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Question about the 2014 engine rules


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#1 Gene and Tonic

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 22:40

Will the new regulations in 2014 completely do away with the current engine freeze and allow for engines to be developed throughout the season?

If so, will the sport then return to the days whereby factory teams and partner-teams will have preferential engines, whilst customers have to make do with previous-spec?

I wasn't entirely sure on this, but it'd be great to have technical freedom such as this on engines again, as it would add another variable into the mix of competition, which in my book is a good thing.

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#2 pingu666

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 22:54

i think theres a 5 engine per year limit, which is going to limit implementing devlopments

#3 EthanM

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 23:02

engines will be homologated on March 1st 2014 so .... no

Edited by EthanM, 15 April 2013 - 23:03.


#4 Gene and Tonic

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 23:31

Will it at least be the case that they will be allowed to be intensively developed year on year perhaps?

#5 EthanM

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 23:35

same homologation rules as we have now, obviously there will be some leeway bundled under "reliability updates" to close any major performance gaps between the engines after launch, but no, generally no "official" development

#6 Gene and Tonic

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 12:53

Well that's quite disappointing. Although I would imagine some development would surely be allowed from season to season, otherwise where would the technical challenge that is attracting manufacturers come from? The whole point of these rules is to make the sport a bit more eco-friendly and more applicable to road-car technology, so I would imagine those car companies would want to try and develop new tech so as to utilise it for their production cars.

#7 EthanM

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 13:16

the regulations were designed at a time where the world was at the brink of what some people thought would be a repeat of the 1929 depression and Formula 1 was assumed would be unable to raise the 3 billion per season it costs to keep the 10 teams racing. So no they weren't designed to promote a development race. The rest is just a stupid Mosley inspired marketing campaign for F1, as if F1 gets green if you limit fuel flow and fuel usage per race or if you turn F1 cars into golf carts when they are in the pitlane.

#8 Jackmancer

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 15:04

So if either Ferrari or Mercedes make bad engine, they're pretty f-ed for five years right?

#9 maverick69

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 15:07

So if either Ferrari or Mercedes make bad engine, they're pretty f-ed for five years right?


Lol. No chance.

Expect more "reliability modifications" than you'd find on a 1974 Dolomite Sprint...........

#10 pingu666

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 17:32

until they compete, or atleast test its all up in the air.

I would of thought having homoligated engines and rules like that would significantly front load the costs