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Poll: Ecclestone and retirement


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Poll: Poll: Ecclestone and retirement (148 member(s) have cast votes)

Clearly, Bernie Ecclestone has done an immense amount of good for F1. At what stage, however, should a leadership role pass to a new generation? Should Ecclestone retire in the new few years?

  1. Strong yes (64 votes [43.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 43.54%

  2. Probably so (21 votes [14.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.29%

  3. No special reason for him to (35 votes [23.81%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.81%

  4. Absolutely not (11 votes [7.48%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.48%

  5. I don't particularly care (16 votes [10.88%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.88%

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#1 genespleen

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:32

Clearly, Bernie Ecclestone has done an immense amount of good for F1. At what stage, however, should a leadership role pass to a new generation? (This poll has nothing to do with the di Montezemolo fracas.)

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#2 eronrules

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:44

you see, bernie is like Soviet dictators, they can't retire, they'll always be ousted (most probable) /substituted (if dead before ousted)/succeded (non of bernies siblings are up to the job anyways) . bernie isn't an employee in the sense like a GM or MD, he's like a founder. so retirement isn't really on the cards unless it's self decided, same with LDM, Ron dennis (who chose to walk away), EJ (IMO he was fed up) and many more.

#3 Clatter

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:49

Many of us have been calling for his retirement for years, but if\when he does go it does not mean things will be any better and could be worse as it's likely to be a company man in charge.

#4 Coops3

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:55

Every time he appears on camera, he just looks lost and confused. I think it's probably time he calls it a day.

#5 Seanspeed

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:57

Every time he appears on camera, he just looks lost and confused.

He really does. I'm convinced he doesn't really know whats going on in F1, either. I really wonder whether he even watches any of the races or anything.

That said, if he is holding up his end on the business side, I'll grant him some slack. Every business needs beancounters.

#6 eric2610

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:58

I thhink he should retire, but not because I think he is confused or because he is not doing a good job. I also do not dislike him. But he is old and I would rather see him handing over the job to someone else alsong he is alive than him dying and then having chaos.

#7 Timstr11

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:08

Strong yes.

I believe he's a crook.
I believe he did bribe the German banker to enable CVC to buy the stake in F1.
FOM needs proper corporate governance and business ethics.
As long as Bernie is there it won't happen.

#8 Rob

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:12

Should have gone long ago. Bernie does what is good for Bernie, not what is good for the sport.

#9 ayali

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:14

As long as he still brings in the money he should stay.

Also different is not per se better

#10 Skinnyguy

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:15

Don´t care.

But those suggesting he does not understand what´s going on in the sporting aspect should look at how he managed to understand a sporting controversy much earlier and better than younger people thinking they know a lot about the sport. :lol:

#11 SealTheDiffuser

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:18

no!
he is a windy guy but without him the teams will peck each others eyes out, it will be war with even more nasty players beeing attracted (private equity firms but without Bernie as Master).
Bernie loves F1, it is his child, he would never harm it because would harm his bankroll and his pride.
Without Bernie as mediator F1 will possibly implode. Too bad he does no have a son that could follow him, only two useless daughters.

#12 Atreiu

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:21

Strong yes.

I believe he's a crook.
I believe he did bribe the German banker to enable CVC to buy the stake in F1.
FOM needs proper corporate governance and business ethics.
As long as Bernie is there it won't happen.



The cynic in me laughed once I read business ethics, hehe.

I just wonder who could ever replace him and not make a self destucting mess of F1?

#13 Seanspeed

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:23

Don´t care.

But those suggesting he does not understand what´s going on in the sporting aspect should look at how he managed to understand a sporting controversy much earlier and better than younger people thinking they know a lot about the sport. :lol:

I doubt Bernie really understood the situation. He probably just saw that F1 had some drama going on that wasn't good for its image.

#14 SealTheDiffuser

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:24

I doubt Bernie really understood the situation. He probably just saw that F1 had some drama going on that wasn't good for its image.


I think he was just embarressed on what poor level the foulplay was executed.

Edited by SealTheDiffuser, 03 December 2012 - 13:25.


#15 Seanspeed

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:27

I think he was just embarressed on what poor level the foulplay was executed.

Any opinion on what 'level' it was would necessitate some actual understanding of the actual issue.

You really think Bernie sat down and studied the incident and all the evidence? C'mon.

#16 wrcva

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:28

I don't particularly care about the dude but from the F1 continuity perspective I am not sure if he has a replacement. He is such a smart wheeler/dealer keeping many country leaders, businesses, and mega-egos in check building, maintaining, monetizing and growing the empire, including the FIA itself operating as an independent regulatory organization but essentially it is his policing arm extending into WMSC. IIRC, Max, and Charlie (with some of his current crew) were all his employees at one time or another... Is he irreplaceable? I don't know enough to answer that question but I would not be surprised if the whole thing crumbles after his retirement...

