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Recalling the 1935 German GP


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#1 Roger Clark

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Posted 10 February 2001 - 20:05

While looking for something else in a 1978 Motor sport, I came across this little article, which may be of some interest.

One of the nicer aspects about editing MOTOR SPORT is being on the receiving end of a fairly regular flow of unexpected items of information and history that our thoughful and enthusiastic readers send in. These are very interesting, especially to one who finds off-beat facets from the motoring past as fascinating as more established material. in this context I am grateful to Mr. H. J. Thomas, writing from Holland, for letting me see a copy of a wall-plaque which he noticed while staying at the Hotel Eifler Hof at the Nurburgring for a recent motor-race. This plaque names the distinguished guests who stayed at this hotel during the period of the 1935 German Grand Prix. The persons listed are a graphic reminder of this great race. 1 confess, however, that 1 do not recognise all of them, and any enlightenment anyone can provide might well lead to further interesting memories ...
Let us go through the list, however, and see where we stand. The first name is that of Walb, who was, 1 think, an Auto-Union technician, in a race in which Mereedes-Benz and Auto-Union started five and four cars, respectively, but were trounced by Nuvolari in a 3.2-litre Alfa Romeo inspite of his refuelling-stop going wrong and causing a 2 min. 14 sec. delay, dropping him from ist to 6th place - a dramatic motor-race indeed. Nuvolari, on this occasion of one of his greatest triumphs, apparently stayed elsewhere. But there is Herr Neubauer's name, in room 28, the Mercedes-Benz Racing Manager next to his ace-driver Carraciola (room 27) - he was to finish 3rd, ahead of the second Auto-Union and Fagioli (room 29), another M-B driver. Then we find the aristocratic Manfred von Brauchitsch close to Caracciola (room 26). These drivers are flanked by Sibbitt and Schmitz (rooms 25 and 30), who were, 1 assume, M-B engineers.
Sommer was in room 61i, presumably looking after Alfa Romeo interests, as he wasn't driving. Brivio, who was to retire his Alfa Romeo on the very first lap with transmission failure, was in room 15, next to Raymond Mays - except that Mays had three rooms and more likely took the one next to Humphrey Cook - or did he? Chiron, whose Alfa also succumbed to transmission failure in the race, was there, likewise the AutoUnion drivers Varzi, Stuck, who was to finish 2nd behind Nuvolari, Rosemeyer and Pietsch, their rooms close to those of A-U designer Dr. Porsche, and Doctor Glaser, the A-U doctor. Ruesch (Alfa Romeo), Etancelin (Maserati) and Zehender (Maserati) who were driving and von Delius who would have been had he not bent his ERA in practice, were also using this convenient hotel. But it looks as if ex-mechanic Lang, being given a trial-drive by Mercedes-Benz, was not yet expected to stay among the elite (in the race his engine expired after i6 laps). Nor, it seems, did the Maserati drivers Hartmann and Ghersi, the lone Bugatti driver Taruffi, or the Alfa pilot Balestrero, book in at the Eifler Hof, although it might have been useful for the last named, when he crashed on the opening lap of the race. Mays, by the way, was rather optimistically racing his 2-litre ERA. He was to hold 5th place momentarily, before the more powerful cars swept by; he and von Delius retired after doing 12 of the 22 laps, when the green car's oilpressure disappeared.
What of the rest of those who occupied this block Of 42 rooms on this important occasion? Dr. Werlin, Mollenhauer, Hundt, Ugolini, Grafs, Hucke and Ricordi may have been associated with the teams that were there to race. But what of Biener (Baurat), Frischer, Krompring Wilhelm, Geyer who shared room 43 with Bernett, and Dellachi? 1 note that Harker was in ROOM 21, where he might well have bid goodnight to Etancelin (written as Etancien) and Mays, who had been booked-in in adjacent bedrooms I assume he was the W.E. Harker who made his name at Brooklands with a fast Ulster Austin and his V8 Harker Special, and Capt. Rhode may well have been another visitor from Britain.
Altogether, an unexpected reminder of an historic occasion, when the skill of Tazio Nuvolari destroyed the promise of the new German teams. The night after this Grosser Preis von Deutschland cannot have been a very jolly one for Neubauer and his drivers.... - W.B.





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#2 Michael Müller

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Posted 11 February 2001 - 10:09

There had been 2 top hotels at the Nürburgring, the “Sporthotel Tribüne” direct at the track (at the place where now the new “Dorint Sporthotel” is situated), and the “Eifeler Hof” in the nearby small town of Adenau. Below some pictures of the “Eifeler Hof”, first in the 30’s, then the 50’s, and finally the 90’s.

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When the German Grand Prix moved to Hockenheim, the downfall of the “Hof” was only a question of time. However, there are rumours that the hotel found new ownership and will be restored to old glory. Anybody knowing details, may be Fines who lives in the region?

In 1935 it was the same game as today, as soon as the date of a major event was made public, the run on the hotels started. Every team had – and has – its favorite accomodation, management and drivers of top teams sleep “first class”, and the other staff as well as the poorer privateers are booked in less expensive smaller hotels and guest houses in the area.

Going through the list:
Willy Walb was in fact team manager of Auto-Union, but what only few know, he was also former works driver for Mercedes-Benz in the 2nd half of the 20’s. Dr. Werlin was the manager of MB’s Munich affiliate, a man with excellent connections to the new Nazi regime in Berlin, he was it who arranged the government subsidies for MB’s racing activities. “Geyer” may be Hanns Geier, reserve driver for MB, and “Bernett” could be Hans-Joachim Bernet, MB engineer and works driver at trials and reliability rallyes. Dr. Jakob Werlin was board member of Daimler-Benz, and considering the fact that Mr. Mollenhauer was not forced to share his room, he probably also was one of the top management guys. Nello “Maestro” Ugolini was team manager of the Scuderia Ferrari already in the 30’s, Chiron and Brivio stayed in the same hotel, but why not Nuvolari and Dreyfus? The other names – sorry, no bell is ringing.


#3 fines

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Posted 11 February 2001 - 13:47

Willy Walb also raced the 'Tropfen-Benz' at Monza in 1923. Sorry, no details about the Eifeler Hof, I'll keep my eyes and ears open. :)

#4 Roger Clark

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Posted 11 February 2001 - 14:30

A letter in the following month's edition suggested that Ricordi was the Italian representative of Auto Union and that Krompring Wilhelm could have been a mis-spelling or misreading of Kronprinz Wilhelm, the Crown Prince

#5 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 12 February 2001 - 05:11

The hotel story was surprisingly interesting. .....and what about the race itself?

Well it is been said numerous times before that Nuvolari won through his masterly craft. Yeah, right. I never believed it, although he is my favorite top dog and I am happy he gave the Germans a licking.

The true reason for the German defeat.

Continental Tires: Before the race, the almost 60 year old Carl Dietrich, head of the Continental Tire Racing Department, gave the answer to the tire situation. Dietrich, already a generation ago, had been driving mechanic of Mercedes racing driver Camille Jenatzy at the Gordon Bennett races. At the end of Saturday practice, the experienced Dietrich had a meeting with the Daimler-Benz team management to discuss their number one problem, tires. Since the Mercedes were the most powerful cars with 445 hp, their tires were more stressed than Auto Union's with only 375 hp. After some fast laps by Caracciola and von Brauchitsch the wear of the rear tires was measured with the result that the left rear tire was worn a bit more than the right. This was due to the particular load in some sharp corners. Dietrich explained that Caracciola with his calm, elegant driving style would get along with one tire change during the race. After inspecting the tires of Brauchitsch's car, he pointed out to Brauchisch and Neubauer obvious heavy tire wear especially on the left rear tire. The damages were sliding and braking marks, which went down to the casing, rendering the tires useless. He concluded that if Brauchitsch were going to drive that fast in the race, he would definitely have to change twice because of the higher heat buildup. The tires had to endure temperatures of 100 degrees Celsius (212 F). It became dangerous, when the casing under the rubber layer heated up to over 120 degrees (248 F), which caused separation of the rubber thread from the casing, since the India rubber could not withstand these temperatures. Synthetic rubber for race tires did not yet exist in 1935.

Manfred von Brauchitsch and Daimler-Benz: Up to the end of lap 11, during the first half of the race, Brauchitsch's tires lasted because lap times were slow on a wet and drying circuit. After his quick tire change, von Brauchitsch inherited the lead, did his excellent mid-race sprint, and established the fastest lap on lap 14. The tire-wear increased because of that record lap. At the end of lap 19, the white breaker strip was already visible at the left rear tire. Since lap 14, Neubauer had given him repeatedly signs to slow down. At the end of lap 20, Brauchitsch was aware of his tire condition because when he passed his pits, he pointed towards his rear tires. Neubauer interpreted his sign language that his driver would stop the following lap to change tires. Neubauer then ordered the mechanics to prepare for a quick tire change. They brought the spare wheels out of the pit and had jack and copper hammers ready for action. To the disbelief of a stunned Mercedes team, Brauchitsch then passed the grand stands at full speed on the end of lap 21. He must have changed his mind, believing more in his own luck than in his mechanics speed.

The Mercedes team however, neglected to order Brauchitsch into the pits. His mid-race pace to facilitate an advantage of 1m27.5s at the end of lap 15 was stunning. Since he drove at such fast a pace, it should have been obvious to Neubauer that the tires were now in serious danger. A tire change including the time of stopping and accelerating would take at least one minute. Had his team stopped him at around lap 18, and given him new tires, von Brauchitsch would have been the deserved winner. He would then have been prepared for the hottest battle with Nuvolari since the Italian's tires were also worn down to the casing at the end of the race. What made this defeat so tragic was the fact that it happened to Mercedes of all racing teams, which was acknowledged to have the best and most reliable organization in the world at its disposal. A sure victory was given away because of an avoidable organization mistake, also because of the undisciplined temperament of von Brauchitsch.

#6 Patrick Italiano

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Posted 13 February 2001 - 15:50

A report about the preparation of the Alfas at the Nürburgring 1935, including notes on the german cars, has been published in a Classic and Sports Cars I should have at hand at home.

Don't promise to quote it all, but at least I'll try to give full references tomorrow.



#7 Patrick Italiano

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Posted 14 February 2001 - 13:33

Here's the promised quote from Classic and Sportscar, may 1989.

Nuvolari's car was the Tipo B chassis # 50005, SF45A. Fusi records, in a 1968 letter, that it was fitted with a 3160cc engine.

The internal report of the race says, about tyres that they were Englebert prepared with the 'Ancorizzato' process of cross-cuts in the thread. Front 6.25x19, rear 6.50x19, 34psi at front, 36 at rear.

About Nuvolari's car:

"From the start, because of the showery weather, R17 spark plugs were fitted. At the 11th lap, while leading, a pit stop was made to replenish with fuel and oil, but at the first stroke of the hand pump, the pump lever broke, and the refueling was done by using 20-litre cans.
"The refuelling pit-stop took 1min58sec and as well as petrol, oil and water the rear tyres were changed with Englebert of the type Nürburg Ring, already experimented with on Chiron's car at the Eifel race, with almost 2mm more tread but pattern and size as the 6.50x19 rain type.
"Nuvolari successively regained positions to take himself from fifth to first by overtaking Brauchitsch on the last lap at the carossello. At the finish the rear tyres were worn to the canvas and would not have lasted another lap."

About Auto Unions:

"Repeated pit-stops for spark plug changes and Rosemeyer changed the rear tyres, damaged during an excursion off the track. These cars, like Mercedes, were fitted with the usual tyres: Continental 5.25x19 front and 7.00x19 rear."

About Mercedes:

"Excepting for the car driven by Lang the other four reached the finish line without major mechanical problems, only Fagioli complained of a broken shock absorber.
"Brauchitsch who,after the pit stop of Nuvolari, was leading up until the second to last lap, limped slowly to the finishing line in fifth position due to blowouts in both rear tyres.
"All the other cars, Auto Union and Mercedes, renewed the rear tyres halfway through the race. The other opposition cars which finished the race did so with the tyres more or less showing canvas. Brauchitsch made his pit-stop for fule, oil and tyre change at the 12th lap in 1min 15sec."

Doug Nye, who wrote the piece for C&SC also quotes a german magazine (no mention of which it was) report written by Dipl. Ing. Hundt.

"The italian cars were quicker under initial acceleration from the start and out of the slow corners. According to italian reports the Alfa Romeos were equipped with the same motors as in Paris with the cylinder heads and block cast in light alloy and the volume increased to 4002cc"

As far as I know, french GP cars had indeed 3.8 engines. But a capacity such as 4002cc never existed for sure.



#8 Ray Bell

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Posted 15 February 2001 - 00:18

So perhaps the Nuvolari legend has been enhanced in order to gloss over the errors on the part of the German team?

The small detail... the rejection of a wheel change, the lack of further pressure from Neubauer, it's all something not brought into this equation. Also the apparently better grip of the Italian tyres and cars.

Extremely interesting, Hans and Patrick... and I guess most of us read it here first!

#9 oldtimer

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Posted 15 February 2001 - 00:54

Not for the first time!

#10 C F Eick

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Posted 15 February 2001 - 11:54

This thread should be interesting, since the info there, at least somewhat, contradicts Hans' post. Apparently, Neubauer did try to get von Brauchitsch into the pits. Any thoughts Hans?

http://www.atlasf1.c...p?threadid=6486

/Christian

#11 Roger Clark

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Posted 15 February 2001 - 18:57

THe detail provided by Hans and Patrick is fascinating, but there's notthing there that makes me have any less admiration for Nuvolari's drive. From lap 15, when Brauchitsch had a lead of 87 seconds to lap 20, Nuvolariwas steadily gaining: 77 secs (lap 16), 63 secs(17), 47 secs(18), 43secs(19), 32 secs(20). This may have been due to Brauchitsch slowing to conserve his tyres, but it was the pressure that Nuvolari was putting him under that caused him or his pit to make the mistake of not stopping. Don't forget, also, that Nuvolari lost over a minute when his 12th lap pit stop went so badly wrong.

I'm also interested in the assertion in Patrick's post that the Alfa's were quicker under initial acceleration from the start. According to William Court, Caracciola lead the race before the field had left the pit area, from the fourth row (although Sheldon has him on the third)

#12 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 17 February 2001 - 07:21

Originally posted by Roger Clark
I'm also interested in the assertion in Patrick's post that the Alfa's were quicker under initial acceleration from the start. According to William Court, Caracciola lead the race before the field had left the pit area, from the fourth row (although Sheldon has him on the third)

Here the first three rows of the grid:

Balestrero -- Nuvolari -- Stuck
......Brauchitsch -- Zehender
. Chiron -- Caracciola -- Etancelin

At the start, Stuck (in the first place of the front row) stalled his engine, Balestrero drove a private Alfa, Zehender and Etancelin were in Maseratis. So, Caracciola in the center of row three, had to fear only von Brauchitsch, Chiron and Nuvolari. It was wet, so Caracciola’s weather, and Rudi went immediately into the lead. According to “The Autocar” report, Caracciola was leading the pack when the cars came past the back straight opposite the grand stand.

#13 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 17 February 2001 - 07:56

Originally posted by C F Eick
...since the info there, at least somewhat, contradicts Hans' post...

Christian,
I read your interesting introduction post of the thread you refer to. I don’t really know what you are talking about when you say, "...at least somewhat, contradicts Hans' post." Please point out the contradiction, so I can correct my reflection about the German defeat, which is part of my own 5-page story on that race.

That Nuvolari drove here one of his best races, nobody will ever question. But Penya Rhin and Budapest in 1936 were even better. The fact remains that the Germans lost the race and Nuvolari inherited the lead.

Nuvolari fully deserved this victory and I would never try to take that away since he is my favorite No.1 greatest driver ever. I just try to keep the episodes honest.

#14 Roger Clark

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Posted 17 February 2001 - 10:06

Originally posted by Hans Etzrodt
Here the first three rows of the grid:

Balestrero -- Nuvolari -- Stuck
......Brauchitsch -- Zehender
. Chiron -- Caracciola -- Etancelin

At the start, Stuck (in the first place of the front row) stalled his engine, Balestrero drove a private Alfa, Zehender and Etancelin were in Maseratis. So, Caracciola in the center of row three, had to fear only von Brauchitsch, Chiron and Nuvolari. It was wet, so Caracciola’s weather, and Rudi went immediately into the lead. According to “The Autocar” report, Caracciola was leading the pack when the cars came past the back straight opposite the grand stand.


It still doesn't explain the assertion that the Alfas were quicker on initial acceleration.

#15 Ray Bell

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Posted 17 February 2001 - 12:24

I concluded this was opinion based on observation, perhaps out of a slow corner somewhere.

