woodland area towards the parkland part of the circuit.

David

Edited by David Lawson, 24 January 2011 - 18:10.


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#180 alansart

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 18:17

I
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Back to wonderful Cadwell Park for this picture of these cars climbing out of the woodland area towards the parkland part of the circuit.

David


Cadwell Park - A great place to race at and take photos :)

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#181 jj2728

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 19:30

He probably would, but he would be starting with the advantage of understanding the Zone System, so no doubt his first effort would be not very wrong! The other difference is the finished print - does an inkjet print on high-quality paper match a selenium-toned print on Kodak or Ilford heavy-wieght fibre-based paper? I haven't seen two side-by-side so I dunno...


My personal opine, is that done well, the inkjet can match a selenium toned print. I have both in my studio. Now, whether or not the inkjet has the longevity before I begin to see color fade or deterioration is another matter.

Edited by jj2728, 24 January 2011 - 19:31.


#182 E1pix

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 19:40

My personal opine, is that done well, the inkjet can match a selenium toned print. I have both in my studio. Now, whether or not the inkjet has the longevity before I begin to see color fade or deterioration is another matter.


Good to hear, and what I surmised with black & white. My bw testing has been limited to a few inkjets and LightJets so far, and they're pretty darned sweet.

My most-extensive tests have all revolved around color P3 and P4 Ciba vs. digitals, and intangible opinions aside, the digital prints blow the Cibas away! Whether inkjet or LightJet. It's rather amazing.

'Nother topic.... I've been using Photoshop for about a decade, and am pretty savvy with it (I've processed over 10,000 film files of 55-700mb so far). But I just bought Lightroom, and must say its sharpening tools alone are blowing my doors off!!!

#183 Option1

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 21:08

Wish they made lightroom for the Mac. I'm less than impressed with the sharpening process in what could be called the Mac equivalent, Aperture, and have gone back to using PS for all my processing.

Neil

#184 The Oracle

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 21:13

Right been through my files, would love some input - be as harsh as you like - however as I mentioned earlier only been attending motorsports for 10 years or so so not too much "nostagia" here, anyway hope the pics are not too big!

Le Mans 2007 dusk shot at Arnage over the debris fence and tweaked slightly in CS3
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Race of Champions @ Wembly 2008 Definatley Coulthard and possibly Loeb might be the final
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3 From Thruxton BTCC finale 2007 Jackson collides with Turkington at the club chicane Jakob Ebrey was shooting in front of me, his image made Autosport!
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Hamilton leads Raikonnen during the early stages of the 2007 British GP, shot over the top of the debris fence and a shot i'm very happy with
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One more for now and one for fans of 2 wheels, Melandri looses it on the first lap of the British Motogp at Silverstone 2010
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#185 E1pix

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 21:34

Wish they made lightroom for the Mac. I'm less than impressed with the sharpening process in what could be called the Mac equivalent, Aperture, and have gone back to using PS for all my processing.

Neil


I'm working Lightroom on a Mac as we speak.... so yes, it's available for Mac.

I use Smart Sharpen in PS, but delightedly Lightroom blows it into the proverbial weeds — and I'm resistant to change after spending years "mastering" anything (we never really master anything, of course). There's a slider where you can "adjust out" smooth areas that typically reek of oversharpening first, like sand, clouds, et al. Unreal.

At $299 it's a bargain, I must say. Today I'm correcting 700 digital selects from a long road trip. In PS, I's spend three or four days doing that right. If you have a group of similarly-exposed images, you apply corrections to the first image, and hit a "Sync" button to auto-correct the rest. This includes EVERY correction, even auto-cropping hundreds of images into a proper 3:2 aspect ratio, rotating to level, everything.... in seconds!

As someone used to copy-pasting Layers to emulate that, and sharpening each individually by duping the bkg Layer, then saving a 70mb file, and all the rest, this feature is to die for — and the file sizes are same as RAW capture, the corrections stored as "commands" within the app and not adding to file size at all. There's no waiting for files to Open or Save, either (!!!). I'm behind the 8 ball on getting the app, but OH SO glad I did! My primary work is large-format nature on Velvia 50, so I'm new to digital captures and this is way easier than I'd tossed and turned wondering about.

I'd be happy to get you up to speed with Lightroom as I do myself, it's easier to learn than PS for sure!

HAPPY SHOOTING!

#186 WDH74

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 21:51

Today I'm correcting 700 digital selects from a long road trip. In PS, I's spend three or four days doing that right. If you have a group of similarly-exposed images, you apply corrections to the first image, and hit a "Sync" button to auto-correct the rest.