#17 Rob

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:28

I just wonder who could ever replace him and not make a self destucting mess of F1?

Lots of people. The idea that only Bernie can do it is a huge fallacy. I'll give him his due in that it's impressive how many people he's convinced that only he can do it.

#18 SealTheDiffuser

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:28

Any opinion on what 'level' it was would necessitate some actual understanding of the actual issue.

You really think Bernie sat down and studied the incident and all the evidence? C'mon.


I think he did the math and found out that it was a lose lose situation giving that there was nothing and they already knew it.

#19 Seanspeed

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:29

I think he did the math and found out that it was a lose lose situation giving that there was nothing and they already knew it.

Once again, for him to see that there was 'nothing' would require him to understand the issue.

Edited by Seanspeed, 03 December 2012 - 13:30.


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#20 Skinnyguy

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:33

I doubt Bernie really understood the situation. He probably just saw that F1 had some drama going on that wasn't good for its image.


http://www.autosport...t.php/id/104650

"Then there is the fact that a green flag was shown, which nobody seems to dispute.

"It's a complete joke. What they are saying in that letter is wrong. I don't think there needs to be any action taken. It's completely and utterly wrong."



#21 SealTheDiffuser

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:34

Once again, for him to see that there was 'nothing' would require him to understand the issue.


there never was an issue for the race control people and FIA and Ferrari as well

#22 Timstr11

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:35

The cynic in me laughed once I read business ethics, hehe.

I just wonder who could ever replace him and not make a self destucting mess of F1?

I'm not of the opinion that FOM alone carries F1.
Car manufacturers and other large corporations have pumped billions of dollars into the sport which has made it the high-profile sport it is today.
Yes, FOM facilitates this (and dis-proportionally profits from this), but these corporations deserve at least as much (if not more) credit for the current standing of F1.

#23 Seanspeed

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:39

http://www.autosport...t.php/id/104650

"Then there is the fact that a green flag was shown, which nobody seems to dispute.

"It's a complete joke. What they are saying in that letter is wrong. I don't think there needs to be any action taken. It's completely and utterly wrong."

There was more to it than that, but I dont want to get into the actual incident again.

And the letter wasn't 'wrong'. It was asking for clarification.

#24 Skinnyguy

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 13:47

There was more to it than that, but I dont want to get into the actual incident again.



Sorry but knowing that there was a green flag there is the only thing that requires some minimal effort in this issue. He knew there was a steward with a traditional green flag there so the pass done after that was leggit. That´s the full issue in fact.

And the letter wasn't 'wrong'. It was asking for clarification.


Asking for clarification on a perfectly clear issue knowing yourself it´s clear... is wrong.

#25 boldhakka

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 14:48

He knows exactly what he's doing and is still as sharp as he ever was.

I'm aghast at the Internet forumers claiming he can't understand the issues surrounding the green flag debacle. My god, do you people realize what it takes to succeed at the level he has? He'll spin circles around you lot.

Hope he continues, I like the path he's taking F1 on, at least in the broad strokes.

#26 maverick69

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 15:02

As others have already alluded to: I was quite struck by how "doddery" he looked and acted when Brundle caught up with him on the grid in Brazil. For the first time ever I thought he wasn't putting on his usual "act" and was genuinely being a little "old age" shall we say........ which is not surprising given his age.........

So yes - it surely is the time to hang his boots up......... But I've got a feeling that he won't go quietly and it could get a little messy......... Grab the popcorn folks.........

#27 Fastcake

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 15:35

He knows exactly what he's doing and is still as sharp as he ever was.

I'm aghast at the Internet forumers claiming he can't understand the issues surrounding the green flag debacle. My god, do you people realize what it takes to succeed at the level he has? He'll spin circles around you lot.

Hope he continues, I like the path he's taking F1 on, at least in the broad strokes.


Agreed, Bernie knows exactly how to play the media and has always been able to beat anyone in the F1 circus. I fully expect him to carry on getting his way til he's 100 :lol:

#28 metz

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 16:10

Bernie was just embarressed on what poor level the foulplay was executed.

:rotfl:
You don't know how funny this is when you put this in an overall F1 context.
Yes, before Bernie, the foulplay in F1 and the FIA was not executed well.
Bernie brought the foulplay to perfection.

#29 Spillage

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 16:20

He's done a lot for F1, but in recent years hasn't really had his eye on the ball of what fans want, or how to make F1 more sustainable. Still, rather Bernie than James Murdoch, any day

#30 BoschKurve

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 16:28

Whether or not Bernie has done a lot of good is debatable.