#16 C F Eick

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Posted 18 February 2001 - 19:11

Originally posted by Hans Etzrodt
The Mercedes team however, neglected to order Brauchitsch into the pits. His mid-race pace to facilitate an advantage of 1m27.5s at the end of lap 15 was stunning. Since he drove at such fast a pace, it should have been obvious to Neubauer that the tires were now in serious danger. A tire change including the time of stopping and accelerating would take at least one minute. Had his team stopped him at around lap 18, and given him new tires, von Brauchitsch would have been the deserved winner. He would then have been prepared for the hottest battle with Nuvolari since the Italian's tires were also worn down to the casing at the end of the race. What made this defeat so tragic was the fact that it happened to Mercedes of all racing teams, which was acknowledged to have the best and most reliable organization in the world at its disposal. A sure victory was given away because of an avoidable organization mistake, also because of the undisciplined temperament of von Brauchitsch.


Hans, I might have read your post too fast the first time, but I just wanted to point out that I've seen sources saying that Neubauer repeatedly and desperately tried to get von Brauchitsch into the pits. As you say in your post, the Mercedes-Benz team prepared for a pit stop, so I would be interested in knowing why you're not putting the full blame for losing the race on von Brauchitsch? If Neubauer tried and tried, what more could he have done? Isn't it a bit harsh to blame Mercedes-Benz for an "organization mistake"? As I see it, von Brauchitsch lost the race entirely on his own.

Nevertheless, the race was fantastic and I'm certainly not trying to take anything away from Nuvolari's performance, nor from von Brauchitsch's (driving) performance.

As a final observation, since we're on the subject of "what-ifs", the "true" race winner, if one studies his lap times and considers the time lost at the start, is actually Hans Stuck!


Does anyone know more about the Alfas? Contemporary reports say that the Mercedes and Auto Union drivers were convinced that the Alfa engines used at the Nürburgring had gained horsepower since the last race (and hence explaining the strongly improved acceleration) but it seems really hard to get this confirmed. Hans? Patrick? Perhaps the Italians didn't want to take anything away from Nuvolari's performance and "forgot" about it...?


/Christian


#17 Ray Bell

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Posted 18 February 2001 - 23:04

my recollection of what I studied up on when I did the story about the later P3 that came to Australia was that there was a 3.9 engine used only late in the life of the model.
I would say that the German GP was late enough in the life of the model for it to have been there, and that it's early enough for it to have been the first outing for this engine. Perhaps early enough for only Nuvolari to have had one?
I'd like to know, in fact, when a few other changes took place.
Did they ever, for instance, have a four speed gearbox?
When did the Dubonnet front end first see use?
When did that seemingly-crazy reversed quarter eliptic rear springing come into being?

#18 Patrick Italiano

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Posted 19 February 2001 - 14:34

Ray,

I can give some infos about the Alfa Tipo B state-of-tune in 1935.

The car Jano had in mind for the 1935 season was indeed the Tipo C, all-independent sprung car, fitted with the new 4064 cc 12 cylinders engine. However, the chassis only appeared later that season. It was actually tested on the autostrada and at Monza in August, and first entered at the Italian GP in september. It was actually the 8C-35 version, i.e. fitted with the 3.8 straight-eight. The 12 C engine appeared only in 1936, called properly 12C-36.

Earlier in 1935, the independent layout of the rear suspension had been tested in a Tipo B, as shown on a picture in 'First among champions'. Odd can seem the quarter-elliptic rear suspension on the Tipo B 1935, but it had to be effective since as soon as tried, it was adopted. It was said at the time it did improve road holding. The Tipo B at Pau, in february 1935 did already feature them. The front Dubonnet appeared only a little later. This appeared for first time at La Turbie hillclimb on april, 18th, although a fully modified car did already exist in february. Also, during 1934, the tranny proved fragile, and the 1935 version reverted to only 3 gears instead of 4, with wider and stronger teething.
The 1935 Tipo Bs were also fitted for the first time with Ariston hydraulic brakes which proved troublesome at several occasions, including the German GP practice.

This is the 'standard' fitting of the Tipo Bs mid-1935. The 3822cc engine needed new castings and, according to Venables, only two were available early 1935. Venables guesses that the engines were needed for the 8C-35 at the time of the German and Swiss GPs, which explains the use of 3160cc engines.
It might be, but I think that at least two more explanations can be found. First, the transmissins of the Tipo Bs were weak and, even with only 3 gears, it still broke often, as it did on the other Alfas at the Nürburgring (both Brivio and Chiron retired early in the race with broken differentials).
Indeed, two Tipo Bs ran at the French GP with 3.8 engines. Both retired with 'unpleasant grinding noise' from the transmission. I quote Venables: "the extra power of the 3.8 engine ahad proven too much for the ageing P3 transmission."
The other reason is that, as it later happened with the choice between 8C-35 and 12C-36 cars, the little engine might well have proven more driveable on a twisty course as the Nürburgring. The tyres may well have welcome the less torque of the 3.2, and eventually, I would claim that, among other things, the choice of the 3.2 may have been the winning one, for both reliability and tyres wear, which were key points in that race.

Now the discrepancy between sources:

I quoted the internal report, where the difficult pit stop is said to have lasted 1min. 58 sec. ; Venables gives a time of 2min. 14 sec.
Also, von Brauchitsch time is given as 1min. 15sec. in the report and 47 secs.by Venables :confused:
Here is maybe some confusion intended to enhance Nuvolari's merits - which is certainly not needed here.


Here are also the gaps lap-per-lap frome the pit stop(on 12th):
Lap 13: 1min. 9sec.
Lap 14: 1min. 26sec.(von Brauchitsch fastest lap)
Lap 15: 1min. 27sec.
Lap 16: 1min. 17sec.
Lap 17: 1min. 3sec.
Lap 18: 47sec.
Lap 19: 43sec.
Lap 20: 32sec.
Lap 21: 35sec.

This shows that if indeed von Brauchitsch had been able to perform an astonishing fastest lap, as Hans reported such a pace would destroy the tyres in a very few laps. He did get the gap over Nuvolari only at the price of trashing them, and the reduced pace he later ran wasn't enough to keep them to the end of the race. It seems indeed that Nuvolari's pressure forced von Brauchitsch to push more as Nuvolari was coming back(laps 19 and 21), with the well known result. Actually, Nuvolari could see von Brauchitsch 200 m in front of him at the Karussel in the last lap, before the tyres burst.





#19 C F Eick

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Posted 19 February 2001 - 17:23

Originally posted by Patrick Italiano
Doug Nye, who wrote the piece for C&SC also quotes a german magazine (no mention of which it was) report written by Dipl. Ing. Hundt.

"The italian cars were quicker under initial acceleration from the start and out of the slow corners. According to italian reports the Alfa Romeos were equipped with the same motors as in Paris with the cylinder heads and block cast in light alloy and the volume increased to 4002cc"

As far as I know, french GP cars had indeed 3.8 engines. But a capacity such as 4002cc never existed for sure.


Patrick, the German magazine Nye refers to is the 1935 September issue of "Nürburgring". The author is Dipl.- Ing. E. Hundt. Here is an interesting section of that original article, probably the one Nye based his text on:

"Eine Sache bleibt allerdings zu klären: Warum war der Alfa Romeo plötzlich so schnell? Nuvolari fuhr im Rennen Runden von 10:49 Minuten, und dabei erklärten die Italiener, dass ihre Motoren nicht verstärkt worden seien. Die erhöhte Fahrleistung resultierte vielmehr ausschliesslich aus der Verbesserung der Strassenlage durch die einzelgefederten Vorderräder. Dem stehen aber zwei Beobachtungen gegenüber: einmal enthielten die Alfa Romeos genau dieselben Motoren wie in Paris, bei welchen Zylinderkopf und Block aus einem Stück in Leichtmetallguss bestehen und die nach italienischer Angabe 4002 ccm Hubvolumen haben; zum andern Mal aber beschleunigten die Alfas auf dem Nürburgring beim Start und nach den Kurven so enorm, dass die Fahrer unserer deutschen Rennwagen nach übereinstimmenden Aussagen bis auf den Fussboden durchtreten mussten, um sie überholen zu können. Offenbar verfügten die Alfa Romeos auf dem Nürburgring also doch über eine wesentlich höhere Motorleistung als seither."

I would really like to translate this text into English for those of you who don't speak German, but I don't have the time right now and will be gone for a couple of days. Maybe Hans could translate it in the meantime, something I'm sure he can do much better than I anyway! :) However, it would be extremely interesting to know where the 4002 ccm figure origins from, if it is certain that such an engine never existed.

/Christian


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#20 Patrick Italiano

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Posted 19 February 2001 - 19:01

Thanks Christian for having found that interesting piece.

As one can read on the very first line, they are trying to explain the unexplainable - to them.
Obviously, somebody pulled their leg with the 4.0 engine, maybe to have them concerned with the next race. That's funny that the german drivers can't explain how that Alfa accelerated out of the bends. :lol:
Note also that Nuvolari's best lap was 10.43, not 10.49, while this can have been his average pace through the race? I haven't all lap times.



#21 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 February 2001 - 23:32

Thanks for that Patrick... now, are you prepared to enter into the debate on the true reason(s) for the split drive setup?

#22 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 20 February 2001 - 07:47

Originally posted by C F Eick
...the German magazine Nye refers to is the 1935 September issue of "Nürburgring". The author is Dipl.- Ing. E. Hundt. Here is an interesting section of that original article, probably the one Nye based his text on:...
...Maybe Hans could translate it in the meantime...

"Admittedly, one matter still needs to be clarified: Why was the Alfa Romeo suddenly so fast? Nuvolari drove laps of 10.49 minutes during the race and simultaneously the Italians declared that their engines were not improved. The increased performance resulted rather exclusively in the improvement of road holding with the independently suspended front wheels. This is opposed by two observations: for once, the Alfa Romeos came with exactly the same engines as in Paris, where the cylinder head and block consisted of one cast light alloy piece and according to Italian statement had 4002 cc capacity; but for the other the Alfas accelerated on the Nürburgring from the start and after the corners so enormously that the drivers of our German racing cars, after agreeing statements, had to push (the pedal) to the floor to enable them to overtake. Obviously at the Nürburgring, the Alfa Romeos had at their disposal also a considerable higher engine performance than up to now."

#23 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 February 2001 - 10:02

I would suspect that the combination of the new rear springing (and damping?) combined with more power might be the whole answer. In fact, with the front end as well, it was an all-new car that meeting - as far as the Nurburgring goes - was it not? Or had there been an Eiffelrennen?
If so, what happened there?

#24 Patrick Italiano

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Posted 20 February 2001 - 17:11

Originally posted by Ray Bell
now, are you prepared to enter into the debate on the true reason(s) for the split drive setup?


Quite ready :) Allow me some hours relax and a deep inspiration. :lol:

Seriously, I'll try to sort that out after I check some sources.

Now, the tipo B at the German GP were no way 'all new cars', since the chassis set up (front and rear suspension as well as hydraulic brakes and 3-speed GB) was already used in previous races, even with the 3.8 engine at the previous French GP. In that outfit, Nuvolari scored second fastest practice time and stayed in front for a while, setting the record lap in the race before retiring on lap 14.

At the Tunisian GP on May 5th, 1935, the starting grid shows one Dubonnet P3 (Comotti's #6) and 2 beam-axle ones (Nuvolari's #4 and Sommer's #16).

At the Eifelrennen only Chiron entered with a beam-axle P3 to finish third behind Caracciola(1st) and Rosemeyer (2nd), but ahead of Fagioli and Lang. Thus, even so, the Tipo B performed rather well on the Nürburgring.

All that sums up, to my mind, in these considerations:

-At the time of the French GP, the Tipo B with 3.8 engine was fast enough to play in front with the german teams, whose cars, however, still had a development margin long gone in the case of the Tipo B.
-The 3.2 engine was enough for a difficult and twisty circuit as the Nürburgring. From Eifelrennen to the German GP, two factors played for Alfa: Nuvolari and the Dubonnet axle (the latter probably in a minor mode since the Dubonnet car, in other races, was not given to the best driver - see Tunis).
-The tyre concern did already appear in former, fast races such as Tripoli and Avus, where the Alfa Bimotore, with all its weight and power, destroyed tyres in only two laps in Lybia. The german cars were probably too powerful for their tyres at the German GP, as it happened in other races during the 30s.

#25 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 February 2001 - 21:04

My intention, Patrick, was to clarify that the cars had not run in this guise at the Nurburgring previously, that they were all new cars as far as the 'ring was concerned, or that they were in an all-new configuration as far as the 'ring was concerned. After all, how they ran at Rheims had no bearing on the German GP...

For the split drive issue, I'll fetch the other thread... hasn't seen the light of day for a while.

#26 Patrick Italiano

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Posted 28 March 2002 - 11:28

I raise again this old thread because Doug Nye is now regular poster on TNF, and I had quoted an article he wrote in C.&S.C. on the Tipo B engines (see above).

I had been deeply convinced by Doug's analysis from his sources, but I'm now a little bit confused because Simon Moore, in a letter a few weeks ago, raises the point that the enlarged engine block an cranckcase needed to rebore to 3822 cc causes the unit to be longer. Since the original (2.6 to 3.2) Tipo B engine is supported at the front by a cross member leaving no room at all, Simon argues that the 3.8 engine can't fit the Tipo B frame. :confused:

Doug? :wave: Any comment on this? Maybe something more from the original archives from where you wrote the C.&S.C. article?

#27 Ray Bell

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Posted 28 March 2002 - 14:41

Just what effect engine changes had on the Tipo B is an interesting issue.

The infamous 'Nomotore' Alfa was fitted with a hulking Alvis engine c 1952. This 4.3-litre engine was apparently lighter than might be expected, but I'm not really sure.

But in this form it was an evil device... This was a Dubonnet variant... it notably went off the road near the end of Bathurst's Conrod Straight, killing and maiming spectators, but was said to be very unstable anyway. It raced on in this form for a few years, even bearing the dents in the bodywork unrepaired...

Then Ray Wamsley (correct spelling, by the way) fitted a GMC truck engine, another fat six, and the handling was apparently transformed. It even improved further, Ray tells me, when he fitted a Corvette V8, which he ran for a couple of years.

Now, the point of this is, the handling and/or braking problems this car experienced seemed to change with engine changes. I wonder about how the engines were mounted, first of all, and then I wonder about weight distribution with different weights in the engines.

It's a bit too hard for me, though. I've never seen the car in the flesh, nor the engines, nor the mountings and I'm not at all familiar with their respective weights. But someone might be able to muse over it for a while...

#28 Doug Nye

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Posted 28 March 2002 - 15:57

Originally posted by Patrick Italiano
I raise again this old thread because Doug Nye is now regular poster on TNF, and I had quoted an article he wrote in C.&S.C. on the Tipo B engines (see above). Doug? :wave: Any comment on this? Maybe something more from the original archives from where you wrote the C.&S.C. article?


Hmm - you are intruding perhaps on private grief here...

I was brought up, in effect, by Cyril Posthumus and Jenks and Peter Hull and the VSCC Alfa coterie to accept absolutely that the 1935 German GP-winning Nuvolari car had been 3.8 powered "as at the French GP". At one stage I found the feature by Hundt which mentioned a capacity in excess of 4-litres which seemed very doubtful and then reading between the lines that struck me as Germani confirmation that the Italians had pulled something out of the bag and had indeed run a big engine in Nuvolari's car at the 'Ring. Everything seemed to fit - we, as the British faction of the 'We know all about Tipo Bs' movement, sat back...fat and smug and happy...

Well, pride always goes before the fall.

Fortunately I do have an enquiring mind, and so when I spent time with Guidotti and Fusi I questioned them both at some length just 'to confirm' the use of the 3.8 engine in the Tipo Bs. Fusi seemed, at best, evasive...he was certainly rather subdued in Guidotti's presence...

Guidotti, however, was absolutely adamant. "No it was a 3.2-litre - I did not see a 3.8 until the first 8C-35 was ready for Monza. In any case the 3.8 would have been too large to be accommodated in the Tipo B...".

"So the cars were not 3.8-litres at the French GP either?" - "No, never, I did not see a 3.8 until the first 8C-35 was ready for Monza..." - "Why would the press have said the cars used the forthcoming 3.8 engine at Montlhery?" - "Perhaps that is what we told them...to make them think, and make our big bosses think, that we were maintaining good development pace...but it was not true!". I cannot swear to his wording, 'cos I cannot locate the tape right now, but this is definitely the drift of what he told me in Milan.

I communicated this testimony to Simon Moore many years ago, soon after having seen Guidotti.

The crucial factor of which I had not previously been aware was that the 3.8 unit was a physically larger engine than the maximum over-bore 3.2, with what Guidotti described somewhat confusingly as 'cuts' between the cylinder bores which the 2.3-2.6-2.9-3.2 capacity units did not have.