FWIW, Photoshop Elements 9 allows batch editing as well, and only costs about a hundred bucks. You can auto adjust a bunch of stuff, as well as change sizes, file type, and add watermarks or captions. I don't know how well it works, since I never process hundreds of photos at once, just that it's an option.

-WDH

#187 E1pix

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 22:13

FWIW, Photoshop Elements 9 allows batch editing as well, and only costs about a hundred bucks. You can auto adjust a bunch of stuff, as well as change sizes, file type, and add watermarks or captions. I don't know how well it works, since I never process hundreds of photos at once, just that it's an option.

-WDH


I left out another shocking function in Lightroom.... one can dust an image, and if the spots are in the same place on others (such as with a dirty sensor), all those dust spots can be batched out at once.... AND each one is erasable.

NO.... I don't work for Adobe. Just jazzed learning what it can do, and all the time I'll save. Only 20,000 images to go! (after scanning)

#188 kayemod

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 22:52

FWIW, Photoshop Elements 9 allows batch editing as well...


So does my favoured system, Nikon Capture NX2.


#189 PCC

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:12

I left out another shocking function in Lightroom....

E1pix, how hard is Lightroom to learn? I've heard nothing but good things about it, but having invested a lot of time becoming moderately competent with Photoshop, I am reluctant (and lazy) to step to the very bottom of yet another learning curve.

#190 PCC

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:18

Just a note with regards to Ansell Adams. He was renowned for the amount of post-processing he did on his pictures, typically dodging and burning away to his heart's content until he got the final picture he would print. He made no secret of it and there's a wonderful documentary, the name of which I've forgotten, on him where he details his repeated process/print, reprocess/reprint/ad infinitum methods.

There was also a book, called something like Ansel Adams: The Making of Forty [or was it thirty? Twenty?] Photographs, that showed straight work-prints beside the heavily manipulated final images. 'Getting it right in the camera' meant previsualization, not lack of manipulation. In fact, the manipulation was simply the final step in realizing the previsualization.

#191 E1pix

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:42

E1pix, how hard is Lightroom to learn? I've heard nothing but good things about it, but having invested a lot of time becoming moderately competent with Photoshop, I am reluctant (and lazy) to step to the very bottom of yet another learning curve.


PCC:

Re: Learning Curve: MAN, I hear Ya! Don't blame you a bit, technology is making all of us rather tired.

I gotta say, of late I have so much backlog of scans to do, keywords to apply, software to learn, a massive stock website to build, on and on and on (still awake?), that I'm the last to be all that eager about jumping on to something else to re-invent my life and workflow yet again. All this only to preface and pre-qualify that I'm right there with you....

I'd say it's far, far easier than Photoshop to learn, and certainly to use. And so much faster I'm spinning! The first day I launched it (last Thursday, I think), I perused the tools and basic structure within an hour or so. Almost all of it intuitively. I opened some dummy files (duplicated to then toss after testing) and jumped right into the menus and started learning the Healing-Clone Brush. As with all this nonsense it was totally different than what I'd worked so hard to learn (PS, on and on and on) I wasn't pleased right off. I'm a "get it done" type, and have to be, not a "work for a week to learn how to later get it done and get back to real work" type.

All that drivel stated, I dusted 700 images in a long day. Today I impeccably color-corrected about 250 of those in maybe 4 hours, and I think they look better than if I'd done them in PS. With time and technique I see no reason to not be able to correct maybe 1,000 images in a day soon. Some differences between LR and PS are this.... Lightroom does not alter or embed anything into the file whatsoever. The files are entirely worked on in RAW format (I'm a LZW TIFF from scans guy), so keep information lost if converted to any other standard like tif. The corrections, dusting, everything, is saved as a set of commands within the app, not within the file. There's no file opening, or saving, or layers adding to file size, the original file size is unchanged regardless os the amount you tweak it.

Photoshop, even in Layers, does degrade an image because it affects pixels. Lightroom works with Luminosity, a hard concept to grasp at first, but the file is not "altered" as in Photoshop. The only other app out there I know of that works in Luminosity is SilverFast, but more likely exist. After 8 years of commitment to Photoshop, and Adobe RGB98 colorspace, I will likely do almost everything in Lightroom here on out (except some things PS is still better at). I have also switched to ProPhoto RGB colorspace, as it has far more gamut than even Adobe RGB98, and that alone saved a couple sunset images where the gradation from sun to sky looked like a bullet hole, the ProPhoto had enough extra gamut to make that issue invisible.