I'd argue he has done more long-term damage to F1 than we even know yet. F1 is now a product that has been bought, and turned into a commodity. There's a distinct difference between what F1 currently is, and what it was 30 years ago. His little deal with Mosley for the commercial rights was disgusting. Through the senile toad, we've seen a version of F1 that glitters like gold, yet lacks much of the substance that it had at one time.

Bernie is also the same guy who said the fans only come to see the cars, not the drivers. Not to mention he is the same guy who killed off many of the classic grand prix races in the name of the almighty dollar.

#31 Alfisti

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 18:48

i am always suspect of people who are filthy rich and well past retirement age yet keep working. It is an indication that this person is usually in it for the sake of it, i.e just because they enjoy "winning" the money war.

#32 Atreiu

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 19:17

Crazy idea, Peter Sauber to replace him. He's respected and knows the business well enough.

#33 tomjol

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 19:32

Every time he appears on camera, he just looks lost and confused. I think it's probably time he calls it a day.


He's been like this for years, it's done on purpose.

If you don't know what he's thinking, you can't write anything about it. He learned a long time ago not to give journalists any signals, except for crazy ones such as the "sprinkler" idea which makes everyone think "oh silly old Bernie, he just doesn't understand does he".

Underestimate him at your peril.

#34 Vesuvius

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 20:12

He really does. I'm convinced he doesn't really know whats going on in F1, either. I really wonder whether he even watches any of the races or anything.

That said, if he is holding up his end on the business side, I'll grant him some slack. Every business needs beancounters.


It's common knowledge Bernie hasn't watched any races in many many years....so yes he is a bit lost most of the times.

#35 midgrid

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 20:14

Yes, simply to avoid the chaos that will occur when he dies without a succession plan in place. Imagine the sport being inherited by Petra and Tamara... :drunk:

#36 metz

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 20:27

Lets understand that this is not an Ecclestone problem.
Bernie already sold the lot to the Kirch/Banks who then sold it to the current owners, who then hired Bernie, as an employee, to come and run it for them.
Bernie already has his billions in the bank (off shore) and the $20 mil/year he collects to run the show is pocket change for him.
He does it because he likes, it but he can quit or retire or be fired, at any time, and someone else will be hired to do the job.
I'm sure the owners have a backup plan.

edit ;His heirs are occupied with the billions and have nothing to do with F1

Edited by metz, 04 December 2012 - 20:31.


#37 Nonesuch

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 20:45

edit ;His heirs are occupied with the billions and have nothing to do with F1

Wasn't one of his kids a 'Serious Journalist' in F1 circles for a while? I guess that got boring quick. :p

But like you said, Ecclestone is employed by the people who own the brand. He'll probably be thrown out the moment he becomes a serious liability. Right now he seems to be doing a good job ruffling feathers and keeping F1 in the news.

#38 Rob

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:47

Lets understand that this is not an Ecclestone problem.
Bernie already sold the lot to the Kirch/Banks who then sold it to the current owners, who then hired Bernie, as an employee, to come and run it for them.
Bernie already has his billions in the bank (off shore) and the $20 mil/year he collects to run the show is pocket change for him.

Yet again, the problem can be traced right back to the shady commercial rights deal that was a present from Max.

#39 tifosiMac

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:53

Retirement or other circumstances (being other thrown) soon please.

Edited by tifosiMac, 05 December 2012 - 10:54.


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#40 Baddoer

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 11:29

Bernie, Charlie, Herman - it's time to retire. We don't need you anymore.

Edited by Baddoer, 05 December 2012 - 11:30.


#41 Dalton007

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 13:39

Have you seen his kids' houses and lifestyle? There's no way that they earned that money, it looks like daddy's money - money that should be reinvested in F1.

#42 goldenboy

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:35

Every time he appears on camera, he just looks lost and confused. I think it's probably time he calls it a day.

Really? I always took the view that he just likes to make interviewers look particularly stupid, but it seems to be backfiring on him if some people think it looks the other way around.

I personally think he's as sharp as ever, and don't believe you have to retire at 65. But I admit it will be strange to have a 90 year old in charge of F1!

The big question is how will it go when someone takes over. Bernie has been a constant, despite some issues with breakaway etc F1 has always looked under control and in a safe pair of hands. Yes, quite likely someone else could have been more agressive and done a better job, but also just as likely cause it to crash and burn in my opinion. Would love to see someone with the demeanour and experience of a Todt or Brawn take over, but can't see any of them really wanting that kind of job?

Much as I like Adam Parr and his suggestions, a young hotshot company man like him could be too volatile.

Edited by goldenboy, 06 December 2012 - 02:41.