I think what he meant was that the 3.2 reduced the wall thickness left in the blocks between cylinders, absolutely to the practical minimum. In the sense in which he was using the word 'cuts' I think he meant 'divisions' - as in the dividing wall remaining between adjacent cylinder bores. Therefore to achieve the extra half-litre-plus capacity, blocks had to be cast with more meat in them and more widely-spaced bore centres than the 3.2's, which in turn demanded a longer crankcase, which in turn would not have fitted into the Tipo B frame.

I haven't got time to turn up the precise references now - but this is my knee-jerk memory of the situation.

Whenever I wrote in the past that the Nuvolari's Nubrurgring car had a 3.8 engine fitted for the German GP I was passing on 'knowledge' received from my elders and betters - and I now believe that as a group we were wrong. Yet again - as with the 1933 Monza accidents story - I have no reason to doubt that what Guidotti told me was gospel.

I apologise for bygone misinformation.

Incidentally, individual chassis identification for the Tipo Bs - indeed for all the 1930s GP Alfas - poses very interesting conundra...if that's the correct term.

I found the Scuderia Ferrari race records in a file at Arese and to my amazement they were arranged with the individual cars identified by RACE NUMBER only, rather than by chassis serial. Thus if the team ran, say, cars with race numbers '12', '14' and '16' in one race, and then the same cars with race numbers '30', '32' and '34' in the next - there was no way of telling from the records how each of those cars from one race related to those from the next...i.e. there was no way, from those records, of lifing components, or of recording progressive individual histories, mileages etc.

This was not very good engineering practise.

Imagine my amusement, therefore, when I unearthed postwar Autodelta records for - first - the T33 sports-racing cars, and then for the later 3-litre F1 cars. The records I saw recorded those cars' exploits in precisely the same way - identification by race numbers worn rather than by individual chassis serial.

Now being charitably inclined, I am prepared to presume that what I had examined were race records as distinct from the engineers' hardware records. At least, I hope that somewhere - as yet untrawled - there do survive proper engineering records which relate true chassis identities to true race histories. Those records that I saw signally failed to do so.

I hope all this may be of some interest.

DCN

#29 fines

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Posted 28 March 2002 - 16:31

Originally posted by Doug Nye
I found the Scuderia Ferrari race records in a file at Arese and to my amazement they were arranged with the individual cars identified by RACE NUMBER only, rather than by chassis serial. Thus if the team ran, say, cars with race numbers '12', '14' and '16' in one race, and then the same cars with race numbers '30', '32' and '34' in the next - there was no way of telling from the records how each of those cars from one race related to those from the next...i.e. there was no way, from those records, of lifing components, or of recording progressive individual histories, mileages etc.

This was not very good engineering practise.

Imagine my amusement, therefore, when I unearthed postwar Autodelta records for - first - the T33 sports-racing cars, and then for the later 3-litre F1 cars. The records I saw recorded those cars' exploits in precisely the same way - identification by race numbers worn rather than by individual chassis serial.

Now being charitably inclined, I am prepared to presume that what I had examined were race records as distinct from the engineers' hardware records. At least, I hope that somewhere - as yet untrawled - there do survive proper engineering records which relate true chassis identities to true race histories. Those records that I saw signally failed to do so.

Isn't that the same with the Alfettas? Someone (Patrick Italiano perhaps) wrote here some time ago, that the Tipo 159s appeared at each race with a new chassis plate, bearing the race number instead of a chassis number... :(

#30 Vitesse2

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Posted 28 March 2002 - 16:47

This may be myth, but I read somewhere (Sheldon?) that the outer rings of the badges on the Alfettas were different colours and that this was theoretically a way of identifying them if you could find enough contemporary colour pictures.

#31 fines

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Posted 28 March 2002 - 16:56

Originally posted by Vitesse2
This may be myth, but I read somewhere (Sheldon?) that the outer rings of the badges on the Alfettas were different colours and that this was theoretically a way of identifying them if you could find enough contemporary colour pictures.

Tried it, doesn't work... :(

#32 Doug Nye

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Posted 28 March 2002 - 18:12

Originally posted by fines

Isn't that the same with the Alfettas? Someone (Patrick Italiano perhaps) wrote here some time ago, that the Tipo 159s appeared at each race with a new chassis plate, bearing the race number instead of a chassis number... :(


I am not at all convinced that this is true. We have some pix of Alfetta engine bays clearly showing a standard-style production car manufacturers's plate with multi-digit serials stamped in. The frustrating part of this is that we do not hold such pix of every engine bay, at every race.

The Alfa Corse factory team certainly - however - juggled such chassis plates to match available Customs carnet paperwork, as did every racing team I have ever heard of until recent years as FIA chassis identification has been tightened up, and conversely (perversely?) border controls have commonly been relaxed.

DCN

#33 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 29 March 2002 - 07:29

Originally posted by Doug Nye
..... Guidotti, however, was absolutely adamant. "No it was a 3.2-litre - I did not see a 3.8 until the first 8C-35 was ready for Monza. In any case the 3.8 would have been too large to be accommodated in the Tipo B...".DCN

Doug,
Thanks for sharing your very interesting findings and explanations with us.



I always wondered why Nuvolari lost several positions on his second lap during the 1935 German GP until I found one plausible explanation - but have to find the source again. The following comprises the start and first two laps of this race as I pieced it together some years back.

The old starting method of a waved flag was replaced with light signals. First the red light came on for Attention and Stop. Then yellow lit up meaning the start would take place within 15 seconds and at green was the start. Nuvolari shot immediately to the front but Caracciola from the third row headed first in the Südkurve. Last to get away were the Auto Unions of Stuck and Pietsch which had stalled on the grid. A few seconds before the start, the engine had stalled of Stuck's car in the first row. He raised his hand and his mechanic Rudolf Friedrich came to Stuck's aid and stood next to the Auto Union to help, which was not allowed and was also very dangerous. When the cars started a few seconds later, three Maseratis went around the stalled Auto Union. Varzi in row five, accelerating through the oil smoke and water spray, just missed Stuck's stranded car but ran into the mechanic, who was knocked to the ground. Friedrich was brought to the nearby Adenau Hospital with a fractured skull. After the field was gone, Stuck was finally push started and had a hard time to pass the other cars.

Lap 1 - It had stopped raining. After over 11 minutes, the cars appeared with Caracciola 12 seconds ahead of Nuvolari's red Alfa followed by three Silver Arrows of Fagioli, Rosemeyer, von Brauchitsch, then two Alfas of Chiron and Brivio, then Varzi's Auto Union, Taruffi's Bugatti, Mercedes Kadett drivers Lang and Geier, Stuck and Pietsch on Auto Union. Geier tried to get around Lang without success and Stuck who had caught up with Geier lost very much time because he was unable to pass him in the water spray. Balestrero crashed his Alfa Romeo. Etancelin stopped at the pits to change plugs on his Maserati. Stuck still had a problem getting passed Geier's Mercedes.

Lap 2 - Nuvolari had been able to keep up front on the rain-soaked circuit, and while trying to close on Caracciola on the second lap, he spun his Alfa at Bergwerk, in a sharp uphill right turn. The car pointed the wrong way. He rolled downhill in the wrong direction and turned around. Nuvolari had lost 25 seconds and four places when Fagioli, Rosemeyer, Brauchitsch and Chiron who were within 10 seconds behind him, went passed. Rosemeyer and Brauchitsch then both passed Fagioli. By the end of lap two, Caracciola led Rosemeyer by 16s. Then followed Brauchitsch, Fagioli, Chiron and Nuvolari now in sixth place, having probably lost some of his guts when he overdid it at Bergwerk. In seventh place came Varzi, then Lang, Taruffi's Bugatti, Geier, and the Auto Unions of Stuck and Pietsch. Stuck still had a hard time getting passed Geier through the water spray.


#34 Patrick Italiano

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Posted 29 March 2002 - 13:44

Thank you very much Doug for your precise answer. :up:

Those things are very much better explained now.


Originally posted by Doug Nye


The crucial factor of which I had not previously been aware was that the 3.8 unit was a physically larger engine than the maximum over-bore 3.2, with what Guidotti described somewhat confusingly as 'cuts' between the cylinder bores which the 2.3-2.6-2.9-3.2 capacity units did not have.

I didn't know that as well. That's why Simon's letter caught me surprised.



Originally posted by Doug Nye
[B]
Imagine my amusement, therefore, when I unearthed postwar Autodelta records for - first - the T33 sports-racing cars, and then for the later 3-litre F1 cars. The records I saw recorded those cars' exploits in precisely the same way - identification by race numbers worn rather than by individual chassis serial.

Now being charitably inclined, I am prepared to presume that what I had examined were race records as distinct from the engineers' hardware records. At least, I hope that somewhere - as yet untrawled - there do survive proper engineering records which relate true chassis identities to true race histories. Those records that I saw signally failed to do so.

DCN

Indeed, Carlo Chiti always said he hadn't kept any record of race-per-race chassis numbers and so on, that all was gone... Up until the day a friend of mine went to see him along with Toine Hezemans. There, after some time going with the "no record" story, he was convinced by Hezemans, who had been keeping kind relations with him, he went upstairs for a while and came back with precise record sheets. I don't have yet a copy of those sheets, but my dutch friend has them. Unfortunately they cover only a few races. Just hope that the remaining ones will some day come to the surface...

#35 Marcor

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Posted 19 April 2002 - 17:39

Here's an interesting stat about this GP, time of the pit stops.
Stuck:49"
Varzi: 1' 12"
Rosemeyer: 1' 15"
Pietsch: 1' 12"
Caracciola: 1' 07"
Fagioli: 51"
von Brauchitsch: 47"
Geier: 52"
Lang: 55"
Mays: 1' 21"
Nuvolari: 2' 14"
Zehender: 3' 45"
Ghersi: 2' 32"
Etancelin: 1' 49"
Hartmann: 2' 07"
Ruesch: 1' 02"

source: newspaper La Meuse (July 1935)

#36 Marcel Visbeen

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 10:01

I thought that somewhere I read a piece where Alfred Neubauer was recalling this race, but I can't seem to find it in the book I have (Manner, Frauen und Motoren, which by the way doesn't have an index). Maybe I'm just mistaken and he never wrote about the race or I read it some place else. Can anybody help me? I know of all the reservations one must have with the memoires of Neubauer but I still would like to read his version.

Furthermore I found some pictures on eBay in relation with this race which some of you might find interesting. I think they won't be up there for long because the auction has ended.

http://cgi.ebay.nl/w.....AMEWA:IT&rd=1

#37 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 16:48

Originally posted by Marcel Visbeen
I thought that somewhere I read a piece where Alfred Neubauer was recalling this race, but I can't seem to find it in the book I have (Manner, Frauen und Motoren, which by the way doesn't have an index). Maybe I'm just mistaken and he never wrote about the race or I read it some place else. ...

The 1935 German Grand Prix is not described in the book mentioned. I made my own index many years ago for reference purposes. On page 177 of the 1978 3rd Edition there is brief mention about Varzi's poor performance in the 1935 German GP related suposedly to the Italian's love affair with the German woman. No word -of course- about Varzi knocking down Stuck's mechanic at the start.

#38 Marcel Visbeen

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 12:00

Thank you Hans, that saves me a lot of time. I had come across the same Varzi anecdote in my edition (page 104/105). Do you happen to know if Neubauer mentions more about the race in any other book of if he is quoted elsewhere with comments on this race?

#39 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 05:42

There is a Neubauer story "I Remember Rudi" in Automobile Quarterly Vol.7 No.1 but no mention about the 1935 German GP.

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#40 Hugo Boecker

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 16:11

Just some more on a what if -

Originally posted by C F Eick

As a final observation, since we're on the subject of "what-ifs", the "true" race winner, if one studies his lap times and considers the time lost at the start, is actually Hans Stuck!
Christian


Hans gave us a very good report of the first laps

Originally posted by Hans Etzrodt

The old starting method of a waved flag was replaced with light signals. First the red light came on for Attention and Stop. Then yellow lit up meaning the start would take place within 15 seconds and at green was the start. Nuvolari shot immediately to the front but Caracciola from the third row headed first in the Südkurve. Last to get away were the Auto Unions of Stuck and Pietsch which had stalled on the grid. A few seconds before the start, the engine had stalled of Stuck's car in the first row. He raised his hand and his mechanic Rudolf Friedrich came to Stuck's aid and stood next to the Auto Union to help, which was not allowed and was also very dangerous. When the cars started a few seconds later, three Maseratis went around the stalled Auto Union. Varzi in row five, accelerating through the oil smoke and water spray, just missed Stuck's stranded car but ran into the mechanic, who was knocked to the ground. Friedrich was brought to the nearby Adenau Hospital with a fractured skull. After the field was gone, Stuck was finally push started and had a hard time to pass the other cars.

Lap 1 - It had stopped raining. After over 11 minutes, the cars appeared with Caracciola 12 seconds ahead of Nuvolari's red Alfa followed by three Silver Arrows of Fagioli, Rosemeyer, von Brauchitsch, then two Alfas of Chiron and Brivio, then Varzi's Auto Union, Taruffi's Bugatti, Mercedes Kadett drivers Lang and Geier, Stuck and Pietsch on Auto Union. Geier tried to get around Lang without success and Stuck who had caught up with Geier lost very much time because he was unable to pass him in the water spray. Balestrero crashed his Alfa Romeo. Etancelin stopped at the pits to change plugs on his Maserati. Stuck still had a problem getting passed Geier's Mercedes.

Lap 2 - Nuvolari had been able to keep up front on the rain-soaked circuit, and while trying to close on Caracciola on the second lap, he spun his Alfa at Bergwerk, in a sharp uphill right turn. The car pointed the wrong way. He rolled downhill in the wrong direction and turned around. Nuvolari had lost 25 seconds and four places when Fagioli, Rosemeyer, Brauchitsch and Chiron who were within 10 seconds behind him, went passed. Rosemeyer and Brauchitsch then both passed Fagioli. By the end of lap two, Caracciola led Rosemeyer by 16s. Then followed Brauchitsch, Fagioli, Chiron and Nuvolari now in sixth place, having probably lost some of his guts when he overdid it at Bergwerk. In seventh place came Varzi, then Lang, Taruffi's Bugatti, Geier, and the Auto Unions of Stuck and Pietsch. Stuck still had a hard time getting passed Geier through the water spray.



After the Grand Prix Hans Geier, Mercedes cadet driver was fined by the ONS for hindrance of Stuck. But Mercedes launched an appeal. Major Hühnlein was angry with the press for making it public, before the last vote was given.
Posted Image
scribble from Wuppertaler Generalanzeiger August 2nd 1935

But he appeal was refused and Geier was fined.
Posted Image
Posted Image
scribble from Wuppertaler Generalanzeiger August 15th 1935

But ONS stated that even without the obstruction of car #1 H.Stuck Nuvolari was a well deserved winner.

But all came to nothing as Geier crashed during practzice for his next race at Bern end of August. Does any know about the concrete fine?

#41 eukie

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 17:41

This might be of interest here: lap chart of the 1935 German GP, published in Der Nürburgring 4/1935:

Posted Image

#42 fines

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 21:21

A quick and dirty Gapchart analysis shows the Nazis weren't any better in timekeeping than most other countries those days - not even Prussian standards shining through!;)

A few notes: I have only checked two sources, Sheldon and Leif Snellman's site (which, in this case are practically identical), but these results differ in quite a few details: Ghersi driving #19, Étancelin finishing and the number of laps covered by flagged and retired competitors are the most striking differences. Some times are off, too, but I'm too tired to check those again today, so I will skip commenting these for the moment, but Mays's times do very obviously not allow for a pit stop and von Delius to take over!