My guess is in two years Adobe will launch a photo-specific, broad app called "Photoshop Lightroom" that will combine the two and have database and web solutions in there as well.


#192 Option1

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 20:14

Thanks for that E1, didn't realise Lightroom was available for the Mac. Will have to look into that. I must admit I have my PS processing techniques down fairly pat with a few self created actions and could batch them or droplet them as well if I wanted. But will still look further into Lightroom.

Neil

#193 E1pix

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 21:11

Thanks for that E1, didn't realise Lightroom was available for the Mac. Will have to look into that. I must admit I have my PS processing techniques down fairly pat with a few self created actions and could batch them or droplet them as well if I wanted. But will still look further into Lightroom.

Neil


Option 1:

We're in the same boat there, I have created over 500 Photoshop Actions for my needs. I put a stopwatch on corrections today, in LR, and Sync-corrected over 300 images in an hour. Granted, many were similar subjects, but that's impossible with Photoshop — much as I love that program, too. Another cool thing I've discovered is that LR recognizes verticals as having been rotated in camera, so I don't have to separate horizontals from verticals to batch them into whatever sizes I want.

I'll keep the Thread posted on my testing, if there's interest.

Thanks.


#194 WDH74

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 00:39

There was also a book, called something like Ansel Adams: The Making of Forty [or was it thirty? Twenty?] Photographs, that showed straight work-prints beside the heavily manipulated final images. 'Getting it right in the camera' meant previsualization, not lack of manipulation. In fact, the manipulation was simply the final step in realizing the previsualization.


I actually saw that book at a used bookshop today, but it must have been a different version because it only showed the finished prints and not the work prints. Still, the amount of darkroom work that went into the final work was quite extensive for many of his most famous photos. Lots of dodging and burning in something like Moonrise or The Tetons and the Snake River, not to say various chemical baths and whatnot.

Truly, pulling the trigger is just one step, and not even the first.

-WDH

Edited by WDH74, 26 January 2011 - 00:40.


#195 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 00:59

I wonder if anyone bothers with the Zone System using digital - probably not, although non-metered bodies might encourage it. With so much sophisticated software available it probably isn't necessary. Another skill and knowledge-base heading for the waste bin...

#196 E1pix

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 01:38

I actually saw that book at a used bookshop today, but it must have been a different version because it only showed the finished prints and not the work prints. Still, the amount of darkroom work that went into the final work was quite extensive for many of his most famous photos. Lots of dodging and burning in something like Moonrise or The Tetons and the Snake River, not to say various chemical baths and whatnot.

Truly, pulling the trigger is just one step, and not even the first.

-WDH


You got that right! Most of my bill-paying work is deep in the bush, often 30 miles from the car. Planning and getting there are the first hurdles.... pulling the trigger is pretty darn easy. That I can do with a coffee in my hand!

Problem with digital, pulling the trigger is nowhere near the last step anymore. Used to be all one had to do was process and page, sleeve, or mount images. Not No Mo.

Shooting's still the reason we do it, though. That fun is still there.


#197 E1pix

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 01:41

With so much sophisticated software available it probably isn't necessary. Another skill and knowledge-base heading for the waste bin...


Yep.... but don't get me started again.... that got me lambasted yesterday.

Where the biz goes from here may be intermittent between stress, tears, and Guiness. But Dang, it's the best time ever to get good at it if it's just for fun. Hard to see sometimes, but it's still fun.


#198 PCC

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 04:11

I wonder if anyone bothers with the Zone System using digital - probably not, although non-metered bodies might encourage it. With so much sophisticated software available it probably isn't necessary. Another skill and knowledge-base heading for the waste bin...

But isn't the zone system equally applicable to digital? That may sound silly, but different sensors seem to have significantly different exposure curves, and placing critical tones exactly where you want them is just as crucial as ever. The main difference is that what we used to have to measure on a densitometer is now instantly available in a histogram. And, of course, we no longer have the variable of processing to work with.

#199 PCC

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 04:12

Most of my bill-paying work is deep in the bush, often 30 miles from the car. Planning and getting there are the first hurdles.... pulling the trigger is pretty darn easy. That I can do with a coffee in my hand!

Arnold Newman used to say that photography was 10% inspiration and 90% moving furniture....

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#200 E1pix

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 04:39

Arnold Newman used to say that photography was 10% inspiration and 90% moving furniture....


LOVE THAT QUOTE! And love the trail, the longer the better.... inspires all to follow.

I might modify.... respects to Mr. Newman.... regarding the digital age:
10% Inspiration
40% Moving Furniture
50% Reinventing Wheel to Move Said Furniture