**** GapChart Race Analysis (c) Michael Ferner 2007-11-08 All rights reserved



1935-D





**** Final Results



FP  SP   # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L

 1   2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			22  4:08'50.2"   10'43.6"  15  120.9 kph

 2   3   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			22  4:10'08.2"   10'41.2"  20	1'18.0"

 3   7   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 22  4:11'03.2"   10'47.2"  16	2'13.0"

 4  12   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			22  4:12'51.6"   10'46.4"  15	4'01.4"

 5   4   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 22  4:14'17.8"   10'32.0"  14	5'27.6"

 6  11   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 22  4:15'58.6"   11'00.0"  16	7'08.4"

 7  20   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 21  4:11'48.2"   11'19.8"  19	  1 Lap		   

 8  13   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			21  4:15'35.8"   11'20.0"  12	  1 Lap		   

 9  14   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			20  4:11'47.6"   12'00.2"   9	 2 Laps		   

10  10  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  20  4:12'22.2"   11'58.2"  17	 2 Laps		   

11   5  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  20  4:14'44.2"   11'57.0"  16	 2 Laps		   

12  18  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  20  4:19'29.4"   12'08.8"  19	 2 Laps		   

13   8  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  19  4:13'14.8"   11'50.2"  18	 3 Laps		   

14  17   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 16  3:16'00.8"   11'31.2"  14	 6 Laps		   

15   9  10 Mays		 ERA				   12  2:42'23.8"   13'14.2"   9	10 Laps		   

16  15  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			  10  2:14'21.2"   12'42.4"  10	12 Laps		   

17   6  14 Chiron	   Alfa Romeo			 5	59'52.8"   11'36.4"   5	17 Laps		   

18  16  23 Taruffi	  Bugatti				4	50'23.8"   12'24.0"   4	18 Laps		   

19  19  15 Brivio	   Alfa Romeo			 1	12'37.2"   12'37.2"   1	21 Laps		   

20   1  11 Balestrero   Alfa Romeo			 0		0.0"	   0.0"   0	22 Laps		   

21  21  19 Delius	   ERA					0		0.0"	   0.0"   0	22 Laps		   

22  22  22 Siena		Maserati			   0		0.0"	   0.0"   0	22 Laps		   



Legend:  FP  Finishing Position

		 SP  Starting Position

		  L  Leader





**** Fastest Laps



Rank # Driver	   Car					  Fastest Lap	A Speed   2nd Fast Lap   3rd Fast Lap

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		   10'32.0"  14  129.9 kph   10'33.8"  13   10'41.8"  15

 2   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			  10'41.2"  20  128.0 kph   10'42.8"  18   10'47.6"  19

 3  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			  10'43.6"  15  127.5 kph   10'44.6"  18   10'45.0"  17

 4   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			  10'46.4"  15  127.0 kph   10'48.4"  16   10'49.0"  11

 5   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		   10'47.2"  16  126.8 kph   10'50.8"  15   10'51.0"  14

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		   11'00.0"  16  124.4 kph   11'07.8"  11   11'08.8"  15

 7   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		   11'19.8"  19  120.7 kph   11'23.6"  17   11'27.2"  18

 8   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			  11'20.0"  12  120.7 kph   11'30.2"  10   11'35.4"   9

 9   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		   11'31.2"  14  118.8 kph   11'34.4"  10   11'35.2"  15

10  14 Chiron	   Alfa Romeo			  11'36.4"   5  117.9 kph   11'43.8"   4   11'56.8"   3

11  17 Etancelin	Maserati				11'50.2"  18  115.6 kph   11'50.4"  17   11'52.6"  11

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati				11'57.0"  16  114.5 kph   12'01.0"  18   12'03.2"  17

13  21 Ruesch	   Maserati				11'58.2"  17  114.3 kph   11'58.8"  13   12'02.0"  12

14   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			  12'00.2"   9  114.0 kph   12'00.8"  15   12'05.4"  12

15  18 Ghersi	   Maserati				12'08.8"  19  112.6 kph   12'09.4"   9   12'09.8"  14

16  23 Taruffi	  Bugatti				 12'24.0"   4  110.3 kph   12'25.8"   3   12'32.0"   2

17  15 Brivio	   Alfa Romeo			  12'37.2"   1  108.4 kph	   0.0"   0	   0.0"   0

18  20 Hartmann	 Maserati				12'42.4"  10  107.7 kph   12'46.4"   9   12'57.2"   4

19  10 Mays		 ERA					 13'14.2"   9  103.3 kph   13'15.6"   7   13'18.2"   8

20  22 Siena		Maserati					0.0"   0	0.0 kph	   0.0"   0	   0.0"   0

21  19 Delius	   ERA						 0.0"   0	0.0 kph	   0.0"   0	   0.0"   0

22  11 Balestrero   Alfa Romeo				  0.0"   0	0.0 kph	   0.0"   0	   0.0"   0



Legend:   A  Average





**** Race Positions Lap for Lap



FP   # Driver		SP	1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22



 1  12 Nuvolari	   2	2  6  6  6  6  5  3  4  2  1  1  6  4  3  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  1

 2   1 Stuck		  3   12 11  8  8  8  7  7  6  6  6  6  3  6  4  4  4  4  4  4  3  3  2

 3   5 Caracciola	 7	1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  4  5  3  2  3  3  3  3  3  4  4  3

 4   3 Rosemeyer	 12	4  2  2  2  2  2  5  5  4  3  2  4  2  5  5  5  5  5  5  5  5  4

 5   7 Brauchitsch	4	5  3  4  5  5  4  4  3  3  4  3  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  5

 6   6 Fagioli	   11	3  4  3  3  3  3  2  2  5  5  5  1  5  6  6  6  6  6  6  6  6  6

 7   8 Geier		 20   11 10 10 10 10  9  9  9  9  9  9  9  9  9  9  8  7  7  7  7  7   

 8   2 Varzi		 13	8  7  7  7  7  6  6  7  7  7  7  7  7  7  7  7  8  8  8  8  8   

 9   4 Pietsch	   14   13 12 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 10 10  9  9	  

10  21 Ruesch		10   15 14 14 13 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10  9  9 10 10	  

11  16 Zehender	   5   14 13 13 14 13 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11	  

12  18 Ghersi		18   17 16 15 15 14 13 15 15 15 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 12 12 12 12	  

13  17 Etancelin	  8   18 18 18 18 17 16 16 16 16 16 15 15 14 14 14 14 13 13 13		 

14   9 Lang		  17   10  8  9  9  9  8  8  8  8  8  8  8  8  8  8  9				  

15  10 Mays		   9   19 17 16 16 16 15 13 13 13 15 14 14							  

16  20 Hartmann	  15   16 15 17 17 15 14 14 14 14 14									

17  14 Chiron		 6	6  5  5  4  4												   

18  23 Taruffi	   16	9  9 12 12													  

19  15 Brivio		19	7															   

20  11 Balestrero	 1																	

21  19 Delius		21																	

22  22 Siena		 22																	



Legend: FP  Finishing Position

		SP  Starting Position





**** Lap Chart



Pos:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22



 SO: 11 12  1  7 16 14  5 17 10 21  6  3  2  4 20 23  9 18 15  8 19 22



  1:  5 12  6  3  7 14 15  2 23  9  8  1  4 16 21 20 18 17 10 

  2:  5  3  7  6 14 12  2  9 23  8  1  4 16 21 20 18 10 17 

  3:  5  3  6  7 14 12  2  1  9  8  4 23 16 21 18 10 20 17 

  4:  5  3  6 14  7 12  2  1  9  8  4 23 21 16 18 10 20 17 

  5:  5  3  6 14  7 12  2  1  9  8  4 21 16 18 20 10 17 

  6:  5  3  6  7 12  2  1  9  8  4 21 16 18 20 10 17 

  7:  5  6 12  7  3  2  1  9  8  4 21 16 10 20 18 17 

  8:  5  6  7 12  3  1  2  9  8  4 21 16 10 20 18 17 

  9:  5 12  7  3  6  1  2  9  8  4 21 16 10 20 18 17 

 10: 12  5  3  7  6  1  2  9  8  4 21 16 18 20 10 17 

 11: 12  3  7  5  6  1  2  9  8  4 21 16 18 10 17 

 12:  6  7  1  3  5 12  2  9  8  4 21 16 18 10 17 

 13:  7  3  5 12  6  1  2  9  8  4 21 16 18 17 

 14:  7  5 12  1  3  6  2  9  8  4 21 16 18 17 

 15:  7 12  5  1  3  6  2  9  8  4 21 16 18 17 

 16:  7 12  5  1  3  6  2  8  9 21  4 16 18 17 

 17:  7 12  5  1  3  6  8  2 21  4 16 18 17 

 18:  7 12  5  1  3  6  8  2 21  4 16 18 17 

 19:  7 12  5  1  3  6  8  2  4 21 16 18 17 

 20:  7 12  1  5  3  6  8  2  4 21 16 18 

 21:  7 12  1  5  3  6  8  2 

 22: 12  1  5  3  7  6 



Legend: Pos  Position at end of lap

		 SO  Starting Order





**** Race Standings Lap for Lap



Lap 1 -   22.810 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  1	12'07.4"   12'07.4"   1  112.8 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 1	12'19.8"   12'19.8"   1	  12.4"	  12.4"

 3   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  1	12'21.0"   12'21.0"   1	  13.6"	   1.2"

 4   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 1	12'23.0"   12'23.0"   1	  15.6"	   2.0"

 5   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  1	12'24.4"   12'24.4"   1	  17.0"	   1.4"

 6  14 Chiron	   Alfa Romeo			 1	12'29.2"   12'29.2"   1	  21.8"	   4.8"

 7  15 Brivio	   Alfa Romeo			 1	12'37.2"   12'37.2"   1	  29.8"	   8.0"

 8   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 1	12'40.6"   12'40.6"   1	  33.2"	   3.4"

 9  23 Taruffi	  Bugatti				1	13'02.0"   13'02.0"   1	  54.6"	  21.4"

10   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  1	13'03.4"   13'03.4"   1	  56.0"	   1.4"

11   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  1	13'05.0"   13'05.0"   1	  57.6"	   1.6"

12   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 1	13'06.6"   13'06.6"   1	  59.2"	   1.6"

13   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 1	13'10.2"   13'10.2"   1	1'02.8"	   3.6"

14  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   1	13'34.2"   13'34.2"   1	1'26.8"	  24.0"

15  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   1	13'36.2"   13'36.2"   1	1'28.8"	   2.0"

16  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   1	13'53.8"   13'53.8"   1	1'46.4"	  17.6"

17  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   1	14'07.8"   14'07.8"   1	2'00.4"	  14.0"

18  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   1	14'18.6"   14'18.6"   1	2'11.2"	  10.8"

19  10 Mays		 ERA					1	14'19.0"   14'19.0"   1	2'11.6"	   0.4"



Lap 2 -   45.620 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  2	24'04.2"   11'56.8"   2  113.7 kph	   0.0"

 2   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 2	24'16.8"   11'53.8"   2	  12.6"	  12.6"

 3   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  2	24'27.8"   12'03.4"   2	  23.6"	  11.0"

 4   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  2	24'31.6"   12'10.6"   2	  27.4"	   3.8"

 5  14 Chiron	   Alfa Romeo			 2	24'35.8"   12'06.6"   2	  31.6"	   4.2"

 6  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 2	24'46.4"   12'19.8"   1	  42.2"	  10.6"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 2	24'53.0"   12'12.4"   2	  48.8"	   6.6"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  2	25'29.6"   12'26.2"   2	1'25.4"	  36.6"

 9  23 Taruffi	  Bugatti				2	25'34.0"   12'32.0"   2	1'29.8"	   4.4"

10   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  2	25'34.4"   12'29.4"   2	1'30.2"	   0.4"

11   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 2	25'35.0"   12'28.4"   2	1'30.8"	   0.6"

12   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 2	25'37.0"   12'26.8"   2	1'32.8"	   2.0"

13  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   2	26'22.6"   12'48.4"   2	2'18.4"	  45.6"

14  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   2	26'24.8"   12'48.6"   2	2'20.6"	   2.2"

15  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   2	27'29.4"   13'35.6"   2	3'25.2"	1'04.6"

16  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   2	27'44.8"   13'37.0"   2	3'40.6"	  15.4"

17  10 Mays		 ERA					2	27'59.0"   13'40.0"   2	3'54.8"	  14.2"

18  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   2	28'17.2"   13'58.6"   2	4'13.0"	  18.2"



Lap 3 -   68.430 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  3	35'52.4"   11'48.2"   3  114.4 kph	   0.0"

 2   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 3	35'59.2"   11'42.4"   3	   6.8"	   6.8"

 3   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  3	36'22.6"   11'51.0"   3	  30.2"	  23.4"

 4   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  3	36'23.8"   11'56.0"   3	  31.4"	   1.2"

 5  14 Chiron	   Alfa Romeo			 3	36'32.6"   11'56.8"   3	  40.2"	   8.8"

 6  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 3	36'51.4"   12'05.0"   3	  59.0"	  18.8"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 3	36'54.6"   12'01.6"   3	1'02.2"	   3.2"

 8   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 3	37'42.2"   12'07.2"   3	1'49.8"	  47.6"

 9   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  3	37'44.2"   12'14.6"   3	1'51.8"	   2.0"

10   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  3	37'48.4"   12'14.0"   3	1'56.0"	   4.2"

11   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 3	37'56.8"   12'19.8"   3	2'04.4"	   8.4"

12  23 Taruffi	  Bugatti				3	37'59.8"   12'25.8"   3	2'07.4"	   3.0"

13  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   3	39'06.6"   12'44.0"   3	3'14.2"	1'06.8"

14  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   3	39'07.4"   12'42.6"   3	3'15.0"	   0.8"

15  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   3	41'01.0"   13'16.2"   3	5'08.6"	1'53.6"

16  10 Mays		 ERA					3	41'28.2"   13'29.2"   3	5'35.8"	  27.2"

17  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   3	41'59.4"   13'35.6"   2	6'07.0"	  31.2"

18  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   3	43'34.0"   13'58.6"   2	7'41.6"	1'34.6"



Lap 4 -   91.240 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  4	47'30.8"   11'38.4"   4  115.2 kph	   0.0"

 2   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 4	47'34.8"   11'35.6"   4	   4.0"	   4.0"

 3   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  4	48'01.4"   11'38.8"   4	  30.6"	  26.6"

 4  14 Chiron	   Alfa Romeo			 4	48'16.4"   11'43.8"   4	  45.6"	  15.0"

 5   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  4	48'17.6"   11'53.8"   4	  46.8"	   1.2"

 6  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 4	48'40.0"   11'48.6"   4	1'09.2"	  22.4"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 4	48'44.4"   11'49.8"   4	1'13.6"	   4.4"

 8   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 4	49'26.8"   11'44.6"   4	1'56.0"	  42.4"

 9   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  4	49'54.8"   12'10.6"   4	2'24.0"	  28.0"

10   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  4	50'03.4"   12'14.0"   3	2'32.6"	   8.6"

11   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 4	50'16.6"   12'19.8"   3	2'45.8"	  13.2"

12  23 Taruffi	  Bugatti				4	50'23.8"   12'24.0"   4	2'53.0"	   7.2"

13  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   4	51'32.2"   12'24.8"   4	4'01.4"	1'08.4"

14  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   4	51'55.8"   12'44.0"   3	4'25.0"	  23.6"

15  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   4	54'08.2"   13'07.2"   4	6'37.4"	2'12.4"

16  10 Mays		 ERA					4	54'49.6"   13'21.4"   4	7'18.8"	  41.4"

17  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   4	54'56.6"   12'57.2"   4	7'25.8"	   7.0"

18  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   4  1:00'18.6"   13'58.6"   2   12'47.8"	5'22.0"



Lap 5 -  114.050 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  5	59'04.8"   11'34.0"   5  115.8 kph	   0.0"

 2   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 5	59'10.0"   11'35.2"   5	   5.2"	   5.2"

 3   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  5	59'49.2"   11'38.8"   4	  44.4"	  39.2"

 4  14 Chiron	   Alfa Romeo			 5	59'52.8"   11'36.4"   5	  48.0"	   3.6"

 5   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  5  1:00'02.8"   11'45.2"   5	  58.0"	  10.0"

 6  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 5  1:00'16.2"   11'36.2"   5	1'11.4"	  13.4"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 5  1:00'25.2"   11'40.8"   5	1'20.4"	   9.0"

 8   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 5  1:01'12.0"   11'44.6"   4	2'07.2"	  46.8"

 9   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  5  1:02'00.6"   12'05.8"   5	2'55.8"	  48.6"

10   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  5  1:02'10.2"   12'06.8"   5	3'05.4"	   9.6"

11   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 5  1:02'44.2"   12'19.8"   3	3'39.4"	  34.0"

12  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   5  1:04'06.0"   12'24.8"   4	5'01.2"	1'21.8"

13  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   5  1:05'23.2"   12'44.0"   3	6'18.4"	1'17.2"

14  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   5  1:07'02.8"   12'54.6"   5	7'58.0"	1'39.6"

15  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   5  1:08'04.4"   12'57.2"   4	8'59.6"	1'01.6"

16  10 Mays		 ERA					5  1:08'10.4"   13'20.8"   5	9'05.6"	   6.0"

17  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   5  1:12'58.2"   12'39.6"   5   13'53.4"	4'47.8"



Lap 6 -  136.860 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  6  1:10'42.6"   11'34.0"   5  116.1 kph	   0.0"

 2   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 6  1:11'10.2"   11'35.2"   5	  27.6"	  27.6"

 3   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  6  1:11'31.0"   11'38.8"   4	  48.4"	  20.8"

 4   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  6  1:11'49.4"   11'45.2"   5	1'06.8"	  18.4"

 5  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 6  1:11'57.8"   11'36.2"   5	1'15.2"	   8.4"

 6   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 6  1:12'14.4"   11'40.8"   5	1'31.8"	  16.6"

 7   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 6  1:12'57.2"   11'44.6"   4	2'14.6"	  42.8"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  6  1:14'14.6"   12'05.8"   5	3'32.0"	1'17.4"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  6  1:14'25.2"   12'06.8"   5	3'42.6"	  10.6"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 6  1:15'36.8"   12'19.8"   3	4'54.2"	1'11.6"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   6  1:16'54.2"   12'24.8"   4	6'11.6"	1'17.4"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   6  1:18'20.0"   12'44.0"   3	7'37.4"	1'25.8"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   6  1:20'14.8"   12'54.6"   5	9'32.2"	1'54.8"

14  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   6  1:21'31.0"   12'57.2"   4   10'48.4"	1'16.2"

15  10 Mays		 ERA					6  1:21'38.2"   13'20.8"   5   10'55.6"	   7.2"

16  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   6  1:26'15.8"   12'39.6"   5   15'33.2"	4'37.6"



Lap 7 -  159.670 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  7  1:22'37.8"   11'34.0"   5  115.9 kph	   0.0"

 2   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  7  1:23'10.2"   11'38.8"   4	  32.4"	  32.4"

 3  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 7  1:23'25.8"   11'28.0"   7	  48.0"	  15.6"

 4   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  7  1:23'29.0"   11'39.6"   7	  51.2"	   3.2"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 7  1:23'37.4"   11'35.2"   5	  59.6"	   8.4"

 6   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 7  1:24'21.0"   11'40.8"   5	1'43.2"	  43.6"

 7   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 7  1:24'36.2"   11'39.0"   7	1'58.4"	  15.2"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  7  1:26'26.0"   12'05.8"   5	3'48.2"	1'49.8"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  7  1:26'36.2"   12'06.8"   5	3'58.4"	  10.2"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 7  1:29'27.4"   12'19.8"   3	6'49.6"	2'51.2"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   7  1:29'31.6"   12'24.8"   4	6'53.8"	   4.2"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   7  1:31'05.8"   12'44.0"   3	8'28.0"	1'34.2"

13  10 Mays		 ERA					7  1:34'53.8"   13'15.6"   7   12'16.0"	3'48.0"

14  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   7  1:35'55.2"   12'57.2"   4   13'17.4"	1'01.4"

15  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   7  1:37'02.8"   12'54.6"   5   14'25.0"	1'07.6"

16  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   7  1:41'22.0"   12'39.6"   5   18'44.2"	4'19.2"



Lap 8 -  182.480 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  8  1:34'14.0"   11'34.0"   5  116.1 kph	   0.0"

 2   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  8  1:34'40.8"   11'30.6"   8	  26.8"	  26.8"

 3   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  8  1:34'45.6"   11'16.6"   8	  31.6"	   4.8"

 4  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 8  1:34'49.0"   11'23.2"   8	  35.0"	   3.4"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 8  1:34'54.0"   11'16.6"   8	  40.0"	   5.0"

 6   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 8  1:36'02.4"   11'26.2"   8	1'48.4"	1'08.4"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 8  1:37'44.2"   11'40.8"   5	3'30.2"	1'41.8"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  8  1:38'33.8"   12'05.8"   5	4'19.8"	  49.6"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  8  1:38'40.2"   12'04.0"   8	4'26.2"	   6.4"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 8  1:42'07.0"   12'19.8"   3	7'53.0"	3'26.8"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   8  1:42'11.4"   12'24.8"   4	7'57.4"	   4.4"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   8  1:43'54.0"   12'44.0"   3	9'40.0"	1'42.6"

13  10 Mays		 ERA					8  1:48'12.0"   13'15.6"   7   13'58.0"	4'18.0"

14  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   8  1:48'52.4"   12'57.2"   4   14'38.4"	  40.4"

15  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   8  1:49'32.2"   12'29.4"   8   15'18.2"	  39.8"

16  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   8  1:53'29.0"   12'07.0"   8   19'15.0"	3'56.8"



Lap 9 -  205.290 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		  9  1:45'39.4"   11'25.4"   9  116.5 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			 9  1:45'46.8"   10'57.8"   9	   7.4"	   7.4"

 3   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		  9  1:45'48.6"   11'03.0"   9	   9.2"	   1.8"

 4   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			 9  1:45'56.6"   11'02.6"   9	  17.2"	   8.0"

 5   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		  9  1:46'07.0"   11'26.2"   9	  27.6"	  10.4"

 6   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			 9  1:47'18.4"   11'16.0"   9	1'39.0"	1'11.4"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			 9  1:49'19.6"   11'35.4"   9	3'40.2"	2'01.2"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		  9  1:50'22.6"   11'48.8"   9	4'43.2"	1'03.0"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		  9  1:50'30.2"   11'50.0"   9	4'50.8"	   7.6"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			 9  1:54'07.2"   12'00.2"   9	8'27.8"	3'37.0"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			   9  1:55'50.8"   12'24.8"   4   10'11.4"	1'43.6"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			   9  2:00'12.0"   12'44.0"   3   14'32.6"	4'21.2"

13  10 Mays		 ERA					9  2:01'26.2"   13'14.2"   9   15'46.8"	1'14.2"

14  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			   9  2:01'38.8"   12'46.4"   9   15'59.4"	  12.6"

15  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			   9  2:01'41.6"   12'09.4"   9   16'02.2"	   2.8"

16  17 Etancelin	Maserati			   9  2:05'24.4"   11'55.4"   9   19'45.0"	3'42.8"



Lap 10 -  228.100 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			10  1:56'42.2"   10'55.4"  10  117.2 kph	   0.0"

 2   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 10  1:56'51.4"   11'12.0"  10	   9.2"	   9.2"

 3   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			10  1:56'51.8"   10'55.2"  10	   9.6"	   0.4"

 4   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 10  1:56'52.6"   11'03.0"   9	  10.4"	   0.8"

 5   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 10  1:57'20.8"   11'13.8"  10	  38.6"	  28.2"

 6   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			10  1:58'25.4"   11'07.0"  10	1'43.2"	1'04.6"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			10  2:00'49.8"   11'30.2"  10	4'07.6"	2'24.4"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 10  2:01'57.0"   11'34.4"  10	5'14.8"	1'07.2"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 10  2:02'09.2"   11'39.0"  10	5'27.0"	  12.2"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			10  2:06'18.4"   12'00.2"   9	9'36.2"	4'09.2"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  10  2:08'08.4"   12'17.6"  10   11'26.2"	1'50.0"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  10  2:12'37.2"   12'25.2"  10   15'55.0"	4'28.8"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  10  2:13'58.2"   12'09.4"   9   17'16.0"	1'21.0"

14  20 Hartmann	 Maserati			  10  2:14'21.2"   12'42.4"  10   17'39.0"	  23.0"

15  10 Mays		 ERA				   10  2:14'57.8"   13'14.2"   9   18'15.6"	  36.6"

16  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  10  2:17'34.6"   11'55.4"   9   20'52.4"	2'36.8"



Lap 11 -  250.910 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			11  2:07'37.6"   10'55.4"  10  117.9 kph	   0.0"

 2   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			11  2:07'40.8"   10'49.0"  11	   3.2"	   3.2"

 3   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 11  2:07'41.4"   10'48.8"  11	   3.8"	   0.6"

 4   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 11  2:08'00.8"   11'09.4"  11	  23.2"	  19.4"

 5   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 11  2:08'28.6"   11'07.8"  11	  51.0"	  27.8"

 6   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			11  2:09'28.6"   11'03.2"  11	1'51.0"	1'00.0"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			11  2:12'27.2"   11'30.2"  10	4'49.6"	2'58.6"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 11  2:13'46.6"   11'34.4"  10	6'09.0"	1'19.4"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 11  2:14'09.0"   11'39.0"  10	6'31.4"	  22.4"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			11  2:18'30.4"   12'00.2"   9   10'52.8"	4'21.4"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  11  2:20'10.8"   12'02.4"  11   12'33.2"	1'40.4"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  11  2:24'58.8"   12'21.6"  11   17'21.2"	4'48.0"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  11  2:26'19.8"   12'09.4"   9   18'42.2"	1'21.0"

14  10 Mays		 ERA				   11  2:28'32.6"   13'14.2"   9   20'55.0"	2'12.8"

15  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  11  2:29'27.2"   11'52.6"  11   21'49.6"	  54.6"



Lap 12 -  273.720 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 12  2:19'42.6"   11'07.8"  11  117.5 kph	   0.0"

 2   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 12  2:19'48.8"   10'48.8"  11	   6.2"	   6.2"

 3   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			12  2:20'27.2"   10'58.6"  12	  44.6"	  38.4"

 4   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			12  2:20'27.2"   10'49.0"  11	  44.6"	   0.0"

 5   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 12  2:20'32.8"   11'09.4"  11	  50.2"	   5.6"

 6  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			12  2:20'51.8"   10'55.4"  10	1'09.2"	  19.0"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			12  2:23'47.2"   11'20.0"  12	4'04.6"	2'55.4"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 12  2:26'36.2"   11'34.4"  10	6'53.6"	2'49.0"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 12  2:26'59.0"   11'39.0"  10	7'16.4"	  22.8"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			12  2:30'35.8"   12'00.2"   9   10'53.2"	3'36.8"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  12  2:32'12.8"   12'02.0"  12   12'30.2"	1'37.0"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  12  2:37'06.0"   12'07.2"  12   17'23.4"	4'53.2"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  12  2:38'38.0"   12'09.4"   9   18'55.4"	1'32.0"

14  10 Mays		 ERA				   12  2:42'23.8"   13'14.2"   9   22'41.2"	3'45.8"

15  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  12  2:45'03.8"   11'52.6"  11   25'21.2"	2'40.0"



Lap 13 -  296.530 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 13  2:30'22.6"   10'33.8"  13  118.3 kph	   0.0"

 2   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			13  2:31'32.0"   10'49.0"  11	1'09.4"	1'09.4"

 3   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 13  2:31'33.6"   11'00.8"  13	1'11.0"	   1.6"

 4  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			13  2:31'41.6"   10'49.8"  13	1'19.0"	   8.0"

 5   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 13  2:32'19.6"   11'07.8"  11	1'57.0"	  38.0"

 6   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			13  2:32'33.0"   10'58.6"  12	2'10.4"	  13.4"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			13  2:35'27.8"   11'20.0"  12	5'05.2"	2'54.8"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 13  2:38'17.0"   11'34.4"  10	7'54.4"	2'49.2"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 13  2:38'38.8"   11'39.0"  10	8'16.2"	  21.8"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			13  2:44'00.0"   12'00.2"   9   13'37.4"	5'21.2"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  13  2:44'11.6"   11'58.8"  13   13'49.0"	  11.6"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  13  2:49'13.8"   12'07.2"  12   18'51.2"	5'02.2"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  13  2:53'42.0"   12'09.4"   9   23'19.4"	4'28.2"

14  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  13  3:00'37.4"   11'52.6"  11   30'14.8"	6'55.4"



Lap 14 -  319.340 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 14  2:40'54.6"   10'32.0"  14  119.0 kph	   0.0"

 2   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 14  2:42'24.6"   10'51.0"  14	1'30.0"	1'30.0"

 3  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			14  2:42'30.2"   10'48.6"  14	1'35.6"	   5.6"

 4   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			14  2:43'28.4"   10'55.4"  14	2'33.8"	  58.2"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			14  2:44'16.4"   10'49.0"  11	3'21.8"	  48.0"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 14  2:46'02.0"   11'07.8"  11	5'07.4"	1'45.6"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			14  2:47'45.6"   11'20.0"  12	6'51.0"	1'43.6"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 14  2:49'48.2"   11'31.2"  14	8'53.6"	2'02.6"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 14  2:50'22.2"   11'39.0"  10	9'27.6"	  34.0"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			14  2:56'08.6"   12'00.2"   9   15'14.0"	5'46.4"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  14  2:56'15.6"   11'58.8"  13   15'21.0"	   7.0"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  14  3:01'28.8"   12'07.2"  12   20'34.2"	5'13.2"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  14  3:05'51.8"   12'09.4"   9   24'57.2"	4'23.0"

14  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  14  3:13'20.4"   11'52.6"  11   32'25.8"	7'28.6"



Lap 15 -  342.150 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 15  2:51'36.4"   10'32.0"  14  119.6 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			15  2:53'13.8"   10'43.6"  15	1'37.4"	1'37.4"

 3   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 15  2:53'15.4"   10'50.8"  15	1'39.0"	   1.6"

 4   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			15  2:54'19.8"   10'51.4"  15	2'43.4"	1'04.4"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			15  2:55'02.8"   10'46.4"  15	3'26.4"	  43.0"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 15  2:57'10.8"   11'07.8"  11	5'34.4"	2'08.0"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			15  3:01'23.4"   11'20.0"  12	9'47.0"	4'12.6"

 8   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 15  3:01'23.4"   11'31.2"  14	9'47.0"	   0.0"

 9   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 15  3:01'56.6"   11'34.4"  15   10'20.2"	  33.2"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			15  3:08'09.4"   12'00.2"   9   16'33.0"	6'12.8"

11  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  15  3:09'52.8"   11'58.8"  13   18'16.4"	1'43.4"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  15  3:13'42.8"   12'07.2"  12   22'06.4"	3'50.0"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  15  3:18'09.2"   12'09.4"   9   26'32.8"	4'26.4"

14  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  15  3:25'13.6"   11'52.6"  11   33'37.2"	7'04.4"



Lap 16 -  364.960 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 16  3:02'33.6"   10'32.0"  14  119.9 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			16  3:04'00.4"   10'43.6"  15	1'26.8"	1'26.8"

 3   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 16  3:04'02.6"   10'47.2"  16	1'29.0"	   2.2"

 4   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			16  3:05'12.8"   10'51.4"  15	2'39.2"	1'10.2"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			16  3:05'51.2"   10'46.4"  15	3'17.6"	  38.4"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 16  3:08'10.8"   11'00.0"  16	5'37.2"	2'19.6"

 7   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			16  3:13'16.4"   11'20.0"  12   10'42.8"	5'05.6"

 8   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 16  3:13'32.2"   11'34.4"  15   10'58.6"	  15.8"

 9   9 Lang		 Mercedes-Benz		 16  3:16'00.8"   11'31.2"  14   13'27.2"	2'28.6"

10  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  16  3:21'55.6"   11'58.8"  13   19'22.0"	5'54.8"

11   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			16  3:21'58.8"   12'00.2"   9   19'25.2"	   3.2"

12  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  16  3:25'39.8"   11'57.0"  16   23'06.2"	3'41.0"

13  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  16  3:30'28.4"   12'09.4"   9   27'54.8"	4'48.6"

14  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  16  3:37'21.6"   11'52.6"  11   34'48.0"	6'53.2"



Lap 17 -  387.770 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 17  3:13'32.2"   10'32.0"  14  120.2 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			17  3:14'45.4"   10'43.6"  15	1'13.2"	1'13.2"

 3   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 17  3:15'04.6"   10'47.2"  16	1'32.4"	  19.2"

 4   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			17  3:16'03.8"   10'51.0"  17	2'31.6"	  59.2"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			17  3:16'41.6"   10'46.4"  15	3'09.4"	  37.8"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 17  3:19'33.8"   11'00.0"  16	6'01.6"	2'52.2"

 7   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 17  3:24'55.8"   11'23.6"  17   11'23.6"	5'22.0"

 8   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			17  3:25'12.2"   11'20.0"  12   11'40.0"	  16.4"

 9  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  17  3:33'53.8"   11'58.2"  17   20'21.6"	8'41.6"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			17  3:34'26.0"   12'00.2"   9   20'53.8"	  32.2"

11  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  17  3:37'43.0"   11'57.0"  16   24'10.8"	3'17.0"

12  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  17  3:42'40.6"   12'09.4"   9   29'08.4"	4'57.6"

13  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  17  3:49'12.0"   11'50.4"  17   35'39.8"	6'31.4"



Lap 18 -  410.580 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 18  3:24'43.0"   10'32.0"  14  120.3 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			18  3:25'30.0"   10'43.6"  15	  47.0"	  47.0"

 3   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 18  3:26'09.4"   10'47.2"  16	1'26.4"	  39.4"

 4   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			18  3:26'46.6"   10'42.8"  18	2'03.6"	  37.2"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			18  3:27'31.4"   10'46.4"  15	2'48.4"	  44.8"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 18  3:30'59.6"   11'00.0"  16	6'16.6"	3'28.2"

 7   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 18  3:36'23.0"   11'23.6"  17   11'40.0"	5'23.4"

 8   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			18  3:37'18.8"   11'20.0"  12   12'35.8"	  55.8"

 9  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  18  3:46'14.0"   11'58.2"  17   21'31.0"	8'55.2"

10   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			18  3:46'56.6"   12'00.2"   9   22'13.6"	  42.6"

11  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  18  3:49'44.0"   11'57.0"  16   25'01.0"	2'47.4"

12  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  18  3:54'53.2"   12'09.4"   9   30'10.2"	5'09.2"

13  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  18  4:01'02.2"   11'50.2"  18   36'19.2"	6'09.0"



Lap 19 -  433.390 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 19  3:35'31.2"   10'32.0"  14  120.6 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			19  3:36'24.4"   10'43.6"  15	  53.2"	  53.2"

 3   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 19  3:37'23.8"   10'47.2"  16	1'52.6"	  59.4"

 4   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			19  3:37'34.2"   10'42.8"  18	2'03.0"	  10.4"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			19  3:38'25.6"   10'46.4"  15	2'54.4"	  51.4"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 19  3:42'10.8"   11'00.0"  16	6'39.6"	3'45.2"

 7   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 19  3:47'42.8"   11'19.8"  19   12'11.6"	5'32.0"

 8   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			19  3:49'10.0"   11'20.0"  12   13'38.8"	1'27.2"

 9   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			19  3:59'24.8"   12'00.2"   9   23'53.6"   10'14.8"

10  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  19  3:59'29.2"   11'58.2"  17   23'58.0"	   4.4"

11  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  19  4:01'59.0"   11'57.0"  16   26'27.8"	2'29.8"

12  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  19  4:07'02.0"   12'08.8"  19   31'30.8"	5'03.0"

13  17 Etancelin	Maserati			  19  4:13'14.8"   11'50.2"  18   37'43.6"	6'12.8"



Lap 20 -  456.200 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 20  3:46'29.2"   10'32.0"  14  120.8 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			20  3:47'11.6"   10'43.6"  15	  42.4"	  42.4"

 3   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			20  3:48'15.4"   10'41.2"  20	1'46.2"	1'03.8"

 4   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 20  3:48'29.2"   10'47.2"  16	2'00.0"	  13.8"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			20  3:49'19.0"   10'46.4"  15	2'49.8"	  49.8"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 20  3:53'23.0"   11'00.0"  16	6'53.8"	4'04.0"

 7   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 20  3:59'15.4"   11'19.8"  19   12'46.2"	5'52.4"

 8   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			20  4:01'01.2"   11'20.0"  12   14'32.0"	1'45.8"

 9   4 Pietsch	  Auto-Union			20  4:11'47.6"   12'00.2"   9   25'18.4"   10'46.4"

10  21 Ruesch	   Maserati			  20  4:12'22.2"   11'58.2"  17   25'53.0"	  34.6"

11  16 Zehender	 Maserati			  20  4:14'44.2"   11'57.0"  16   28'15.0"	2'22.0"

12  18 Ghersi	   Maserati			  20  4:19'29.4"   12'08.8"  19   33'00.2"	4'45.2"



Lap 21 -  479.010 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 21  3:57'13.4"   10'32.0"  14  121.1 kph	   0.0"

 2  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			21  3:57'58.6"   10'43.6"  15	  45.2"	  45.2"

 3   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			21  3:59'14.6"   10'41.2"  20	2'01.2"	1'16.0"

 4   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 21  3:59'52.2"   10'47.2"  16	2'38.8"	  37.6"

 5   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			21  4:00'20.2"   10'46.4"  15	3'06.8"	  28.0"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 21  4:04'33.4"   11'00.0"  16	7'20.0"	4'13.2"

 7   8 Geier		Mercedes-Benz		 21  4:11'48.2"   11'19.8"  19   14'34.8"	7'14.8"

 8   2 Varzi		Auto-Union			21  4:15'35.8"   11'20.0"  12   18'22.4"	3'47.6"



Lap 22 -  501.820 km

Pos  # Driver	   Car				 Laps  Total Time	Fastest Lap   Gap to L   Gap to P

 1  12 Nuvolari	 Alfa Romeo			22  4:08'50.2"   10'43.6"  15  120.9 kph	   0.0"

 2   1 Stuck		Auto-Union			22  4:10'08.2"   10'41.2"  20	1'18.0"	1'18.0"

 3   5 Caracciola   Mercedes-Benz		 22  4:11'03.2"   10'47.2"  16	2'13.0"	  55.0"

 4   3 Rosemeyer	Auto-Union			22  4:12'51.6"   10'46.4"  15	4'01.4"	1'48.4"

 5   7 Brauchitsch  Mercedes-Benz		 22  4:14'17.8"   10'32.0"  14	5'27.6"	1'26.2"

 6   6 Fagioli	  Mercedes-Benz		 22  4:15'58.6"   11'00.0"  16	7'08.4"	1'40.8"



Legend: Pos  Position at end of lap

		  L  Leader





**** Recorded Times in Chronological Order



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 1	12'07.4"   12'07.4"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	   0.0"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	   1	12'19.8"   12'19.8"@	  12.4"	  12.4"	  12.4"  

 3   6 Fagioli		1	12'21.0"   12'21.0"@	  13.6"	   1.2"	   1.2"  

 4   3 Rosemeyer	  1	12'23.0"   12'23.0"@	  15.6"	   2.0"	   2.0"  

 5   7 Brauchitsch	1	12'24.4"   12'24.4"@	  17.0"	   1.4"	   1.4"  

 6  14 Chiron		 1	12'29.2"   12'29.2"@	  21.8"	   4.8"	   4.8"  

 7  15 Brivio		 1	12'37.2"   12'37.2"@	  29.8"	   8.0"	   8.0"  

 8   2 Varzi		  1	12'40.6"   12'40.6"@	  33.2"	   3.4"	   3.4"  

 9  23 Taruffi		1	13'02.0"   13'02.0"@	  54.6"	  21.4"	  21.4"  

10   9 Lang		   1	13'03.4"   13'03.4"@	  56.0"	   1.4"	   1.4"  

11   8 Geier		  1	13'05.0"   13'05.0"@	  57.6"	   1.6"	   1.6"  

12   1 Stuck		  1	13'06.6"   13'06.6"@	  59.2"	   1.6"	   1.6"  

13   4 Pietsch		1	13'10.2"   13'10.2"@	1'02.8"	   3.6"	   3.6"  

14  16 Zehender	   1	13'34.2"   13'34.2"@	1'26.8"	  24.0"	  24.0"  

15  21 Ruesch		 1	13'36.2"   13'36.2"@	1'28.8"	   2.0"	   2.0"  

16  20 Hartmann	   1	13'53.8"   13'53.8"@	1'46.4"	  17.6"	  17.6"  

17  18 Ghersi		 1	14'07.8"   14'07.8"@	2'00.4"	  14.0"	  14.0"  

18  17 Etancelin	  1	14'18.6"   14'18.6"@	2'11.2"	  10.8"	  10.8"  

19  10 Mays		   1	14'19.0"   14'19.0"@	2'11.6"	   0.4"	   0.4"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 2	24'04.2"   11'56.8"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	9'45.2"  

 2   3 Rosemeyer	  2	24'16.8"   11'53.8"@	  12.6"	  12.6"	  12.6"  

 3   7 Brauchitsch	2	24'27.8"   12'03.4"@	  23.6"	  11.0"	  11.0"  

 4   6 Fagioli		2	24'31.6"   12'10.6"@	  27.4"	   3.8"	   3.8"  

 5  14 Chiron		 2	24'35.8"   12'06.6"@	  31.6"	   4.2"	   4.2"  

 6  12 Nuvolari	   2	24'46.4"   12'26.6"	   42.2"	  10.6"	  10.6"  

 7   2 Varzi		  2	24'53.0"   12'12.4"@	  48.8"	   6.6"	   6.6"  

 8   9 Lang		   2	25'29.6"   12'26.2"@	1'25.4"	  36.6"	  36.6"  

 9  23 Taruffi		2	25'34.0"   12'32.0"@	1'29.8"	   4.4"	   4.4"  

10   8 Geier		  2	25'34.4"   12'29.4"@	1'30.2"	   0.4"	   0.4"  

11   1 Stuck		  2	25'35.0"   12'28.4"@	1'30.8"	   0.6"	   0.6"  

12   4 Pietsch		2	25'37.0"   12'26.8"@	1'32.8"	   2.0"	   2.0"  

13  16 Zehender	   2	26'22.6"   12'48.4"@	2'18.4"	  45.6"	  45.6"  

14  21 Ruesch		 2	26'24.8"   12'48.6"@	2'20.6"	   2.2"	   2.2"  

15  20 Hartmann	   2	27'29.4"   13'35.6"@	3'25.2"	1'04.6"	1'04.6"  

16  18 Ghersi		 2	27'44.8"   13'37.0"@	3'40.6"	  15.4"	  15.4"  

17  10 Mays		   2	27'59.0"   13'40.0"@	3'54.8"	  14.2"	  14.2"  

18  17 Etancelin	  2	28'17.2"   13'58.6"@	4'13.0"	  18.2"	  18.2"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 3	35'52.4"   11'48.2"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	7'35.2"  

 2   3 Rosemeyer	  3	35'59.2"   11'42.4"@	   6.8"	   6.8"	   6.8"  

 3   6 Fagioli		3	36'22.6"   11'51.0"@	  30.2"	  23.4"	  23.4"  

 4   7 Brauchitsch	3	36'23.8"   11'56.0"@	  31.4"	   1.2"	   1.2"  

 5  14 Chiron		 3	36'32.6"   11'56.8"@	  40.2"	   8.8"	   8.8"  

 6  12 Nuvolari	   3	36'51.4"   12'05.0"@	  59.0"	  18.8"	  18.8"  

 7   2 Varzi		  3	36'54.6"   12'01.6"@	1'02.2"	   3.2"	   3.2"  

 8   1 Stuck		  3	37'42.2"   12'07.2"@	1'49.8"	  47.6"	  47.6"  

 9   9 Lang		   3	37'44.2"   12'14.6"@	1'51.8"	   2.0"	   2.0"  

10   8 Geier		  3	37'48.4"   12'14.0"@	1'56.0"	   4.2"	   4.2"  

11   4 Pietsch		3	37'56.8"   12'19.8"@	2'04.4"	   8.4"	   8.4"  

12  23 Taruffi		3	37'59.8"   12'25.8"@	2'07.4"	   3.0"	   3.0"  

13  16 Zehender	   3	39'06.6"   12'44.0"@	3'14.2"	1'06.8"	1'06.8"  

14  21 Ruesch		 3	39'07.4"   12'42.6"@	3'15.0"	   0.8"	   0.8"  

15  18 Ghersi		 3	41'01.0"   13'16.2"@	5'08.6"	1'53.6"	1'53.6"  

16  10 Mays		   3	41'28.2"   13'29.2"@	5'35.8"	  27.2"	  27.2"  

17  20 Hartmann	   3	41'59.4"   14'30.0"	 6'07.0"	  31.2"	  31.2"  

18  17 Etancelin	  3	43'34.0"   15'16.8"	 7'41.6"	1'34.6"	1'34.6"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 4	47'30.8"   11'38.4"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	3'56.8"  

 2   3 Rosemeyer	  4	47'34.8"   11'35.6"@	   4.0"	   4.0"	   4.0"  

 3   6 Fagioli		4	48'01.4"   11'38.8"@	  30.6"	  26.6"	  26.6"  

 4  14 Chiron		 4	48'16.4"   11'43.8"@	  45.6"	  15.0"	  15.0"  

 5   7 Brauchitsch	4	48'17.6"   11'53.8"@	  46.8"	   1.2"	   1.2"  

 6  12 Nuvolari	   4	48'40.0"   11'48.6"@	1'09.2"	  22.4"	  22.4"  

 7   2 Varzi		  4	48'44.4"   11'49.8"@	1'13.6"	   4.4"	   4.4"  

 8   1 Stuck		  4	49'26.8"   11'44.6"@	1'56.0"	  42.4"	  42.4"  

 9   9 Lang		   4	49'54.8"   12'10.6"@	2'24.0"	  28.0"	  28.0"  

10   8 Geier		  4	50'03.4"   12'15.0"	 2'32.6"	   8.6"	   8.6"  

11   4 Pietsch		4	50'16.6"   12'19.8"	 2'45.8"	  13.2"	  13.2"  

12  23 Taruffi		4	50'23.8"   12'24.0"@	2'53.0"	   7.2"	   7.2"  

13  21 Ruesch		 4	51'32.2"   12'24.8"@	4'01.4"	1'08.4"	1'08.4"  

14  16 Zehender	   4	51'55.8"   12'49.2"	 4'25.0"	  23.6"	  23.6"  

15  18 Ghersi		 4	54'08.2"   13'07.2"@	6'37.4"	2'12.4"	2'12.4"  

16  10 Mays		   4	54'49.6"   13'21.4"@	7'18.8"	  41.4"	  41.4"  

17  20 Hartmann	   4	54'56.6"   12'57.2"@	7'25.8"	   7.0"	   7.0"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 5	59'04.8"   11'34.0"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	4'08.2"  

 2   3 Rosemeyer	  5	59'10.0"   11'35.2"@	   5.2"	   5.2"	   5.2"  

 3   6 Fagioli		5	59'49.2"   11'47.8"	   44.4"	  39.2"	  39.2"  

 4  14 Chiron		 5	59'52.8"   11'36.4"@	  48.0"	   3.6"	   3.6"  

 5   7 Brauchitsch	5  1:00'02.8"   11'45.2"@	  58.0"	  10.0"	  10.0"  

 6  12 Nuvolari	   5  1:00'16.2"   11'36.2"@	1'11.4"	  13.4"	  13.4"  

18  17 Etancelin	  4  1:00'18.6"   16'44.6"	12'47.8"	5'22.0"	   2.4"  

 7   2 Varzi		  5  1:00'25.2"   11'40.8"@	1'20.4"	   9.0"	   6.6"  

 8   1 Stuck		  5  1:01'12.0"   11'45.2"	 2'07.2"	  46.8"	  46.8"  

 9   9 Lang		   5  1:02'00.6"   12'05.8"@	2'55.8"	  48.6"	  48.6"  

10   8 Geier		  5  1:02'10.2"   12'06.8"@	3'05.4"	   9.6"	   9.6"  

11   4 Pietsch		5  1:02'44.2"   12'27.6"	 3'39.4"	  34.0"	  34.0"  

12  21 Ruesch		 5  1:04'06.0"   12'33.8"	 5'01.2"	1'21.8"	1'21.8"  

13  16 Zehender	   5  1:05'23.2"   13'27.4"	 6'18.4"	1'17.2"	1'17.2"  

14  18 Ghersi		 5  1:07'02.8"   12'54.6"@	7'58.0"	1'39.6"	1'39.6"  

15  20 Hartmann	   5  1:08'04.4"   13'07.8"	 8'59.6"	1'01.6"	1'01.6"  

16  10 Mays		   5  1:08'10.4"   13'20.8"@	9'05.6"	   6.0"	   6.0"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 6  1:10'42.6"   11'37.8"		0.0"	   0.0"	2'32.2"  

 2   3 Rosemeyer	  6  1:11'10.2"   12'00.2"	   27.6"	  27.6"	  27.6"  

 3   6 Fagioli		6  1:11'31.0"   11'41.8"	   48.4"	  20.8"	  20.8"  

 4   7 Brauchitsch	6  1:11'49.4"   11'46.6"	 1'06.8"	  18.4"	  18.4"  

 5  12 Nuvolari	   6  1:11'57.8"   11'41.6"	 1'15.2"	   8.4"	   8.4"  

 6   2 Varzi		  6  1:12'14.4"   11'49.2"	 1'31.8"	  16.6"	  16.6"  

 7   1 Stuck		  6  1:12'57.2"   11'45.2"	 2'14.6"	  42.8"	  42.8"  

17  17 Etancelin	  5  1:12'58.2"   12'39.6"@   13'53.4"	4'47.8"	   1.0"  

 8   9 Lang		   6  1:14'14.6"   12'14.0"	 3'32.0"	1'17.4"	1'16.4"  

 9   8 Geier		  6  1:14'25.2"   12'15.0"	 3'42.6"	  10.6"	  10.6"  

10   4 Pietsch		6  1:15'36.8"   12'52.6"	 4'54.2"	1'11.6"	1'11.6"  

11  21 Ruesch		 6  1:16'54.2"   12'48.2"	 6'11.6"	1'17.4"	1'17.4"  

12  16 Zehender	   6  1:18'20.0"   12'56.8"	 7'37.4"	1'25.8"	1'25.8"  

13  18 Ghersi		 6  1:20'14.8"   13'12.0"	 9'32.2"	1'54.8"	1'54.8"  

14  20 Hartmann	   6  1:21'31.0"   13'26.6"	10'48.4"	1'16.2"	1'16.2"  

15  10 Mays		   6  1:21'38.2"   13'27.8"	10'55.6"	   7.2"	   7.2"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 7  1:22'37.8"   11'55.2"		0.0"	   0.0"	  59.6"  

 2   6 Fagioli		7  1:23'10.2"   11'39.2"	   32.4"	  32.4"	  32.4"  

 3  12 Nuvolari	   7  1:23'25.8"   11'28.0"@	  48.0"	  15.6"	  15.6"  

 4   7 Brauchitsch	7  1:23'29.0"   11'39.6"@	  51.2"	   3.2"	   3.2"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	  7  1:23'37.4"   12'27.2"	   59.6"	   8.4"	   8.4"  

 6   2 Varzi		  7  1:24'21.0"   12'06.6"	 1'43.2"	  43.6"	  43.6"  

 7   1 Stuck		  7  1:24'36.2"   11'39.0"@	1'58.4"	  15.2"	  15.2"  

16  17 Etancelin	  6  1:26'15.8"   13'17.6"	15'33.2"	4'37.6"	1'39.6"  

 8   9 Lang		   7  1:26'26.0"   12'11.4"	 3'48.2"	1'49.8"	  10.2"  

 9   8 Geier		  7  1:26'36.2"   12'11.0"	 3'58.4"	  10.2"	  10.2"  

10   4 Pietsch		7  1:29'27.4"   13'50.6"	 6'49.6"	2'51.2"	2'51.2"  

11  21 Ruesch		 7  1:29'31.6"   12'37.4"	 6'53.8"	   4.2"	   4.2"  

12  16 Zehender	   7  1:31'05.8"   12'45.8"	 8'28.0"	1'34.2"	1'34.2"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 8  1:34'14.0"   11'36.2"		0.0"	   0.0"	3'08.2"  

 2   6 Fagioli		8  1:34'40.8"   11'30.6"@	  26.8"	  26.8"	  26.8"  

 3   7 Brauchitsch	8  1:34'45.6"   11'16.6"@	  31.6"	   4.8"	   4.8"  

 4  12 Nuvolari	   8  1:34'49.0"   11'23.2"@	  35.0"	   3.4"	   3.4"  

13  10 Mays		   7  1:34'53.8"   13'15.6"@   12'16.0"	3'48.0"	   4.8"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	  8  1:34'54.0"   11'16.6"@	  40.0"	   5.0"	   0.2"  

14  20 Hartmann	   7  1:35'55.2"   14'24.2"	13'17.4"	1'01.4"	1'01.2"  

 6   1 Stuck		  8  1:36'02.4"   11'26.2"@	1'48.4"	1'08.4"	   7.2"  

15  18 Ghersi		 7  1:37'02.8"   16'48.0"	14'25.0"	1'07.6"	1'00.4"  

 7   2 Varzi		  8  1:37'44.2"   13'23.2"	 3'30.2"	1'41.8"	  41.4"  

 8   9 Lang		   8  1:38'33.8"   12'07.8"	 4'19.8"	  49.6"	  49.6"  

 9   8 Geier		  8  1:38'40.2"   12'04.0"@	4'26.2"	   6.4"	   6.4"  

16  17 Etancelin	  7  1:41'22.0"   15'06.2"	18'44.2"	4'19.2"	2'41.8"  

10   4 Pietsch		8  1:42'07.0"   12'39.6"	 7'53.0"	3'26.8"	  45.0"  

11  21 Ruesch		 8  1:42'11.4"   12'39.8"	 7'57.4"	   4.4"	   4.4"  

12  16 Zehender	   8  1:43'54.0"   12'48.2"	 9'40.0"	1'42.6"	1'42.6"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   5 Caracciola	 9  1:45'39.4"   11'25.4"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	1'45.4"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	   9  1:45'46.8"   10'57.8"@	   7.4"	   7.4"	   7.4"  

 3   7 Brauchitsch	9  1:45'48.6"   11'03.0"@	   9.2"	   1.8"	   1.8"  

 4   3 Rosemeyer	  9  1:45'56.6"   11'02.6"@	  17.2"	   8.0"	   8.0"  

 5   6 Fagioli		9  1:46'07.0"   11'26.2"@	  27.6"	  10.4"	  10.4"  

 6   1 Stuck		  9  1:47'18.4"   11'16.0"@	1'39.0"	1'11.4"	1'11.4"  

13  10 Mays		   8  1:48'12.0"   13'18.2"	13'58.0"	4'18.0"	  53.6"  

14  20 Hartmann	   8  1:48'52.4"   12'57.2"	14'38.4"	  40.4"	  40.4"  

 7   2 Varzi		  9  1:49'19.6"   11'35.4"@	3'40.2"	2'01.2"	  27.2"  

15  18 Ghersi		 8  1:49'32.2"   12'29.4"@   15'18.2"	  39.8"	  12.6"  

 8   9 Lang		   9  1:50'22.6"   11'48.8"@	4'43.2"	1'03.0"	  50.4"  

 9   8 Geier		  9  1:50'30.2"   11'50.0"@	4'50.8"	   7.6"	   7.6"  

16  17 Etancelin	  8  1:53'29.0"   12'07.0"@   19'15.0"	3'56.8"	2'58.8"  

10   4 Pietsch		9  1:54'07.2"   12'00.2"@	8'27.8"	3'37.0"	  38.2"  

11  21 Ruesch		 9  1:55'50.8"   13'39.4"	10'11.4"	1'43.6"	1'43.6"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1  12 Nuvolari	  10  1:56'42.2"   10'55.4"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	  51.4"  

 2   5 Caracciola	10  1:56'51.4"   11'12.0"@	   9.2"	   9.2"	   9.2"  

 3   3 Rosemeyer	 10  1:56'51.8"   10'55.2"@	   9.6"	   0.4"	   0.4"  

 4   7 Brauchitsch   10  1:56'52.6"   11'04.0"	   10.4"	   0.8"	   0.8"  

 5   6 Fagioli	   10  1:57'20.8"   11'13.8"@	  38.6"	  28.2"	  28.2"  

 6   1 Stuck		 10  1:58'25.4"   11'07.0"@	1'43.2"	1'04.6"	1'04.6"  

12  16 Zehender	   9  2:00'12.0"   16'18.0"	14'32.6"	4'21.2"	1'46.6"  

 7   2 Varzi		 10  2:00'49.8"   11'30.2"@	4'07.6"	2'24.4"	  37.8"  

13  10 Mays		   9  2:01'26.2"   13'14.2"@   15'46.8"	1'14.2"	  36.4"  

14  20 Hartmann	   9  2:01'38.8"   12'46.4"@   15'59.4"	  12.6"	  12.6"  

15  18 Ghersi		 9  2:01'41.6"   12'09.4"@   16'02.2"	   2.8"	   2.8"  

 8   9 Lang		  10  2:01'57.0"   11'34.4"@	5'14.8"	1'07.2"	  15.4"  

 9   8 Geier		 10  2:02'09.2"   11'39.0"@	5'27.0"	  12.2"	  12.2"  

16  17 Etancelin	  9  2:05'24.4"   11'55.4"@   19'45.0"	3'42.8"	3'15.2"  

10   4 Pietsch	   10  2:06'18.4"   12'11.2"	 9'36.2"	4'09.2"	  54.0"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1  12 Nuvolari	  11  2:07'37.6"   10'55.4"		0.0"	   0.0"	1'19.2"  

 2   3 Rosemeyer	 11  2:07'40.8"   10'49.0"@	   3.2"	   3.2"	   3.2"  

 3   7 Brauchitsch   11  2:07'41.4"   10'48.8"@	   3.8"	   0.6"	   0.6"  

 4   5 Caracciola	11  2:08'00.8"   11'09.4"@	  23.2"	  19.4"	  19.4"  

11  21 Ruesch		10  2:08'08.4"   12'17.6"@   11'26.2"	1'50.0"	   7.6"  

 5   6 Fagioli	   11  2:08'28.6"   11'07.8"@	  51.0"	  27.8"	  20.2"  

 6   1 Stuck		 11  2:09'28.6"   11'03.2"@	1'51.0"	1'00.0"	1'00.0"  

 7   2 Varzi		 11  2:12'27.2"   11'37.4"	 4'49.6"	2'58.6"	2'58.6"  

12  16 Zehender	  10  2:12'37.2"   12'25.2"@   15'55.0"	4'28.8"	  10.0"  

 8   9 Lang		  11  2:13'46.6"   11'49.6"	 6'09.0"	1'19.4"	1'09.4"  

13  18 Ghersi		10  2:13'58.2"   12'16.6"	17'16.0"	1'21.0"	  11.6"  

 9   8 Geier		 11  2:14'09.0"   11'59.8"	 6'31.4"	  22.4"	  10.8"  

14  20 Hartmann	  10  2:14'21.2"   12'42.4"@   17'39.0"	  23.0"	  12.2"  

15  10 Mays		  10  2:14'57.8"   13'31.6"	18'15.6"	  36.6"	  36.6"  

16  17 Etancelin	 10  2:17'34.6"   12'10.2"	20'52.4"	2'36.8"	2'36.8"  

10   4 Pietsch	   11  2:18'30.4"   12'12.0"	10'52.8"	4'21.4"	  55.8"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   6 Fagioli	   12  2:19'42.6"   11'14.0"		0.0"	   0.0"	1'12.2"  

 2   7 Brauchitsch   12  2:19'48.8"   12'07.4"		6.2"	   6.2"	   6.2"  

11  21 Ruesch		11  2:20'10.8"   12'02.4"@   12'33.2"	1'40.4"	  22.0"  

 3   1 Stuck		 12  2:20'27.2"   10'58.6"@	  44.6"	  38.4"	  16.4"  

 4   3 Rosemeyer	 12  2:20'27.2"   12'46.4"	   44.6"	   0.0"	   0.0"  

 5   5 Caracciola	12  2:20'32.8"   12'32.0"	   50.2"	   5.6"	   5.6"  

 6  12 Nuvolari	  12  2:20'51.8"   13'14.2"	 1'09.2"	  19.0"	  19.0"  

 7   2 Varzi		 12  2:23'47.2"   11'20.0"@	4'04.6"	2'55.4"	2'55.4"  

12  16 Zehender	  11  2:24'58.8"   12'21.6"@   17'21.2"	4'48.0"	1'11.6"  

13  18 Ghersi		11  2:26'19.8"   12'21.6"	18'42.2"	1'21.0"	1'21.0"  

 8   9 Lang		  12  2:26'36.2"   12'49.6"	 6'53.6"	2'49.0"	  16.4"  

 9   8 Geier		 12  2:26'59.0"   12'50.0"	 7'16.4"	  22.8"	  22.8"  

14  10 Mays		  11  2:28'32.6"   13'34.8"	20'55.0"	2'12.8"	1'33.6"  

15  17 Etancelin	 11  2:29'27.2"   11'52.6"@   21'49.6"	  54.6"	  54.6"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   13  2:30'22.6"   10'33.8"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	  55.4"  

10   4 Pietsch	   12  2:30'35.8"   12'05.4"	10'53.2"	3'36.8"	  13.2"  

 2   3 Rosemeyer	 13  2:31'32.0"   11'04.8"	 1'09.4"	1'09.4"	  56.2"  

 3   5 Caracciola	13  2:31'33.6"   11'00.8"@	1'11.0"	   1.6"	   1.6"  

 4  12 Nuvolari	  13  2:31'41.6"   10'49.8"@	1'19.0"	   8.0"	   8.0"  

11  21 Ruesch		12  2:32'12.8"   12'02.0"@   12'30.2"	1'37.0"	  31.2"  

 5   6 Fagioli	   13  2:32'19.6"   12'37.0"	 1'57.0"	  38.0"	   6.8"  

 6   1 Stuck		 13  2:32'33.0"   12'05.8"	 2'10.4"	  13.4"	  13.4"  

 7   2 Varzi		 13  2:35'27.8"   11'40.6"	 5'05.2"	2'54.8"	2'54.8"  

12  16 Zehender	  12  2:37'06.0"   12'07.2"@   17'23.4"	4'53.2"	1'38.2"  

 8   9 Lang		  13  2:38'17.0"   11'40.8"	 7'54.4"	2'49.2"	1'11.0"  

13  18 Ghersi		12  2:38'38.0"   12'18.2"	18'55.4"	1'32.0"	  21.0"  

 9   8 Geier		 13  2:38'38.8"   11'39.8"	 8'16.2"	  21.8"	   0.8"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   14  2:40'54.6"   10'32.0"@	   0.0"	   0.0"	2'15.8"  

14  10 Mays		  12  2:42'23.8"   13'51.2"	22'41.2"	3'45.8"	1'29.2"  

 2   5 Caracciola	14  2:42'24.6"   10'51.0"@	1'30.0"	1'30.0"	   0.8"  

 3  12 Nuvolari	  14  2:42'30.2"   10'48.6"@	1'35.6"	   5.6"	   5.6"  

 4   1 Stuck		 14  2:43'28.4"   10'55.4"@	2'33.8"	  58.2"	  58.2"  

10   4 Pietsch	   13  2:44'00.0"   13'24.2"	13'37.4"	5'21.2"	  31.6"  

11  21 Ruesch		13  2:44'11.6"   11'58.8"@   13'49.0"	  11.6"	  11.6"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 14  2:44'16.4"   12'44.4"	 3'21.8"	  48.0"	   4.8"  

15  17 Etancelin	 12  2:45'03.8"   15'36.6"	25'21.2"	2'40.0"	  47.4"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   14  2:46'02.0"   13'42.4"	 5'07.4"	1'45.6"	  58.2"  

 7   2 Varzi		 14  2:47'45.6"   12'17.8"	 6'51.0"	1'43.6"	1'43.6"  

12  16 Zehender	  13  2:49'13.8"   12'07.8"	18'51.2"	5'02.2"	1'28.2"  

 8   9 Lang		  14  2:49'48.2"   11'31.2"@	8'53.6"	2'02.6"	  34.4"  

 9   8 Geier		 14  2:50'22.2"   11'43.4"	 9'27.6"	  34.0"	  34.0"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   15  2:51'36.4"   10'41.8"		0.0"	   0.0"	1'14.2"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	  15  2:53'13.8"   10'43.6"@	1'37.4"	1'37.4"	1'37.4"  

 3   5 Caracciola	15  2:53'15.4"   10'50.8"@	1'39.0"	   1.6"	   1.6"  

13  18 Ghersi		13  2:53'42.0"   15'04.0"	23'19.4"	4'28.2"	  26.6"  

 4   1 Stuck		 15  2:54'19.8"   10'51.4"@	2'43.4"	1'04.4"	  37.8"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 15  2:55'02.8"   10'46.4"@	3'26.4"	  43.0"	  43.0"  

10   4 Pietsch	   14  2:56'08.6"   12'08.6"	15'14.0"	5'46.4"	1'05.8"  

11  21 Ruesch		14  2:56'15.6"   12'04.0"	15'21.0"	   7.0"	   7.0"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   15  2:57'10.8"   11'08.8"	 5'34.4"	2'08.0"	  55.2"  

14  17 Etancelin	 13  3:00'37.4"   15'33.6"	30'14.8"	6'55.4"	3'26.6"  

 7   2 Varzi		 15  3:01'23.4"   13'37.8"	 9'47.0"	4'12.6"	  46.0"  

 8   9 Lang		  15  3:01'23.4"   11'35.2"	 9'47.0"	   0.0"	   0.0"  

12  16 Zehender	  14  3:01'28.8"   12'15.0"	20'34.2"	5'13.2"	   5.4"  

 9   8 Geier		 15  3:01'56.6"   11'34.4"@   10'20.2"	  33.2"	  27.8"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   16  3:02'33.6"   10'57.2"		0.0"	   0.0"	  37.0"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	  16  3:04'00.4"   10'46.6"	 1'26.8"	1'26.8"	1'26.8"  

 3   5 Caracciola	16  3:04'02.6"   10'47.2"@	1'29.0"	   2.2"	   2.2"  

 4   1 Stuck		 16  3:05'12.8"   10'53.0"	 2'39.2"	1'10.2"	1'10.2"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 16  3:05'51.2"   10'48.4"	 3'17.6"	  38.4"	  38.4"  

13  18 Ghersi		14  3:05'51.8"   12'09.8"	24'57.2"	4'23.0"	   0.6"  

10   4 Pietsch	   15  3:08'09.4"   12'00.8"	16'33.0"	6'12.8"	2'17.6"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   16  3:08'10.8"   11'00.0"@	5'37.2"	2'19.6"	   1.4"  

11  21 Ruesch		15  3:09'52.8"   13'37.2"	18'16.4"	1'43.4"	1'42.0"  

 7   2 Varzi		 16  3:13'16.4"   11'53.0"	10'42.8"	5'05.6"	3'23.6"  

14  17 Etancelin	 14  3:13'20.4"   12'43.0"	32'25.8"	7'28.6"	   4.0"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   17  3:13'32.2"   10'58.6"		0.0"	   0.0"	  11.8"  

 8   8 Geier		 16  3:13'32.2"   11'35.6"	10'58.6"	  15.8"	   0.0"  

12  16 Zehender	  15  3:13'42.8"   12'14.0"	22'06.4"	3'50.0"	  10.6"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	  17  3:14'45.4"   10'45.0"	 1'13.2"	1'13.2"	1'02.6"  

 3   5 Caracciola	17  3:15'04.6"   11'02.0"	 1'32.4"	  19.2"	  19.2"  

 9   9 Lang		  16  3:16'00.8"   14'37.4"	13'27.2"	2'28.6"	  56.2"  

 4   1 Stuck		 17  3:16'03.8"   10'51.0"@	2'31.6"	  59.2"	   3.0"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 17  3:16'41.6"   10'50.4"	 3'09.4"	  37.8"	  37.8"  

13  18 Ghersi		15  3:18'09.2"   12'17.4"	26'32.8"	4'26.4"	1'27.6"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   17  3:19'33.8"   11'23.0"	 6'01.6"	2'52.2"	1'24.6"  

10  21 Ruesch		16  3:21'55.6"   12'02.8"	19'22.0"	5'54.8"	2'21.8"  

11   4 Pietsch	   16  3:21'58.8"   13'49.4"	19'25.2"	   3.2"	   3.2"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   18  3:24'43.0"   11'10.8"		0.0"	   0.0"	2'44.2"  

 7   8 Geier		 17  3:24'55.8"   11'23.6"@   11'23.6"	5'22.0"	  12.8"  

 8   2 Varzi		 17  3:25'12.2"   11'55.8"	11'40.0"	  16.4"	  16.4"  

14  17 Etancelin	 15  3:25'13.6"   11'53.2"	33'37.2"	7'04.4"	   1.4"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	  18  3:25'30.0"   10'44.6"	   47.0"	  47.0"	  16.4"  

12  16 Zehender	  16  3:25'39.8"   11'57.0"@   23'06.2"	3'41.0"	   9.8"  

 3   5 Caracciola	18  3:26'09.4"   11'04.8"	 1'26.4"	  39.4"	  29.6"  

 4   1 Stuck		 18  3:26'46.6"   10'42.8"@	2'03.6"	  37.2"	  37.2"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 18  3:27'31.4"   10'49.8"	 2'48.4"	  44.8"	  44.8"  

13  18 Ghersi		16  3:30'28.4"   12'19.2"	27'54.8"	4'48.6"	2'57.0"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   18  3:30'59.6"   11'25.8"	 6'16.6"	3'28.2"	  31.2"  

 9  21 Ruesch		17  3:33'53.8"   11'58.2"@   20'21.6"	8'41.6"	2'54.2"  

10   4 Pietsch	   17  3:34'26.0"   12'27.2"	20'53.8"	  32.2"	  32.2"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   19  3:35'31.2"   10'48.2"		0.0"	   0.0"	1'05.2"  

 7   8 Geier		 18  3:36'23.0"   11'27.2"	11'40.0"	5'23.4"	  51.8"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	  19  3:36'24.4"   10'54.4"	   53.2"	  53.2"	   1.4"  

 8   2 Varzi		 18  3:37'18.8"   12'06.6"	12'35.8"	  55.8"	  54.4"  

14  17 Etancelin	 16  3:37'21.6"   12'08.0"	34'48.0"	6'53.2"	   2.8"  

 3   5 Caracciola	19  3:37'23.8"   11'14.4"	 1'52.6"	  59.4"	   2.2"  

 4   1 Stuck		 19  3:37'34.2"   10'47.6"	 2'03.0"	  10.4"	  10.4"  

11  16 Zehender	  17  3:37'43.0"   12'03.2"	24'10.8"	3'17.0"	   8.8"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 19  3:38'25.6"   10'54.2"	 2'54.4"	  51.4"	  42.6"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   19  3:42'10.8"   11'11.2"	 6'39.6"	3'45.2"	3'45.2"  

12  18 Ghersi		17  3:42'40.6"   12'12.2"	29'08.4"	4'57.6"	  29.8"  

 9  21 Ruesch		18  3:46'14.0"   12'20.2"	21'31.0"	8'55.2"	3'33.4"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   20  3:46'29.2"   10'58.0"		0.0"	   0.0"	  15.2"  

10   4 Pietsch	   18  3:46'56.6"   12'30.6"	22'13.6"	  42.6"	  27.4"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	  20  3:47'11.6"   10'47.2"	   42.4"	  42.4"	  15.0"  

 7   8 Geier		 19  3:47'42.8"   11'19.8"@   12'11.6"	5'32.0"	  31.2"  

 3   1 Stuck		 20  3:48'15.4"   10'41.2"@	1'46.2"	1'03.8"	  32.6"  

 4   5 Caracciola	20  3:48'29.2"   11'05.4"	 2'00.0"	  13.8"	  13.8"  

 8   2 Varzi		 19  3:49'10.0"   11'51.2"	13'38.8"	1'27.2"	  40.8"  

13  17 Etancelin	 17  3:49'12.0"   11'50.4"@   35'39.8"	6'31.4"	   2.0"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 20  3:49'19.0"   10'53.4"	 2'49.8"	  49.8"	   7.0"  

11  16 Zehender	  18  3:49'44.0"   12'01.0"	25'01.0"	2'47.4"	  25.0"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   20  3:53'23.0"   11'12.2"	 6'53.8"	4'04.0"	3'39.0"  

12  18 Ghersi		18  3:54'53.2"   12'12.6"	30'10.2"	5'09.2"	1'30.2"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1   7 Brauchitsch   21  3:57'13.4"   10'44.2"		0.0"	   0.0"	2'20.2"  

 2  12 Nuvolari	  21  3:57'58.6"   10'47.0"	   45.2"	  45.2"	  45.2"  

 3   1 Stuck		 21  3:59'14.6"   10'59.2"	 2'01.2"	1'16.0"	1'16.0"  

 7   8 Geier		 20  3:59'15.4"   11'32.6"	12'46.2"	5'52.4"	   0.8"  

 9   4 Pietsch	   19  3:59'24.8"   12'28.2"	23'53.6"   10'14.8"	   9.4"  

10  21 Ruesch		19  3:59'29.2"   13'15.2"	23'58.0"	   4.4"	   4.4"  

 4   5 Caracciola	21  3:59'52.2"   11'23.0"	 2'38.8"	  37.6"	  23.0"  

 5   3 Rosemeyer	 21  4:00'20.2"   11'01.2"	 3'06.8"	  28.0"	  28.0"  

 8   2 Varzi		 20  4:01'01.2"   11'51.2"	14'32.0"	1'45.8"	  41.0"  

13  17 Etancelin	 18  4:01'02.2"   11'50.2"@   36'19.2"	6'09.0"	   1.0"  

11  16 Zehender	  19  4:01'59.0"   12'15.0"	26'27.8"	2'29.8"	  56.8"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   21  4:04'33.4"   11'10.4"	 7'20.0"	4'13.2"	2'34.4"  

12  18 Ghersi		19  4:07'02.0"   12'08.8"@   31'30.8"	5'03.0"	2'28.6"  



Pos  # Driver	  Laps  Total Time   Last Lap	Gap to L   Gap to P   Gap on R  Comment

 1  12 Nuvolari	  22  4:08'50.2"   10'51.6"		0.0"	   0.0"	1'48.2"  

 2   1 Stuck		 22  4:10'08.2"   10'53.6"	 1'18.0"	1'18.0"	1'18.0"  

 3   5 Caracciola	22  4:11'03.2"   11'11.0"	 2'13.0"	  55.0"	  55.0"  

 9   4 Pietsch	   20  4:11'47.6"   12'22.8"	25'18.4"   10'46.4"	  44.4"  

 7   8 Geier		 21  4:11'48.2"   12'32.8"	14'34.8"	7'14.8"	   0.6"  

10  21 Ruesch		20  4:12'22.2"   12'53.0"	25'53.0"	  34.6"	  34.0"  

 4   3 Rosemeyer	 22  4:12'51.6"   12'31.4"	 4'01.4"	1'48.4"	  29.4"  

13  17 Etancelin	 19  4:13'14.8"   12'12.6"	37'43.6"	6'12.8"	  23.2"  

 5   7 Brauchitsch   22  4:14'17.8"   17'04.4"	 5'27.6"	1'26.2"	1'03.0"  

11  16 Zehender	  20  4:14'44.2"   12'45.2"	28'15.0"	2'22.0"	  26.4"  

 8   2 Varzi		 21  4:15'35.8"   14'34.6"	18'22.4"	3'47.6"	  51.6"  

 6   6 Fagioli	   22  4:15'58.6"   11'25.2"	 7'08.4"	1'40.8"	  22.8"  

12  18 Ghersi		20  4:19'29.4"   12'27.4"	33'00.2"	4'45.2"	3'30.8"  



Legend: Pos  Position at end of lap

		  L  Leader

		  P  Position ahead

		  R  Road (to car ahead)

		  @  Fastest Lap so far


#43 fines

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 10:13

I have now checked a few other sources, and the results from "Der Nürburgring" appear to be more authentic, considering they contain all the lap times which add up pretty well, btw. Also, most differences can be explained by simple typos and the confusion of fifths and tenths, i.e. Sheldon's 4:08'04.1" for Nuvolari are a combination of both and should really read 4:08'40.2"!

Apart from a few fifths here and there most everything adds up nicely, and only two aggregate times are off more than 1 second, ironically those of the first two finishers, but from the various reports was I able to nail down the mistakes pretty closely: Nuvolari should have ten seconds substracted from his time for lap 12, while 10 seconds need to be added for one of Stuck's laps bewtween 4 and 11. Since Stuck was usually a very regular driver, I chose lap 4 which "smoothes out" the progression of his lap times a bit. :)

Here's a corrected version of the lap chart:

Posted Image

#44 fines

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 17:20

A few things of note:

- the story of Varzi and Pietsch trying to resolve their tug of war on the track is obviously bollocks. I believe it's another "Don Alfredo" invention, but I've seen it also in respectable places, so perhaps it's time to lay it to rest for good. AFAIK, Pietsch already rejected the story in his autobiography, and the Gapchart analysis shows that the two of them hadn't even visual contact for more than 4 hours, only at the start and (perhaps) partly through the first lap, at the end of which Varzi was already half a minute ahead, with four cars seperating them. That was as close as they got together all day on the frontstretch, and they never passed or lapped each other, not even during pit stops.

- for whatever reasons, several writers appear to have tried to magnify Nuvolari's achievement even more by stating bogus pit stop times (someone has already noted that Nivola's feat hardly merited such treatment), but his stop can hardly have taken more than 2 minutes, and in fact he lost probably less than a full minute in relation to Brauchitsch on their respective stops, possibly a lot less. Brauchitsch took 12'07.4" on his stop lap and averaged 10'35.87" over the next three, with Nuvolari at 13'04.2" and 10'47.33" respectively, so the actual loss was about half the often quoted 1'27"! Still, it almost cost him the race, but Nuvolari drove an absolutely impeccable race thereafter.

- Stuck being the moral winner is an often heard side-bar notion, but there's no evidence to support this theory. After getting clear of Geier and Lang on lap 3, he enjoyed an almost unobstructed run to the front, with a quick pit stop and only a weakened Caracciola to actually overtake. This was a very good race for any driver to have, but Nuvolari actually increased his advantage over Stuck during these laps from 50.8" to 1'38.0" even though he had to fight and (sometimes even repeatedly) overtake Caracciola, Fagioli, Rosemeyer and Brauchitsch, to say nothing of his catastrophic pit stop. True, Stuck had to overtake a lot of cars on the opening lap, but those were merely stragglers, and the time lost, even when added to the time lost behind Geier, was only about 1'30" - he wasn't driving in the same league as Tazio!

- to quote Sheldon, "the fact that Nuvolari beat all the German teams on their home ground is well known. Not so well known is that the race, certainly for the first half, was an absolute cracker." How right he was! If you just look at the figures, without even trying to visualize those gorgeous cars tearing their way through the Eifel countryside, you already sense the excitement that must have prevailed in the pits and stands that day: Nuvolari's initial surge, stopped by the spin, then Rosemeyer closing in on Rudi, only to clout an earthbank (another bout of rain? Notice that no fast laps were recorded on lap 6!), Fagioli and Chiron keeping well up until trouble sets in, then Brauchitsch showing his hand, with both Nivola and Bernd closing in once more, then the red car hitting the front, the dramatic pit stops, Manfred's incredible mid-race sprint and the "finale grandioso" - a symphony in horsepower! Ancora! Dacapo! Bravissimo!

#45 Hugo Boecker

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 17:55

At the finish line Stuck was79.88 sec behind Nuvolari, in the first lap he was 46,8 sec slower than Nuvolari, in the second 1,8 sec slower than Nuvolari so he had lost 48,6 sec to Nuvolari and 31.28 in the remaining 20. So why should he be the moral winner - rubbish. Nuvolari the one and only winner well deserved

#46 fines

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 18:48

- "Nuvolari's epoch making 13th lap" (William Court) was, seen by light ;) not "that" sensational after all: yes, he charged back from 5th to 2nd after a long delay at the pits, but two of the drivers in front of him stopped on that very lap, so he had to actually overtake only two others. The two drivers he did overtake, Caracciola and Rosemeyer, where two of the toughest SOBs out there, but unfortunately they were both greatly handicapped, Rudi by his body (he was ill) and Bernd by his car (misfiring/bent axle). And, to cap it all, Brauchitsch was no less than 16 seconds faster over the course of this 13th lap, admittedly without having to overtake two world class drivers, but still it was a lap time Nuvolari couldn't match, even with the benefit of a clear road ahead of him. In fact, it was Manfred's driving that was sensational during those initial laps after the fuel and tyre stops, but he paid the price later...

- Ernst von Delius driving relief for Mays: most sources mention this, so we can conclude that it was at least planned that way, but as I have already posted earlier, the ERA's lap times don't allow for this to have happened. There are two possibilities: (1) the published lap times are wrong, which although a bit unlikely given the fact that all the other times appear to fit very well, is not impossible in the light of the fact that, in the case of retired competitors, there are no aggregate times to check the individual lap times. (2) Mays may have stopped at the end of lap 12 with Delius taking over from here, only to retire on that very lap. Can anyone produce some extra evidence here, perhaps quotes by Mays or Delius themselves?

#47 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 19:19

Originally posted by Hugo Boecker ...But all came to nothing as Geier crashed during practzice for his next race at Bern end of August. Does any know about the concrete fine?

I have not found anything yet but will give a shout should come across such facts.

A good place to find such information should be the files of the Mercedes-Benz Archiv, or whatever it is named now after the Chrysler name was dropped.

#48 David McKinney

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 19:27

Originally posted by fines
Mays may have stopped at the end of lap 12 with Delius taking over from here, only to retire on that very lap. Can anyone produce some extra evidence here, perhaps quotes by Mays or Delius themselves?

Not Mays or Delius, but in his detailed ERA history David Weguelin says that the car suffered bearing failure "shortly after Mays had handed over to Delius on the 11th lap"
So an error of one lap would fit your hypothesis

#49 odin

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 21:24

Interesting information,
but I can't understand, that experts, like you, are still searching for reasons, of Nuvolaris win, or a moral winner. Nuvolari, was one of the greatest drivers at his, or all times and a good driver could everytime win, like Moss and Clark did later, on the Nürburgring in far less powerful cars. Caracciola, his biggest (only) opponent, was ill this day. So what made this win so extraordinary??

- It was a political smash, for the Nazis, but nothing else. -

Who speaks about the 'epic' drive of Dreyfus in Pau, when he beat the Mercedes? Maybe there was no epic drive, Lang couldn't use the power of the Mercedes, same Fangio in Buenos Aires in 1951.
We still keep talking of Fangios win in 1957. It was a great race, of a wonderful champion, but he could go for two laps (44 Km) very fast, without Collins, or Hawthorne, even noticed this and the Maserati was not a less powerful Car, then the Ferraris, but Fangio was a better driver.

The Alfa was a very well balanced car, with a good traction, with the 'Master' at the wheel.
I think, the Mille Miglia race, from 1931, was a much more epic ride.
Regards
Jörg

#50 dretceterini

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 03:05

Stuck did well too, coming from mid-field to finish 2nd....